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Adobe releases Camera Raw v6.7 release candidate

By dpreview staff on Mar 7, 2012 at 02:14 GMT

Alongside Lightroom 4, Adobe has release the latest release candidate of Adobe Camera Raw. This not-quite finalized version of ACR v6.7 brings all the cameras and lenses supported in Lightroom 4 to users of Photoshop CS5, plus the Canon EOS 5D Mark III as something of a bonus feature. As usual, it is being released on Adobe's Labs site to allow feedback before its final launch.

Adobe Camera Raw v6.7 release candidate adds support for:

  • Canon
    EOS-1D X, PowerShot G1 X, PowerShot S100, EOS 5D Mark III
  • Fujifilm
    FinePix F505 EXR, FinePix F605 EXR, FinePix HS30 EXR, FinePix HS33 EXR
  • Nikon
    D4, D800, D800E

Comments

Total comments: 27
phlowtography
By phlowtography (Mar 10, 2012)

Is it possible to use ACR outside of LR/PS? I'm a LR user, I used a PS for its trial period, and raws were opened in this clean looking and tidy UI of ACR which I really liked. I get that at the heart of Lightroom ACR is working, but isn't it possible to "just" use ACR when one doesn't want to fire up LR/PS?

0 upvotes
Charles King
By Charles King (Mar 14, 2012)

It's possible to do your editing through Bridge. Select 'Open in Camera Raw' and it will open the file in ACR without firing up the full Photoshop application. If you just press 'Done' instead of 'Open' when finished, the ACR settings will be saved to an xmp file (or embedded in the RAW if you're using DNGs), providing similar non-destructive editing to LR (though without the history). Bridge will allow you to then export the photo to a jpeg with standard resize/quality options.

AFAIK, you will, however, need to have the full Photoshop installed for this to work.

0 upvotes
carlos roncatti
By carlos roncatti (Mar 7, 2012)

Anyone can give me a link for a dng converter 6.7 for windows?

0 upvotes
Charles King
By Charles King (Mar 14, 2012)

http://download.macromedia.com/pub/labs/cameraraw/6-7/dngconverter6-7_r1_win_030612.exe

On the same page as the ACR download, as always.

0 upvotes
Elinas
By Elinas (Mar 7, 2012)

Same here about X-Pro1! That is a huuuuuge scandal! I mean seriously!

0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 7, 2012)

The big problem with the X-Pro1 is its entirely different colour filter array, which means that conventional Bayer demosaicing routines won't work. So adding support won't necessarily be quite as straightforward for Adobe as it normally is.

3 upvotes
milwman
By milwman (Mar 7, 2012)

True but Fuji said it would work with them too.

1 upvote
Elinas
By Elinas (Mar 8, 2012)

Thanks for the info Andy.
But how do i manage my raw files? This is really a problem now.

0 upvotes
neatnclean
By neatnclean (Mar 8, 2012)

people buying a brand new camera model on day one and then whining about lacking support from third-party software manufacturers ... how ridiculous!

nobody forced you to buy an oddball cameras from an oddball manufacturer ... go and complain to Fuji if they don't provide a working raw converter for their X-Pro1 raw files.

1 upvote
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Mar 8, 2012)

As it happens, Fuji provide an excellent converter for their raw files - it's called the X-Pro1. If it's anything like the X100, in many cases you'll struggle to better the camera's own output, and you get a lot of flexibility to change parameters after the event using the in-camera raw conversion. Of course this isn't necessarily ideal in terms of workflow, especially when handling lots of files, but it's definitely worth bearing in mind until raw support widens.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Elinas
By Elinas (Mar 9, 2012)

Indeed. I heard about it but I haven't try it yet: convert the files with the camera.
I've contacted Fuji, I am waiting for an answer.
Thanks Andy.

0 upvotes
Elinas
By Elinas (Mar 13, 2012)

People how bought the X-Pro1, you can "develop" your raw files with RAW FILE CONVERTER, the version in the CD included with your purchase. Until Adobe create a compatible version.

1 upvote
niglom
By niglom (Mar 22, 2012)

You can batch convert RAW files in the supplied Raw Converter EX to 16 bit Tiffs (90mb), saving them to a prenamed folder, and from there into LR or PS

0 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Mar 7, 2012)

E-M5? X-Pro1?

0 upvotes
ahoeflak
By ahoeflak (Mar 7, 2012)

Support for D800(E) but not for X-Pro1!?! :-(

0 upvotes
nekrosoft13
By nekrosoft13 (Mar 7, 2012)

lightroom 4, doesn't support 5D III

0 upvotes
ahoeflak
By ahoeflak (Mar 7, 2012)

The 5DIII has only just been announced, that's why.

2 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Mar 7, 2012)

What is the point of having ACR and Lightroom when they edit photos in exactly the same way?

0 upvotes
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Mar 7, 2012)

Some people don't want to buy photoshop and some people don't want to buy Lightroom. I already have production premium CS5 so I'm not about to drop another $100+ on lightroom.

0 upvotes
Kim Letkeman
By Kim Letkeman (Mar 7, 2012)

Do a bit of research. LR is a different animal. More of an organizer, but also an excellent editor. And since it launches into CS5 for advanced editing, you can think of it as the best of both worlds. LR is far more pleasant to use than bridge. The database alone is worth the small investment. By the way ... they do not edit photos in the same way. LR always renders on the fly while CS always bruises the pixels.

4 upvotes
micahmedia
By micahmedia (Mar 7, 2012)

LR is for people who aren't technical enough to figure out photoshop or organized enough to manage their own work flow.

I'm still shocked when I encounter studios that exclusively use LR. There are still things you can't do in it (layers and actions for starters) that are absolute musts in a professional workflow. I'll readily admit that more and more happens in ACR for me, as they add features, but not everything. Nor do I expect that will ever be the case.

BTW, PS doesn't "bruise" your pixels if you use ACR images as smart objects. They can be edited and re-edited non-destructively and embedded in PSD files. Makes for big files, but also lets you do, again, things you just can't do in LR.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Mar 7, 2012)

Lightroom was designed by and for photographers, some of whom prefer to spend their time shooting and editing instead of being "technical". I agree that you can spend hours or days doing fantastically complicated image manipulation in Photoshop. What joy.

1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Mar 7, 2012)

Because one's a full image editing suite and the other a photo organisation suite with a small set of editing tools?

0 upvotes
steveh0607
By steveh0607 (Mar 8, 2012)

LR has a much better user interface: No layers needed. That alone is reason enough to use it over PS, unless you're a graphic artist.

1 upvote
PC Wheeler
By PC Wheeler (Mar 7, 2012)

Hmm .. ACR 6.6 added S100 support in December.

0 upvotes
cc_math
By cc_math (Mar 7, 2012)

I wish we had access to the controls using the 2012 process. Just have to wait for CS6...

2 upvotes
WheelerDealer
By WheelerDealer (Mar 7, 2012)

"Photoship" CS5? That's funny.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 27