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Canon acknowledges 'light leak' in the EOS 5D Mark III

By dpreview staff on Apr 16, 2012 at 18:20 GMT
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Canon has published a product advisory notice acknowledging the existence of a 'light leak' issue on the EOS 5D Mark III. Users of the camera have reported that in dark conditions, switching on the top-LCD's back-illumination or shining a light on it alters the camera's metering, suggesting light is leaking into the body and reaching the metering sensor. The company says it is investigating the problem and possible countermeasures, and will make further announcements once a decision has been made on resolving the issue. The full advisory note is on the Canon USA website. Petapixel reported on the issue and has linked to user videos which illustrate the problem.

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Comments

Total comments: 282
12
abi170845
By abi170845 (Apr 17, 2012)

meh, a mint, yuppy owned low mileage 5dmk2 in my country is already hitting u$1200!

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Apr 17, 2012)

Sold mine for over $1900. Bought the mk III and both seller and buyer are happy. The end.

0 upvotes
nomiss777
By nomiss777 (Apr 17, 2012)

Well at least Canon has the balls to acknowledge their mistakes and willing to fix it. The ones who acknowledge their mistakes first are always the bravest. I don't see Nikon acknowledging any of the problems associated with the Nikon D800.

4 upvotes
AnHund
By AnHund (Apr 17, 2012)

Yes, Canon is the big winner here. Nikon should be ashamed not to admit all the faults with the d800. I have heard the lenses are falling of when shooting and the flash may catapult into space when opened. It also doesn't take real film only crappy digital images. Wow :-)

7 upvotes
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 17, 2012)

D800 CLS failures is actually a far bigger problem than bad exposure of lens cap photos. A studio camera that fails on flash systems, the bread and butter of studio photographers. Been reported for weeks, yet, no advisories have been made by Nikon. I expect that they will silently implement a firmware. Nikon never admits to faults in their system. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RJ6jgKWsgo

Now bringing this back to perspective. Most professionals use RadioPoppers or PWs to trigger. but there are some that still use pure CLS. Regardless, this is a design flaw, from an early unit. It will be corrected at some point through firmware updates. No one is a winner here. Both of these cameras came out at the same time with their own set of problems.

Seems a double standard is here.... if it is Canon, it's a fail, if it is Nikon, it's not an issue? Common on you trolls, no one is winning this. They are both great cameras, and equal to each other, also equal in problems.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
nicolaiecostel
By nicolaiecostel (Apr 18, 2012)

@Kinematic: dude, who woud use CLS in the studio ? do you think your subjects will enjoy being flashed straight in the retina ? I doubt. No one uses the CLS unless they forgot their Pocket Wizards at home.

1 upvote
philo123
By philo123 (Apr 18, 2012)

Look. ALL manufacturers in the electronics industry make mistakes. I worked in the industry for 15 years to realise that it's very common with new models. It's the way the company deals with the issue that should be measured here. As an aside, the best time to buy something is at the end of it's model run as all issues have been ironed out by then. Now a D700 and 5DMkII will give you years of trouble free shooting, so grab a bargain. :-)

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 19, 2012)

@nicolaiecostel well Joe Mcnally for starters.... but I guess he's not a professional studio photographer.

1 upvote
XmanX
By XmanX (Apr 17, 2012)

Can anyone tell me where all the Nikon users hang out when they need a break from shooting epic pictures?

5 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 19, 2012)

on the repair shop waiting for their D5000´s

http://www.nikonusa.com/Service-And-Support/Service-Advisories/gezwvxil/D5000-Service-Advisory.html

0 upvotes
Janice Ann
By Janice Ann (Apr 21, 2012)

Right in line after all the Canon users getting their cameras repaired.

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 17, 2012)

I should point out that there's a real simple temporary work around to this problem.

1. Hit and hold the * button on the back (also known as the AE lock button - you can also reassign this to the DoF button which I find easier to handle and leaves the right hand free to adjust things).
2. Hit the illumination button to inspect the top LCD Screen.
3. With your left hand, adjust the Ev/Aperture wheel to adjust your exposure bias.

Other than needing two hands to get your exposure correctly (if you're super agile you could do it with one hand and the half press on the shutter) it's not all that hard to deal with this until Canon has issued a fix if it's a service recall or firmware.

If you really rely on that illumination button, then this is probably the best solution for now. Alternatively, you could also use your left thumb to hit and hold the * button, leaving your right hand to operate the camera as usual.

Happy shooting lens caps.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Alejandro del Pielago
By Alejandro del Pielago (Apr 17, 2012)

So good the Canon 5Ds are !!!

They present "epic fails" but allow to get extraordinary images all the time !!!!

0 upvotes
Tmphoto55
By Tmphoto55 (Apr 17, 2012)

You can say what you want the 5DMKII is still the best camera .Althoght
the 5DMKIII is not enough for me to upgrade .

0 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Apr 17, 2012)

I have the MKIII and I would have NEVER noticed this "problem". If canon has a fix that requires me to ship it in for a week or so...i will just keep my camera as is. Its not a big deal.

2 upvotes
Photoman
By Photoman (Apr 16, 2012)

Canon 5DMK1 - Mirror falls out - Fail!
Canon 5DMKII - Didn't upgrade AF - Big Fail!
Canon 5DMKIII - Light Leak?! - EPIC FAIL!!!!

Bahahahahahahha......You just made my day Canon.
Have been selling your cameras for a long time now and I
have seen the quality of your cameras going down Canon,
over the years. At least it wasn't a shutter fail like you XXD DSLR's.
Bring on the next failure Canon!

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 17, 2012)

This post is an epic fail.... every manufacturer has had issues.

Recent History:
Pentax K5 - LCD Issues, Oil on Sensors DoA units
Nikon D7000: Focus issues with AF, Oil on Sensors, DoA Units
Nikon D800: LCD discolouration, CLS failures, Tethering problems, CF Card Failures
Fuji X100: AF issues, UI performance issues
Fuji X10: White Orbs.
Sony A77: Noisy sensors

So I say the whole industry is as big as a failure as your posting. Everyone has production issues in the beginning. It's how they deal with it. Some companies never acknowledge that there were issues (many of the above listed ones in fact). I've heard of reps tell my local stores to keep their lips shut and to stay the party line that there are no problems.

18 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Apr 17, 2012)

Why would this make you--or anyone--happy? I remember selling 5D mk I as fast as we could get them and never once did a mirror fall out. Not yet, anyway. As for the light leak, I thought they meant a light leak, where stray light hits the image. I agree, the AF used to be lousy. Now it's as good as anybody's. I still prefer Nikon for a variety of reasons but even if there was something really serious here, I take no joy in someone else's misfortune.

Comment edited 50 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
Alejandro del Pielago
By Alejandro del Pielago (Apr 17, 2012)

So good the Canon 5Ds are !!!

They present "epic fails" but allow to get extraordinary and epic images !!!!

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Photoman
By Photoman (Apr 17, 2012)

I agree other brand have failures as well (and some glorious!), but this not a cheap 600D/1100D camera. This is aimed at the pros and should be tested to the highest degree before being released. It would be nice for Canon to get one 5D right. At least the AF has been upgraded.

3 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 17, 2012)

photoman .. or another idiot is outing himself.

you are 12 years old i guess... so where will you work ?
at foxconn?

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2005/9/28/nikonadvisory

http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/content_page.asp?cid=7-10041-10178

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 7 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Photoman
By Photoman (Apr 18, 2012)

Oh Mr Hertz, I think you outed yourself as a Canon troll?! If I'm I'm 12, it means I joined dpreview when I was born...I have been selling cameras for about 18 years now (have you sold cameras?) and over time I have noticed quality of Canon cameras declining with respect to shutter failures (our rental cameras and photography dept cameras shutters keep failing, but not Nikon), Canon customers saying they know that a certain % (eg. 20-80%) of photos will be out of focus (which Canon repairs say there are in factory spec), plus lack of support from Canon Reps.

You can see my reasons for lack of respect for a company, that seem to put profits before quality. They also do back deals with certain companies in my country as well as govt depts, which cuts out photo dealers chance of selling to these clients.

So when I see a Canon do a great big fail (brings a smile to my face!), it reminds me of the words of a famous American ......
"Ha Haw!"

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 19, 2012)

Photoman, if you're in retail then you would know the real track record. From two of the major chain retail outlets, who I have a commercial relationship with and send my students to, have accounted for more failures from aperture failures from Nikon Lens than any other lens system. If you truly work in retail then you'd see this. Canon's biggest issues are usually related to back focus issues with their non-L lenses, and with Sony, the problems are usually related to focus issues as well.

None of these are desirable, but at my suppliers, they see about 3-4 Nikons going in for repairs per week vs 1 Canon every 2 weeks.

Last year when the D7000 came out, In a one month span, there were over 25% of them returned because of oil on the sensors and focus issues. I have rarely seen Canon lenses come in for repairs, but every week I would see one or two Nikon failed apertures get sent in.

So you claim to work in retail, then you'd also see the same failure rate as I.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Iamzing
By Iamzing (Apr 19, 2012)

It just sounded like these Nikon lens are being used more :P

0 upvotes
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Apr 21, 2012)

@photoman you either lie with a purpose or you are very uneducated. i don´t know what it is but your simply wrong.
and i doubt that a resellers can have an stupid attitude like you towards a company that makes him money.
so i guess you are just keep telling bull. im right?

nikon is the company who will not sell parts to smaller companys. so nikon is the company who cuts of resellers.
if you had any clue about reselling you would know that.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/03/12/Nikon-cuts-out-independent-service-companies

second point is that nikon has much more problems with lenses then canon. but that is not going blown out of proportion like this small canon issue.

about gov. deals etc.... did you notice the US military uses nikon?
did you notice the nikon product placement in hollywood movies and TV shows (CSI las vegas) ?

the pot calling the kettle black.... you are just a troll in my honest opinion.

Comment edited 4 times, last edit 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Janice Ann
By Janice Ann (Apr 21, 2012)

Henry and Gothmoth, please just shut up. I am getting tired of flagging your nasty abusive posts.

And please stop calling people who don't agree with you trolls.

That is the pot calling the kettle black.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
Gothmoth
By Gothmoth (Apr 21, 2012)

well 12 month and all you replys are to me or henry and with no value.... so who is the troll here? just check his DPR stats.... he is a sad joke.

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 16, 2012)

Does anyone actually trust a reflective light meter below 1 lumen or a couple of seconds? There's a reason why I keep an exposure-mat calculator in my wallet.

1 upvote
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 16, 2012)

Was trying to figure out why my Lens Cap photos were always underexposed.

Thank goodness Canon has given me something else to blame when my photos look like crap.

Can we say that people are trying to make a mountain out of mole hill... I shoot in low light and in bright sunlight, never a single metering error. It's solid and although there are some people who still use the top LCD. I get everything I need on the live view when I'm on a tripod anyhow.

Canon acknowledges it, and for those that find great issues with it, probably will get an exchange. For those that don't take big issue of it, they will issue a firmware that will correct for it when the illumination button is hit.

1 upvote
Lenny L
By Lenny L (Apr 16, 2012)

There will always be those who love to gloat. I'm sure a number of Canon users do the same thing whenever Nikon has an issue with a camera or lens.

2 upvotes
raincoat
By raincoat (Apr 16, 2012)

You don't find it disturbing that years after the 1st pinhole camera you STILL can't make a solid light box?

Overheating causing sensor lines etc I can understand, but sealing the edge of the top LCD shouldn't be that hard.

2 upvotes
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 17, 2012)

Of course it's disturbing. But thats the price of buying early in a production run. It doesn't affect any of my photos, and the way that other sites have demonstrated the problem is like sticking your camera in the oven and saying it overheats. I've yet to see a realistic application of the camera where this is a problem. I'm at 3200 exposures, both in hard sunlight and in long exposure and never an issue.

It doesn't mean it should be ignored, but this defect is overblown. Will I get mine fixed if they issue a recall, of course I will, but I'm not losing sleep over this minor issue.

0 upvotes
Alejandro del Pielago
By Alejandro del Pielago (Apr 17, 2012)

Yes, Kinematic, always I´d rather wait some time until the production is very stable and any issue be fixed...

1 upvote
Mr Fartleberry
By Mr Fartleberry (Apr 16, 2012)

Hahahahahahahah let Fakechuck Westfall know.

http://fakechuckwestfall.wordpress.com/author/fcwestfall/

Better luck with those new movie cameras Chucky Baby!

1 upvote
Superka
By Superka (Apr 16, 2012)

If it affects Metering only, its really not a problem. But if leaking photons reaches sensor, it can influence long exposure shots.

1 upvote
mr.izo
By mr.izo (Apr 16, 2012)

now, check all cameras for this, i'm sure that 80% would show this problem. heck, that's why there's that rubber on shoulder strap..

3 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 17, 2012)

Much prefer Nikon eyepiece shutter to "that rubber on the shoulder strap". Way more elegant implementation for blocking light in AE than a piece of plastic attached to the strap.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 16, 2012)

Not a very important issue but must be fixed. It is natural that any recent released product shows some minor errors mainly in software but this one if really it is a light leakage is a building defect. A cap in the strap is provided to cover viewfinder in case of live view under direct sunlight entering viewfinder. So we already know that light could alter exposure meter in live view when direct ligt source enter the unprotected viefinder in live view mode. I wonder why MKIII is more priced than Nikon D800 although it has less pixels than it. Is it not that intriguing?

2 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Apr 16, 2012)

Canon had the advantage of massive amounts of customer input as to what the Mk2 buyers wanted fixed or added to its feature set. No one was complaining about the image quality and resolution of the Mk2. So Canon was free to address other concerns like better optical viewfinder, autofocus, burst rate, higher ISO, build quality, and tweaks to the video side, especially with regard to the Mk3's in camera software. Nikon was fishing in a new pond for them, so they went for the "Hail Mary" of massive resolution at a lower price point. Both the 5D Mk3 and D800 should do very well in the marketplace, but with different customers and for different reasons.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Dougbm_2
By Dougbm_2 (Apr 17, 2012)

Why would you price a camera on the MP alone?

3 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Apr 17, 2012)

What I'm saying is: Canon is so confident in its product that priced it at a higher level than the one of its strong competitor: Nikon. Is Canon besides a respected brand a griffe to its customers? I'm a Canon customer.

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Apr 17, 2012)

I'm guessing that Nikon chose its price point for the D800 believing that the pixel counters will buy their product in much greater numbers than normal, especially since pixel count is still the most important spec for some buyers no matter what the other specs are about. I think Canon took a more conservative view of the marketplace and priced their product accordingly. Neither company wants to gouge its customer, but they don't want to go broke either.

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Apr 16, 2012)

We are proud to announce that this 5D Mk3 light leak disaster has been brought to your attention by those very same folks who figured out a way to make their record players (remember those) play records backwards so they could hear Satan speaking :)

1 upvote
ThrashingMoses
By ThrashingMoses (Apr 16, 2012)

My Holga has light leaks too.

9 upvotes
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Apr 16, 2012)

Not if you tape it up with gaffer tape! And cover the red window on the back. You can add the light leaks back in with Photoshop (cough).

0 upvotes
Shunda77
By Shunda77 (Apr 16, 2012)

This camera is hopeless for lens cap photography!!! What do we have to do to get a decent camera that can take a good picture of the inside of a lens cap!!!!!!!!!
Arrrrrgggghhhhh!!!!!!!

13 upvotes
Locker1984
By Locker1984 (Apr 16, 2012)

In viewing the "sunlight" proof videos don't you have to have the lens cap on and light starve the camera for the exposures being shown in the videos? Can this be recreated in the sunlight with a lens cap off?

For the record I have the Mk3 camera, I can recreate the LCD light change in the AE as indicated, but I've been shooting it since debut and I cannot tell it appart from my 5D2/40D in a negative way for an exposure error or light leak on any of my files. If Canon recalls I may send it in one day but this doesn't appear to effect my normal or lowlight use. I've shot at low EV requireing 25,600 ISO and the shots are bang on for the exposure.

I guess if they recall I'll send it in someday, I usually send my gear in for a clean and check once a year anyhow...but it doesn't appear to be an immediate need at the moment for me.

1 upvote
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Apr 16, 2012)

LOL CANON'S FINISHED NOW! GOODBYE TO THE OLD DINOSAUR! LONG LIVE SONY!

2 upvotes
Sordid
By Sordid (Apr 16, 2012)

There's something wrong with your keyboard.
And while I do actually do use Sony, I doubt Canon will have major issues caused by this.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Apr 16, 2012)

Seriously....

0 upvotes
JensR
By JensR (Apr 16, 2012)

I detect a sarcasm leak here.

2 upvotes
sween sunny
By sween sunny (Apr 16, 2012)

Sony! Bah ha ha ha ha.

0 upvotes
Chris_in_Osaka
By Chris_in_Osaka (Apr 16, 2012)

Sony? They've got bigger problems than light leaks. Don't you read the news? "Long live.." is a funny expression to use for a company that just lost $6.4 billion, has just announced the first cut of 10,000 workers etc etc.

1 upvote
skrulm8
By skrulm8 (Apr 16, 2012)

The 550D is leaking from the viewfinder pretty massively. That's it, I want my money back! After taking thousands of shots without a problem I suddenly realized the camera's unusable.

6 upvotes
SDPharm
By SDPharm (Apr 16, 2012)

> The 550D is leaking from the viewfinder pretty massively.

That's a feature in many cameras. I'm not sure about recent DSLRs, but I remember that my old Canon manual specifically said you have to cover the viewfinder when using self timer. In fact the camera strap doubled as a viewfinder cover.

0 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Apr 16, 2012)

Ok folks, who are the people with the flashlights and too much time on their hands? :)

6 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 16, 2012)

You've never heard of Astrophotography, or simply people with poor eyesight who need to illuminate the top LCD panel to see it better?

2 upvotes
abracadabenhotmailfr
By abracadabenhotmailfr (Apr 16, 2012)

who does astro photography with AE on? noobies?

3 upvotes
sravpes
By sravpes (Apr 16, 2012)

Unboxing Canon 5D Mark III: manuals, body, soft, cables, stripe, black duct tape, ...

10 upvotes
Henrik NJ
By Henrik NJ (Apr 16, 2012)

A lot of people obviosly bought a camera they in reality couldn't afford. I've seen a lot of the "affected" people wanting Canon to cut $1000 off the price.

The problem also exists on some 5D2 and on my 60D, and has never been a problem. It exists on several Nikon's too if you test by shooting the inside of a lenscap at ISO 800 or above. Lokk it up on Vimeo or Youtube.

I'm still in the market for a 5D3 when it hits the retailers shelfs here in Denmark.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 16, 2012)

Do you have links to the Nikon DSLRs that have light leaks? If not, it never happened.

5 upvotes
picassos camera
By picassos camera (Apr 16, 2012)

Also, while you're at it, give me the links to the Canon product advisory notices for the other bodies that have this problem too.

0 upvotes
abracadabenhotmailfr
By abracadabenhotmailfr (Apr 16, 2012)

I posted a link showing light leak on the Nikon 24-70 but dpr removed my post... :D

0 upvotes
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 16, 2012)

My D700 would go completely white after 30 second exposure if there was light shining into the viewfinder and you didn't put the eyefinder shutter down. The 5Dmk2 takes about 2-3 minutes before you see some leakage of light, but there's a reason why both have countermeasures to deal with that, however Nikon is worse as the seals on the mirror doesn't protect the sensor from light leaks. In the case of Canon, the countermeasures are there so you can meter correctly and less on leakage through the mirror seal.

1 upvote
raincoat
By raincoat (Apr 16, 2012)

Kinematic Digit that's very interesting. Too bad we're talking about METERING errors from leaks in the TOP LCD (a design DEFECT)

and not light entering the viewfinder during long exposure (a KNOWN and EXPECTED effect of not using the viewfinder cap)

0 upvotes
BPJosh
By BPJosh (Apr 16, 2012)

http://vimeo.com/40042270

0 upvotes
Kinematic Digit
By Kinematic Digit (Apr 17, 2012)

Raincoat I know what the issue is here, and for the past couple of days I've done my own testing. The issue only comes up if the illumination light has been triggered. A minor issue. It's like saying you have a 6th toe. Of all the people I know that do long exposure shooting, none of us use the top LCD screens. We all do calculations from our charts. Those that don't use charts, use the back LCD Screen, and third, those that don't do any of those do multiple shots/bracket their best guess. I've also tested in low light and direct sunlight and none of that affects the meter. This is a minor design flaw and it will be corrected. In the mean time, it's just lovely Troll food to banter about.

0 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Apr 16, 2012)

Relax people..This is Canon's take on Leica's Noctilux concept.

0 upvotes
drwho9437
By drwho9437 (Apr 16, 2012)

Pretty much a non-issue issue. Mostly because if you are shooting at something dark there isn't enough light to go into LCD to change the metering. You have to have something bright while shooting in the blackest possible conditions. In normal conditions this effect won't change the metering even 1/3 of a stop...

So it is a bit silly. The only time this would maybe be an issue is if you do use the backlight in the dark on a tripod to check the exposure I guess. In that case you might want to look through the finder to change the exposure or use the LCD quick menu...

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 16, 2012)

exactly ... most who think this is an real life issue never touched an 5D MK3.

when i read that the LCD cause underexposure in sunlight i can only laugh. not even on night shots.
i had the 5D MK3 from my brother for 9 day and metering was spot on. i tested it for the LCD "issue".

and honest who uses the LCD light in bright sunlight?
these people are just lying or making things up i bet.

80% are nikon trolls who are more then happy to write something negativ about canon.

8 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 16, 2012)

Yes, what a bizarre use-case: shooting on a tripod at night. Are you serious? Tons of people do this kind of photography, in fact Canon just released a 60D specifically for Astrophotography.

If you can't use the LCD Top Panel in all situations, you might as well leave it off like Sony does.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
BPJosh
By BPJosh (Apr 16, 2012)

http://vimeo.com/40042270

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Apr 16, 2012)

I'd say this is an inexcusable defect for a $3500 camera. And it will be pretty expensive to fix, since a "firmware upgrade" can't do the work of a light seal. I imagine that all the 5DIIIs sold will have to be shipped back for a modification now.

Canon simply must do better quality control testing.
It's really a lot cheaper to get it right the first time.

10 upvotes
skrulm8
By skrulm8 (Apr 16, 2012)

I will be very surprised if 9/10 DSLRs on the market don't have the same "problem". Nobody's had it affect their photos.

0 upvotes
morganb
By morganb (Apr 16, 2012)

@skrulm8 you cannot seriously believe that 90% of DSLR's have light-leak issues? and it just shouldnt happen on a pro-level. ever.

0 upvotes
raincoat
By raincoat (Apr 16, 2012)

skrulm8 sure 90% of all DSLRs in the history of all DSLRs have the same problem, but the population of this planet decided to keep quiet until 2wks after the 5D3 launch just so they can pick on Canon.

OK I get it now. World conspiracy.

0 upvotes
Dougbm_2
By Dougbm_2 (Apr 17, 2012)

Check out BPJosh's link and it shows how it causes underexposure.

0 upvotes
doctorbza
By doctorbza (Apr 16, 2012)

i own this camera. i can see this issue when i toggle the LCD light in a completely dark room. i can see how it would be an issue for people who do a lot of night/tripod work.

in my every day shooting, even in very low light, there is absolutely no effect from this. metering is perfectly fine. i've also not seen any effect of direct sunlight changing my metering.

is there an issue? yes. is it a big one? it depends on what you shoot. is canon going to fix it? apparently, since they've issued an advisory. is this something to have a heart attack over? no. is the camera fantastic? yes.

12 upvotes
Ecorone
By Ecorone (Apr 16, 2012)

heh, you posted at about the same time as me, with almost the same message. Great minds?

0 upvotes
Ecorone
By Ecorone (Apr 16, 2012)

I don't understand why some people feel the need to completely downplay the problem or others to blow things out of proportion.

It's a problem that exists. For me, in bright sunlight, some pictures do get slightly underexposed because of the light leak when the sun shines on the top lcd. In response, I can bump up the exposure compensation by 1/3 or correct it in post.

When doing dark long exposure shots, for now, you can make test shots and adjust using the histogram or use a light meter for more accuracy.

Yes, it is a problem that shouldn't have occurred but the workaraounds to let you keep on taking great pictures aren't difficult. Canon isn't denying the problem exists, and furthermore, they said that they'll fix it... so, why all the big fuss?

2 upvotes
DWR0082
By DWR0082 (Apr 17, 2012)

Because current owners don't want to feel bad about their purchase (so they defend it to the nth degree) while the Nikon shooters are relishing in their (supposed) misery. Human nature.

0 upvotes
Maritn Edwards
By Maritn Edwards (Apr 16, 2012)

Unbelievable and extremely shoddy of Canon.

This is a major issue - incorrect exposures v. likely in my experience. Very easy to get stray light impacting exposure values. This is a camera to steer clear of with a barge pole.

What a shambles.

11 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 16, 2012)

steer clear with a barghe pole.. what a nonsense.
i bet you did not even bother to read what this is about....

3 upvotes
fotolopithecus
By fotolopithecus (Apr 19, 2012)

This is bad, very bad. I have a feeling this might necessitate a recall. To their credit Canon has jumped on this fast, rather than denying there's a problem. If I were planning to buy one of these I'd wait for the fix.

0 upvotes
senn_b
By senn_b (Apr 16, 2012)

quite a minor issue, .. far from being decisive in any respect ..

(from a no Canon user)

0 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 16, 2012)

Until you have a shoot in low light and your metering is off by 2/3 stop....

4 upvotes
abracadabenhotmailfr
By abracadabenhotmailfr (Apr 16, 2012)

the 5d mark ii is well known for underexposing by 2/3 to 1 stop under low light as well.... I don't really see a problem. and it only happens when lcd is on and in very low light conditions

1 upvote
Lenny L
By Lenny L (Apr 16, 2012)

To Just a Photographer : when I'm shooting in low light, I don't usually have my LCD light on while doing auto exposure. And I always take some test shots to check the AE setting, and adjust accordingly, because AE can be off for any number of reasons.

1 upvote
Rubenski
By Rubenski (Apr 16, 2012)

I'm going to sell all my L lenses and jump to Nikon (...in my next life).

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 16, 2012)

At least it's weather sealed. 1 out of 2 is not bad.

9 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 16, 2012)

i guess this is really only a issue for NIKON shooter, who usually shoot with the lens cap on, who switched to canon.....

i have tested the 5D MK3 and while i noticed the behavior.... it does not matter if you have a lens on your camera (and of course no lens cap on the lens).

i have not noticed any wrong metering on night shots.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
altenae
By altenae (Apr 16, 2012)

Same here.
I am happy I shoot only with the lenscap not attached

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Apr 16, 2012)

Henry, Henry, Henry. I think your mom tied off your diapers too tight. Nikon has nothing to do with this. It's interesting to see how Canon users are approaching the issue, but otherwise none of my business or the business of any Nikon shooter.

2 upvotes
Donnie G
By Donnie G (Apr 16, 2012)

Imagine the scene at the factory with everybody casting dirty looks in the direction of the new guy :)

7 upvotes
Tape5
By Tape5 (Apr 16, 2012)

I disagree Donnie. Imagine holes in the ceilings at Nikon HQ from the Champagne corks.

7 upvotes
TOTAALFOTOGRAFIE
By TOTAALFOTOGRAFIE (Apr 18, 2012)

I recieved my camera today, but I didn't noticed some problems. Maybe because were in Europe and have another type? Anyway, I wil put some samples today on my website www.totaalfotografie.nl

0 upvotes
mister_roboto
By mister_roboto (Apr 16, 2012)

Wow- a legit holga art filter that uses real light leaks ;)

10 upvotes
openskyline
By openskyline (Apr 16, 2012)

How many of you actually use the Light on/off button in your life time? I am not saying that it shouldn't be fixed, but it's not a major issue like the focus problem of 1D MKIII before. BTW, I owned 1D MKIII and I went through the paint, and I have 5D MKIII too, I don't even care to repeat the test.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 23 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Lenny L
By Lenny L (Apr 16, 2012)

I use it a fair bit, actually, but I don't have it on when doing auto exposure. I also don't use AE much when shooting in extremely low light.

I'm more concerned about if it affects AE under sunlight (and if so, how much). At this point I'm assuming that the light leak only affects the AE sensor and doesn't leak onto the image sensor.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 16, 2012)

If you've ever done any night photography, you use it all the time. How else do you read the top panel?

2 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Apr 16, 2012)

You need to go to the Petapixel website and see the user videos of this problem. This is NOT a problem that happens only in the dark or by illuminating the screen.

One video shows the problem in broad daylight, caused by the sun hitting the LCD screen on the top of the camera. The user waves a card over the LCD screen, alternately shading it and exposing it to sunlight, and you can see the metering change.

By the way, I don't own Canon (or Nikon), so I could care less. I own an E-510 and G2. If this happened to one of my cameras, they would be like, "What do you expect? You only paid $xxx!" I think it is kind of funny here.

7 upvotes
MediaDigitalVideo
By MediaDigitalVideo (Apr 16, 2012)

@ bobbarber, than it would be nice if the symbols on the pushbuttons where transparent and had backlight too. Think even the EOS-60Da (astro-photography) doesn't have that.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 16, 2012)

bobbarber.. maybe it´s in the sunshine.... but he has the lens cap on.
so the camera thinks it´s dark. the camera can only "see" through a lens you know...

i have done night shots with my brothers 5D MK3.... i don´t know what the fuss is about.
it did not affect the images i have taken.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
openskyline
By openskyline (Apr 16, 2012)

Please read the test again Bobbarber, the lightleak under direct sunlight is only shown with a "LENS CAP" on. I guess that you can take a real good photo with your "LENS CAP" on to care about the meter reading :) :) :)

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 16, 2012)

and who uses the LCD light in sunlight?
hell people...... you are really nuts.

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Apr 16, 2012)

Henry and others,

You are correct that nobody would ever shoot the back of their lens cap, but that is beside the point. Covering the lens was the only way to demonstrate that the light that was affecting the metering was entering through the LCD screen and not the lens. You have to control conditions to reach a valid conclusion.

I believe the shooters here who own the camera and say it's probably no big deal. I'm not trying to cause a fuss. If you look in the video, you can see the shutter speed changing from 6 seconds to 4 seconds in response to the light, or something like that, which is what, a third of a stop? That is probably too little to make a difference in most conditions.

0 upvotes
openskyline
By openskyline (Apr 16, 2012)

@bobbarber, we all know and confirm that the lightleak is there, but it's only happen in the total darkness. Your point is valid, but it's not a big deal, that's it.

0 upvotes
vikcious
By vikcious (Apr 16, 2012)

Guys!

The "light leak" problem does not only occur in "low light" but also in sunlight / very bright conditions! This is a serious warning!
Please check the link below for proof:
http://www.weddingstaff.ro/2012/04/canon-5d-mark-iii-probleme-la-etansare/

10 upvotes
jon404
By jon404 (Apr 16, 2012)

You could cover it with silver or black duct tape. But, at $3,500, maybe just dip the whole camera in some trendy black shrinkwrap.

1 upvote
celcius
By celcius (Apr 16, 2012)

They ackowledged the fact that the lens had the "bonnet" on and the camera thought it was in the dark.

0 upvotes
facedodge
By facedodge (Apr 16, 2012)

Good to know that the lcd causes exposure problems when I'm taking photos of the back of my lens cap.

Good grief people.

1 upvote
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 16, 2012)

Amazing!

Such a big problem and still defending Canon, while this is clearly a fault by design.

Even if it does not affect you in the shots you made up until now - it might affect you at another shoot.

Pretty stupid imho to not want to acknowledge this problem.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Apr 16, 2012)

in sunligtht when the cap is on.. so the camera thinks is pitch black dark.

but i guess we should not bother you with details....

1 upvote
jon404
By jon404 (Apr 16, 2012)

Oops! I thought that, with the advent of digital, we would never, ever again have to worry about light leaks. Silly me.

Must've been that earthquake -- white spots on Fujis, light leaks on high-end Canons... Japan better get back to their famed quality control, or the Chinese will eat their lunch.

1 upvote
Khizer
By Khizer (Apr 16, 2012)

I have owned Canon EOS film cameras for many years and have been impressed with their robustness. My EOS 10s 35mm film SLR must have done some 500,000 shutter actuations, and still exposes perfectly.
However....present day manufacturing is probably not of the same quality. Last year, I bought the Powershot S100 in January and it has already stopped working due to the notorious 'lens error'. Now we are hearing of light leak in a flagship model.

Maybe it is time I took a punt on Nikon D800 instead of the 5D Mk III. Somebody, tell me I am overreacting.......

5 upvotes
Photoman
By Photoman (Apr 17, 2012)

Your not. Quality of Canon cameras have been going down for years.

1 upvote
Jmmg
By Jmmg (Apr 18, 2012)

Nikon D3X to D4, D700 to D800, D90 to D7000, D3000 to D3100, D5000 to D5100, etc. All have significant improvement from the last generation.

Canon 50D to 60D, 500D to 600D, G12 to G1X, 5DmkII to 5DmkIII, all of them built quality dropped, noise tolerant dropped, Picture sharpness dropped. User friendliness dropped. Don't even mentioning the quality of their lenses...

0 upvotes
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 16, 2012)

An extremely serious issue while Canon is announcing the 1D C.
How come this could happen in a Japanese manufacturing plant? No way!
Canon should immediately take appropriate steps to find out and rectify the problems.
Is there any other malfunction in other models? Canon should have a full check of all product design and manufacturing process; and make prevention for further failure.

1 upvote
Jmmg
By Jmmg (Apr 18, 2012)

Made in Japan doesn't mean a jack shXX anymore, just look at what happen to all those"Made in Japan" Fuji camera...

0 upvotes
D1N0
By D1N0 (Apr 16, 2012)

+1 for people shooting in the dark.

0 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Apr 16, 2012)

Wow ... test engineers never shot the thing in the dark? That's kind of incredible.

0 upvotes
ybizzle
By ybizzle (Apr 16, 2012)

Though clearly a QC issue, it is nice to see that Canon has acknowledged the issue and is working on a fix. Kudos Canon!

2 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 16, 2012)

That fix can only be made by a recall.

Some extra gaskets are needed to keep the light out.

0 upvotes
Samuel Dilworth
By Samuel Dilworth (Apr 16, 2012)

Reminds me of the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 lens, another high-end piece of photographic equipment that the manufacturer forgot to make light-tight.

1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 16, 2012)

Only that never happened. Why make stuff up?

4 upvotes
Just a Photographer
By Just a Photographer (Apr 16, 2012)

Never happened - Why do you make up such lies?

0 upvotes
abracadabenhotmailfr
By abracadabenhotmailfr (Apr 16, 2012)

Nikon USA statement on possible AF-S Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED distance panel light leak

We have received indications that when extremely bright light strikes the lens while shooting at high sensitivities, light other than that passing through the front of the lens may be reflected. This is not a problem with normal shooting and occurs very rarely under very specific conditions.

We value our customer feedback, and if a user is inconvenienced by this issue, they may request an inspection of their lens. If deemed necessary Nikon will take the appropriate steps to address the issue.

0 upvotes
nomiss777
By nomiss777 (Apr 16, 2012)

Oh it happened alright.

0 upvotes
raincoat
By raincoat (Apr 16, 2012)

Yeah, cuz "extremely bright light strikes the lens while shooting at high sensitivities" is exactly as likely as turning on top LCD using built in top LCD light.

0 upvotes
HBowman
By HBowman (Apr 16, 2012)

Epic fail is Epic !

8 upvotes
69chevy
By 69chevy (Apr 16, 2012)

I wouldn't call it epic. It only affects people shooting in the dark. Most photography requires light.

0 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Apr 16, 2012)

@69chevy -- there is plenty of light in the dark. Dark does not mean jet-black. It means at night to capture the moon, the stars, city lights, or whatever you fancy. Having a bright LED leaking onto the meter is going to throw things off a bit. Even concert shooting could be affected. Of course, vacation shooters who like that lovely blazing mid-day sunlight would probably escape serious issues. Are you perhaps suggesting that this is the 5D III's target market?

1 upvote
69chevy
By 69chevy (Apr 16, 2012)

Not suggesting anything. Just said I wouldn't call it EPIC. Canon says they will fix it. I am in the target market, and have never once back-lit my lcd..

0 upvotes
Lenny L
By Lenny L (Apr 16, 2012)

Epic fail is denying there's a problem, and insisting "you're using it wrong". This is certainly a fail, but hardly epic.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
1 upvote
marike6
By marike6 (Apr 16, 2012)

The caveat "it only affects people shooting in the dark" is about the worst excuse ever. If you cannot see the LCD top panel in any kind of light, you might as well not have it there.
No, a light leak in a $3500 DSLR? Whether you call it epic or not, it's pretty bad.

1 upvote
DPRchallenger
By DPRchallenger (Apr 16, 2012)

more expensive than D800 but the most basic testing could have possibly detected it...but what did canon do? shame on you canon.

6 upvotes
kubrik111
By kubrik111 (Apr 16, 2012)

Yes, with D800, Nikon don't test your lens...

http://nikonrumors.com/2012/03/10/nikon-support-nikkor-pc-e-24mm-f3-5d-ed-lens-cannot-be-used-with-shifting-and-tilting-on-the-d800.aspx/

What default is still hidden in D800?

This is ? http://nikonrumors.com/2012/03/27/nikon-d800-issues.aspx/

1 upvote
mpgxsvcd
By mpgxsvcd (Apr 16, 2012)

I am sure Canon will correct this as soon as possible. It is good that they are publicly acknowledging it though.

1 upvote
DuBucha
By DuBucha (Apr 16, 2012)

Agree. Maybe this would be an expensive fix for Canon, but at least they went to public acknowledging this problem.
Diferent from Nikon about the oil spray over the sensor in the D7000 which I never hear any pronunciation about it from Nikon.
(I have a D7000 with this problem and reading a lot of people with the same problem, most of the time I just see that Nikon just did a sensor clean instead to fix the problem).
I'm just waiting to head about people who got the D800 and D4 if this issue will be around again.

0 upvotes
Jmmg
By Jmmg (Apr 18, 2012)

@DuBucha,

Just can't stand for you KINDS---->Canon FANBOY!

I knew also everyone in our local area camera store and before I purchased my wife a D7000, i checked out its repair/ return/ exchange and complain ratio from all my buddies from all those store and the ration of something wrong with the D7000 is like 1 in 130ish units. Meanwhile, the 60D, 5DmkII and the 7D is a almost 50/50 split. Don't tell me all 5 major camera store and most of their sale guy are all NIKON fanboys!

BTW, the D7000 is perfect, no bright spot on live view, no focusing issue, no oil leak,etc. I heard only place like Hong Kong or somewhere hot and humid could cause those kind of issue in ANY electronic products, I live in part of Canada always cool and dry, no issue at all.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Edmond Leung
By Edmond Leung (Apr 16, 2012)

Too bad! What the engineers and production people were doing? The QC and QA were sleeping?

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Photoman
By Photoman (Apr 17, 2012)

Thay must have been drinking together, the night before!

0 upvotes
canonikony
By canonikony (Apr 17, 2012)

its a shame amateurs comment on this page

0 upvotes
D200_4me
By D200_4me (Apr 16, 2012)

A few pieces of black electrical tape will stop the light :-)

0 upvotes
69chevy
By 69chevy (Apr 16, 2012)

The light is coming from inside of the camera.

0 upvotes
D200_4me
By D200_4me (Apr 16, 2012)

They said a flashlight directed at the LCD panel affected the metering too? So that would mean it's making it in from outside too...not just coming from the underside of the backlit LCD.

1 upvote
69chevy
By 69chevy (Apr 16, 2012)

Shining a light on any camera in the dark will affect its metering.

0 upvotes
jon404
By jon404 (Apr 16, 2012)

Cover it in black or silver duct tape; grunge is stylish.

0 upvotes
Roy Niswanger
By Roy Niswanger (Apr 17, 2012)

LOL, this entire discussion is an EPIC FAILURE. I see this as an opportunity, more chances I can get a 5DMK3 refurbished from Canon...I got my 5DMk2 from Canon over 2 years ago for $1100 (short story, their Virginia office called me). Personally I can’t justify an upgrade to my 5DMK2, it’s a decent body. I just wish they would take all the minor upgrades and replace them with a competing sensor to the tune of the low light performance of the top-end Phase-One cameras…that would make waves more than anything, including this latest issue.

1 upvote
chriscotec
By chriscotec (Apr 18, 2012)

"An extremely serious issue . . ."

I think some perspective is needed here.
I just did the test with my camera. I had the lens cap in in a darkened room and the LCD panel light caused a shift fluctuating between half and one stop. Maybe I got a lucky camera but, even if you could get a usable shot in that kind of light, no DSLR meter is going to be anywhere near accurate. If you have a 5D Mk III, do some tests and assess whether this would affect your workflow in any way.

The very first shoot I did with my 5D Mk III was in poor light. I was running around 5000-8000 iso. The metering was perfect (and the images were very clean). We should always be prepared to make our own judgements on the readings depending on the subject anyway. Cameras are not mind readers.

If you are doing the kind of photography that is affected by this "issue", either accept a 1 stop meter drift or take the lens cap off.

I hope Canon doesn't panic and mess with the firmware to "fix" this.

0 upvotes
Sarobar
By Sarobar (Apr 27, 2012)

Are the upcoming 5D MIII cameras will still have this issue?

0 upvotes
Total comments: 282
12