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Sony launches SLT-A37 16MP fixed-mirror DSLR and 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 SAM lens

By dpreview staff on May 17, 2012 at 04:00 GMT

Sony has launched the SLT-A37 entry-level 16MP SLT camera and the enthusiast-grade 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 SAM standard zoom. The A37 is a refreshed replacement for the A35, bringing the entry-level model into line with the rest of the SLT lineup. Meanwhile the 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 SAM lens offers Alpha mount users a more flexible upgrade option over the entry-level 18-55mm without having to stretch to the 16-50mm F2.8. The A37 will be available from June at a cost of $600 with 18-55mm kit zoom. The 18-135mm lens will follow in July for $500 or as a $200 premium over the basic zoom kit cost with any of the company's SLT cameras.

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Press Release:

Sony Introduces Speedy α37 Camera with Full-time Continuous AF Powered by Translucent Mirror Technology

SAN DIEGO, May 16, 2012 – Lightweight, easy to use and packed with a variety of useful features, the new Sony SLT-A37 camera is an ideal choice for consumers eager to explore the world of interchangeable lens DSLR photography.

The new α37 camera is the latest to feature Sony’s acclaimed Translucent Mirror Technology, which delivers a potent combination of fast shooting, non-stop phase detection autofocus and continuous live image preview during still and full HD video (60i/24p) shooting.  This innovative technology also allows the new α37 camera to grab split-second action with a burst of sharply focused images.  Shots can be captured at up to seven frames per second in Tele-Zoom High Speed Shooting Mode, where the central portion of the sensor’s image is magnified by approximately 1.4x.

The camera has a precision 3-cross 15-point AF system with tracking autofocus that keeps faces and fast-moving subjects in sharp focus.  From action-packed sports to spontaneous family portraits, it will ensure that all the drama and beauty of that special moment is captured.

“Delivering lightning-fast shooting speeds and autofocus plus advanced full HD video capture, our innovative Translucent Mirror Technology continues to serve as the backbone of our A-mount line of cameras,” said Mike Kahn, director of the Alpha business at Sony.  “Featuring this unique technology plus a host of exciting new features and an attractive price tag, our new α37 camera brings a whole new meaning to the term ‘entry level DSLR’.”
Framing and focusing is easy with the camera’s high-resolution Tru-Finder™ electronic viewfinder.  With a high 1440k dot resolution, excellent contrast and 100% field of view, it matches or exceeds the abilities of many optical viewfinders.  Adjustments to exposure and other creative picture settings can be previewed in real time, either via the Tru-Finder™ EVF or the tilt-angle 6.7 cm (2.7") Clear Photo™ LCD screen, making it easy to create shots with a customized, professional finish.

Additionally, the Sony α37 camera helps inexperienced photographers create top-quality portraits with ease.  The new Auto Portrait Framing mode identifies the subject’s position in a composed image and follows the “rule of thirds” to trim the scene and create a beautifully framed portrait.  The cropped photo is then boosted to full resolution using Sony’s unique By Pixel Super Resolution technology, which uses pattern matching to maintain superb image detail, tones and textures in the photo.   Both the original and cropped image files are saved for review. 

By Pixel Super Resolution Technology is also used for the “Clear Image Zoom” feature, which digitally doubles the effective magnification of any lens attached to the camera.  Ideal for travel and everyday shooting, it’s a great way to boost maximum focal length without carrying extra hardware.

The 16.1 effective megapixel Exmor® APS HD CMOS sensor inside the α37 camera captures finely detailed, low noise stills and Full HD video. It’s teamed with the latest BIONZ® image processor that extends sensitivity to an ISO 100-16000 range, broadening options for low-light shooting without flash.  Shared with all α A-mount cameras, SteadyShot INSIDE™ stabilization cuts the effects of camera shake by up to 4.0 stops for clearer handheld images with any A-mount lens.

The new α37 camera also features Superior Auto Mode, which intelligently recognizes a wide range of scenes and subjects and adjusts settings automatically. 

New A-Mount 18-135mm Telephoto Zoom Lens and Accessories

A versatile match for the α37 and other Sony A-mount camera bodies, the new SAL18135 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 telephoto zoom offers a generous 8x (approx.) zoom range in a compact, go-anywhere lens that’s great for travel, street photography and everyday shooting.  The lens features a SAM design that assures smooth, rapid, whisper-quiet autofocus operation and Direct Manual Focus for accurate fine-tuning of focus.  This sharp telephoto zoom lens will also be offered as a kit lens with the α37 and other Sony A-mount camera bodies.

Compatible accessories include the new PCK-LM11 semi-hard screen protector sheet, exclusively designed for a perfect fit with the LCD screen on the α37 camera, as well as the HVL-F43AM flash, LCS-BP2 backpack and a variety of other exciting products that complete the Alpha ecosystem.  

Pricing and Availability

The new α37 digital camera will be available this June with an 18-55mm kit zoom lens (model SEL1855) for about $600.  The new SAL18135 telephoto zoom lens will be available as a stand-alone product this July for about $500, and will be offered as a kit lens with Sony A-mount cameras beginning this August at the below approximate prices:

  • α37 camera kit with 18-135mm lens: $800
  • α57 camera kit with 18-135mm lens: $1,000
  • α65 camera kit with 18-135mm lens: $1,200
  • α77 camera kit with 18-135mm lens: $1,700

The camera kits, new lens and variety of accessories will be available at Sony retail stores (www.store.sony.com) and other authorized dealers nationwide.

Sony SLT-A37 specifications

Price
MSRPBody + 18-55mm lens: $599.99/ €599/£530
Body type
Body typeCompact SLR
Sensor
Max resolution4912 x 3264
Other resolutions4912 x 2760, 3568 x 2368, 3568 x 2000, 2448 x 1624, 2448 x 1376
Image ratio w:h3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels16 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors17 megapixels
Sensor sizeAPS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
Color spacesRGB, Adobe RGB
Color filter arrayPrimary color filters
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25600
White balance presets6
Custom white balanceYes (1)
Image stabilizationSensor-shift
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal
File format
  • RAW
  • RAW + JPEG
  • JPEG Fine
  • JPEG Standard
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampBuilt-in Flash type
Digital zoomYes (2x Clear Image Zoom)
Manual focusYes
Number of focus points15
Lens mountSony/Minolta Alpha
Focal length multiplier1.5×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDTilting
Screen size2.6
Screen dots230,400
Touch screenNo
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeElectronic
Viewfinder coverage100%
Viewfinder magnification1.09×
Viewfinder resolution1,440,000
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed30 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • iAuto
  • Superior Auto
  • Program
  • Aperture Priority,
  • Shutter Priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • Portrait
  • Sports Action
  • Macro
  • Landscape
  • Sunset
  • Night view
  • Hand-held Twilight (6 shot layering)
  • Night Portrait
  • Picture Effect
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
Flash range12.00 m
External flashYes (Hot-shoe, Wireless)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-Eye, Slow Sync, High Speed Sync, Rear Curtain, Fill-in, Wireless
Flash X sync speed1/160 sec
Drive modes
  • Single Shot
  • Continuous (Hi/Lo)
  • Self-timer (10/2 sec. delay)
  • Bracketing (Cont., Single, White Balance), Remote Control (with optional RM-DSLR1)
Continuous drive6 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec, 10 sec 3 or 5 images)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 2/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingYes (3 frames, H/L selectable)
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (60, 29.97 fps), 1440 x 1080 (30fps), 640 x 424 (29.97 fps)
FormatMPEG-4, AVCHD, H.264
Videography notes1080i60 or 24 on NTSC models
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC/Memory Stick Pro Duo/ Pro-HG Duo
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini Type C)
WirelessEye-Fi Connected
Remote controlYes (Optional)
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionRechargeable NP-FW50 battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)500
Weight (inc. batteries)506 g (1.12 lb / 17.85 oz)
Dimensions124 x 92 x 85 mm (4.88 x 3.62 x 3.35)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
GPSNone

Additional images

Additional images

42
I own it
7
I want it
5
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 93
tabloid
By tabloid (Jul 6, 2012)

Im surprised that the standard lens supplied with the body is not VR.
VR is a MUST when shooting videos...which some of us need.

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Sep 13, 2012)

Why, the body itself has image stabilization, apparently you need to get up to speed with information on Sony DSLRS. All Sony DSLRS/SLTs have image stabilization built in.

C

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Abaregi
By Abaregi (Oct 7, 2012)

Nice try idiot troll.

All Sony have VR built into the camera to keep costs and weight down in lenses.

Only Canikon squeezes it's customers by selling VR lenses to them over and over..

2 upvotes
paparazziman17
By paparazziman17 (Jun 7, 2012)

WHY DOES IT HAVE SUCH A SMALL LOW RESOLUTION DISPLAY???? were not living in 2009 anymore, the a33 and a35 both had a large high resolution display how come this one doesn't??

0 upvotes
gchamp727
By gchamp727 (May 20, 2012)

Re: Snov's question about background blurr

Just to give my two cents worth to Snov. We all love that effect. Any of the Sony SLTs or the Nex models are equally capable of getting you that effect (all have APS-C sized sensors). What you want is a narrow or shallow Depth of Field. You get that by one or more of the following:
1. larger sensors (the any DSLR, SLT, or Nex is fine. Micro 4/3 a little less so but possible)
2. large aperture f2.8 to f1.2 works well
3. longer focal lengths (I suggest 50mm or more)
4. move closer to your subject
5. combinations of 1-4

0 upvotes
snovs
By snovs (May 23, 2012)

Thanks. Appreciate the help.

0 upvotes
gchamp727
By gchamp727 (May 20, 2012)

I already have a Sony A-580 (terrific body and optical viewfinder) and a bunch of lenses but.....
I am looking for a travel camera .. I have just bought a G3 but I'm not satisfied with it so its going back. (it feels like I am shooting with a mobile phone). I like the body size of the A55 but I hate missing out on the focus peaking feature since I like using manual focus primes. So my choices seem to be:
1. Buy an A-55 and forget the focus peaking feature (is this camera a quality body or a dog?)
2. Buy this new A-37 model (a bit short on features but ??)
3. Suck it up (size/weight wise) and spend $200 more for an A-57 (which is close in size and weight to my A-580 )

Any advice?

0 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (May 31, 2012)

That depends on your priorities to some extent. Personally there is very little the a55 offers over this new a37 for my uses (I had 2 x a55's). The a55 was/is a great little camera, so much packed into a tiny body (comparatively) and this is where I think the whole SLT has an advantage (amongst other areas) but people seem to prefer the 'fuller' bodies.

The a37 despite the lower resolution has a better articulation in the screen and probably by the sounds of things a little bit better EVF (not much but a bit). It has lower fps and no GPS. But also has newer firmware with newer 'software' features such as peaking and better video modes. I have seen a55's going really cheaply around the place which seem like a bargain to me, but the newer a37 is an evolution of that design with a few fixes (and a few omissions).

Oh and if the new 18-135mm is of interest to you, getting it with the a37 will save you a lot of cash by the sounds of things - around $799 in the kit vs $500 by itself.

0 upvotes
AndyGM
By AndyGM (May 20, 2012)

Ouch, Sony stiffs the UK on price once again. Even with 20% VAT on top, the US price should convert to £480

0 upvotes
snovs
By snovs (May 17, 2012)

A little help?

Nex 5N, Nex f3, A37-- what to do??

Been taking pics on my iphone for years. Love the image quality of DSLRs and recognize when pics are shot with them. In the market for a new camera particularly to take on my honeymoon (leaving June 26th, very important) and also for future use with children etc..

Seems like I should eliminate the 5N no? What features would I miss with the f3? Any help would be much appreciated. Will probably post in multiple spots.

0 upvotes
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

I would say any of these will make you very happy. I've had my eyes set on 5N for a while now, to replace my NEX-3, but this F3 has my attention (primarily to be able to add EVF) and a nice sensor. I would say, get what you see as the best deal. But personally, for a primary camera, I would go with A37 (because it has a view finder).

0 upvotes
snovs
By snovs (May 17, 2012)

Thanks. What about "background blur" feature. This appeals to me, as I fear on the A37 I wouldn't be able to manage that as well. As a novice, I notice quickly when a photo has blurred background and sharp subject... I like that effect. Thanks again all

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (May 18, 2012)

The camera body has nothing to do with the background blur you are referring. It is all in the lens. Fast lenses such as those with apertures of f1.2-f2.8 will give you the blur effect. Take a look at this video to learn more:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAxJRF73vwc

0 upvotes
dara2
By dara2 (May 18, 2012)

Not completely true, the sensor size do matter: nikon 1, d3200,d800

oups: I mean cybershoot, a37, a900

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 18, 2012)

"Thanks. What about "background blur" feature. This appeals to me, as I fear on the A37 I wouldn't be able to manage that as well."
- You will be able to manage this FAR better with A37 than any other camera you listed. A37 has f/1.4 lenses which will give you much better blur than anything currently in NEX system (which is f/1.8 at most), and soon Zeiss plans to release f/1.2 lens giving you even more control over depth of field (and by this: background blur) than anything you can get for NEX with autofocus.

0 upvotes
Caprice Raw
By Caprice Raw (May 17, 2012)

I would not buy this camera simply by the fact that it has a very small screen and low resolution (although I know perfectly well that this has nothing to do with the end result of the image).

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Wally626
By Wally626 (May 17, 2012)

A lot of point and shoots do not have 920k LCDs so this is not a downgrade for most people buying this camera. My last few cameras having 920k LCDs I would certainly not buy this camera but I am not its market. The a35 had a better screen but it was not movable, I guess this is where Sony could cut a few bucks and offer the camera at a lower price. Return the movements but cut the quality.

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (May 18, 2012)

I would skip the 33/35/37 models all together. If you can get your hands an a55, grab it! It will be around the same price as this cam and much better as far as features and performance!

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (May 17, 2012)

Is this with the improved EVF like A57 or old EVF like A55? Thanks

1 upvote
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

Likely identical to A57.

0 upvotes
cplunk
By cplunk (May 17, 2012)

I just read it's the same, this article or the linked preview article.

0 upvotes
abortabort
By abortabort (May 31, 2012)

I believe it is phase sequential like the a55, but makes better use of the resolution like the a57, so somewhere in between. Should be somewhat closer to the Panasonic G3 for example, but not quite as good as the a57, which is not quite as good as the A65/77.

0 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (May 17, 2012)

It's not a DSLR because it has an electronic viewfinder. DSLRs have optical ones instead.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 17, 2012)

DSLR with EVF. Happy? ;)

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

Plastek:

Nope, still not a DSLR. That mirror doesn't move out of the way.

1 upvote
Plastek
By Plastek (May 17, 2012)

Canon Pellix, which was an SLR, didn't have a moving mirror either.
Besides - what's the problem anyway? For or the purpose of usability, features, and compatibility it's a DSLR with EVF.

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
brendon1000
By brendon1000 (May 17, 2012)

^^ +1. Calling it a DSLR or DSLT is merely splitting hairs on a non issue. The more pressing matter is that Sony is simply spitting out models with minor improvements while forgetting some small niggles like only +0.7 EV in AE bracketing mode, having only 1/160 flash sync and using such an outdated screen in this day and age !

3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

Plastek:

Not buying the assertion that the Canon Pellix would be an SLR, no matter what Wiki says. Single lens yes, and neat to learn what Sony is copying with these new transparent mirrors.

(The word "reflex" besides being a pun about reflection is about movement, so the Pellix would only be about movement, if the moving metering cell counted.)

2 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 17, 2012)

HowaboutRAW - I don't care what wiki says. Everyone can write what they want on Wiki. What matters is how people view it and how it operates - Pellix was considered an SLR at it's times and noone had any problem with that unlike you do now. It operated exactly like any other SLR and used the same lenses as other Canon SLRs (plus: few more using advantage of not-moving mirror). Same with SLT: Uses same lenses, has the same handling and features, hence for all needs: it's DSLR with EVF.

1 upvote
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

Correct. It isn't a DSLR. It points at the future of DSLRs. :)

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
1 upvote
cplunk
By cplunk (May 17, 2012)

It is Digital, it has a Single Lens, I guess if to qualify for "Reflex" they have to be stuck on 60's technology of flipping a mirror up and down for you to see through that single lens, then it's not a "dslr"...

But FOCUS PEAKING ROCKS!!!! so who the hells cares about flipping mirrors anymore.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

Plastek:

Sorry but the word "reflex" has a meaning, no matter what people may have thought 45 years ago. Again: Single yes, lens yes.

Made up language has lead to terrible things being excused. Not the case here, but still very relevant.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

cplunk,

Those who care about optical view finders care about a flipping mirror.

2 upvotes
cplunk
By cplunk (May 17, 2012)

"Those who care about optical view finders care about a flipping mirror."

Especially those still using film, because digital isn't "good enough" for them...

And this argument is especially silly in a $600 dollar camera (with lens). With anything comparable in the price range having the most basic of mirror / optical viewfinders.... If you want to complain about EVF replacing them fancy expensive prisms on $2k+ camera's I wouldn't bother arguing... But I still love me some of that FOCUS PEAKING!!! and there's no way you'll even get that with any OVF.

1 upvote
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

HowaboutRaw: "Those who care about optical view finders care about a flipping mirror."

Why? If they can't see the benefits of EVF, they can stick with something bound to be overtaken.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

EinsteinsGhost,

Um it should be obvious that "good" OLED EVFs still aren't up optical viewfinders. Way too much contrast, and OLED EVFs simply miss much colour subtlety

This all may change in 10 years.

cplunk,

Your film comment is just stupid.

2 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (May 17, 2012)

"It's not a DSLR because it has an electronic viewfinder. DSLRs have optical ones instead."
And ... ?

2 upvotes
cplunk
By cplunk (May 17, 2012)

"Way too much contrast, and OLED EVFs simply miss much colour subtlety "

Seriously, it's a viewfinder. I use it the frame my photo focus the lens. And with the EVF I can verify the exposure, and use the focus peaking and zooms to verify focus.

Missing "colour subtlety"? I'd be concerned if the lens / sensor missed that, but the viewfinder? I use my camera to take pictures, and the EVF on my A77 works plenty well for me. In fact, I like in much better than any of the OVF camera's I've previously owned (although, all prior cameras were of lower priced "beginner" models). It's easier for me to focus with it (using peaking and the zoom), and it's easier for me to recognize more complicated exposure issues, where part of the image might be blown out. These are features that just can't exist with OVF.

The EVF is not all perfectly representing the view of the camera like the OVF is, but neither is the sensor capturing the image, and EVF vs. OVF isn't going to change that.

1 upvote
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

HowaboutRAW: Um it should be obvious that "good" OLED EVFs still aren't up optical viewfinders. Way too much contrast, and OLED EVFs simply miss much colour subtlety. This all may change in 10 years.

Not necessarily. They are brighter and more useful with more information available at any time than OVFs in comparable DSLR cameras. Where they lack will definitely be a thing of the past and that is not much. In fact, I would dare say that what an OVF presents to me as complete darkness, a good EVF (even on my A55, much less the OLED version) attempts to brighten up.

It is why I implied... welcome to the future. DSLTs aren't DSLRs. They indicate the future of DSLRs.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

cplunk:

Viewfinders aren't simply for framing.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

EinsteinsGhost:

Not saying there's no use for OLED EVFs, just saying that there are things one can see in OVFs that one can't in EVFs. And EVFs have a some catching up to do.

The DSLT is one possible future for cameras, no mirror flipping up to block the view, I like that fact.

0 upvotes
oss
By oss (May 17, 2012)

@ HowaboutRAW
>>Sorry but the word "reflex" has a meaning, no matter what people may have thought 45 years ago. Again: Single yes, lens yes.
<<

Yes the word "reflex" has a meaning, it means folded light path in the context of SLR's, always has and always will, it's got nothing to do with flappy mirrors getting out of the way.

This Sony thing appears to still implement a mirror for the purpose of folding the path of part of the light coming through the lens, so it's using a reflex mirror.

Ever hear of a Twin Lens Reflex, they didn't have moving mirrors either!

Comment edited 38 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 18, 2012)

oss:

That's one meaning.

You sure have a point about twin lens reflex cameras.

0 upvotes
Babya
By Babya (May 17, 2012)

My A390 has the same res LCD as the A37-both 230k but .1" smaller (2.6" on A37 vs 2.7" on my A390) and the A37's grip reminds of me of my A390 a bit.
Nice to see a mic socket even in a entry-level Alpha.

0 upvotes
zidliyka
By zidliyka (May 17, 2012)

1920x 1080 at 60p ! interesting touch.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 17, 2012)

D3200 killer :)
Better high ISOs, tiltable LCD, much bigger viewfinder with 100% coverage, AF motor, better continuous shooting mode, immersely better video (one that's usable by people who don't have entire rig set up for filming with manual focus or strugglig with contrast detection which doesn't work more often than does) including stereo sound (! lol nikon Mono mode), stabilization for all lenses including Primes, lighter, smaller, 100$ cheaper! (for 100$ you can get 50mm prime in addition to kit lens which is something must-have for beginners IMO).

Nikon gets nicer accessories and +-5 EV exposure compensation which is good feature in did, but... on the other hand you get crapload of fun-features in Alpha: panoramas (including 3D), build-in teleconverter, and god-knows-what-else (cause I don't care about them).

IMO: Now there's no reason to get Nikon besides being proud of Nikon sticker at the front of camera.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
5 upvotes
iBuzz
By iBuzz (May 17, 2012)

Where did you find better high ISOs in the specifications?
And for many people, an EVF viewfinder is not really an advantage.

0 upvotes
io_bg
By io_bg (May 17, 2012)

Lol. The D3200 has an OPTICAL viewfinder which saves a lot of battery, has a bigger resolution and a lot more lenses. Including VR ones - optical stabilization is better than the sensor one. Oh, I almost forgot the larger and better screen.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 17, 2012)

Optical TINY-joke viewfinder. And LCD which is useless for half of the features thanks to blazing-contrast detection AF in anything that uses it.
lol

3 upvotes
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

For most people, and for most circumstances (and especially if you actually focus as opposed to relying on the camera doing it for you), EVF is a better solution. It provides more information, everything live and is getting better with every iteration. It is the future. OVF is trying to mimic some benefits but has reached a point where live-view is bound to take over for most practical purposes. That, and a proliferation of rangefinder cameras (like Sony NEX) which would do better with EVF than with OVF.

1 upvote
ybizzle
By ybizzle (May 18, 2012)

I would compare this more to the Canon T3 than the Nikon D3200...It would be a great alternative to the aging T3 until that gets replaced sometime soonish...

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 18, 2012)

I think comparing it to T3 would be simply unfair knock-out. That camera, while no doubt still good, looses miserably with almost anything on the market right now. D3200 might be some competition as it was released just now, but still: Nikon cut WAY too much from it. This camera doesn't have half of important features for photography while offering nothing instead (unless someone enjoys high number of MPx).

1 upvote
M Jesper
By M Jesper (May 17, 2012)

The 90s called, they want their diskman back !
Maybe it's me but i find it absolutely hideous especially from the top :/

0 upvotes
artguy79
By artguy79 (May 17, 2012)

Yep, Just you, so what dslr is pretty in your opinion?

1 upvote
M Jesper
By M Jesper (May 20, 2012)

Anything is better than this monstrosity ...

0 upvotes
FreeRadical009
By FreeRadical009 (May 17, 2012)

Well, at least Sony wasn't stupid enough to remove the screw drive focusing motor in this model, as it was rumored some months ago.

That's all I was looking forward to confirm. That they weren't going to pull a "Nikon-says-suck-it-newbies" on us.

Moving on.

5 upvotes
mglowe
By mglowe (Jul 17, 2012)

I was burned by Nikon on this very issue. I bought the Nikon D50 when it was released, a few lenses [screw drive], and very shortly time thereafter they removed the screw drive from the newer camera's I could afford. This sucked.

0 upvotes
Zvonimir Tosic
By Zvonimir Tosic (May 17, 2012)

Sony seems to be really bored. It seems company's imagination room has been made into a rest room.

1 upvote
mick232
By mick232 (May 17, 2012)

Out of the major SLR/SLT manufacturers, Sony is clearly the most innovative.

Sony's sensor innovations alone justify this statement. I don't even have to get started about SLT or the NEX system.

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

mick232:

Sony made the sensor in the Nikon D3s? No. Sony made the sensor in the Sigma SD1? No. Sony made the sensor in the Fuji X-Pro1? No. This is a new Sony sensor? No.

That innovation of a fixed mirror is a neat trick which also makes high ISO work difficult. For example the A77 isn't really useable above 3200.

1 upvote
Peiasdf
By Peiasdf (May 17, 2012)

@ HowaboutRAW, what are you talking about? Both D3s and X-Pro1's sensor are made by SONY.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

Peiasdf:

Fuji made the sensor in the X-Pro1. And it is likely that Fuji made/makes the sensor in the D3, D3s, D700 and D4.

The Sony Nikon D3 connection is an unconfirmed internet rumor, yes really just a rumor with nothing back it up. Sony did make the sensor in the Nikon D3x (it's the same sensor as the Sony A900), and it's likely that Sony makes the sensor in the D800.

Asserting that Sony makes the sensor for the X-Pro1 is preposterous. It's also not clear which company makes the Nikon 1 series sensors. Given the autofocus system, it's probably Fuji.

0 upvotes
mick232
By mick232 (May 17, 2012)

@HowabouRAW:

So, Sony does not make ALL sensors for ALL cameras. Wow, what a finding! Nevertheless their sensors are innovative if you compare with Canon (hint: 5DM3) or Nikon. Foveon or Fuji sensors are certainly innovative, too, but if you read my statement again you'll notice that I said "out of the major SLR/SLT manufacturers". I don't count Sigma or Fuji into that group.

The fixed mirror is a transitional technique on the way to getting rid of the mirror completely when on-sensor PDAF becomes available. But that's clearly more innovative than building basically the same cameras like 8 years ago, isn't it

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

mick232:

Sorry Sony hasn't come close to the sensor in the D3s. And that's certainly a major camera.

PDAF, um well there's the Nikon 1 series, and Fuji had/has a P$S, jpeg, only camera that uses that autofocus system.

0 upvotes
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

HowaboutRAW,

Who is the manufacturer of D3s sensor? BTW, while D3s sensor is tuned for better high ISO performance, Sony NEX-7 and NEX-5N sensors (also used in A37, A57 and F3) have better color depth and dynamic range.

1 upvote
mick232
By mick232 (May 17, 2012)

D3s is a low-megapixel sensor with good high-ISO. What's so great about that?

The challenge is to build a high-resolution sensor that performs good at high ISO. And Sony has done exactly that with the D800 sensor.

0 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (May 17, 2012)

Fuji design their own sensors, but they're manufactured by Toshiba, if I'm not mistaken. And the Nikon 1 sensor is manufactured by Aptina, but were probably designed by Nikon themselves.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

EinsteinsGhost:

It's unclear who manufactures the D3 and D3s and D4 sensors, as I already wrote a good guess would be Fuji.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

mick232:

The D3s' sensor, in conjunction with a Zeiss lens, is extraordinary for colour--including high ISO colour. It is probably better than the D4. Though I have not used the D4 with the same Zeiss lens that I've used on a D3s.

And at lower ISOs, say 400, the D3s is great for colour with Nikon lenses. To quote the Sigma engineer about the D3s' sensor: "Yep, there's magic in that sensor." No, I will not be sharing names. And yes the SD1 was out then.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 18, 2012)

"The D3s' sensor, in conjunction with a Zeiss lens, is extraordinary for colour" - man, you should have seen the Zeiss on A-mount (you can connect ZF lenses to any Sony Alpha camera thanks to Leitax, without loosing any features it has on Nikon, plus: you get nice range of ZA lenses with autofocus). The colors are dream! Can't compare to anything else out there!

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
1 upvote
CFynn
By CFynn (May 18, 2012)

@Plastek

According to Leitax site you do loose features when converting ZF, or other manual focus F mount lenses, to A mount since they say you have to use stopped-down metering. That implies you can't use A mode either. With ZF.2 lenses you loose even more features.

What you might gain is SSS stabilization - but for that you also have to add a correctly programmed chip to the converted mount.

Too bad Sony isn't making a direct successor (with an OVF) to the A900 - because I agree that camera produced extraordinary colour with the ZA lenses and had an OVF that was maybe the best of any DSLR. But then that camera was levels above a camera like the A37.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 15 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 18, 2012)

Plastek:

Um so you've compared that Sony sensor Zeiss lens combination to everything? I'd guess not.

Also Sonys don't do high ISO (like 12800) real well. And the Nikon D4 and D3s do, particularly using Zeiss lenses.

Of course Leica M or S lenses on say Leica cameras at ISO say 200 would also beat anything from Sony. Though there's nothing stopping you from putting an M lens on a Nex 5N.

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Smartypants
By Smartypants (May 17, 2012)

I guess this is Sony's new kit lens. How many is that now?

It would be nice to see a lens or two or TEN that are good enough to stay in the line-up for a few years.
The old 85/f1.4 has been in the line-up since 2006 and its still good product, needs a new motor and sealings and other refreshes but it's still has good optics.
We need more lens like that and not a new ket lens each season like this one looks to be!

0 upvotes
Dave Oddie
By Dave Oddie (May 17, 2012)

I agree. They need to stop covering the same ground and plug the gaps in the line up.

They can give up on SAM as well for me. What a backward step that was given it does not allow Dynamic Manual Focus unlike old screw drive or SSM lenses.

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
cplunk
By cplunk (May 17, 2012)

"The lens features a SAM design that assures smooth, rapid, whisper-quiet autofocus operation and Direct Manual Focus for accurate fine-tuning of focus." from the article above....

I dunno why this one would support DMF and no other SAM lens would? unless this is a mistake in the article?

But if true, it might replace my minolta 28-105.

0 upvotes
EinsteinsGhost
By EinsteinsGhost (May 17, 2012)

I like the idea that Sony is giving buyers more choice than throwing the same kit lens. I wish I had that choice... to select from 18-55 (the only option at the time), 16-50 (which I have) and this 18-135. You pick what you want. The new lens bridges the gap between the need for the typical 18-55 kit and a rather bulkier travel zoom (18-200 or 18-250 or 18-270).

Typically, a kit saves only $100. So, if one buys body only on a $500 camera, you add $400 18-135 if you prefer, and the price tag is $900. If you wanted that lens as a kit, you pay $800 instead. Works better for consumers, IMO.

1 upvote
cgarrard
By cgarrard (May 17, 2012)

Uh.....

Um, ok.

Is that 18-135mm weather resistant at all?

A37... a35 owners, A55 owners- got nothing to be jealous of.

C

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (May 17, 2012)

Um, uh, it clearly isn't targeted at A35/A55 owners - strange comment. This is an entry-level camera that by the way seems to compete very well with the competition, while being cheaper.

I'm guessing that a kit lens, introduced mainly as a more versatile upgrade to the entry-level 18-55mm, will not be weather sealed. Does the competition weather seal their equivalents?

It does however come with a button to request a personal meeting with Sony to discuss any focusing issues.

3 upvotes
Revenant
By Revenant (May 17, 2012)

Lotus Eater, the A37 replaces the A35 in the entry-level segment, so the target market is the same. However, Sony probably expects current A35 owners to follow the upgrade path to the A57, and not buy another entry-level one.

0 upvotes
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (May 17, 2012)

That was basically my point.

1 upvote
Revenant
By Revenant (May 17, 2012)

Oh, I misunderstood your point then. :)

2 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (May 17, 2012)

You mean a kit lens like the 16-50mm f/2.8 that is weather sealed for 499 retail? Yeah.

Pentax weather seals their kit lenses, and I believe that Oly just did recently too with the new kit lens for the EM5.

Who said it wasn't targeted at A35/55 owners? It's a natural upgrade path to the A35, just as all cameras that replace older models are- that's common sense.

Odd comment indeed.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
The Lotus Eater
By The Lotus Eater (May 17, 2012)

Where is the 16-50mm retailing for $499.00? Unless you're talking £, but even then you'd be hard pushed to get one from a reputable retailer for that price. Besides, the 16-50mm is hardly a kit lens in the traditional sense of the word. Sony doesn't weather seal their A3x/A5x/A6x bodies, so why would they seal a kit lens upgrade that's aimed primarily at users of those bodies?

Common sense maybe, but Sony are clearly rejigging their lineup slightly. Of course the A37 isn't aimed at A35 users, otherwise they would have given clear upgrade incentives. Buyers aren't stupid enough to believe a higher model number = better. Well most of them aren't.

2 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (May 17, 2012)

The 35 and 33 models are clearly better than this. Sony keeps downgrading this model to cut costs. A 2.6" 230K dot screen? Come on Sony, this isn't 2008...

3 upvotes
hippo84
By hippo84 (May 17, 2012)

Screen size is not the main thing.
$150 is enough to buy 50/1.8 ) Good deal, isn't it?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
zstan
By zstan (May 17, 2012)

tell that to the Leica X2 first please.

Comment edited 7 seconds after posting
6 upvotes
iudex
By iudex (May 17, 2012)

Maybe the Sony bosses assumed: If a 9000 EUR Leica can have a 230000 LCD, why not our entry-level camera?

2 upvotes
caspianm
By caspianm (May 17, 2012)

Live view cont. focus is what SLT all about..Then Sony offers a smaller screen!! Shooting self in foot..

0 upvotes
cplunk
By cplunk (May 17, 2012)

It's an entry level camera and their trying to drive the price down. For current owners, I'm not sure why they'd want to "upgrade" from one entry level to a slightly newer entry level camera?

Besides, the EVF is where it's at, in the viewfinder (stated somewhere as the same as the A57?), the LCD isn't all that important. If they want to hold it up in front of them looking at the LCD in point and shoot style, the Nex is the way to go...

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (May 18, 2012)

@ cplunk

The lcd resolution isn't just important for shooting, but also for reviewing images and manual focus.

0 upvotes
Plastek
By Plastek (May 18, 2012)

I focus manually with viewfinder.
And review images on my colour-callibrated screen. (BTW: I wonder how Nikon users live at all with their green LCDs, lol)

1 upvote
gchamp727
By gchamp727 (May 20, 2012)

Yo.. Index .. you're off base man .. zstan said "tell that to the Leica X2.." NOT S2. The X2 is a $2k rangefinder that competes in the fuji x-100 arena.

Caspianm .. I like using manual focus primes so I feel your pain over the 230k screen but... the EVF is a good one and they give you the renowned "focus peaking" manual focusing feature that takes the squinting out of manual focus in low light situations .. better than any LCD even better than OLED. So it's a fair trade in my book.

0 upvotes
lilia24
By lilia24 (May 22, 2012)

it looks ok but i'm happy with my a35, it is has ultra fast autofocus and decent features for novice like me and the right size for my hands....don't see a reason to buy a37

0 upvotes
Total comments: 93