Previous news story    Next news story

Nikon replaces high-end Coolpix 'P' series with P510 and P310

By dpreview staff on Feb 1, 2012 at 04:01 GMT

Nikon has updated its photographer-friendly P series with the Coolpix P510 and P310. The P510 gains GPS and an extended zoom, now reaching from 24-1000mm equivalent. This 42x range is likely to be quite a challenge for its VR image stabilization system, so we'll be interested to see how it performs. The P310 is a more subtle upgrade of the P300. Like the P510 it gains a 920k dot LCD and moves to using a 16MP back-lit CMOS sensor, with all the high-speed, multi-shot image processing modes it enables. More than any of the technology changes, we're most interested to see the addition of a 'Fn' button on the front - if this can be set to control useful functions, it may improve the handling of an already pleasant-to-use camera.

Both cameras offer 1080p30 with stereo sound recording. The fast sensor also allows them to offer a Night Landscape mode that combines multiple shots to average out noise, and an Advanced Night Portrait mode that does much the same thing, but includes a flash image of your subject to prevent the 'my friends in a coalmine' effect. There's also an in-camera HDR option.

The Coolpix P510 will have a suggested selling price of $429.95, while the P310 will cost around $329.95

Jump to:


Press Release:

NIKON'S NEW COOLPIX P-SERIES PAIR PACKS A POTENT PUNCH OF OPTICAL EXCELLENCE AND POWERFUL PERFORMANCE

Nikon Coolpix P510 - also available in red

The 42x COOLPIX P510 is the Ultimate Ultra-Long Zoom Camera, While the Fast Aperture Lens of the COOLPIX P310 Makes it the Advanced Photographer's Compact Companion

MELVILLE, NY (Jan. 31, 2012) – Today, Nikon Inc. introduced two new COOLPIX cameras into the P-series, providing photographers with amazing optics from compact offerings for their next adventure-packed outing. Breaking the zoom barrier, the new COOLPIX P510 brings the action close with an impressive 42x optical Zoom-NIKKOR ED glass lens, from a wide 24mm to an amazing 1,000mm* focal range. When the adventure begins once the sun sets, the new COOLPIX P310 tackles demanding low-light conditions with a 16.1-megapixel Backside Illuminated (BSI) CMOS sensor and a fast f/1.8 maximum aperture, NIKKOR glass lens. From the expansive Serengeti horizon, thunderous waterfalls of the Amazon to the jazz-infused nightlife setting of New Orleans, Nikon's new COOLPIX P-series cameras enable photographers to capture any adventure with astounding clarity.

"With the new COOLPIX P-series cameras, Nikon is raising the bar for performance and image quality to better accommodate the needs of advanced photographers looking for a compact companion," said Bo Kajiwara, director of marketing, Nikon Inc. "Both the COOLPIX P510 and P310 combine Nikon's legendary NIKKOR lenses and advanced features to challenge photographers creatively in environments that call for portability and easy access."
COOLPIX Technology

At the core of these powerful new COOLPIX cameras are Nikon's world-class NIKKOR lenses, delivering accurate detail, brilliant color and amazing clarity. Further enhancing color and sharpness, Nikon's EXPEED C2™ high performance digital image processing engine is implemented and custom-optimized for each COOLPIX model to ensure high-quality pictures and movies.

The New COOLPIX P510: Setting a Higher Zoom Standard

Shattering the conventional zoom barrier, the new COOLPIX P510 features a staggering 42x Wide-Angle NIKKOR glass zoom lens. The astounding zoom range of 24mm to 1,000mm with advanced optical Vibration Reduction (VR) image stabilization ensures that the photographer captures their intended subject with exceptional image quality. With this kind of extreme focal length, the need for superior image stabilization becomes essential for photos and HD video. Photographers are given increased stability with the additional zoom control located on the side of the lens barrel.

To further enhance image quality and help combat challenging low-light conditions, the COOLPIX P510 includes an advanced 16.1-megapixel BSI CMOS sensor. Utilizing the high-speed continuous shooting performance (capture five images at full resolution in approximately one second) of the CMOS sensor and fast autofocus (AF), the COOLPIX P510 makes it possible to capture even the most spontaneous moments.

This full-featured compact camera also comes complete with built-in GPS capabilities, allowing photographers to track their adventures and geotag photos. The COOLPIX P510 also includes Full HD (1080p) movie recording with stereo sound and the ability to utilize the expansive zoom range during recording with AF for dynamic videos. A 3-inch high resolution (921,000-dot) vari-angle monitor makes it easy to compose images and movies from difficult angles. Additionally, The COOLPIX P510 features a variety of advanced functions for the sophisticated user seeking smooth handling with intuitively placed controls such as the mode dial that enables easy setting of frequently used functions on the fly.

The New COOLPIX P310: Low Light, No Problem

The new COOLPIX P310 achieves superior image quality in low-light settings thanks to the powerful combination of a 16.1-megapixel BSI CMOS sensor, wide ISO range up to 3200 (Hi1 6400 equivalent) and a fast, wide-angle maximum aperture f/1.8 lens. The COOLPIX P310 further fights blur by incorporating advanced optical VR image stabilization and makes shooting in low-light a breeze with several scene modes including Advanced Night Portrait mode, Night Landscape mode and Backlight/High Dynamic Range (HDR) mode. The Advanced Night Portrait mode combines consecutive images of the background while the subject is captured using the flash, while the Night Landscape mode combines a series of consecutive shots taken at a fast shutter speed into a single image with reduced noise. The Backlight HDR mode merges images of the same scene at different exposures to achieve a single image with a broad range of tonal detail.

Designed to be the serious photographer's compact companion, the COOLPIX P310 comes equipped with several features found in D-SLR cameras including manual exposure control (P/S/A/M) and a new Zoom Memory function that enables the selection of popular prime focal lengths during shooting. Through an easily accessible top-mounted control wheel, users are able to adjust shutter speed, aperture and other settings in order to achieve their preferred look. For more creativity, the COOLPIX P310 also includes special effects and filter effects that can be added to photos in-camera for a quick artistic touch. To facilitate easy composing, viewing and playback, the COOLPIX P310 features a 3-inch high resolution (921,000-dot) LCD screen.

Understanding the demand for a capable multimedia camera, the COOLPIX P310 also sports incredible video capabilities. With the ability to capture Full HD (1080p) video at 30 frames-per-second (fps) with AF, stereo sound and the use of the optical zoom while recording, the COOLPIX P310 also lets users edit movies in-camera for a seamless moviemaking experience.

Nikon Coolpix P510 and P310 specifications

 Nikon Coolpix P510Nikon Coolpix P310
Body type
Body typeSLR-like (bridge)Compact
Sensor
Max resolution4608 x 3456
Other resolutions4608 x 2592, 4608 x 3072, 3456 x 3456, 3264 x 2448, 1920 x 1080, 1600 X 1200, 640 x 480
Image ratio w:h1:1, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels16 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors17 megapixels
Sensor size1/2.3" (6.17 x 4.55 mm)
Sensor typeBSI-CMOS
ProcessorExpeed C2
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 2000, 3200
White balance presets5
Custom white balanceYes
Image stabilizationOptical
Uncompressed formatNo
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal, Basic
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)24–1000 mm24–100 mm
Optical zoom41.7×4.2×
Maximum apertureF3.0 - F5.9F1.8 - F4.9
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Tracking
  • Face Detection
Digital zoomYes (2x)Yes (4x)
Manual focusYes
Normal focus range30 cm (11.81)
Macro focus range2 cm (0.79)
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDTiltingFixed
Screen size3
Screen dots921,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT-LCD with Anti-reflection coating
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeElectronicNone
Photography features
Built-in flashYes (Pop-up)
External flashNo
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-Eye, Slow-sync
Self-timerYes
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
  • Spot AF-area
Exposure compensation±2 (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingNo
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (15, 30fps), 1280 x 720p (60, 30 fps), 640 x 480 (120, 30fps)1920 x 1080 (30fps), 1280 x 720p (30 fps), 640 x 480 (120, 30fps)
FormatMPEG-4, H.264
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini Connector)
WirelessEye-Fi Connected
Remote controlNo
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionNikon EN-EL5 Lithium-Ion batteryNikon EN-EL12 Lithium-Ion battery
Battery Life (CIPA)200230
Weight (inc. batteries)555 g (1.22 lb / 19.58 oz)194 g (0.43 lb / 6.84 oz)
Dimensions120 x 83 x 102 mm (4.72 x 3.27 x 4.02)103 x 58 x 32 mm (4.06 x 2.28 x 1.26)
Other features
Orientation sensorNo
Timelapse recordingYesNo
GPSBuiltInNone

Additional images

Nikon Coolpix P310
23
I own it
5
I want it
2
I had it
Discuss in the forums
44
I own it
31
I want it
7
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 179
12
Macist
By Macist (Feb 9, 2012)

Wow! The COOLPIX P510 sounds like the perfect travel camera.

If the GPS implementation is better than on the Sony HX100V (which sucks, since it has to lock anew every time the camera is turned on), this will be my new travel camera :)

1 upvote
Thakur Dalip Singh
By Thakur Dalip Singh (Feb 4, 2012)

This camera with its super zoom 1000mm can be very useful for serious shooters if there is RAW, Manual zoom control and good continuous shooting speed.
I cant understand why most companies donot provide manual zoom like Fuji?
Hope Nikon Listens it.

0 upvotes
max metz
By max metz (Feb 4, 2012)

With Fujifilm on a mission to turn Canon and especially Nikon into Kodak, things must be a little frantic in the old Japanese dslr ivory towers. The Nikon 1 system sees investment in a new market, these two cameras show a much more serious approach to compacts - so far its not all that impressive. Will sports dslr photography sustain Nikon - only time will tell.

0 upvotes
coastcontact
By coastcontact (Feb 3, 2012)

The P510 certainly does have a basket full of features. If Canon and Panasonic haven't been able to deliver this feature set and make a profit how can Nikon? IQ is the issue. Since the P500 was poorly rated there is little hope for this model. Let’s wait for the reviews. If nothing else this camera may help drive down the price on the Panasonic FZ150.

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Feb 2, 2012)

Holy cow!

42X zoom range..... 24-1000mm equivalent...HD video....optical image stabilization..... 920,000 dot tilt screen.... GPS.... $429?

That's a very ambitious camera, and if the image quality is any good then Nikon may have a hit here. But I suspect this will be another camera packed with features most soccer moms won't use that produces very mediocre results. This could almost be a rebadged Casio!

Shooting at 1000mm and getting blurry results won't sell a lot of cameras. Nikon should stick to making DSLRs and let Panasonic and Canon make the compacts.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

"Nikon should stick to making DSLRs and let Panasonic and Canon make the compacts."

Wow, we'got those "photographic closet comedians" out here in record numbers this winter, it seems. :-))

Marty, so you still calling the shots over there at Nikon HQ, huh?

0 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Feb 2, 2012)

coolpix's is for kids and moms... stop whining guy's!

0 upvotes
Bob from Plymouth
By Bob from Plymouth (Feb 2, 2012)

It makes me laugh when people come up with a list of things they want to see on the camera(s) under discussion. It would make more sense to say "I wouldn't buy this camera because I require these features..."

It's a tiny pocketable compact with a wide zoom, a bright lens and full manual control, yours for a very reasonable price. Not an alternative to high-end cameras.

4 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

Yeah, they have a serious laundry list for their own set of "MUST HAVE FEATURES." But since the Nikon P310 is $330, they would have to have all the pro features AND a price of say $33.30 for them to be considering a purchase.

I guess these are mostly the folks who do not own ANY digital camera, right?

0 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 1, 2012)

I'd like better:
a) sensor bigger (2/3" with crop factor 4x)
b) min 6 Megapixel, max 8 Megapixels
c) zoom 14x (28-400mm equiv.) fast as possible
d) RAW.
Bigger pixel's size -> better dynamic range.
For birdwatchers too.

2 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Feb 1, 2012)

Just consider the Fuji X-S1 instead. It has the 2/3" sensor, 12Mp or 6MP in EXR mode (improved DR), zoom is not exactly 14x but 26X, and it has RAW. It is also made of metal and weather sealed and I expect good colours from Fuji. It also has a faster lens and a tilting screen and many more buttons. I tried it and it seems very nice. A little slow in AF when zoomed to the max, but for outdoor bird watching, it seems to be the best of its kind.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Shutterbug108
By Shutterbug108 (Feb 2, 2012)

I wish Nikon had incorporated their 1" CX sensor into this bridge camera. To compromise on the lens side, I can live with a smaller zoom of let say 15 times.

0 upvotes
cesaregal
By cesaregal (Feb 3, 2012)

I'm a birdwatcher (Nikon DSRL FF and Sigma lens). I'm looking for a second camera for long walks in the mountain. Nikon could follow the way of high-end bridge camera with 1" CX sensor but a lens 14x/15x for 1" sensor would be big and expensive probably. Then we must wait for long Nikon lens (400-500mm equiv.) if planned for V1. The P5100 can be useful but, I'm afraid, the sensor is too small for my requirements.

0 upvotes
rfstudio
By rfstudio (Feb 1, 2012)

Why isnt any of this company learn tht people needs better sensor rather than stupid long zoom with a quarter finger nail sensor ?????

1 upvote
jmaxx30
By jmaxx30 (Feb 1, 2012)

Agreed. I'm super frustrated with this issue. I really wanted to like the P300 and aside from the lacking sensor it is a very cool proposition. But the images are ridiculously bad. With the P7100 sensor in that form factor these would sell like crazy.

Plus that aperture is next to useless since it's only available at the wide end. Come on Nikon!!@!!!! Listen to the people that buy your products. They are giving away P300s because of these exact problems.

0 upvotes
tamras29
By tamras29 (Feb 1, 2012)

Do you really think anyone buying a 40x zoom has any idea what a sensor even is? They are the type I imagine who buy 4 x 4's to take the kids to school, and wear Rolex watches to impress, and would buy the Leica equivalent if they were told it's better.

4 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

"With the P7100 sensor in that form factor these would sell like crazy."

I think Nikon would have done it if it would be feasible at all. Don't forget the size- and lens-wise comparable Canon S100 has slower (starts at 2.0 vs. 1.8) and bigger lens than the P300. The p300 lens simply cannot be used with a 1/1.7" sensor, I'm afraid. Otherwise, Nikon would have long ago released a much better version of the P300.

0 upvotes
Sergey Borachev
By Sergey Borachev (Feb 1, 2012)

See my post above re the Fuji X-S1. If you want an even larger sensor and shorter zoom, then there is now the Canon G1X. There is a review in

www.photoreview.com.au

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Feb 2, 2012)

@Menneisyys "The p300 lens simply cannot be used with a 1/1.7" sensor, I'm afraid."

So they build it with a lens that can cover a 1/1.7" sensor. Certainly Nikon knows how to design great lenses, and if the lens is a bit larger, a la the S95, or even XZ-1, who cares.

That said, a good 1/2.3" BSI-CMOS sensor is capable of excellent performance as we've seen with the Pentax Q. DXOMark testing of the Pentax Q sensor found it in many areas equal in performance (DR, ISO) to 1/1.7" CCD sensors.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

Say, why don't the perennial whiners here just buy a larger sensor camera than the 1/2.3-inch sensor bridge-cams and point-and-shoots that these little cheap jobs have inside them?

If you want or need a 2/3-inch or 1/1.7-inch or whatever size of sensor in your camera -- the Nikon P510/310 just ain't it, people. Live with it already.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 3, 2012)

"If you want or need a 2/3-inch or 1/1.7-inch or whatever size of sensor in your camera -- the Nikon P510/310 just ain't it, people. Live with it already."

Again - you seem to have forgotten to take the price segment into account. The P3x0 is NOT a competition / alternative to the S95/S100 (the closest equivalent, size-wise). They are in a completely different market / price segment.

0 upvotes
jsandjs
By jsandjs (Apr 25, 2012)

People needs better IQ. If, a 1000mm zoom with a tiny sensor gives a better IQ of a wild bird than a 200mm lens on a DSLR does (shooting from a same distance and cropping), then the stupid long zoom isn't stupid anymore.

0 upvotes
Doug Frost
By Doug Frost (Feb 1, 2012)

The P510 is yet another boring "super zoom" with a super slow lens. f/3.0 - f/5.6 maximum aperture. Are they kidding? Give me a super zoom camera with a constant f/2.8 maximum aperture throughout the zoom range and I'll buy it in a heartbeat. Is that really too much to ask?

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

"Give me a super zoom camera with a constant f/2.8 maximum aperture throughout the zoom range and I'll buy it in a heartbeat. Is that really too much to ask?"

It is. Not even the gargantuan and heavy Fujifilm X-S1 has a lens that bright, let alone lighter / smaller superzooms.

3 upvotes
Le Kilt
By Le Kilt (Feb 2, 2012)

"yet another boring "super zoom"" Yet another boring comment.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

@ Doug: go, fly a kite, dude. Or better yet, make your own camera & lens with those heady specs and sell it to the rest of us for up to US$33.30.

0 upvotes
mannyr
By mannyr (Feb 3, 2012)

Doug's right. 8 years ago Panasonic's Lumix FZ10 had a constant 2.8 12x zoom. Great pictures in low light. Only 4 megapixels and very slow between shots by today's standards. But it can, and should be done.

1 upvote
jsandjs
By jsandjs (Apr 25, 2012)

Yes, sure it is and will be for quite a long from now.

0 upvotes
PaulRivers
By PaulRivers (Feb 1, 2012)

Dissapointing that the p310 still won't have raw. And that the nikon rumors rumor over it having an f1.8-f2.6 lens didn't pan out.

0 upvotes
cre8unique
By cre8unique (Feb 1, 2012)

I'm really not a natural customer for superzoom cameras with high zoom ratios (very rarely use anything longer than a 35mm equiv. 100mm), but as I have a Nikon P500 that I won in a competition, I do have some limited experience of this type of camera...

The Nikon P500 at its maximum focal length of 800mm is almost totally unusable. Its almost impossible to even find you subject in the viewfinder, never mind hold the camera steady (even with IS). In fact the P500 is practically useless at anything more that 300mm.

But the wide angle setting of 22mm on the P500 is really nice to have and provides unique perspectives for a camera like this. So to give up even a couple of mm at the wide end for an utterly meaningless 200mm at the telephoto end is such a waste.

Zoom ratio is just an alternative to megapixels as a way to generate excitement on the sales floor... like an extra couple of megapixels it is utterly meaningless in practice. IMHO this type of camera is gadget 1st and camera 2nd.

1 upvote
Peter Nelson
By Peter Nelson (Feb 1, 2012)

No offense but since you stated that your experience is with lenses no more than 100mm, for you to judge any superzoom camera does not reflect a qualified opinion. I have been shooting DSLR's with 300mm, 400mm, 500mm, 800mm and I also use a 1.4 Tele-converter on these lenses. I also use a Bridge superzoom that has an 800mm equivalent lens. It takes a long while to become really profiecient using supertele lenses. Perhaps years. Now along you come and with very little expereince with supertele's you are bound to fail at first. Did to go through a 2 to 5 year year learning curve? I think not. Therefor your opinion must be taken with the caveat that you do not know what you are doing in regards to using superzoom cameras. In another words you are to be ignored in that regard.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Feb 1, 2012)

With my SX30 IS I had no problem shooting at 140x (3360mm eqiv) handheld on a windy day .
http://vimeo.com/15750099

Or at 35x (840mm eqiv) handheld tracking a blimp.
http://vimeo.com/15887185
http://vimeo.com/16040013

0 upvotes
cre8unique
By cre8unique (Feb 2, 2012)

@ Peter Nelson

The fact you will only get useful results with these excessively long super-zooms after many years of practice supports my point: the vast majority of people are never going to get decent photos at 800mm, so extending the range to 1000mm is of precious little practical use. It is a marketing gimmick only.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

@ cre8unique: Have you tried using a gizmo called the "TRIPOD?" It is really good, I was told, for shots when you lens' focal length is in the 800 to 4000mm range, you know.

Re. the "utterly meaningless 200mm." Yeah, you've said it, and it is utterly meaningless indeed.

@ Peter: exactly right. Out friend cre8unique can only count up to 100mm in a lens, yet he is delivering academic white papers on how stupid longer than 100mm focal lengths are. Weird, huh?

In defense, the gentleman did not go through the 2-5 years of useful training and hands-on with the super tele intricacies. He won the camera in a raffle instead, I understand. In comparison, most folks who go out and BUY a camera will probably eventually learn how to use its features.

0 upvotes
Inars
By Inars (Feb 1, 2012)

Month ago , choose P300 for begginer (lady). My opinion: small, light, fast, wide etc. Asked about raw, postprocessing, the answer is no no (but she works with PS daily). I show my LX5 with so many buttons and menu on 8 pages, answer is exactly, no. Ok, no many questions, P300 is my choice - reasonably good menu on 1 1/3 page, fast in daylight, on 100mm good sharpness, no CA, good colours.
We easily learned basics of A S M modes, there are 2-3 good scene modes too.
What Nikon miss - fast ISO change (maybe 310 have this), live exp. simulation or live histogram, maybe better grip in front. I'ts tiny strip not serious. I don't need 16mp, full HD; then better be RAW

P300 is a good bargain, why Nikon release P310?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 3, 2012)

"P300 is a good bargain, why Nikon release P310?"

Technology advances - why stick with the P300 for more than a year when all the competition refreshes their camera line every year? (Much as there isn't much competition in the bright-lens manual category in this very cheap price category - e.g., the Canon S100 is in a COMPLETELY different segment.)

0 upvotes
ispress
By ispress (Feb 1, 2012)

Does anyone know the on-sale date for the P310? Thanks.

0 upvotes
drabina
By drabina (Feb 1, 2012)

Does anybody know if the flash on P310 needs to be manually raised or if it pops up automatically when needed?

0 upvotes
Inars
By Inars (Feb 1, 2012)

Manualy, not written about new feature.

0 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Feb 1, 2012)

I have the P300 and love it. It is a fantastic little camera. Very quick, great features. But as some others have pointed out, going higher with the megapixel is total nonsense and purely driven my marketing.

The P300 has 12 mp and it is no where near utilizing the resolution. If you zoom in to 100%, you see how the resolution and detail just isn't there. If I compare that to a 12 SLR it becomes obvious how much less detail there is. So the P300 is already unable to make use of 12 mp, how does it help to replace the sensor with a 16 mp one? It's just marketing. In reality you get the resolution of a 6 mp sensor.

1 upvote
Michael Long
By Michael Long (Feb 1, 2012)

The Backside Illuminated sensor could go a long way towards correcting that. Using BSI tech on the 8MP iPhone 4s meant that it had much better image quality than the 5MP iPhone 4.

Of course, they could have gone with 12MP AND BSI... but I'm willing to wait and see some good low-light/nighttime sample images before I take them to task...

0 upvotes
kronosx2
By kronosx2 (Feb 1, 2012)

The iPhone 4 5MP was already using BSI tech. iPhone 4S improvements were down to the slightly faster lens and improvements to the existing BSI sensor.

The previous Nikon P300 12MP was also already using BSI tech.

0 upvotes
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Feb 1, 2012)

"from a wide 24mm to an amazing 1,000mm* "

There's a * there - typo, or is there some kind of catch (e.g. the 1000mm isn't really 1000mm)? Otherwise this'll be fascinating for checking out the Apollo landing sites. Also, it sounds like the ultimate beach pervert camera.

1 upvote
photonius
By photonius (Feb 1, 2012)

* Equivalent in 35-mm [135] format

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Feb 1, 2012)

Would you prefer they use 4.3-180mm ?

0 upvotes
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 1, 2012)

official samples of P310:
http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/coolpix/performance/p310/sample.htm
P510:
http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/coolpix/performance/p510/sample.htm

0 upvotes
ashwins
By ashwins (Feb 1, 2012)

Why so many people are whining about the small sensor? It has certainly been very conscious desicion from Nikon not to use bigger sensor and thereby not to jeopardizes the sales of system 1. Exactly for the same reason the system 1 was launched with 1" sensor only (to protect their DSLRs).

0 upvotes
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 1, 2012)

People aren't whining about the small sensor... read well. People is whining about the megapixel race... 16Mp. is very stupid in this kind of camera, every brand, of course... Nikon same pixels than Nikon 4D... ??? It's like a joke...

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Feb 1, 2012)

No conspiracy. The System 1 cameras will never have a 1000mm equivalent lens, which would cost a heap and be larger than a jumbo Fosters can.

As for the megapixel race, it's driven by a popular notion which mass buyers make it perilous to defy.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

We LOVE to whine here!!!! 1/2.3-inch is microscopic for a sensor these days, folks. But maybe you work for Nikon, ashwins, and are thus protecting their 'corporate interests' at all costs?

Also, double whammy here with the ridiculously high pixel count on the midget-sized sensor. Good luck with this baby indoors or after the Sun sets.

0 upvotes
Kirppu
By Kirppu (Feb 1, 2012)

Heh I almost got the Idea that they had managed to squeeze 42x zoom and F1.8 lense in the same package. Reading in haste may lead to misunderstanding ;)

0 upvotes
kkardster
By kkardster (Feb 1, 2012)

I also was amazed that they could offer both 42X zoom and f1.8 with a lens that size. Alas, writiing in haste is as bad as reading in haste! According to the specs above, f1.8 is available on the P310 - the P510 aperature range is given as f3.0 to f5.6.

Where's the hot shoe, articulating screen, remote control, and RAW support? Why does the Nikon bridge camera only always come oh so close?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

"Lens f/-number f/3.3-5.9"

That is for the P510 from Nikon's product site specs. Where are people coming up with these weird aperture numbers from?

@ kkardster: have you looked into Nikon's DSLR camera line-up yet? The features you desire are being offered there on many of their models.

0 upvotes
kkardster
By kkardster (Feb 2, 2012)

They also exist on my Panasonic FZ150 - I'm saying that Nikon continues to leave out several features that a true bridge camera deserves. They're among the reasons I didn't buy a P500 and Nikon lost a sale - they refuse to take this category seriously and just keep throwing out bigger numbers in an attempt to stay relevant until they suck you into a DSLR.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

Since I like to shoot video, I would never buy any DSLR or HDSLR or video-enabled DSLR even. So, I am ready to be suckered into any other digital camera segment, as long as it is not that old-school flipping mirror technology type of DSLRs with the huge bodies, huge lenses, and huge price tags.

Nikon bridge-cams are just as good as the other mfrs bridge cams at these low prices, so I am not sure what the point here is exactly?

0 upvotes
kkardster
By kkardster (Feb 16, 2012)

Their competition provides features that Nikon thinks require their DSLRs - like remote controls or external flashes or better IQ. The point is they lost a sale by pushing only the zoom/MP specs and leaving out features that are important to me even though they may not matter to you.

0 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Feb 1, 2012)

The use of 1.8 in the P310 was a real deal, and it's very welcomed this pushing of optical zoom limits in the P510. Bridge superzoom cameras are for that, for playing, for making you experience extremes without the commitment to that wow quality. Though many problems arise at such tele end, it's still impressive. See that videocameras (that do not require the same lens resolution) already play with 60 x, so I want to see makers going up there and beyond!

The deal breaker for me, however, is the sensor size. All Nikon compacts should be developed around their 1 system sensor. That's the big deal. Can you imagine how would it be great if Nikon had all their compacts with 1 system sensor? After a time they would be selling them at a similar (or little higher) price as the competition using 1/2.3 sensors. The other sensor, 1/3, they could use for all the other super/ultra compacts with built-in zoom.

CAN YOU HEAR, NIKON?!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

Apparently, they didn't hear you. :-((

It's a 1/2.3-inch diagonal size, 16MP sensor world out there in this low priced product category, and will probably be for quite a while longer yet.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Feb 1, 2012)

A photo taken at 42X 1000mm equiv zoom means narrow aperture, fringe distortion, and high risk of blur (because the shutter must be slower). Back-lighting or atmospheric haze (dust, humidity, ozone) make a long zoom outdoor shot look "smokey" anyway.

Video shot at the same zoom will be shakey, no matter how good the OIS. Even a tripod shot will look jittery. And it will be darn near impossible to track anything, since the slightest movement of the camera will cause the frame to waver by a multiple of your target, just as in aiming a gun at a great distance. Bad light and haze are also a problem.

Sometimes you just can't get close to things. But mega-zoom is no golden answer, either.

True or false?

0 upvotes
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 1, 2012)

but you can use it as a "microscope"... XD

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Feb 1, 2012)

I had no problem shooting at 140x (3360mm eqiv) handheld on a windy day .
http://vimeo.com/15750099

Or at 35x (840mm eqiv) handheld tracking a blimp.
http://vimeo.com/15887185
http://vimeo.com/16040013

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

Cy, seems like you would be best served with a fixed lens camera that has an app. 40mm focal length, for instance the Fujifilm Finepix X100. A golden compromise, and that one is priced quite reasonably at US$1,200, too.

These superzooms jobs with extreme telephoto capabilities are apparently too much hustle and thus not worth it.

0 upvotes
wallbreaker
By wallbreaker (Feb 1, 2012)

P510-no external flash & still tiny sensor size. I hope canon will come up with bigger sensor on these bridge camera competition.

1 upvote
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Feb 1, 2012)

I think Fuji is the first to place a bigger sensor in super zooms.

0 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (Feb 1, 2012)

I guess Nikon is happy to concede this (P310) market segment to the Canon S100 for some strange reason.

Here's some free advice from a Canon user, Nikon: first one to put a larger sensor in a compact wins. Canon is already headed that way with the G1X, you better catch up.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

Current "New" prices at Amazon:

Canon S100: $417.99

Nikon p300: $276.95

The price difference is way more than $100...

As you can see, they are absolutely not in the same category in any sense. The S100 is a high-end enthusiast camera; the P300 is a budget but still high-quality one.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

The best Canon could come up lately is the laughably spec'd G1 X at a head-scratching price of 800 dollars. Ouch. I don't think Nikon has anything to worry about, not from Canon at least.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 2, 2012)

"The best Canon could come up lately is the laughably spec'd G1 X at a head-scratching price of 800 dollars. Ouch. I don't think Nikon has anything to worry about, not from Canon at least."

While I agree at some areas the Canon g1x indeed doesn't excel (e.g., the 24p only at 1080p when Sony's and even Pana's cameras are already capable of 60p), based on the preview shots here at DPR and the high ISO tests at F-L, it will have EXCELLENT image quality. I think it'lll be a big hit on the market and Nikon will not have anything to directly counter it. (Nikon 1 series maybe? Bad joke.)

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

Nikon V1 beats the crapola outta the Canon G1 X whatever-cam with its hand tied behind its back.

The Canon G1 X looks like a camera that Canon folks designed a good 10 years ago, and only now decided to actually make it for some odd reason. The lens on it is particularly appalling. It makes the whole G1 X camera a nonsensical purchase IMO.

Canon G1X: No good at all for video, no good for real wide angle or UWA shots, and the tele setting is also pretty limited. Dark glass. What's to like then, only the 800 shekel price tag?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 4, 2012)

"Nikon V1 beats the crapola outta the Canon G1 X whatever-cam with its hand tied behind its back."

Well, let's wait for some actual tests and real-life results :) DPR didn't give much praise to System 1. Based on the test images so far, the G1X will have excellent IQ, way better than those of System 1 - or. for that matter, most cheapo DSLR kit lens out there.

Comment edited 20 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (Feb 1, 2012)

Incredible, a 1/2.3" sensor, so Nikon still don't have a rival to Canon's S90/95/100 series.

These days if you want a compact sub 200g camera to be taken at all seriously it has to have at least a 1/1.7" sensor. Denial is going to make that fact go away Nikon.

Just as if you want your new sub 400 g compact camera to be taken seriously, it has to have an APS-C sized or at least four thirds sized sensor. But heh lets not go there.

Comment edited 25 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
tamras29
By tamras29 (Feb 1, 2012)

To be honest, I'm not even sure why "dp review" folk that anyone hear on a photography forum, would have any interest in these "toys" at all. These for camera phone uses who want a zoom with a big x number - the bigger the number, the better it must be. Does anyone think any of these buyers will ever take these toys out of full auto mode?

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Feb 1, 2012)

There are smart toys and dumb ones. Some cost a lot, are big and heavy, don't offer a fraction of the effective focal length or crop, are magnets for dust, and are prohibited in some settings. Might those toys be the dumb ones?

Auto mode is very helpful if you aren't shooting in a studio and must be ready for shots that don't pose, repeat, or wait.

I've used an old H1 in full manual mode hundreds of times for time exposures or cases where the auto-focus fails.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

@ simon65: what professionalism, OMG. You are buying your cameras BY THE GRAM, and nothing else really matters, huh? I would love to see you in action at the local camera store, mate.

"Gimme that 200 gram thing over there, and while you're at it, gimme a 400 gram one, too."

0 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (Feb 2, 2012)

@ Francis Carver

Yes size and weight are the first things I look at. And I think you'll find both play a major part in everyones choice of camera, otherwise we'd all be walking around with Nikon D4s. No?

So yes, please hand me that APS-C sub 400 g camera to have a look at, and leave the 1.4 kg one on the shelf. Thanks.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

@ simon65: those who can afford the price of admission will be proudly strutting around with a pair of Nikon D4s hanging down from each shoulder. The rest will have to make do with the proverbial light-weight-cams.

Nikon is not your camera company, anyhow. They don't have any APS-C sensor digital cameras in your own required weight class, see?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 4, 2012)

"Just as if you want your new sub 400 g compact camera to be taken seriously, it has to have an APS-C sized or at least four thirds sized sensor. But heh lets not go there."

Well, I'm afraid few APSC / m43 cameras are under 400g with lens attached. Even the top dogs like the excellent Nex5N weigh some 50g more with the (otherwise, compared to kit lens on other systems, pretty good) 18-55.

That is, that 50g plus makes the 5N useless cr@p? I don't think so.

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
schaki
By schaki (Feb 1, 2012)

P310 - Another wasted compact. Again, Nikon have fumbled it wrong this time too.
A serious compact with a fast widest aperture needs something more to get the best out of it. Raw and a 1/1.7" sensor as for the Coolpix P7100. Add that tilt-lcd and it would have been even better/more interesting.
Hopefully there is more in camera-parameters to tweak the jpeg-output this time - Something that the P300 also missed. It should also offer the option NR off, especially now without raw.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

Did you consult with Nikon BEFORE they released these new models of theirs? What did they say?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 2, 2012)

"Raw and a 1/1.7" sensor as for the Coolpix P7100. Add that tilt-lcd and it would have been even better/more interesting."

There IS such a Nikon camera - the P7100. You should take into account that you can't beat the laws of physics and just can't have as small a lens for a 1/1.7" sensor than for a 1/2.3" one.

1 upvote
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Feb 1, 2012)

And the madness goes on ...

The year 2011 was so hopefull for compact users: Pany FZ150, Canon SX230, Fuji X10 & X-S1, Nikon P300, P7100, all of those came with reasonable resolutions.

So the new year 2012 welcomed us with a renewed raving of megapixel race. It seems the manufacturers gave up on the compact segment altogether. It seems the only choice for enthusiasts are the overpriced mirrorlesses, or oversized DSLR's.

I find mirror&pentaprism to be a fosilia of the pre-digital age; the same holds for the need to clean the sensor due to the lens changes. The EVF coupled wth the sealed sensor-lens unit is an achievement of the digital era, IMHO.

That's why I consider the declining commitment of manufacturers to compact segment's quality to be a saddening regres.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (Feb 1, 2012)

Umm, Canon S100? G1X?

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 2, 2012)

Canon's G1 XI is rather overpriced for something that clearly is quite under-spec'd. They should have brought it out at around $400, 450 shekels tops.

Of course, their EOS C300 is priced at US$16,000, and that thing probably does not worth a red cent over 5 grand, either. Canon had practically priced themselves out of the competition.

0 upvotes
Bob from Plymouth
By Bob from Plymouth (Feb 1, 2012)

I'm not sure why people are suggesting that to include RAW would neccessarily increase the price. It's just some additional software which is probably already written for the processors of their other cameras. It must be a marketing decision but I don't know why?

As well as DSLR kit I have a P300 and it's a great pocket camera which can produce some surprisingly good results. Forget about the sensor size and all the other points being debated, it's a small camera with a bright, wide-angle lens, just take it out and use it. I'm sure the P310 will do very well.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

"I'm not sure why people are suggesting that to include RAW would neccessarily increase the price. It's just some additional software which is probably already written for the processors of their other cameras. It must be a marketing decision but I don't know why?"

It IS a marketing decision. Should the P300/P310 have RAW, a lot of P7000/P7100 buyers (more expensive enthusiast P&S cameras by Nikon) would have preferred it because of the much smaller size / lower price.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Feb 1, 2012)

A guy goes on a vacation and shoots 500 pictures. He can shoot in bracket mode if the exposures are ambiguous. He can "enhance" a JPEG if it needs a bit of lightening or sharpening. RAW would be superfluous 95% of the time, hog memory, and simply slow the uload to FaceBook.

3 upvotes
Bob from Plymouth
By Bob from Plymouth (Feb 2, 2012)

To answer my own question about RAW not being included, I wonder if the P310 would then be seen as in competition with other cameras of a higher specification in the Nikon range and compare unfavourably with them. Hence a marketing decision rather than a pricing one. It's a compact with the big plus of full manual control rather than a P7100 competitor with an inferior sensor. All a question of perception.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 2, 2012)

"I wonder if the P310 would then be seen as in competition with other cameras of a higher specification in the Nikon range and compare unfavourably with them."

Of course it compares unfavourably. After all, it's $100-150 cheaper - you can't expect the same feature set for a lot less money.

0 upvotes
Sarwa Gunawan
By Sarwa Gunawan (May 2, 2012)

P510 certainly is a bridge camera and not a DSLR. Brdige camera (DSLR like) use small sensor to catchup superzoom, if the sensor is bigger, so the magnification should be reduced, except they make longer zoom barrel and even should make bigger diameter zoom barrel, if necessary. So, all kind of camera has a trade-off. RAW maybe necessary or not depends on the users. I agree that RAW existing maybe a trade policy. Fujifilm have many product line in their bridge camera, all of them based on one camera only, but the magnification is different and we can choose including RAW or not and also use hotshoe or not (8 type of cameras). Please see Wikipedia: Bridge camera.

0 upvotes
sk000ks
By sk000ks (Feb 1, 2012)

1/2.3" SENSOR????? Blah....

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

Come on - read the P300 review first and then call ALL 1/2.3" Nikon cameras useless. (Unless you need RAW, of course.)

1 upvote
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 1, 2012)

I checked some samples... just watercolors and that was with 12 Mpx and Iso 100... I better no imagine 16 Mpx and iso 400... lol.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 2, 2012)

"I checked some samples... just watercolors and that was with 12 Mpx and Iso 100... I better no imagine 16 Mpx and iso 400... lol."

Nevertheless, DPR still dedicated a (favorable) review to the camera. That is, it's not THAT bad, particularly if you're on a budget / want 24mm wide / want 1.8 / want full manual control.

Comment edited 9 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 2, 2012)

ok, it's not that bad, but would be much better with 6-10 Mp. Who prints that big. Btw, it's not only Nikon... Sony is the big guilty here.

0 upvotes
YG1974
By YG1974 (Feb 1, 2012)

Is a pity they didn't put a GPS in the P310. this would boost the camera.

If it a high end, why such a small sensor?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

To keep the lens size down - and, incidentally, the price.

1 upvote
leno
By leno (Feb 1, 2012)

Why this passion for GPS? I can't see how it improves the picture quality.

3 upvotes
sglewis
By sglewis (Feb 1, 2012)

Some people like to geotag their photos. A solid body construction, faster frame rate, support for modern, fast memory card types, including a camera strap - lots of things don't improve the quality of a picture. A battery that lasts 500 shots doesn't improve picture quality over a battery that's only good for 50 shots. Just because GPS doesn't appeal to YOU, doesn't mean it doesn't appeal to many consumers. I have a pocket size GPS tagger, and to be honest, the time it takes to sync the data to a PC and run the images through a program that adds longitude and latitude is just long enough that I don't do it.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

Guys, it's actually VERY easy to import your GPS data in your shots if you have an external GPS receiver and some patience. I've written a complete tutorial on this: http://www.iphonelife.com/blog/87/geocoding-photos-your-ios-device-or-desktop-computer

1 upvote
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 1, 2012)

optical excelence!!... that will be a good joke!

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

Well, the P300 *is* an excellent camera (for its price / class), IQ-wise (if you don't need RAW and can put up with the default, non-modifiable sharpening). I don't think the P310 will be (considerably) worse.

2 upvotes
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 1, 2012)

lol. Nikon D4, full frame... 16,2 Mpx. These cameras (all brand, of course) would be much better with 8-10 Mp.

0 upvotes
Alfie Smith
By Alfie Smith (Feb 1, 2012)

Sensor photo detectors 16.8 megapixels
Sensor size 1/2.3" (6.17 x 4.55 mm)

do it again Sam!

0 upvotes
voz
By voz (Feb 1, 2012)

Raw would have been nice...

2 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Feb 1, 2012)

raw is for those who can get it right in the camera

1 upvote
Bomple
By Bomple (Feb 1, 2012)

yes, raw is for those who actually can get it right in the camera, but don't like the crappy processing the cameras do and want to enhance the image quality even further. Or for those who want to do black and white conversions with channel mixing, without the limits that 8-bit jpegs impose on you.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

The P300/P310 is dirt cheap because Nikon targeted it below prosumers. With RAW, it's be considerably more expensive.

2 upvotes
photofan1986
By photofan1986 (Feb 1, 2012)

That's nonsense. Raw is a software feature, and it would cost absolutely nothing to Nikon to implement.
Marketing strategy, that's all.

0 upvotes
NetMage
By NetMage (Feb 1, 2012)

Because the software to create RAW and process RAW on PCs is free and you will write it for nothing, right? And you'll pay for testing too?

0 upvotes
photofan1986
By photofan1986 (Feb 1, 2012)

There is no need to "create" a raw file. Every single camera produces a raw file before it is converted to jpeg.(see CHDK for example). But only certain cameras offer the possibility to record this file. And if they used an open source format like the DNG, there would be no problem for raw software support.

1 upvote
Komakai Okane
By Komakai Okane (Feb 1, 2012)

For the last 5 months I've kept a P300 on me or within reach at all times. It's small and light and easily fits all but tight jeans pockets. The f1.8 lens works very well indoors and out, the IQ is sharp with nice color rendition in the jpgs, and the flash quality very acceptable. Without a need to print 8x10 or larger or do high % crops the small sensor has been a non-issue. As a prolific DSLR user, the P300's PASM capability offers an essential level of control. RAW would be nice, but for $270 I adjusted my expectations. Is there a photographic instrument at this price point that does RAW?

The f1.8 lens, PASM dial and small size brought this camera into my daily life and all that plus the image quality has kept it there. I have a few low to medium light images on flickr under the username komakai okane. I'm going to enjoy this simple camera until the lens falls off.

5 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Feb 1, 2012)

RAW is not a feature that costs money to implement. It's just a few lines of code in the firmware.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

"RAW is not a feature that costs money to implement. It's just a few lines of code in the firmware."

RAW has been deliberately left out from this (cheapest) line of quality Nion P&S cameras NOT to compete with their more expensive, RAW-capable models (to protect their sales).

As you've also put it below: "Nikon has a history of deliberately putting out feature-crippled products in order to protect their more expensive offerings"

3 upvotes
Najinsky
By Najinsky (Feb 1, 2012)

Raw exposes the sins of the sensor to prying eyes. The smaller the sensor, the more processing is needed to produce an acceptable image. I don't think an un-corrected image from a 16MP 1/2.3" sensor would be a pleasant sight. It would likely scare those of a nervous disposition.

While there is little cost involved in enabling a raw feature in firmware, there are many associated costs such as extra power for faster write time to prevent dog slow saving to the SD, providing raw software with the camera (and all the development, testing and support associated with that software), working with 3rd party raw developers to provide support in their apps, and so on.

I find my small sensor raws need so much processing (using 3rd party raw tools) that 9 times out of 10 I find the JPEG far superior. For best results you usually have use the manufactures raw software to make sure all the software corrections are applied, but this isn't convenient when your workflow accommodates multiple brands.

9 upvotes
.Sam.
By .Sam. (Feb 1, 2012)

Wow, sounds like just what a PR company would write for this camera. Every point was hit ;-)

1 upvote
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Feb 1, 2012)

Najinsky has it right. These small camera zooms have massive distortion and raw takes longer to write. It's that simple.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

These types of cameras do not need RAW, so kudos to Nikon for not listening the RAW-whiners.

0 upvotes
bb hk
By bb hk (Feb 1, 2012)

Should they be using lens shift type VR?

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

The IS in the P300 is very good - unlike, say, the ones in the Oly m43 cameras. Based on my experience, I'd say it's much (at least 2 EV) better than the Pana one in the Pana ZS3 (which is a lens OSS).

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
1 upvote
techmine
By techmine (Feb 1, 2012)

Agree, the VR on P300 is astonishing. Really love my hand held shots. Blows my fujix10 and E-PL1 out of the water.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 2, 2012)

"Blows my fujix10 and E-PL1 out of the water."

Yeah, Oly's IIS isn't very good, unfortunately.

0 upvotes
Robmac07
By Robmac07 (Feb 1, 2012)

Increasing the Megapixels from 12 (P300) to 16 (P310) is a backward step, I think. Its's still only a tiny 1/2.3"sensor and the lens is only bright (f1.8) at the wide end. Still no RAW either.

2 upvotes
Reg Natarajan
By Reg Natarajan (Feb 1, 2012)

Wouldn't surprise me a bit if the P310 produced equivalent results to the 1 series.

1 upvote
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Feb 1, 2012)

That certainly isn't saying much

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

Surely it won't.

1 upvote
Altruisto
By Altruisto (Feb 1, 2012)

LOL. Nikon 1 Bashers! P300 was already a smeary affair with its 12MP. I remember a comparison with LX5 and S90, and it was absolutely less defined and more processed. Nikon 1 is the best thing Nikon pulled lately. Stop moaning!

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

"I remember a comparison with LX5 and S90, and it was absolutely less defined and more processed."

The LX5 / S90 / other 1/1.7" enthusiast cameras are in a completely different price category (at least $100 more) and, therefore, aren't directly comparable to the P300/P310.

0 upvotes
Reg Natarajan
By Reg Natarajan (Feb 1, 2012)

I wasn't really serious. I was just taking a cheap shot at the 1 system. lol.

0 upvotes
Lights Perfection
By Lights Perfection (Feb 1, 2012)

More info for those who are curious, like me! :-)

http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/coolpix/performance/p510/

0 upvotes
caissam
By caissam (Feb 1, 2012)

No raw, no 3:2 Option??
Nikons wants us to buy the canon S100 :(

1 upvote
KonstantinosK
By KonstantinosK (Feb 1, 2012)

Or, even better, the FZ 150...

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 2, 2012)

"No raw, no 3:2 Option??
Nikons wants us to buy the canon S100 :("

Again, the S100 costs more than $100 more. They are in a completely different market segment / category.

0 upvotes
KonstantinosK
By KonstantinosK (Feb 1, 2012)

That 1000mm reach is really tempting for paparazzi style candids... But photographer-friendly without RAW? I'd happily sacrifice the GPS for RAW.

4 upvotes
bradleyg5
By bradleyg5 (Feb 1, 2012)

nude beaches with nearby cliffs here I come!

4 upvotes
KonstantinosK
By KonstantinosK (Feb 1, 2012)

You're my man, bradleyg5!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

Get a camera then that can capture in RAW and stop whining about these new Nikons here incessantly. This "RAW Brigade" is getting ever so boring, frankly.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Feb 1, 2012)

without any exposure simulation live preview offered on prosumer coolpix... my interest remains zero...

except for D3/D3x/D3s, which does offer it fulltime; but too pricey... (and D4, i suspect)

until they do... prosumer Canon PowerShots solely have my attention (like their G/S/SX/A series... more so... their G1 X), which all do have such 'exposure simulation live preview' (on an EOS LV dSLR, it is known as ExpSim LV)

0 upvotes
Altruisto
By Altruisto (Feb 1, 2012)

Even my LX3 and P7000 were simulating live preview when the shutter was half pressed. It's a manufacturer choice I think, not a powershot advantage. I used to have it on my S5is, and I recognize it was handy for Exposure lock.

0 upvotes
techmine
By techmine (Feb 1, 2012)

P510 on the other hand is the right step for that category of a camera. A longer zoom range with GPS can lure a lot of tourists and bird watchers. 42x is certainly power packed....

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 1, 2012)

So I am not seeing one thing different on the P310 other than 16MP. Oh goodie.

0 upvotes
Digitall
By Digitall (Feb 1, 2012)

Canon put the high-end compact cameras with G1X and a large CMOS sensor and make history by now and took the Nikon and other brands by surprise, as with its products ready to go out into the market without giving room for rivals manoeuvre. Canon at this moment is the king. I believe that the next top compact cameras from other brands will take account of more higher quality and larger sensor too. Canon set the bar even higher and others will have to follow. imo
I'm curious by upcoming reviews.

5 upvotes
Altruisto
By Altruisto (Feb 1, 2012)

Mmmmh.. Look at DXOmark score of G1X, it's at 60 and Nikon J1 with its tiny sensor is at 56. :) End of story. Canon are good, but not as innovative as Fuji, and lately, not thinking out of the box like Nikon. So you think Nikon can't add RAW to P300/P310, sure they can, but want these products to be seen as a bargain, improving on similarly priced cameras rather than cannibalizing its P7100 sibling.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

There is a lengthy thread of it in teh Canon forum ( http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1010&message=40466336 ). To put it short, DXO's results isn't necessarily dependable. The G1X has a definitely better sensor, high ISO-wise, than the Series 1.

Comment edited 28 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

Canon hasn't released a decent digital camera in ages. They are now being ridiculed even in Hollywood -- or have you not yet read up on the $16,000 EOS C300, hmmm?

Re. the G1 X, that looks like a 10-year old design that just now is going to come to market for some mysterious reason. Looks like hell, and has one of the most abominably spec'd lens on it of them all. Heck, the glass on the $330 Nikon P310 is better than the lens on the 800 bucks G1 X.

0 upvotes
techmine
By techmine (Feb 1, 2012)

P310 needed RAW support and possibly a GPS chip. That had been the main feedback from P300 users. You pick any review or user forums, the demand was clear. Yet Nikon came back with the same spec'ed camera (same lens and sensor). Simply beyond my understanding. Oh well Nikon wants to stay in 3.5 - 4 star category with their coolpix lineup, so be it. They don't want to compete with top performers from Canon/Fuji/Panasonic. Wonder why?

2 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Feb 1, 2012)

Nikon has a history of deliberately putting out feature-crippled products in order to protect their more expensive offerings. Canon have no mirrorless models, so can go to town with their G series compacts. Fuji and Ricoh have no dSLR, so likewise.

1 upvote
techmine
By techmine (Feb 1, 2012)

Yeah I agree but they (nikon) do that so much so that their whole coolpix lineup never gets the attention from enthusiasts. They must be selling a lot of these world wide to justify producing under achievers.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

@ Richard Murdey: Canon has tons of mirrorless models. And Fujifilm now has the X-Pro1, which some folk might bag in the DSLR category. The features are what the features are. You don't have to buy it, either. And there is no worldwide conspiracy against DP Review commenters, people.

0 upvotes
NowHearThis
By NowHearThis (Feb 1, 2012)

The paragraphs above say *optical stabilization* but the spec list says sensor shift... which is it DPR?

1 upvote
Bomple
By Bomple (Feb 1, 2012)

Well, sensor shift _is_ a kind of optical stabilisation...

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

Whichever it has, it doesn't really matter. The IS in the P300 is very good - unlike, say, the ones in the Oly m43 cameras. Based on my experience, I'd say it's much (at least 2 EV) better than the Pana one in the Pana ZS3 (which is a lens OSS).

0 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Feb 1, 2012)

It's interesting to see these companies trying to protect their product lines at the cost of inovation.

P300 series with a 1" "1 system" sensor and the same AF UMF would certainly have been technically feasible.

But then they would risk cutting into "1 system" sales.

So instead we got a P300 with pretty much everything the same but an extra button or two and the latest sony sensor.

And no RAW? What's with that?

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

"P300 series with a 1" "1 system" sensor and the same AF UMF would certainly have been technically feasible. "

Are you sure? That bright a 4x lens in such a size? I wouldn't be...

0 upvotes
Altruisto
By Altruisto (Feb 1, 2012)

Yeah, and much bigger optics to get that F1.8 aperture. You're joking, isn't it?

0 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Feb 1, 2012)

The P510 gives you all the disadvantages of a DSLR (size) with the poor low light performance of a P&S micro sensor.

3 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Feb 1, 2012)

This applies to all superzoom "bridge" cameras. The point is they are cheaper and still smaller than a dSLR+equivalent zoom lens.

1 upvote
Altruisto
By Altruisto (Feb 1, 2012)

I think it's for a prosumer category that don't want to have or to bring the DSLR. For DSLR owners, it's nonsense. I'm dribbling on Panny FZ150, but want that same sensor and performance in a TZ series shape, to be my pocket camera. But TZ don't have RAW :(

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Feb 3, 2012)

DSLRs are old school, folks, it's a MIRRORLESS WORLD out there now. And your optical viewfinders are going by the way of the horse and buggy, too.

0 upvotes
spidercrown
By spidercrown (Feb 1, 2012)

why are they so reluctant to put in a larger sensor. This is the high end compact...

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Feb 1, 2012)

They do have a larger-sensor compact camera in a completely different price class. And the Series 1 in addition. The P300/P310 is the budget line of their quality series.

0 upvotes
Altruisto
By Altruisto (Feb 1, 2012)

Well said Menneisyys

0 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Feb 1, 2012)

1000mm reach? Are they out of their minds? Who could possibly care to zoom in that far?

1 upvote
Naveed Akhtar
By Naveed Akhtar (Feb 1, 2012)

there are bird friends who would love to go even beyond that. call them out of their mind, but they will buy this ... without a second thought

Comment edited 37 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Gary S
By Gary S (Feb 1, 2012)

Plenty of applications for a superzoom if you're not going the DLSR & Supertelephoto route. Distant sports like boat racing, windsurfing, wave surfing, birding, etc, etc, etc.

Now, will the Nikon look good at that max zoom? Maybe they can surprise us.

0 upvotes
Shirrif
By Shirrif (Feb 1, 2012)

Me...

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Feb 1, 2012)

I am sure plenty of people want a super long lens, but do they want one that starts at 24mm and zooms 42x? Oh the optical compromises that surely have been made.

Comment edited 24 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
dbareis
By dbareis (Feb 1, 2012)

Me too and GPS, this camera is top of the list for now.

0 upvotes
photonius
By photonius (Feb 1, 2012)

For birding, surfing and other far away things it would be very useful. However, what I would like to see is how these long P&S cameras that have 800mm or longer actually perform. What is the quality of these pictures at these lengths compared to say a Canon 100-400L on an APS-C camera. Can you get the same quality with a 300mm lens on a dSLR, because the P&S are not that great, are do they offer significant improved resolution compared to a dSLR?? (Ignoring the ISO/light issue).

0 upvotes
Total comments: 179
12