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Olympus launches Tough TG-1 iHS higher-spec rugged, waterproof camera

By dpreview staff on May 8, 2012 at 05:00 GMT

Olympus has announced the Tough TG-1 iHS, a high-end rugged, waterproof compact camera. The main selling point of the camera is its 25-100mm equivalant F2.0-4.9 zoom lens. The TG-1 is tougher than previous Tough models, being waterproof to 12m (40ft) and shockproof from a height of 2m (6.6ft) and will have optional waterproof fisheye and telephoto converter lenses available. The TG-1 iHS is built around a 1/2.3"-type 12MP back-lit CMOS sensor and a TruePic VI processor to make the most of its output.

Its lens may not be terrifically fast at the long end of the zoom but is usefully bright at its wide angle setting, especially for underwater photography. There will also be the option to add a full underwater housing for working at greater depths.

Bolstering its high-end status, Olympus has also included an OLED screen and an autofocus system it says uses the same technology found in its PEN cameras. It also features audio technology originally developed for the company's voice recorders, to go with its 1080p video capture.

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Press Release:

CAPTURE PRO IMAGE QUALITY FROM A WHOLE NEW PERSPECTIVE: OLYMPUS TOUGH TG-1 iHS

Durability Unites with DSLR-Image Quality, Best-In-Class f2.0 Lens, Full 1080p HD Video and Amazing Features for Thrill Seekers, Reef-Loving Explorers and Everyone In Between

CENTER VALLEY, Pa., May 8, 2012 – Olympus draws on its heritage of creating rugged, durable cameras that take the worry out of life-on-the-go shooting with the new Olympus TG-1 iHS. Marking a revolution for the Tough Series of Waterproof, Shockproof, Freezeproof, Crushproof and Dustproof compact cameras, the Olympus TG-1 iHS combines incredible durability with iHS technology, the world’s first high-speed bright f2.0 lens on a Tough camera and converter-lens compatibility to create a versatile system camera. The combination of durability and outstanding image quality make it possible to shoot in even the harshest conditions. Capture beautiful underwater scenes and aquatic life, snap photos of dusk-lit peaks or record your ride down the rapids in dazzling 1080p Full HD Video.

Superior Optics
The Olympus TG-1 iHS is the world’s first rugged camera to incorporate an ultra-bright, high-speed f2.0 lens* so you can capture high-quality images at blazing fast shutter speeds, even in low-light conditions. The camera’s three-inch high-resolution OLED display (610K dots) provides excellent visibility in bright situations, enabling you to compose the perfect shot in direct sunlight. Protective coatings help to prevent scratches and cut down on reflective glare, and the new lens on the Olympus TG-1 iHS transforms your photographs with the same FAST AF system technology found in Olympus PEN® cameras. Never worry about water droplets obstructing your images thanks to the water-repellent lens coating that prevents water from remaining on the lens surface.

Unmatched Rugged Durability
From atop an Alpine mountain to the depths of a tropical lagoon, the Olympus TG-1 iHS captures the perfect shot in unforgiving environments. Waterproof to 40 feet, Shockproof to 6.6 feet, Freezeproof to 14°F and even Crushproof to a weight of 220 pounds, the flagship Olympus Tough model is the toughest Tough model to date and an exceptionally high-speed performer with faster start-up time and quicker refresh rates.

Outstanding Image Quality
A high-sensitivity, high-speed 12-megapixel backlit CMOS sensor combined with a blazing fast, DSLR-quality TruePic™ VI image processor results in high-speed autofocus, enhanced Intelligent Auto for spectacular scene and subject recognition, and 10x Super-resolution Zoom to produce jaw-dropping images in locations that make even the most seasoned photographers cringe. This family of technologies combines for unmatched image quality in challenging shooting conditions with improved lighting, less noise and response times twice as fast as traditional cameras.

Designed specifically to keep up with the on-the-go photographer, the new Super Sport Mode combines high-speed autofocus with extra fast shutter speeds – up to 1/2000 – to freeze the action. Conveniently located on the dial, this mode captures five shots in a high-speed burst to ensure crisp shots in even the most extreme action sport settings. Low Light Mode is perfect for capturing the mood of low-light indoor scenes, beautiful sunsets or late night outdoor festivities without ruining the ambience with a bright flash. Shoot like a pro with 10 frames-per-second high-speed burst shooting and 1080p Full HD videos (1920x1080 pixels) or 60 frames-per-second (3mp) at the touch of button, allowing for slow-motion playback. Thanks to iHS Technology, your videos will benefit from excellent color reproduction and faster processing speeds, while Multi-Motion IS compensates for user movement during recording, creating smoother videos. Linear PCM Recording, an audio technology pioneered by Olympus for professional voice recorders, records your videos with high-definition audio for optimal playback results.

In iAuto mode, the Olympus TG-1 iHS automatically detects the subject, lighting and situation to identify the scene you’re shooting – up to 30 different scenes including Night, Sport, Beach and Snow, Underwater Snapshot and Backlight HDR – and adjusts the settings for ideal results.

System Expandability
For serious photographers, Olympus is offering system expandability for the Olympus TG-1 iHS. A converter ring allows you to add a lens converter adapter, waterproof Fisheye Converter Lens and Teleconverter Lens for use on land or in water. The Fisheye Converter Lens captures panoramic, wide-angle shots without sacrificing the brightness of the 4x wide optical zoom (25-100mm*) f2.0 lens. The Teleconverter Lens extends your optical zoom from 4x to 6.8x, delivering dramatic close-ups with professional-looking background blur. Combined with the Olympus TG-1 iHS’ 8x Super-resolution Zoom, which extends the range of the optical zoom with virtually no loss of image quality, you can reach an unmatched 13.6x magnification. Both converter lenses are waterproof to 40 feet. If 40 feet is not deep enough for you, the new Olympus PT-053 underwater housing is designed specifically for the TG-1 iHS, enabling you to dive to depths of 135 feet (45m).

Extreme Versatility
With the GPS and e.compass functions on the Olympus TG-1 iHS, location and landmark information will be displayed and recorded along with every image. The camera is also equipped with a logging function so you can track the route taken from recorded images by using applications such as Google Earth and Picasa. And with the brand-new LI-90 battery, you’ll worry less about battery life and more about your next destination. Mark your spot on the map with the built-in manometer, which records elevation and water depth and even displays a warning when the user approaches a depth of 40 feet. The Olympus TG-1 iHS boasts four different underwater scene modes -- Underwater Snapshot, Underwater Wide 1, Underwater Wide 2 and Underwater Macro – each carefully calibrated to allow for optimal color balance, exposure and flash so you automatically get the best results. An LED illuminator on the front of the camera enhances focus and exposure for macro shooting – great for underwater close-ups where light is scarce. The LED illuminator also works in conjunction with the flash to help illuminate your subject in low-light conditions.

U.S. Pricing and Availability
The Olympus TG-1 iHS will be available in June and ships with a USB Cable & Charger (F-3AC), Lithium-Ion Battery (Li-90B), Wrist Strap, Instruction Manual and ib Software CDs, Quick Start Guide and a Warranty Card.
Estimated Street Price: $399.99 (Available in Silver)
Underwater housing will be available in July.

*As of April 23, 2012
** Waterproof according to IEC standard publication 529 IPX8. Shockproof figures equivalent to MIL Standard (Olympus test conditions). Freezeproof according to Olympus test conditions.

Olympus Tough TG-1 iHS specifications

Price
MSRP$399
Body type
Body typeCompact
Sensor
Max resolution3968 x 2976
Other resolutions3968 x 2232, 3264 x 2448, 2560 x 1920, 2048 x 1536, 1920 x 1080, 1600 x 1200, 1280 x 960, 640 x 480
Image ratio w:h4:3, 16:9
Effective pixels12 megapixels
Sensor size1/2.3" (6.17 x 4.55 mm)
Sensor typeBSI-CMOS
ProcessorTruePic VI
Image
White balance presets4
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationSensor-shift
Uncompressed formatNo
File format
  • JPEG
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)25–100 mm
Optical zoom4×
Maximum apertureF2.0 - F4.9
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Face Detection
Digital zoomYes (4x)
Normal focus range60 cm (23.62)
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFixed
Screen size3
Screen dots610,000
Viewfinder typeNone
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed4 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/2000 sec
Scene modes
  • Portrait, Beauty, Landscape, Night Scene, Night + Portrait, Indoor, Candle, Self Portrait, Sunset, Fireworks, Cuisine, Documents, Beach & Snow, Underwater Snapshot, Underwater Wide 1, Underwater Wide 2, Underwater Macro, Pet (Cat), Pet (Dog), Snow, Panorama, 3D, Backlight HDR
Built-in flashYes
Self-timerYes (2 and 12 sec)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±2 (at 1/3 EV steps)
Videography features
FormatH.264
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerStereo
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Type D)
Physical
Environmentally sealedYes
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLI90B
Battery Life (CIPA)350
Weight (inc. batteries)230 g (0.51 lb / 8.11 oz)
Dimensions112 x 67 x 30 mm (4.41 x 2.64 x 1.18)
Other features
GPSBuiltIn

Additional images

Optional TCON-T01 teleconverter Optional FCON-T01 fisheye converter
26
I own it
9
I want it
2
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 206
12
sproketholes
By sproketholes (Jan 5, 2013)

Anyone know of a site that discusses specifically the GPS parts of this camera and how to use it with software?

0 upvotes
TacticDesigns
By TacticDesigns (Oct 15, 2012)

Ok. Finally got my hands on this camera and got to play with it for an afternoon. All I got to say is, man is it fast. Fast to focus. Fast to take a picture and get ready for the next. Besides being rugged enough to take pictures in the heat of the battle, its nice that one of these rugged cameras can take a picture at the right moment, and get it in focus. This one will probably give you the best chance at that. And I guess with that BSI-CMOS sensor, the images look nice and clean, and acceptable in low light.

It's my buddy that picked it up. He was looking for a rugged camera to take on vacation, and this came out right before his vacation. I told him about it and told him to check the speed to make sure he'd be happy with it. We showed it to another friend of ours at Thanksgiving, she has an older Olympus rugged camera and she's looking to upgrade. After playing with it I think she's sold.

And now, some how after playing with this camera, its crept up onto my want list. [grin]

1 upvote
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Aug 7, 2012)

No raw means no buy for me. Funny too, I would buy it asap if it had raw, since nobody makes a waterproof cam with raw. All digital cameras should have a raw option nowadays, especially ones that attempt to court "enthusiasts". Next time Olympus consider that? Maybe you did consider it this time, however next time consider it, then decide to implement it.

It can't be that much more costly to do so.

C

1 upvote
Thomas Hoven
By Thomas Hoven (Nov 29, 2012)

Absolutery agree. Why did no camera manufacturer come up with raw in a rugged compact yet? Please also add time lapse recording and I would rush to the store. This Oly seems to have everything else right at a first glance. Perfect size and zoom range.

0 upvotes
Emoto
By Emoto (Aug 5, 2012)

Pardon my ignorance, but do they really ship this thing without any memory card at all???

0 upvotes
Rex_W
By Rex_W (Aug 18, 2012)

They do. But given the multiplicity of cards available for this depending on stills, movie and wifi connection, it is best left to the buyer to get the one they want.

0 upvotes
robmanueb
By robmanueb (Aug 22, 2012)

Like all cameras. it's only ever the distributors that throws together a package that includes essentials like memory cards and cases. Generally this is at the request of the retailers as the mark up on cameras is now so slim as to be almost non existent. The only way the retailer can make anything is by "upselling" you those bits. Sell a camera with a case, card and spare battery (and charger if it takes AA) and your boss will be smiling.

0 upvotes
Rex_W
By Rex_W (Jul 29, 2012)

I picked up our TG-1 on Friday and have enjoyed playing with it. We bought it as a family camera to be compact, versatile and 'bomb' proof where carrying round the normal dSLRs would be a pain. It seems to perform well.
I enjoyed playing with the super macro mode! I was impressed with the performance of the screen in very bright sunshine, but would still have preferred a view finder!
A slight annoyance is the GPS data format in the EXIF data is incompatible with Google maps.
I have no intention of using the Oly software as we have a work flow for the dSLRs so I don't know what Oly do with the data. Google maps would be a very quick way of tagging the image. I can do the arithmetic to convert but it would have been a simple change.
Overall pleased with the purchase but its early days.
PS My wife was not prepared to test the waterproofing by going into the sea this morning!

0 upvotes
Rex_W
By Rex_W (Aug 18, 2012)

Used it today on my bike and found a few things which annoyed me.
I had three very underexposed images, no idea why, the next frames were OK.
I had an instance where I pressed the shutter, nothing happened, pressed again and then got two successive images of the road!
Operating the camera single handed in my right hand (I was riding my bike) the space for my thumb was a bit too small and I kept hitting the zoom button. That prevents the camera from firing.
I also found the indexing on the function knob insufficient to stop accidental rotation whilst operating with one hand.
I did get some good images though.

0 upvotes
Autolycuss
By Autolycuss (Jul 6, 2012)

I've bought a TG-1, but it has 2 flaws - one of which has prevented its use since purchase. The First is its lens, which has clever coatings and is F2 too - but which has NO PROTECTION. Solution: buy an Olympus TLA-CO1 Converter Adaptor and fit a Lens cap - or a 40.5mm UV filter AND a lens cap - but WHY did I have to buy one from fleaBay? WHY don't Olympus include one in the box...?
Second: It is a well-sealed camera and I will buy a PT-053 housing (also on eBay), for deeper dives. But WHY only provide an "On-board" charging system? Having one latched & locked cover open to charge it - for 2 hours at a time - allows moisture & dust ingress past all the O-ring protection - thus negating it. Why is there no separate charger & spare battery, in the box? Unlocking the baseplate for a swift battery change WOULD allow less nastiness to invade the innards - so I've had to buy these items separately. Guess where...?
But WHY should we have to buy all these (essential) extras?

0 upvotes
Rex_W
By Rex_W (Aug 18, 2012)

I agree with the comment about the battery charger, that's a pain.
A day out doing something special needs a spare battery. Then only being able to charge in camera is a pain.

0 upvotes
adobespain
By adobespain (May 18, 2012)

Does anyone know if this camera is possible to take time-lapse shots?

0 upvotes
alexjeoh
By alexjeoh (May 14, 2012)

DSLR Quality ? check this out...

http://www.olympusimage.com.sg/products/compact/tough_series/tg1/sample/

0 upvotes
dtmoody
By dtmoody (May 18, 2012)

Sadly, I am kinda depressed. Not at all the IQ I was hoping for. But It what It Is... something to take pretty much anywhere that produces decent quality images. Question is, would I dare fork over $400 for it? So far, i am leaning towards nope.

0 upvotes
pcworth
By pcworth (May 18, 2012)

It is a bit spendy, but if you compare it to something like the S100, it is not bad at all. It has pretty much all the features of an S100 plus you can get it wet or play tennis with it. The add-on lenses also sound interesting. We will see if the image quality of this match that of the S100. If it does then I might be interested. If not, then I'll keep waiting for the XZ-1 replacement, or the LX-6.

1 upvote
Nick Criggar
By Nick Criggar (May 12, 2012)

Many posters here keep referencing the lack of RAW, and other traits lacking here. For some pros, these types of cams will never be good enough. I admit, I'm not Neil Leifer or some other photo god, but I do work professionally as a freelance/stringer, and I can honestly say that I'm not looking for RAW in a cam like this. I might shoot one or two of my son's T-ball games, karate events, or swim meets each season with my Nikon D200 and 70-200 f 2.8. But I can't lug that sucker around with me everywhere I go. And the last time I took it on vacation, I spent more time baby-sitting my gear than I spent enjoying/using it. So, that's where a camera like this comes in real handy. With that wide-open f2 aperture, and the optional converter lenses, I should be able to get SOME of the shots that I want. This camera looks like it is going to bridge the gap a little bit between prosumer DSLRs and consumer tough P&Ss. We'll all just have to wait and see some samples...!

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 12, 2012)

Repeating someone else from these comments: Just because you don’t want to shoot raw with this camera does not mean that others don’t want to shoot raw with these toughened cameras.

Now your point about taking a dslr to a sporting event, well yes that’s the right camera because of course it shoots much faster (particularly in jpeg mode, ironic that) than one of these tough cameras.

Look raw doesn’t add cost or weight, and does not necessarily add the complexity of full manual control, so why not include raw? You haven’t really provided an answer to that question, instead just pointing out that there are better cameras than these small toughened ones--a point which no one asking for raw on this particular Olympus would dispute.

1 upvote
John Aldeborgh
By John Aldeborgh (May 17, 2012)

The marketing people at Olympus likely did a market survey of other cameras in this category and have determined that development costs and time to market more than off-set any incremental sales that might be realized by including RAW capability at this generation of camera. Plus they have left open a major feature that can be added to the next generation product if and when RAW becomes a competitive necessity.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 17, 2012)

John A:

What cost to adding raw? Adobe would do good raw extraction software if Olympus provided the specs.

RAW is a competitive advantage, after all even a casual snorkler may want to get the best color out of his/her pictures, without having to use case on a raw capable camera. This is a really obvious point.

All cameras see raw and it's easy enough to make them record raw, so Olympus should start, especially with this F/2.0 camera.

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Antanicus
By Antanicus (Jun 19, 2012)

Everything is a compromise on market.
TG-1 has a 4x optic zoom that is clearly less than 5x of 810.
Somebody may ask "Why reducing zoom?"

As the same way, maybe saving jpeg may result faster than saving raw. Or maybe algorithms (filters, postprocessing...) are already ok for jpeg and Olympus does not want to pay Adobe.

1 upvote
dtmoody
By dtmoody (May 10, 2012)

I bought a Canon SD1100 back in '08/'09 as my take everywhere family camera. Still today its what I grab first mostly because of its size and decent image quality.
However, its starting to age (gracefully) and I wonder how this new Tough Oly compares as far as image quality. Any one have any input? Looking at the SD1100 on Amazon, they are wanting nearly $550 for it. I think I paid $150 new.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 10, 2012)

Um what's wrong with a good condition used Canon SD1100 on Ebay? ($90)

And why bring up the Canon, it's not a a tough camera?

0 upvotes
dtmoody
By dtmoody (May 10, 2012)

There is nothing wrong with a good condition used Canon SD1100 on ebay. You are missing my point and question entirely.

I ALREADY own a Canon SD1100 that still works great. Not wanting to buy one again. Was shocked to see the price of them on amazon.

I am considering a new P&S and with my kids getting older now (the oldest uses the SD1100) I was considering a "Tough" camera for our outings and was asking if anyone had any input on if the quality would be on par with the Canon or better or worse as far as from what we know at this point.
:)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Knight Palm
By Knight Palm (May 11, 2012)

OT:
The first Digital IXUX were terrible noise machines with their small sensors (1/2.7"). Same goes with the miserable PowerShot A500 series, which were the same noise machines as your SD1100, all with the tiny (1/2.5") sensor.

Today's commodity sensor among all vendors P&S cameras is further a bit larger (1/2.3") equals to a 5.6x crop factor, and are found in eg. Pentax Q CSC, as well as in all Olympus Tough cameras. Here with a moderate pixel pitch BSI-CMOS technology sensor, having moderately 12 Mpixels.

2 upvotes
nekrosoft13
By nekrosoft13 (Jul 9, 2012)

why bring up a price of old SD1100. no one will pay your $550 for that camera, you will be lucky if you get $80

0 upvotes
Steve 316
By Steve 316 (May 10, 2012)

The press realease says, "Outstanding image quality." Well, the features are nice, but Olympus has rarely had good results with its 1/2.3" sensors in these waterproof cameras. Try before you buy!!! My Olympus Tough, now an older model, takes pictures underwater no better than a $15 film disposable with a plastic lens.

1 upvote
Knight Palm
By Knight Palm (May 11, 2012)

The Pentax Q is recently tested on
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/PENTAXQ/PENTAXQA.HTM
stating that "...at apertures smaller than f/2.8, you're already diffraction-limited, meaning that you have to stay at f/2.8 or larger if you want to get the maximum detail."

At least, this new Olympus Tough TG-1 iHS ruggedised camera has a faster lens in order to limit these effects of diffraction, which taken that parameter into account, bodes well for improved overall image quality.

Unfortunately, this camera lacks raw options, otherwise like with Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 (also equipped with a 1/2.3" sensor), it would be possible to taylorize the output image quality to each enthusiasts preferences.

2 upvotes
Vitruvius
By Vitruvius (May 10, 2012)

People keep complaining that the image quality is getting worse as sensors get smaller. Well... YA! You also get what you pay for. People used to be willing to pay more for qaulity too. Stop complaining that you can't get $1,000 quality from a $400 camera. Most people are not photogs and don't really care about the dynamic range of the image they just tweeted of a friend sitting on the photocopier at the party. I am sure that Canon would add 'L' lenses to their Powershots again, like the Pro1, if they thought people were willing to pay for it. I don't think most people are.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 10, 2012)

Well Panasonic uses Japanese made Leica lenses on their tough cameras, and Panasonic kept the pixel count down on the one from last year.

All Panasonic really needed to to was to made the camera record raw data.

1 upvote
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (May 11, 2012)

Thats a broad statement ...Oly's TG-610 has much much better image quality than my panny ts20 ...much better.

I agree with Vitruvius ...people just miss the point on these.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 11, 2012)

@happypoppeye:

Last year Panasonic replaced the TS20 with the TS4 and REDUCED the pixel count. So the T4 is the Panasonic to reference.

How can you draw conclusions about jpegs from this not yet shipped Olympus?

0 upvotes
Xoom
By Xoom (May 10, 2012)

I'd be interested if it had the XZ-1 size sensor, but with the tiny sensor it has, no thanks.

0 upvotes
Elaka Farmor
By Elaka Farmor (May 10, 2012)

A underwater housing to a waterproof camera is quite funny......

1 upvote
Der Steppenwolf
By Der Steppenwolf (May 10, 2012)

It for those cases where you want to take camera to lower depths then itself is rated for. Was that really so hard to get ?
Du är löjlig ju...

1 upvote
Elaka Farmor
By Elaka Farmor (May 11, 2012)

Of cause and got that, but still it sounds funny FOR ME. Bra att du dömer folk......

1 upvote
Fred255 Photography
By Fred255 Photography (May 10, 2012)

Need to tie this to a house brick for added weight. It would be idea and feel like my 1D :)

0 upvotes
smileblog
By smileblog (May 10, 2012)

Oh.. I hope there is another colored one like in blue or white.

0 upvotes
marcomariano
By marcomariano (May 10, 2012)

good thing i didnt bought the uber slow lens Canon D20... though i already bought S100. im keen on this one...

0 upvotes
Knight Palm
By Knight Palm (May 9, 2012)

The GPS data logger, paired with an increased battery size, intrigues me. The altimeter/barometer comes as a plus. But I haven't found out, if maps can be loaded, maybe only POIs.

The price increase seems steeper in European currency then in USD, when comparing to other Tough models. That hampers my interest.

The lens design with a side-reflecting mirror claims containing improved optics. Sounds promising for the improved image quality, compared to the lower Tough models.

P.S. RAW is missing.

1 upvote
Louis_Dobson
By Louis_Dobson (May 9, 2012)

Oh. No RAW? Back to looking for a cheap waterproof case for one of my MFT cameras then :-(

1 upvote
ARTASHES
By ARTASHES (May 9, 2012)

It's always good to have an option as RAW but this camera is a bit far from that segment IMHO, what it really lacks is some manual control over shutter speed (aperture priority is useless to me in camera with such a small sensor)

3 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 9, 2012)

If your shooting style allows you to use an MFT camera in a housing, don't settle for a rugged cam. It would be too much of a drop in control and image quality.

I'm only interested in ragged cams because there's no way anything else would fit into the pocket of my PFD (or swimming trunks, for that matter).

A TG-1 sounds like a tremendous step up for a rugged cam (should be something like 3-4 stops improvement over my Panasonic TS-1), but it would be an even bigger downgrade compared to an MFT camera.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
vladimir vanek
By vladimir vanek (May 9, 2012)

I'd rather get genuine underwater case for my Olympus XZ-1 for the price and still I save a few bucks.

0 upvotes
Antanicus
By Antanicus (Jun 19, 2012)

Yes, you can choice the underwater case. Maybe it will still fit in your pocket.
However the point is that, from the first Though till the TG-1, the clear market segment addressed by Olimpus is Sport and Mass.

I mean people who don't treat camera very gently or don't want to stress themselves taking care of it while they are enjoying.
Also people who don't need any big and professional equipment but also like to take some picture wherever they go (snow, underwater close to the beach or any unusual situation).

In fact you find fashion features like 3D, GPS, HDR backlight, Touch function for changing menu dressing gloves.

I personally destroyed a Pentax Optio just falling having it in my pocket. Canon D10 seems no far rough than Pentax.
Olympus Though are METAL case, double locke
d, the objective is protected by a metal screen when off, even the display is still there, despite I bring the camera of my 8010 when I go in caves, climb mountains and through on the sand of the beach.

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (May 9, 2012)

When asked, I advice people not to buy the cheap small sensored compacts from Olympus. They have lately been a leader in all the marketing-driven races (megapixel, zoom, scene modes, low price) at the expense of all reasonable measures of camera quality (distorion, sharpness, speed of optics, noise of the sensor, algorithmic image processing). Maybe they'll start to produce decent goods again and after some time, but it will take a long time to win my trust.

1 upvote
snake_b
By snake_b (May 9, 2012)

I've never had a good Oly compact. Even the expensive ones. I remember a fairly expensive one I had a few years ago that was unable to produce anything but blurry pictures.

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (May 9, 2012)

the XZ-1 seems to be OK as far as image quality (this is my first Oly).
if you don't want a small sensor, don't buy a small camera.
why are you even posting such a comment under a waterproof camera this compact?
what do you expect?

5 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (May 9, 2012)

Yes, XZ-1 is a very good camera. And I have no objections against decent small sensor cameras. Unfortunatelly, they are rare these days.

Besides XZ-1 (a premium device, aimed at enthusiasts), Olympus manufactures a loads of cheaper devices, majority of them being of quite poor quality - as opposed to their predecessors from several years ago.

The most striking example is Oly's line of superzooms: the once venerable SP-* line. Compared to SP-570 (from 2008), the newer devices (SP-800, SP-810) are a joke :

blurry lens
noisy sensor
poor NR
no RAW
no manual settings

but they do provide 36x zoom and 14MPix of colourful noise.

0 upvotes
Alpine78
By Alpine78 (May 9, 2012)

I haven't seen good picture quality with rugged cameras yet. I'm afraid that this camera won't change that situation much. But let's see.

1 upvote
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 9, 2012)

Rugged cams have to have compromises. They cannot have a protruding lens, and their electronics has to be lower-powered (the rugged bodies are difficult to keep cool).

On the other hand, they work in scenarios where nothing else would.

So as far as the image quality, you take what you get - it's either that, or no image at all.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
amirput90
By amirput90 (May 9, 2012)

RAW sound serious considering it is just a point and shoot camera. Besides, Olympus JPEG is considerably good.

1 upvote
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (May 9, 2012)

And yet again, apparantly NO RAW support.

1 upvote
jon404
By jon404 (May 9, 2012)

I have an older Olympus SW-1030... a fine shockproof, waterproof little camera. This TG-1 looks like a substantial improvement... am looking forward to testing one once they hit the market. My big SW-1030 discovery -- in a pouring rain, or even a thick drizzle, don't use the flash! The light just reflects from a zillion little water droplets. I like low-light photography, and the TG-1's lens will be perfect for those rainy non-flash moments...

What's the sonnet?
"O Spring! If TG-1 arrives, can XZ-2 be far behind?"

1 upvote
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 9, 2012)

In my own experience (Pentax WR33, then WR43, then Panasonic TS-1) that flash is very useful as fill light, but nearly useless as the main source of light. So it's "forced on" in good light, and "forced off" at all other scenarios, unless the moment is so good that I don't mind a "cardboard-cutout" type picture.

0 upvotes
duartix
By duartix (May 8, 2012)

This is real GoPro competition.

Sensors are the same size but the Olympus Lens is twice as fast. Considering that the Olympus sensor is most probably sub-sampled for video they are neck and neck except these things going for:

OLYMPUS:

* If the Olympus IBIS works in video this will be a massive advantage.
* The Olympus lens probably trounces the GoPro in both IQ and versatility.
* The body itself is a lot more flexible.
* The Olympus also does Photo now with an amazing advantage in Low Light.

GOPRO:

* The GoPro is smaller and lighter.
* There are all kinds of mounts available.

Unknowns:
Codec and bitrate choice from Olympus will pretty much determine what the video quality will be. GoPro have issued a fw update that makes the IQ from the Hero HD2 completely trounce the factory settings.

1 upvote
Nick Criggar
By Nick Criggar (May 12, 2012)

Olympus' Spec says codec is H.264 in MOV format, 1080p, 60 fps, so it is a safe bet that video quality will be excellent. If they're smart, they'll be using a Full HD variant of the Quicktime codec that Apple developed specifically for iPhone/iPad. This seems like a smart move by Olympus.

0 upvotes
photoholiko
By photoholiko (May 8, 2012)

I have the Oly. Tough-6020, It would be a fun camera if I could only get some pics that are not blurry. The IS on it is useless.

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
David Hart
By David Hart (May 8, 2012)

Regardless of the specs, lack of RAW, etc. I think that this is one cool looking camera.

2 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (May 8, 2012)

I'll probably buy it. (Next year after the price drops $100)

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (May 8, 2012)

Tougher than Tough? The aperture is faster at wide and long ends than the competition. A stereo speaker? Not just a stereo mic? 1080 60p video? This would be the first Oly model to feature that. Interesting to see the picture tests.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 9, 2012)

Man! I'd absolutely /loooourve/ to see a picture test would show off the camera's stereo speaker to its full advantage!

Sorry, couldn't resist :)

0 upvotes
TacticDesigns
By TacticDesigns (May 8, 2012)

Looks like a really fun, carefree camera to me! I really like the idea of the fisheye and teleconverter. And the lens in the middle, so no more finger smudges when picking up the camera. And with the faster lens and I think this camera is good to go! <grin>

0 upvotes
semorg
By semorg (May 8, 2012)

Useless!

Here is the camera that I would have bought right now:

30% thicker camera (to accommodate larger sensor and fast lens more waterproofing)
Larger sensor ( backlit)
8-10 mp
raw
20M waterproof
LED lamps around the lens for macro shot
21-70mm (faster on tale)
additional $100-200 to cover the extra cost

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (May 8, 2012)

20m depth tolerance would require control buttons to be very stiff to withstand high pressures, making the camera unpleasant to use on land. Were the camera 30% thicker, people would not like that either, since they might prefer a smaller camera with a marine case, which costs the $200 extra you say you'd pay.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (May 8, 2012)

And then everyone would complain that it is too big and expensive with no zoom. They'd sell about 200 of them and lose a million bucks on the camera overall. And that's presuming your specs are even feasible.

0 upvotes
semorg
By semorg (May 8, 2012)

This is all about market positioning. There are numerous thinner cameras that are weatherproof.
The buttons need not to be stiffer. Depending on what technology is use. It could be a magnetic triggered circuit under the waterproof sealing and the buttons themselves don't need to be sealed

0 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (May 9, 2012)

Cy, you should know some basics about hydraulics before offering any opinion about underwater ambient and work. And the optical characteristics of water and light are pretty much different than on dry land too.
Nikonos III and V have been specified water and pressure-resistant to -40 meters (5Atm) but I used to have them along to double that pressure / depth without any ill consequences.
And in those times it was considered a small take-anywhere camera with a choice of four lenses (from 15mm fisheye to 80mm "tele"... more of a portrait lens) and its two macro tubes with three framers were enough for 3:1 - 1:3 macro work...
Three of those lenses were also usable on dry land same as one used normal P&S cameras.
Now, no-one can tell me all those pretty specs can't be repeated and even made better in a digital version.
The question is, why hasn't it been already done?

0 upvotes
Antanicus
By Antanicus (Jun 19, 2012)

Be careful with water proof definition.

See the link,
http://www.oris.ch/services/faq.aspx?ln=it&sel=2&id_faq=7
Sorry is in Italian, but I am quite sure you find in English too

0 upvotes
SamTruax
By SamTruax (May 8, 2012)

You gotta love the marketing BS they come up with... "Durability Unites with DSLR-Image Quality".
If my DSLR was only as good as this 1/2.3" sensor I would be suing its manufacturer.
Why do we put up with the BS marketing?

3 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (May 8, 2012)

Yeah ...can't beleive the BS ...yet, I'm sure it works on many people. It's a good lookin waterproof P&S ...to compare it to an SLR is probably (giving it the benefit of the doubt) a ridiculous statement

Just look at the forums ...all these p&s's get compared to slr's anyway

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (May 8, 2012)

If you judge by their financial scandals, it seems they are well-seasoned BS veterans!
Some corporate cultures just don't change!

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (May 8, 2012)

Your underwater DSLR shots won't be any better than what you get with a P&S, unless you have exceptionally clear water and (at any depth over 3m) you'd need a strobe or have rotten color. Very likely, you'd not care to learn (the wet way? how trustworthy the DSLR's pricey marine enclosure is at any great depth. So the P&S wins by default and the judge throws out your frivolous tort.

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (May 8, 2012)

They meant as good as their first 4/3 DSLR, so it's totally true.... :)

0 upvotes
kelpdiver
By kelpdiver (May 8, 2012)

Sorry, Cy, you're light years off on the UW comparison of P&S versus DSLR. There's a reason (many actually) why people go through the hassle and expense of carrying a large DSLR + lens + port while diving. Macro is the only subject where compacts come into the equation. (I've taken thousands of pics with each type)

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (May 9, 2012)

I found what you are referencing, in their press-release. They are talking about the micro-processor, not the image quality. What they mean, is there is enough horsepower to have fast processing, fast response time, the capability for HD video at 60 framerate, etc.

0 upvotes
Thoughts
By Thoughts (May 8, 2012)

I would not take photos with this camera in RAW format. It is meant to be a fun camera after all.

4 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (May 9, 2012)

Yes it is ment to be a fun camera. It will get used at the beach, at the lake, around the pool, hiking in the mountains. All places where there is a very strong likelyhood of having very strong sunlight resulting in very contrasty situations (sunny cloudless sky with the sun reflecting off the water and white sand).
These are the very situitations where the use of RAW would provide the most benefit. So for me, RAW is an absolute MUST in these rugged cameras, yet no one offers it. Why is that?

0 upvotes
Bomple
By Bomple (May 9, 2012)

Having detail smeared by crappy in-camera noise reduction is fun?

0 upvotes
Thoughts
By Thoughts (May 9, 2012)

have you seen the sample photos yet? please don't assume that everyone is a serious photographer and this camera is aparently not for her/him...

0 upvotes
Antanicus
By Antanicus (Jun 19, 2012)

I don't know if most people want to spend time by managing raw images...

Considering the target, the most important is a good quality picture, that may be shot if the camera has good lens and a good image processing software inside.

Customized WB of TG-1 for example is a step forward that recovers the step versus other compact cameras.

I am still waiting for pictures shot from common people, not from Olympus people!

0 upvotes
ARTASHES
By ARTASHES (May 8, 2012)

Lets hope it will have JPEG engine similar to one on XZ-1 not usual Oly's P&S jpeg

3 upvotes
asaph
By asaph (May 8, 2012)

Should it be an 8x or 10x Super-resolution Zoom (@ Outstanding Image Quality)?

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (May 8, 2012)

Wide angle is more useful for action or POV shots. Telephoto is generally useless under water.

1 upvote
kelpdiver
By kelpdiver (May 9, 2012)

telephoto for macro purposes is useful for small objects you can't get too close to, but otherwise I concur.

0 upvotes
ARTASHES
By ARTASHES (May 9, 2012)

Macro capabilities of those cams dramatically decrease with even minor zoom but you can get a bit of DOF for portraits with full zoom

Comment edited 23 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
mischivo
By mischivo (May 8, 2012)

I love it! It looks like a P&S from the 90s!

1 upvote
marcomariano
By marcomariano (May 8, 2012)

i want one for my mountain biking...

3 upvotes
SynchroM
By SynchroM (May 8, 2012)

I think many on here are barking up the wrong tree. I'm interested in this as a replacement for action cameras like GoPros and Contours. Both of those have absolutely abysmal optics and sensors; this camera would be a massive upgrade to both.
So what it needs to compete with them is a wide-angle lens (got that), decent mounting options (a chest-mount seems ideal) and the ability to use it unsighted with gloves on. I know that Oly have previously made such mounts and they've also had a tap-triggered shoot/record function on other tough cams, though I've yet to see if that's actually workable.
Zoom is generally not needed for wearable cameras, though it makes it much more useful when you take it off to use it like a normal camera.
It's pointless comparing with higher-end cameras when they're useless in a practical sense. If I crashed at 60mph with a DSLR strapped to my chest I'd probably trash the camera and it would probably injure me, so small, neat, rugged wins.

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

This one doesn't have tap control, and doesn't let you shoot stills while shooting video. As a GoPro preplacement, it's probably too pricey, too.
I wear my TS-1 in a PFD pocket while whitewater kayaking. I guess, with a quick-release harness, it could pull double-duty. I wonder if the water-repellent lens coating would work as advertised (and for how long).

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (May 8, 2012)

After a 60mph crash, let's hope your head, kneck or vital organs aren't trashed. But, of course, any dying camera lover's final words will be, "Hope that shot came out," or "Is my camera OK?"

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (May 8, 2012)

They had to use the 1/2.3" sensor because you can't make a waterproof/durable camera that has a regular zoom lens that pops out when you turn it on. That's the #1 point of failure on camera. These need the internal periscopic zooming kind which limit the size.

But, it is basically a super rugged Nikon P310. Should be a great camera option for anyone doing outdoor activities.

1 upvote
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

Exactly. That Nokia Purview with a large sized sensor had to have a fixed f:2.4 lens and reliy on digital zoom. When zoomed in to 100mm equivalent, it uses 1/16 of its sensor area. This gives TG-1 something like 1 stop advantage over it at the tele end - and TG-1's optical stabilzation should give it much more of an edge.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

This camera can cover a lot more scenarios than a typical rugged cam.

If it really is 3-4 stops better than my TS-1, it should be very useable indoors.

Add-on filters - I'd get a polarizer, a gradual-density fitler, and a teleconverter, perhaps the fisheye too - would make a lot of landscapes possible (provided the lens is sharp enough).

The 1.7 teleconverter might even give some subject separation for portraits.

All in all, this has a potential to be both a stellar rugged cam and a decent all-around vacation camera in one tiny package.

Bravo, Olympus!

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (May 8, 2012)

To my sorrow, it's another Almost...
Imagine waterproofing that is working to the pressure of 1.2 bar, and how little it takes to make something really usable to divers (i.e. being able to resist pressures of 5 bar)! Taking photos within 12 meters depth is really frustrating if you want to do more than dive in apnea or just snorkle. There is no excuse for any manufacturer who wants their products to be interesting to outdoors people, for not yet being able to make a proper amphibious camera which would be at least as usable as ancient Nikonos, including Nikon who already has two excellent casings, - III and V - easily adaptable to digital technology...
And adding an underwater housing to an underwater camera is just as laughable as having extra Pet modes for Cats and Dogs. While having none for Parrots, for instance. The whole idea of an u/w camera is to finally get rid of the housing, which is just another piece of equipment one has to buy and take care of...

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

I don't think this was intended it as a dive camera. I'm not a diver myself, but isn't it /dark/ at 40 meters? The built-in flash is not powerful enough for anything but fill light, and there's no way to attach a flash to it.
Snorkeling is another matter - you get sunshine.

4 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (May 8, 2012)

Boris, I think you make a good point.

These cameras are mostly used by hunters, bikers, boaters, beach goers, rock climbers, water skiers, fishermen, and hikers.... and not by deep sea divers.

They are for people who enjoy active sports.... above sea level! These are for people who want something rugged and splash proof.

You just won't find a deep sea capable camera for $400.
No one makes something like that, and no one ever will at that price point.

6 upvotes
Richt2000
By Richt2000 (May 8, 2012)

Yep,
This will be a perfect camera for snorkelling (if the autofocus is nice and fast like an EP3), beach, skiing, mountain biking...

0 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (May 8, 2012)

Huh? ...this is a family vaca type p and s not a dive camera
...this isn't a prosumer or pro type camera either, thus no raw, which would be useless to most people this camera is geared to (more to all the other posters not you) and which will be buying

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (May 8, 2012)

A camera built to withstand 5 bar would have to be built like a bathysphere and the control knobs would require a wrench or hammer to deploy on land.

0 upvotes
kelpdiver
By kelpdiver (May 9, 2012)

Boris - it's rated for 40ft, not 40m. And yet, compacts still function at 130ft. The flash can be used to trigger a strobe using fiber optics, though once you've added a tray, arms, and strobe, you're in a different price category and the bulk factor isn't much better than a compact SLR or mirrorless rig.

Marty - the S95 + housing runs just over $500. Certainly bulkier, but this would be a much better camera. You can get a housing for Canon's similar 1/2.3" cameras for under $200, making a 130m capable unit about the same price as this one. (For that matter, Olympus also makes housings for about the same price point, so you can get their models in a fully UW capable state as well.) The TG-1 is really focused at people engaging in sports on top of the water where you don't want to worry about water damage from splashes or drops.

Cy - 5 bar is 130ft. No bathysphere, no wrenches or hammers. Stop making stuff up.

0 upvotes
Deleted pending purge
By Deleted pending purge (May 9, 2012)

Of course deep down it's rather dark, but by no means impossibly so. Especially with the range of sensibility we have nowadays. But even the usual flash strength is sufficient, as it is not depth- but distance-dependent. Its light will be further sharply reduced by water medium, which can be compensated to some extent, but that does not mean much. You can't use flash over two meters water distance anyway, regardless of the strength because of so-called "blue barrier" (spectral filtering). Six meters of water will filter out all the light any flash unit can deliver, but just about any flash can be used for macro and close-up work, and those themes are usually fascinating.
The very fact that you can't take a camera below snorkeling depths is frustrating, and there is no technical reason not to enable it at least the Nikonos performance specs.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 9, 2012)

kelpdiver:
" it's rated for 40ft, not 40m." right. I meant that TG-1 /won't handle/ 40m because of the lack of external flash.
"And yet, compacts still function at 130ft. The flash can be used to trigger a strobe using fiber optics,"
Don't know how you'd accomplish that. The compacts use pre-flashes to meter, and there's no way to override that metering. If the pre-flashes trigger the external flash, it will fire before the shot is taken. If that external flash is "digital" and can ignore the preflashes, it will massively overexpose the shot.

In my experience (above water), the built-in flash in these compacts is very good for fill light, and pretty poor for anything else.

Comment edited 10 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 9, 2012)

OldArrow: Well, you're right, you'd be able to shoot things up close. Still, in my experience, ragged cams are nearly useless in the low light. They focus badly if at all, the flash is weak and very close to the lens (so any kind of particles in the water will cause the infamous "globes"). Perhaps the TG-1 would be somewhat better because of the faster lens, but I just don't see a diver putting up with a chunk of gear that's as difficult to use as, say, my TS-1 in low light. (I don't dive myself, but got a lot of respect for the people who do).

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
wutsurstyle
By wutsurstyle (May 8, 2012)

In Magic mode, the camera will transform to a waterproof OM-D E-M5 and make your shots of your friends look like supermodels.

5 upvotes
Ken Milburn
By Ken Milburn (May 8, 2012)

I have long been wanting a "take it anywhere in any weather" camera that was pocketable, but it still lacks the one thing that it needs the most: RAW. Especially when shooting in less-than-ordinary conditions such as underwater and in crummy weather or flying dust. A slightly larger sensor would help, too.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

Repeating OpticGlass,

And still no RAW, what are they thinking?

Nice that the lens is F/2 at the wide setting.

How about fewer megapixels, say 8 or 10?

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

I have a Panasonic TS-1. It's 12MP, but I have it permanently dialed down to 5MP. The way I shoot it, it makes no difference - just like RAW wouldn't.

The megapixel thing - if you take good NR software to a noisy 12MP image, then resize it to 8MP, you'd get a signigicantly cleaner image than a native 8MP sensor of the same size could give you. You'd get more detail and DR, too.

0 upvotes
OpticGlass
By OpticGlass (May 8, 2012)

No RAW :( No good.

Nice that it has f2 and converter lenses.

But without raw it won't do.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

There's no need for RAW in this type of camera. RAW is beneficial when you take care with your camera settings. No way to do that when you're shooting one-handed, using another hand to hold on to the cliff face (rope, paddle, slope, etc) for dear life.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

BorisK1:

You have no idea what you're talking about, raw is not only used when shooting manual exposure/aperture. RAW is used all the time with the camera set to auto (frequently indicated by the letter P, for program, not A for auto).

Put differently, you can simply set a camera to shoot in raw and leave it to record that way for the next say 5 years. You don't have to do anything to shoot in raw when actually taking the picture.

Go hang off a cliff face with a Canon S95 presetup to shoot raw, and compare the results to any Olympus Tough or some other manufacturer's tough camera.

1 upvote
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

HowaboutRAW: [insults edited out now that I've cooled down]

Look, I've used both DSLRs and rugged cameras for many years.

If you're hoping to use RAW processing to get additional quality from those ragged cams, that's not going to work - the image quality is usually limited by the shooting style.

You won't beat the built-in image correction, too - the shots are much more processed (and the raw would be much dirtier) than what you're used to seing in enthusiast cameras.

You might be able to fix whilte balance a bit easier, and that's about it.

Comment edited 15 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

BorisK1–

Don’t really care if you have handled a DSLR that doesn’t mean you know how to use it, you still clearly don’t know what raw can do; having four times the data of jpeg sure helps with noise, exposure and colour control, camera size is immaterial.

Below you made a perfectly valid point about why a zoom lens that extends on a camera like the Canon S90 would not work on this Olympus (or really any tough camera), but you need to pick up something like an S90 and shoot raw and jpeg with it and look at the stupendously better results in raw.

And binning a say 10MP output jpeg down to a 5MP output jpeg is not going to make a raw image.

Yes, I full well get that a physically bigger sensor also contributes to higher image quality, but that doesn’t mean that throwing out three quarters of the data from a tiny sensor is a good idea.

0 upvotes
happypoppeye
By happypoppeye (May 8, 2012)

I'm with Boris ...and add - this camera isn't intended for a RAW type purpose shooter ...it's a p&S and raw would be a wasted option for 99% of users thus probably a good business choice to leave it out

3 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

HowaboutRAW: In other words, I was correct, and you haven't used a rugged cam. That explains why someone would start throwing around insults all of the sudden. It's the embarassment of being caught with your pants down.

Well, these things happen. Don't let it get to you.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

BorisK1–

Gee where did you get the idea that I don't own a rugged camera? Clearly you didn't read further down where I note owning a waterproof Pentax (a W30 which I’ve had since it was new in like 2006 or 7). I’ve sure wished this Pentax shot in raw, like my newish Panasonic LX5 does. (Yes, I know that the Panasonic has a slightly bigger sensor than the Pentax.)

P&S or not, raw helps.

You still clearly don’t understand the advantages of raw. That there are more advantages with a APSC sensor I don’t dispute.

Try getting decent raw extraction software and then get some Canon S95 raws and jpegs of the same scene, then extract the raws, you’ll see a big difference and perhaps learn something.

It sure reads like you've never bothered to try raw on a raw capable P&S.

(A lot of terrible food is defended by claims of what people can taste and smell. And yes, I’m someone who can hear how bad digital audio sounds compared to half decent vinyl.)

Many hide behind the term of insult.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

@happypoppeye:

How do you know that no one would use raw on this camera, why then does Canon sell the S100? Your 99 percent claim is based on nothing and is in fact probably incorrect.

(If you mean that a typical tourist at a beach would not use raw, say so, if you mean that a gear head mountain biker would not use raw on a tough camera, then you’re making a preposterous claim.)

Note well how many others in these comments have called attention to the lack of a raw capacity on this Olympus.

0 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (May 9, 2012)

This (and all rugged) camera is a total FAILURE without offering RAW.
RAW, in my opinion, is an absolute essential in ANY camera, regardless of how many people choose to use it.
EVERY camera produces a raw file (how do you think the camera generates it jpg?), but then throws it away without regard to the users needs. Sheer stupidity.

2 upvotes
hahaha
By hahaha (May 8, 2012)

small sensor camera = phone
LOL
Just go taking pictures underwater with your phone, iPhone whatever
Show me any tough waterproof & shockproof phone with nice camera. I use Sonim LR, the camera sucks. Maybe the next G Shock Android phone, but I won't believe it until I see it :)

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

Most phones don't have zoom lenses. The dimensions of this sensor are likely bigger than almost all phones' cameras.

With an iPhone there's no SD card one can take out.

I have yet to see an phone camera that can beat my 6 year old Pentax waterproof pocket digicam.

2 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (May 8, 2012)

Nokia 808?

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

That Sonim's camera has a fixed slow no-zoom, no-focus lens, and an obsolete 2MP sensor 1/4 the area of the TG-1's, with no way to control your picture and very little post-shot image correction. It's /designed/ to suck.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

peevee1:

Yes probably bigger dimensions that the Nokia 808, you've confused pixel count with size--it's a big mistake.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (May 8, 2012)

How many 2m falls to concrete do the phones withstand?

1 upvote
peevee1
By peevee1 (May 8, 2012)

The last type of compact camera which still makes some sense for a modern cameraphone owner. But they could put bigger sensor there, the 4x zoom is nothing special.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

bigger sensor either means less zoom (fine with me) or a bigger more expensive lens to equal the same capacities.

0 upvotes
peevee1
By peevee1 (May 8, 2012)

XZ-1 also has 4x zoom. Canon S100 has 5x zoom, and the camera is tiny. Small sensor does not make sense anymore because the abilities will not be significantly better than a phone, and phones are bought anyway and subsidized by subscriptions.
Then, larger sensor have higher latitude for digital zoom.

0 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

peevee1, that S100 has a lens that protrudes far outside of the main camera body. Such a design would make it pretty much useless as a rugged cam.
The only way TG-1 could have had a large sensor, is if it disposed with the optical zoom altogether - and that would've put a huge limitation on its usability.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

peevee1:

Read what BorisK1 wrote, or examine--in person--a toughened pocket camera along with a Canon S100.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (May 8, 2012)

A waterproof camera needs to have internal zooming like an AW100 or TS4, because a telescoping zoom lens is significantly more difficult to make water-sealed. That's the main reason for the 1/2.3" sensor.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (May 8, 2012)

Don't expect any compact camera with a smallish sensor to top a Canon S100, Panasonic LX5, or Olympus XZ-1.

What you see here is designed to be the cream of the underwater camera crop. Rather than compare it to high end enthusiast models, try comparing it to other underwater cameras.

This camera is a nice big step over the Olympus Tough 810.... at the exact same list price!

As far as their financial problems go, I think Olympus keeps demonstrating that their designers and engineers are a lot better at their jobs than their previous Board of Directors was.

19 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

But the Canon S100 does not have an internal zoom, nor is it waterproof.

And search as I have no one here but you mentioned the Canon S100.

0 upvotes
Kirppu
By Kirppu (May 8, 2012)

I think they don't bother to make any better underwater cameras for the enthusiast is because there probably ain't that much of a demand for those kind of things. And those who go deep and need better gear there's always the underwater housing option.

Just my tougths...

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (May 8, 2012)

Kirppu:

RAW is a simple software tweak, and memory cards are cheap now, unlike 10 years ago. You can download that exact software tweak for Canon P&Ss which only shoot jpeg (no, this is not Canon approved software, but it works).

And an underwater housing for a Panasonic LX5--besides being big and not pocketable--costs more than the camera.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
BorisK1
By BorisK1 (May 8, 2012)

Kirppu:
Like I said elsewhere, TG-1 doesn't have a way to control an external flash. I've never been below 3-4 meters deep, but my understanding is, it gets quite dark further down. You need a much more advanced rig to take pictures there.

0 upvotes
Kirppu
By Kirppu (May 9, 2012)

I think it's just weird how often the raw option have been disabled by the manufacturer.

0 upvotes
Kirppu
By Kirppu (May 9, 2012)

to: BorisK1

First thing that comes to my mind when I see these underwater point and shoot cameras are the crystal clear waters from holiday resort on some exotic far away place.

What comes to my mind from the real underwater photography is dark murky waters of deep sea dives. To me those are two totally different sittuations and the underwater PS cameras are made for the first situation in my opinion.

0 upvotes
spitsi
By spitsi (May 8, 2012)

It sounds interesting. an alternative choice with good characteristics. I would like to see some tests and image samples. Also i am wondering if olympus plans to renew the XZ-1 with another more innovative?

0 upvotes
ovatab
By ovatab (May 8, 2012)

There is "MAGIC" shooting mode on the dial!
Opposite to iAuto.

1 upvote
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