Previous news story    Next news story

Preview: Canon PowerShot G1 X large sensor zoom compact

By dpreview staff on Jan 10, 2012 at 00:01 GMT
Buy on GearShop$549.00

Just Posted: Our hands-on preview of the Canon G1 X large sensor zoom compact. Canon is swimming against the tide somewhat with the G1 X - a camera that embraces the large-sensors used by most mirrorless cameras, but foregoing the interchangeable lenses to create a relatively compact all-rounder. The camera combines a 28-112mm equivalent, F2.8-5.8 stabilized zoom with a 14MP sensor just a fraction smaller than those in Canon's DSLRs. Could this be the photographers' compact that we always wanted the G series to be? Read our preview to find out.

Jump to:

Press Release:

Canon unveils The Master Compact – the revolutionary PowerShot G1 X

London, UK, 9th January 2012 – Canon today introduces the PowerShot G1 X – a revolutionary new compact camera with a large CMOS sensor, designed to produce DSLR levels of image quality and control in a highly portable metal body. Created for professional and serious photographers, the PowerShot G1 X creates a prestigious new category at the top of Canon's legendary G-series line-up, and redefines the
performance achievable from a compact camera.

A high-quality camera in its own right or the perfect complement to a professional DSLR, the PowerShot G1 X combines EOS sensor technology with DIGIC 5 processing power, a new precision Canon lens and extensive manual control – creating the finest compact camera Canon has ever produced. Designed to be highly portable, the PowerShot G1 X features a zoom lens which retracts into a discreet, robust metal body, providing photographers with an unimposing camera that delivers high quality images and superior handling.

Professional levels of image quality

Incorporating Canon-developed technologies and expertise trusted by professionals worldwide, the PowerShot G1 X offers a level of image quality previously only possible with a Canon DSLR. It's Canon's first compact camera to feature a large, 4:3 aspect, 14.3 Megapixel CMOS sensor measuring 18.7mm x 14mm – similar in height to the APS-C sensors used within EOS DSLR models. Featuring the same pixel size and structure as the EOS 600D, and a surface area approximately 6.3 times larger than the sensor in the acclaimed PowerShot G12, it provides DSLR image quality in a body small enough to carry anywhere.

The increased sensor size allows photographers to have greater control over the depth of field, with increased potential to creatively and artistically isolate a subject from its background. Improved dynamic range enables users to accurately capture shadows and highlights within the same frame, while the 14.3 Megapixel resolution allows for the output of large-sized prints, or permits images to be cropped for more powerful compositions.

The PowerShot G1 X also features a range of benefits that result from the advanced CMOS sensor technology developed within Canon's EOS range. On-chip noise reduction ensures images are clear, even at high ISO speeds, while a 4-channel read-out provides high speed image capture – ensuring fast, responsive performance in all conditions.

Combining the large sensor with the DIGIC 5 image processor, the HS System in the PowerShot G1 X sets new standards for low-light performance, with a maximum fullresolution ISO range of 100 to 12800 – a level never before seen in a Canon compact. Photographers can shoot using the ambient light in even the darkest of conditions, capturing natural shots with incredible detail and low noise – providing a powerful basis for low-light photography.

Precision lens technology

Developed using the same design, manufacturing and quality processes as the world renowned EF lens range, the lens in the PowerShot G1 X is built to achieve professional levels of image quality. Utilising Ultra high refractive index Aspherical (UA) elements and precision glass moulding technology, the lens achieves both a compact size and pin-sharp clarity for the most discerning of photographers. The lens retracts compactly into the camera body while offering a flexible 4x optical zoom range of 28mm – 112mm, giving photographers the option to use the zoom creatively and change the framing and perspective of their shot. A 6 blade aperture also combines with the largesized sensor to produce beautiful background blur.

To help ensure optimum image and Full HD movie clarity, the lens features a 4-stop optical Image Stabilizer (IS), allowing photographers to shoot in darker conditions and use shutter speeds up to four stops slower than would be possible without IS. The optical Image Stabilizer is supported by Intelligent IS which analyses the focal length, focal distance and type of camera movement and applies the most appropriate Image Stabilizer mode1. For example, when a panning motion is detected, Panning IS is activated and stabilises in only one direction for more artistic capture of movement across the frame. Hybrid IS technology is also included to capture macro subjects without the blur associated with shift camera shake.

The lens also includes an in-built 3-stop Neutral Density (ND) Filter, permitting the use of wider apertures in bright light to achieve a shallower depth of field, or to use slower shutter speeds to intentionally blur motion.

Extensive control

Following on from the control historically offered by the PowerShot G-series, the PowerShot G1 X offers Full Manual Control with shooting mode and exposure compensation dials for quick and intuitive access to a range of settings. For maximum control over the final image, the PowerShot G1 X fits seamlessly into the EOS photographer's workflow, supporting 14-bit RAW capture for smooth gradations and natural colours which can be fine-tuned using the supplied Digital Photo Professional (DPP) software.

Giving photographers the option to capture split-second action, the PowerShot G1 X features High-speed Burst HQ, capturing bursts of six full-resolution shots at 4.5fps to freeze fast-moving action. Alternatively, users can shoot continuously at 1.9fps right up to card capacity in JPEG format – ensuring longer sequences of action are captured.

High quality, Full HD movies

The PowerShot G1 X supports Full HD (1080p) movie capture instantly at 24fps, via a dedicated movie button. Taking advantage of the camera's large CMOS sensor, users can experience high quality movies, even in low light conditions, with the shallow depth of field associated with a larger sensor. Additionally, the 4x optical zoom can be used whilst filming, offering versatility, while stereo sound is also captured.

Professional handling

With its robust, stainless steel chassis and compact design, the PowerShot G1 X offers professional-quality handling. A large vari-angle, 7.5cm (3.0") PureColor II VA LCD screen allows photographers to shoot from virtually any angle or position, to get the composition they desire. The bright, high-resolution, 920k dot LCD provides a sharp, detailed platform for image framing and review, while an optical viewfinder (OVF) with dioptre adjuster gives photographers the option to shoot according to their individual style. A newly-integrated manual pop-up flash provides the option to add additional light to a scene, and, using the hotshoe, external Canon Speedlite flashes can also be used.

Advanced shooting modes

A range of advanced shooting modes are provided to assist photographers in capturing challenging scenes and situations. When shooting in very dark conditions without a tripod for example, Handheld Night Scene captures a high-speed sequence of shots, combining the data to produce one well-exposed image with minimal blur.

Additionally, High Dynamic Range (HDR) mode captures scenes with a particularly high range of bright and dark tones, taking multiple exposures and combining them to deliver rich detail in shadows and highlights.

Expanded potential through accessories

Ideal for EOS DSLR users, the PowerShot G1 X is compatible with a range of EOS System accessories, allowing photographers to instantly expand the potential of the camera. Canon's EX Speedlite flash units can be used for creative lighting, while the WP-DC44 waterproof case provides protection to a depth of 40m – ideal for shooting in the heavy rain or taking shots underwater – with full access to all controls.

An optional lens Filter Adapter, FA-DC58C, also enables photographers to use a range of filters, such as a circular polariser to enhance blue skies or remove reflections. For more even lighting when shooting macro subjects, a Macro Ring Lite adapter (MLA-DC1) allows Canon's Macro Ring Lite or Twin Lite flash units from the EOS System to be used.

Offering truly advanced levels of professional control alongside unprecedented image quality, the PowerShot G1 X is the ideal camera for professional and serious photographers who demand DSLR flexibility and quality from a compact camera.

PowerShot G1 X – key features:

  • Large 14.3 MP CMOS, DIGIC 5, HS System
  • Compact 4x zoom; Intelligent IS
  • 7.5 cm (3.0") vari-angle LCD; OVF
  • Full Manual, RAW, DPP
  • Full HD, HDMI
  • High-speed Burst HQ
  • Smart Auto
  • Extensive accessories
  • HDR mode and ND filter
  • Optional 40m waterproof case

Canon PowerShot G1 X Specfications

Price
MSRP$799, £699, €749
Body type
Body typeLarge sensor compact
Body materialMetal
Sensor
Max resolution4352 x 3264
Other resolutions4352 x 2248, 4352 x 2904, 3264 x 3264, 3072 x 2304, 3072 x 1728, 3072 x 2048, 2608 x 3264, 2304 x 2304, 1920 x 1080, 1840 x 2304, 1600 x 1200, 1600 x 1064, 1200 x 1200, 960 x 1200, 640 x 480, 640 x 360, 640 x 424, 480 x 480, 384 x 480
Image ratio w:h1:1, 5:4, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels14 megapixels
Sensor size1.5″ (18.7 x 14 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorDigic 5
Color filter arrayPrimary Color Filter
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400, 500, 640, 800, 1000, 1250, 1600, 2000, 2500, 3200, 4000, 5000, 6400, 8000, 10000, 12800
White balance presets7
Custom white balanceYes (2)
Image stabilizationOptical
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal
File format
  • JPEG Exif 2.3
  • RAW
  • DPOF 1.1
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)28–112 mm
Optical zoom4×
Maximum apertureF2.8 - F5.8
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampYes
Digital zoomYes (4x)
Manual focusYes
Normal focus range40 cm (15.75)
Macro focus range20 cm (7.87)
Number of focus points9
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFully articulated
Screen size3
Screen dots920,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT PureColor II LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (tunnel)
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed60 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Smart Auto
  • Program
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
  • Scene
  • Creative Filter
  • Movie
Scene modes
  • Movie Digest
  • Portrait
  • Landscape
  • Kids & Pets
  • Sports
  • Smart Shutter (Smile, Wink Self-Timer, FaceSelf-Timer)
  • High-speed Burst HQ
  • Handheld Night Scene
  • Beach
  • Underwater
  • Foliage
  • Snow
  • Fireworks
  • Stitch Assist
Built-in flashYes
Flash range7.00 m (via hot shoe EX series Speedlites, Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX, Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX)
External flashYes (Hot-shoe)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-Eye, Slow Sync, Fill-in
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Continuous with AF
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive2 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec, custom)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±2 (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingNo
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (24 fps), 1280 x 720 (30 fps), 640 x 480 (30 fps)
FormatH.264
Videography notesMiniature Effect (HD, L) 6fps, 3fps, 1.5 fps
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini)
Remote controlYes (Optional (RS60-E3))
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion NB-10L rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)250
Weight (inc. batteries)534 g (1.18 lb / 18.84 oz)
Dimensions117 x 81 x 65 mm (4.61 x 3.19 x 2.56)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingNo
GPSNone

Additional Images

190
I own it
105
I want it
28
I had it
Discuss in the forums
Our favorite products. Free 2 day shipping.
Support this site, buy from dpreview GearShop.
Canon PowerShot G1 X

Comments

Total comments: 791
12345
tilariths
By tilariths (Jan 9, 2012)

4/3 is the ideal sensor size for digital photography - outside of strictly professional needs.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Why is that exactly, please?

0 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Jan 9, 2012)

la mamma de la G
portrait <----> 5.8
water >------< oil

it looks like a solid camera (tradition of G series), well-packet with specs.
if it is say like a pregnant g12 wouldn't be the end of the world... BUT with
this sensor/lens awkward compromise seems more like a frankestG made
out of diferent canon divisions parts. just my opinion.

• to buy a larger coat
• to cut in half DSLR bag
• to unSCREW the lens and exchange them with… a 24-70L
• forget it (time heals)

gashô

0 upvotes
RoccoGalatioto
By RoccoGalatioto (Jan 9, 2012)

If only the optical viewfinder were reliable, it would be a non brainer for me. Let's see what turns out.

0 upvotes
FritsThomsen
By FritsThomsen (Jan 9, 2012)

Its SOOO ugly ... looks like a NIKONOS underwatercamera :)

3 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Jan 9, 2012)

It looks perfectly fine, like other Canon Gs, with a nice grip for the right hand, among other things.

Besides, cameras aren't fashion accessories.

3 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Jan 10, 2012)

"....Besides, cameras aren't fashion accessories...."

to non photographers they are!!

2 upvotes
jedinstvo
By jedinstvo (Jan 10, 2012)

"Its SOOO ugly ... looks like a NIKONOS underwatercamera"

I love my Nikonos! Got one 30 years old sitting right here in front of me!

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

Guys, I don't understand the negativity. Consider this camera as a new Sony R2. At last - we've waited seven(!) years for a decent replacement.

(If it does deliver excellent IQ, better than those of almost all current kit zooms, of course.)

0 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Jan 9, 2012)

The idiocy of Canon and Nikon shines again!!

Instead seeing what the m4/3 competition have done and being able to find just the right balance of lens and chip, they each royally screw up their new cameras.

Nikon, by making its chip way too small and reducing external controls. A slightly bigger chip, P A S M controls, and F-mount adapter would have sold me given its great auto focus.

And now Canon with a chip that's unnecessarily big and hence a lense that's unnecessarily slow and not wide enough. And no EVF and non-interchangeable lenses and crippled video functions are all huge oversights.

Why do they not realize that so many of us who are invested in their DSLR and lenses already wouldn't jump to Fuji or Panasonic if we got what we wanted from Nikon or Canon?

This marketing idiots at N and C continuously frustrate me.

9 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Jan 9, 2012)

Good post, my sentiments exactly. If they'd only ask us what we actually want

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Jan 9, 2012)

if only you both would be bright enough to build a camera!!
your company would make even more profit then the loosers from nikon and canon make...

ironie off....

6 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Jan 9, 2012)

The technology is there. We know it can be done. You don't HAVE to build a chip that big and therefore be compromised in how fast a lens you can have.

It seems like the cream doesn't rise to the top in these companies, the idiot marketers do.

0 upvotes
Jon Stern
By Jon Stern (Jan 9, 2012)

There's no pleasing some people!

Nikon 1: "Oh, but the sensor is too small! Whaaaa!"
Canon G1 X: "Oh, the sensor is too big! Whaaaa!"

Come on people! The industry is producing amazing cameras and now is the best time ever to be a photographer. The tools we have available are quite incredible. If there's one you don't like just don't buy it. It's clearly not designed for the kind of photographer you are. But quit the incessant complaining!

People on posting on this site (and others) are sounding like a load of spoiled brats. You've never had it so good and still it's not enough.

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
17 upvotes
Todd Walker
By Todd Walker (Jan 9, 2012)

So by your logic, you are only allowed to speak negatively about products if you make that product yourself? I can't complain about what BMW does because I don't make cars? I can't complain about what Samsung does because I don't make TVs? I can't complain about what Canon does because I don't make cameras? Really???

2 upvotes
Todd Walker
By Todd Walker (Jan 9, 2012)

Well said Jon. You are absolutely right.

0 upvotes
racketman
By racketman (Jan 9, 2012)

a non-interchangeable lens is hardly an oversight, it is aimed at shooters who do not want the bother of a lens collection and do not need mega zooms or want a more compact but capable back up in their dslr bag. I think it will sell well.

1 upvote
Jon Stern
By Jon Stern (Jan 9, 2012)

@Todd Walker:

I would just invite you to consider that we live in a society of abundance with amazing consumer choices.

Focusing on what's wrong never leads to happiness in life. When we get attached to a mental picture of how things "should be", we end up disappointed and dis-empowered.

If instead we think about the amazing opportunities these products provide us with, we will end up inspired and ultimately far more satisfied.

0 upvotes
hiplnsdrftr
By hiplnsdrftr (Jan 9, 2012)

exactly

0 upvotes
Redteg94
By Redteg94 (Jan 9, 2012)

Your comment about the sensor being too big and the lens too slow doesn't make a whole lot of sense. Making the sensor smaller and the lens faster would get you nowhere, both in terms of Dof control and image quality.

1 upvote
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 9, 2012)

@racketman

Exactly! Until now if you wanted a smaller camera than a DSLR it either had a tiny sensor, a bunch of lenses to deal with most of which ruined the whole "smaller than a DSLR" thing anyway, or a short prime lens. This camera is exactly what a lot of people have been waiting for. A real step up in image quality in a camera that has a zoom lens but still actually fits in your coat/cargo/vest pocket or easily with all your other gear in your camera bag. It will be the perfect compromise camera for a lot of people.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Jan 10, 2012)

you can speak as you want.. at least i can, living in a free country.
but i also can say that people have no clue.
especially people who have no clue about technology AND how things work in business.

0 upvotes
robmanueb
By robmanueb (Jan 10, 2012)

I can't help but agree with Raztac's original premise that a melding of the Nikon 1 and this Canon would be nice. A Nikon with controls and or a more versatile Canon (better lens, smaller body (smaller sensor?)). If it has a fixed lens it needs to go to 24mm on the wide and start a f2 don't care how far the zoom goes too, anything over about 80mm is jam (screw in a telephoto adapter if you need more). Go the raztacs of the world, dare to dream. Nikon and Canon do listen, the market dictates. The changes will come about as they are logical requirements for photography just takes a bit of time. I would love to own either a Nikon 1 or the G1 though I see a better camera on the horizon in the form of the next generation.

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Jim
By Jim (Jan 10, 2012)

I agree with Jon Stern...the whining is just too much. Some people need to come up for air. Let's see how it performs before all the knee jerk negativism. It's just a camera...not a cure for cancer.

Jim

0 upvotes
Faisalee
By Faisalee (Jan 10, 2012)

100% Agree with Jon Stern :)
It drives me nuts looking at tonz of the complains about each and every camera that is announced! If nothing wrong, then there are complains about DPR and AMAZON earning $$$ from these posts... :-\

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jan 10, 2012)

Purely negative remarks sure won't help anything.

To "build" a camera might consist simply of putting together an ideal spec list. Just don't expect to get a FF sensor in a P&S body and have an F/1.8 400mm lens that collapses. Nor can you simply ask for a <$500 camera that "has all I want (don't ask me for details) and just takes perfect pictures." On the other hand, it may just be the case that no camera will seduce a person who already has $XXXX sunk into an existing kit and plenty of pride too.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Here comes yet another "purely negative remark."

Iceberg ahead! The once might SS CANIKON may indeed be sinking, folks. At least the passengers are jumping into the lifeboats and pedaling over to SS SONY, SS PANASONIC, SS FUJIFILM, and SS OLYMPUS.

For Canon to cook up a price of $800 for the G1 X makes me question their sanity, frankly. Why pay double for a basic $400 point-and-shooter, well I haven't a clue.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

Basic point and shoot cameras don't have sensors bigger than your M4/3 Fuji, Frank.

0 upvotes
ERA1953
By ERA1953 (Jan 9, 2012)

I just can't believe there are so many whiners out there. Someone comes out with something new and possibly better and all you do is complain its not the same as the old one (size) or it's not what YOU would buy, or you think they should have done it your way. Well in a perfect world you take whats available and if you don't like it no-one is forcing you to buy one. I will be waiting to see what camera all the complainers build I'm sure it will be a wonderful item.
P.S. The canon should be a great contender for the competition. Check aperture on your cameras, there aren't too many that fast on a compact.

11 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Jan 9, 2012)

Because we know they can do better (aka GH2) Read my post above. A slightly smaller chip from Canon with a faster and wider lens would do it.

They are purposely crippling their new cameras so as to keep you buying and buying and buying. It's frustrating and not to mention unethical in my opinion. Don't give the 'free market' argument. It's like controlled obsolescence or building something that falls apart shortly after its warranty runs out.

When profit reigns over quality it's unethical. People smell dishonesty a mile away.

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"Because we know they can do better (aka GH2) Read my post above."

While the GH2 has some freaking good features (its video resolution still hasn't been beaten by not even the Nex-7 or the A77, let alone cheaper cameras from all manufacturers), its high ISO and DR has a lot to be desired. Canon's (serious) DSLR cameras have always been better in this regard.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 9, 2012)

@ERA1953

I agree completely. This camera fills in a gap in the camera market that has needed filling for a long time. It is the first truly high end fixed zoom lens compact camera. This is also the first fixed lens zoom camera announced in a long time that actually improves on what has been done before in a significant way.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

G1 X is a pretty good camera at around US$400, I suppose. But at $800, it's a no brainer. As in "no, my brain tells me not to buy it for 800 big ones."

0 upvotes
hiplnsdrftr
By hiplnsdrftr (Jan 9, 2012)

Was hoping for a slightly smaller, no flip-screen, no zoom, no gimmicks, with fast prime lens.

However, I do applaud Canon for finally releasing a big sensor compact.

2 upvotes
lvovsky
By lvovsky (Jan 9, 2012)

i love the flip-screen! Glad they kept it.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 9, 2012)

A camera like that is too much of a niche camera for canon to bother with. Way more people want a camera like this one. One of the reasons the Fujifilm X100 is so expensive is because there just isn't a large market for a fixed, prime lens camera.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Jan 10, 2012)

how many people with a X100 you know?
beside some photography bloggers on the web? :)

i know 2 myself.... but i know 9 people with a G11 or G12.

4 upvotes
sdmike48
By sdmike48 (Jan 9, 2012)

Looks reminiscent of the medium format film rangefinders marketed by Fuji in the 1980's and 90's. Truly what goes around comes around stylistically at least.
I have a G9 and a G12, but I don't see myself running out to drop a grand on this one.

1 upvote
HiRez
By HiRez (Jan 9, 2012)

Looks like a nice camera, but I wouldn't say f/2.8 minimum aperture on a sensor smaller than APS-C real allows "greater control over the depth of field". Not much you can really do with that. And the 2.8 is probably at the wide end so if you want tight shots with OOF backgrounds, you'll be dealing with f/5.8 at the long end, which is really bad.

0 upvotes
Redteg94
By Redteg94 (Jan 9, 2012)

60mm f/5.8 is easily fast enough to isolate a subject from the background: the aperture is 10.3mm, which is nearly as large as my 24/1.4 when shot at f/2. And trust me those settings have no trouble with blurring out a background.

In point of fact, 16mm f/2.8 (like the 16-35L) can pretty easily separate a subject, though said subject has to be relatively close.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Canon actually had to cripple the video recording frame rate to 24fps (longer shutter speed) to compensate for this slow lens.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

Just as likely didn't want to spend the money on more memory for the buffer. Conclusions drawn from zero facts aren't helpful.

0 upvotes
dpreviewprov
By dpreviewprov (Jan 9, 2012)

As a comparison:

The new Canon G1 X sensor size: 18.7mm x 14 mm
Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds cameras' sensor size: 17.3 x 13 mm

Canon EOS 600D/T3i sensor size: 22.3 x 14.9 mm

So, the sensor is G1 X is just a tad larger than Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds cameras but smaller than Canon's own APS-C sensor.

1 upvote
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Jan 9, 2012)

I find it funny that the other recently announced large sensor long zoom camera only has 42 comments after 4 days.

And this one has over 330 comments in just a couple hours.

Goes to show you how little people care about the Fuji X-S1.
A camera I look forward to trying out.

2 upvotes
treepop
By treepop (Jan 9, 2012)

Fuji makes cameras? I jest I jest.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"Goes to show you how little people care about the Fuji X-S1."

It has a way smaller CMOS than the Canon and is plagued by the orbs. The new Canon, however, can pretty much be compared to no other than the Sony R1 itself. No wonder people would like to know whether the Canon lives up to the hype, IQ-wise.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Here come the Crazy Fujinion White Orbsters, everyone! Lock up your women and children!

Sony, Panasonic, Fujinon, etc. are the future. Canikons -- the past. Case example: Canon G1 X. Back to the future now.

0 upvotes
treepop
By treepop (Jan 9, 2012)

Honestly I think the all in one lens solution is better for this segment. The current line up of lens's from other manufacturers is less than stellar and really make these "portable" cameras way to large. However I wonder why the G1 X didn't come with an f/2.8 zoom!? The depth of field is already going to be hampered enough. Why offer it with an f/5.8? That's like a f/9.28 on a t3i and will probably be (don't know the multiplier) an f/10.44 on this camera! Good luck getting any sort of shallow depth of field with that.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Good luck capturing any video with that in any sort of low-light and indoors. This is a "Black Hole of Calcutta" camera, folks.

I was thinking, if a start-up Chinese company would bring something like the G1 X to market for $249, we would probably be laughing at it. But it being a Canon, the $799 price is somehow justified?

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

I'm sure having clean images up in the higher ISOs won't be useful in low light.

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Jan 9, 2012)

Canon.... This would have been ok if it was G12 sized perhaps which was already well oversized for a tiny sensor.

As it stands it is a massive point and shoot with slightly better image quality. I would rather a much more compact XZ1 or similar which would offset the odd sensor size no doubt with a two stop speed advantage.

Depth of field control with an f5.6 lens. Awesome.

Might as well cannibalize your own precious Rebel DSLRs before Oly, panasonic, fuji and Sony and Nikon do.

Predictably short sighted. Hopefully there is also a plan B.

1 upvote
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Jan 9, 2012)

G12 is perfect size, just as my G10, not oversized at all. Smaller and it is fiddly and really not user friendly. The G1x is thicker ... but the other two measures are just slightly larger. I think I would like to use it. One cm less thickness would be nice, I agree, but nothing that would really bother me.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 9, 2012)

at least its larger sensor than past dcams fills in the gap in Canon's own lineup, and offers compact enough form with in-between dof (still moderately high; but not overly high like small sensored dcams before it), and serves nicely, where only my FF dSLR does all the other creative shallower dof duties (or super low light hi-res duties).
this is a lot more 'pocketable' than a FF dSLR... that's for sure.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

Slightly better image quality? First thing, we haven't seen the image quality. Second, the sensor is HUGE by comparison. It has the same pixel pitch at my 7D, and only a little smaller in area. I would wager a considerable increase in image quality over the G12 in dynamic range, resolution, and ISO performance. I think the problem with the posts regarding this camera is that there is a clash between DSLR owners and P&S owners.

0 upvotes
cxsparc
By cxsparc (Jan 9, 2012)

It probably can compete with mirrorless systems with the kit lens or a small DSLR with kit.

However, at least 30 % of the fun I am having with my Nex 5N is when I mount a 50mm and shot at 1.8 to 2.8. The Canon can't since the 2.8 are at eq. 28mm and at 50 is will probably have 5.0.

So playing with low DOF is just not really possible with this camera.

Other issues: quite heavy. Ugly IMHO. HD video not up to Nex. More expensive than Nex with kit.

HECK! Just read more carefully, that camera does NOT have an APS-C sensor!
It is just a tad over M43. So another camera fitted into a almost non-existing niche. Of course Canon doesn't want to jeopardize the sales of their small rebel DSLRs, same approach as Nikon.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 9, 2012)

low DOF with APS-C is no more possible (to APS-H)
just as G1X (is to APS-C):

DOF relativity (for same vertical subject scale):

MedFmt = 0.72x FF (~33mm ht)
FF = 1.0x (24mm sensor height)
APS-H = 1.3x FF (~18.5mm)
APS-C = 1.6x or 1.5x FF (~15mm or 16mm)
APS-(G1X) = 1.8543x FF (14mm)
43d = 2.0x FF (13mm)
1"(Nikon) = 2.7x FF (~8.8mm)

MedFmt:FF = 1.375
FF:APS-H = 1.3
APS-H:APS-C = 1.23 to 1.16
APS-C:APS(G1X) = 1.07 to 1.14 [G1X fills this gap*]
APS(G1X):43d = 1.08
43d:1"Nikon = 1.47

*but this gap is smaller than APS-H over APS-C for DOF; so the NEX can hardly be that much different for DOF than G1X has over 43d systems; whereas even APS-H differences are greater than APS-C (NEX) than it is over G1X.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"Other issues: quite heavy. Ugly IMHO. HD video not up to Nex. More expensive than Nex with kit."

... and considerably lighter and smaller than the Nex with the 18-55...

0 upvotes
VadymA
By VadymA (Jan 9, 2012)

Since it is not really pocketable, why not making the lens barrel 1.0-3.0cm longer and increase zoom to something like 10-15x and reduce macro distance from 20cm to 1-5cm. Then it would be an ideal all-in-one camera for me. But with current specs, the G1X doesn't look interesting enough.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Jan 9, 2012)

10-15x ? With that size sensor? I think you shall be more realistic. Maybe some time in the future such lenses of reasonable size are possible, but not now.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

10-15x, small and still bright travel zoom? Is it some kind of a joke?

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

Considering the advancements in lens technology over the last few decades I'd put this type of technology about a hundred years out.

Comment edited 12 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Yeah, the new Fuji 770 has that.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

With a sensor the same size at th G1 X? No, it doesn't. Big zooms are a lot easier when the sensor is much smaller.

0 upvotes
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (Jan 9, 2012)

Canon have just taken the G12 and stuck a bigger sensor in it. All G-users (and there are quite a few) will be pretty happy at this development. I still maintain that my G9 produced far better images than my PanaLumix G1 and GF1 and at far less cost.

1 upvote
Superka
By Superka (Jan 9, 2012)

As there must be fast contrast detect Autofocus, we hope to see it ( CD Autofocus) in next APS-C DSLR.
G-series was never a small camera, so its a good idea to paste large sensor there.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"As there must be fast contrast detect Autofocus, we hope to see it ( CD Autofocus) in next APS-C DSLR."

I wouldn't bet on it - as it's CAFD "only", I don't think it'll rival the Nikon 1. (And not even the latest m4/3 models, I'm afraid...)

0 upvotes
MysticX
By MysticX (Jan 9, 2012)

It's a heavy camera and not too compact as 65mm width is not a pocketable camera.

Perhaps it will sell to a certain extent and will be replaced with something else soon while dropping the price to get rid of the excess stock.

Maybe some girls will buy it as it fits properly in the purse and some benevolent uninformed rich fathers will buy it for their children as a a super gift believing that's the dslsomething they want.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

Still much more pocketable than the directly comparable Nex5+18-55 or the Sony R1.

0 upvotes
filmrescue
By filmrescue (Jan 9, 2012)

Ha....I'm sure it's a perfectly capable camera but I'm not sure of how the people over at Canon define "revolutionary". I think it's the same word they used when after about 4 years of flip screens on other manufacture's cameras they finally introduced it on one of theirs. Looks like a great camera and I think it has an interesting feature set but "revolutionary"....come on! I'm not sure that by omitting the option to interchange lenses on your mirrorless camera, makes it "revolutionary".

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"Ha....I'm sure it's a perfectly capable camera but I'm not sure of how the people over at Canon define "revolutionary"."

Come on... if it does deliver on the IQ (and AF speed) front, it'll be THE new Sony R1. A lot of people already call it the R2 in the local Canon / m43 fora.

0 upvotes
filmrescue
By filmrescue (Jan 10, 2012)

I loved and owned a R1. I would probably really like this camera too but if you put out a camera that's basically like an R1, it might be a great idea because there's a place for such a camera but wouldn't the R1 be the revolutionary camera? Anyway...love the look of this camera but the only thing revolutionary about it is that you can't interchange the lens as you can with other large sensor mirrorless cameras.

0 upvotes
rurikw
By rurikw (Jan 10, 2012)

For me the focal length range on my R1 is much more useful. Mais chacun a son gout.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Canon has lost all credibility after the worldwide fiasco involving their EOS C300 release on 3 November 2011. We are all still laughing at everything they promised at the press conference -- and that lame half-baked bird that they then delivered.

And after the wording of this G1 X press release -- I will never believe anything any Canon press release claims for any of their cameras or lenses.

0 upvotes
Jepz Dee
By Jepz Dee (Jan 9, 2012)

Canon should have incorporated interchangeable lens with this updated G series camera. Fuji will soon be introducing the X1 Pro. And Panasonic the GX1. Canon seems immune to market pressures for a mirrorless interchangeable system.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"Canon should have incorporated interchangeable lens with this updated G series camera."

Why should they? They have a DSLR line. This is completely different (even the target audience is different - mostly ex-P&S folks not wanting to swap lens) and by incorporating the lens in the design by migrating a lot of glass inside the body itself, they have made the entire camera much smaller. Just compare the size to that of the Nex + 18-55 combo...

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

"Why should they? They have a DSLR line."

Well, for one thing, because people are staying away from flipping-mirror DSLRs in droves. It's all mirrorless cameras these days, the rage is, didn't everyone get the memo? :-)

0 upvotes
dlknktk4866
By dlknktk4866 (Jan 9, 2012)

If your making lenses, what difference does it makes whether it's an SLR type camera or a compact version. I don't get Canon's logic. Looks like Sony with their NEX series, (if more lenses become available) may be the best game in town at present. And where in the world have the "fast lenses" gone ?? Used to be a fast lense was the answer for low light ?? DUH !!

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
Thomas Traub
By Thomas Traub (Jan 9, 2012)

Another great cam from Canon. The only thing that's wrong is the title of this preview. The price and the size of the Canon PS G1X is on the level of a 4/3-cam and in my opinion this cam targets exactly on the same user-group as this mirrorless 4/3-cams.

The Canon PS G1X seems to be near twice as big as the LX5 (if you put 2 LX5-bodys together you have only a little bit more volume than this new canon) so it is not realy compact - although the meaning of "compact" is relativ, it depens on the sice of your pockets ;-)

This is obviously a great cam but not a pocketable one. For me my LX5 is hard on the limit to be "pocketable", the G12 is not and the G1X neither.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

Hey, Canon can call this thing whatever they like -- "Master Compact," "1.5-incher," whatever. They decided not to call it a M4/3 sensor fixed lens camera, however, so I don't quite see why DP Review should do so in their place.

0 upvotes
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Jan 9, 2012)

I love it and it's NEARLY exctly what I've been waiting for, a compact, integrated lens, travel camera with emphasis on image quality. Except the emphasis swung too far on the chip side.

Sure, an APS-C chip is to be commended, but by going so large they ended up with a very limited 4x lens on there. Not as wide as needs to be, and certainly not long enough to get distant objects.

So the "Compact Travel Zoom" with focus on image quality category is starting to get some near misses, but still no bullseye.

And limited to 1080p24? How about 30.
Limited to 720p30? How about p60.
The C300 rocks, now show some forward thinking in the rest of the line.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

What are you talking about? This thing doesn't have an APS-C sized chip. Didn't anyone get the memo or read the specs?

Re. Canon's last attempt to take Hollywood by storm, their EOS C300 "rocks" so hard indeed that its originally rumored list priced of US$20,000 is already down to $13,000. And still falling. And the camera is not even out yet!

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"And limited to 1080p24? How about 30. "

Canon's all (decent) new cameras (e.g., the S100) are severely hampered by 24p only at 1080p. They may have a slow NMOS?

1 upvote
hunk
By hunk (Jan 10, 2012)

24p is the preference of a lot of people, the slower shutter speed gives you that nice blur in movement... like the movies

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

24fps is awful in video, and was a cost saving measure in celluloid based motion pictures. Then since the mid-1950s, they were shooting movies at 30fps (Todd AO), and now, increasingly in 48fps and even 60fps.

But the Canon camera processor here must be so under-powered, it cannot even handle ordinary 1080p30. Besides, people who buy this overpriced whatever-cam are not buying it to make "movies," most likely. Just videos. For that, you need 30p, duuuuh.

0 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Jan 9, 2012)

People here trashed the Nikon 1, because it has a relatively small sensor, and because it lacks enthusiast-oriented controls.

The Canon GX1 has a much larger sensor, and has enthusiast-oriented controls.

It's safe to say that it will sell quite well.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

Canon G1X uses the 4/3 / Micro 4/3 size sensor that other manufacturers have been making for years. It's just Canon calls it something else. Consider these dimensions, pls:

Canon G1X sensor size: 18.7 x 14.0mm.

Olympus and Panasonic 4/3 & M4/3 sensor size: 18.0 x 13.5mm.

http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glossary/Camera_System/sensor_sizes_01.htm

It's not all that huge of a difference, is it now? I know Canon calls it a "large sensor." Olympus and Panasonic does not.

And for $800 -- who exactly is going to be buying this thing, you think?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jan 9, 2012)

That article is rather old and appears to have some incorrect data in it. Four Thirds sensors are 17.3x13mm. Four Thirds is a copyrighted term, so Canon couldn't call its sensor Four Thirds even if it was the same size.

The sensor in the G1X is 18.7x14mm, which is slightly larger (actually very similar to the 'oversized' Four Thirds sensors in the GH1 and GH2, but with the ability to illuminate the whole area).

2 upvotes
migus
By migus (Jan 9, 2012)

"actually very similar to the 'oversized' Four Thirds sensors in the GH1 and GH2, but with the ability to illuminate the whole area"

Good observation! Seems that G1X was targeted at MFT, X10, nikon1... and not trying too hard to compete neither against APS-C, nor against NEX in particular.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Fact remains, Canon fudged their press release here to try to present something else than what they in fact had delivered. They did the same exact thing with that last tragic press release of their EOS C300 video camera back on November 3, 2011.

I don't know how their PR firm is, but they are untrustworthy as of late. Why not simply tell the truth, for once? Oh yeah, and don't beat up on the existing competition in your belated press release when you are the last one at the table to come out with a large sensor advanced digital camera.

0 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Jan 9, 2012)

Does this camera have manual video mode?

Forgive me for asking, but as usual, DPReview have given no consideration to users of video during a preview.

The days of "stills" cameras being the domain of stills only shooters, have long gone. It's about time features such as manual video mode were detailed as being available or not. Please consider the video users in your preview and reviews.

Please also consider adding a "Manual Video Mode" section to the specification list of all cameras and putting a YES or NO next to it. I'm sick and tired of waiting for a full review only to have my dreams smashed when I discover they have crippled the camera with a "Made for Idiots" automatic mode.

This is my ideal camera if it provides manual video mode, but if it doesn't, I'll be avoiding it in the same way I avoid every other camera that treats me like an idiot. Canon are superb with the video implementation on their DSLR's, so hopefully it has filtered down to this little beauty.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

No facts on that, but I would bet 2 bits and an apple that is, like you say, an "idiots-only" camera then it comes to video recordings. So is the identically priced Fujifilm X-S1, unfortunately. All-auto all the time, no manual controls at all.

0 upvotes
dpbrad
By dpbrad (Jan 9, 2012)

Thanks pumeco -- couldn't agree more. For videographers, this is critical. And also requires some thought as to what exactly a "Manual Video Mode" means. A Panasonic LX5, for example, is surprising for a P&S: it allows the user to set the shutter speed (that's the main thing) and adjust the aperture but then messes things up by making the minimum ISO 400! So you can't shoot outdoors in any significant light at the desired shutter speeds of 1/50 or 1/60. Of course a P&S isn't going to have ND filters, so you'd have to add a variable ND -- which might be overkill. Still, I'd generally include the LX5 in the "Manual Video Mode" category.

But with the Panasonic GF1 you have to defeat the auto settings for video by shooting shutter-priority (to prevent the camera from changing it behind your back), then setting the ISO (as low as possible), and using the AE-lock button (to prevent exposure hunting). It works, but it's convoluted. So, no, it would not "Manual Video."

0 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Jan 9, 2012)

I think I'll go insane if this turns out to be yet another crippled camera.

The specification cries out for it. Just imagine having those controls at your fingertips for video use along with that nice big sensor (and the bokeh that goes with it), and fits, at a push, in your pocket!

0 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Jan 9, 2012)

Sorry, dpbrad, I cross-posted with you :-)

Yes, absolutely, but seriously, if this Canon had even those minor limitations of the LX5, I would be more than happy. In fact I would be using an LX5 myself if it wasn't for it being plagued with CCD streaks in video mode. If Canon play like idiots and cripple this camera then we really can't win. We can have a Panasonic with a CCD not suited to video, or we can have a Canon with an amazing sensor but no control over video.

Sony HX9v users don't even have a most essential exposure lock in video mode, which is absolutely ridiculous on a camera that is their "Premium Creative Compact".

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Andy Westlake
By Andy Westlake (Jan 9, 2012)

If you take the time top read the preview more thoroughly, you'll find the answer to your question. There's no manual exposure control in movie mode.

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Jan 9, 2012)

Get the GH2 if you want the ultimate hybrid camera with manual video mode that has better quality video than any DSLR.
It is also not much larger than the G1 X.
http://vimeo.com/32204670
http://vimeo.com/32520456

0 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Jan 9, 2012)

Cheers Andy, my apologies, I hadn't read the full preview.

When I said "preview", I was referring to the main preview announcement page (the one we see first with the specifications list). It would be a good gesture for video users if we could have a part added about the video implementation. There is mention in this preview, for example, that the camera is "fully manual". Technically though, it isn't fully manual if the video mode is automatic. The fact that Canon have a video mode on this camera, automatically makes video part of the specification. If the video side of things isn't fully manual, then that means the camera as a whole isn't, either.

Manufacturers are talking nonsense when they claim it to be a fully manual camera when it isn't. They're not cliaming "manual stills mode" or "automatic video mode", they're simply claiming "fully manual camera".

Anyway, nice one Canon!
Unbelievable.

I shall now proceed to smash my head against a brick wall.

0 upvotes
pumeco
By pumeco (Jan 9, 2012)

Sorry Joe, cross-posted again :-P

I've been considering the GH2, but to be honest Panasonic have seriously alienated me agains their gear. People were complaining that the GF cameras were too "dumbed down" and that there was no control over video. Panasonic say hey, worry not, were working on a new solution to this, one that'll give you control.

Yeah, like hell, it turned out with a whole new badge (the GX) and it's still as utterly useless as the previous GF efforts in the video department. The price of the GX suggests a premium product for which one would expect manual control.

But it fails badly, and that has put me right off Panasonic.

0 upvotes
vin 13
By vin 13 (Jan 9, 2012)

G1X? There's already a Panasonic GX1, couldn't they have called it G something else? Looks like logical progression from the G9 / G10 / G11 etc.

2 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

Today, ALL camera manufacturers seem to love both "G" and "X" :)

0 upvotes
jhinkey
By jhinkey (Jan 9, 2012)

Would be perfect for me except:
- No EVF
- Starts at 28mm instead of 24mm FX equivalent
- Slow at the tele end (85mm at f/4 would be better)

I've wanted Nikon to come out with such a beast with their APS-C senors, but perhaps this will now spur them to do this with the CX sensor.

Some may think this would compete with the N1 system, but it would motivate folks like me who will not be buying an V1 anytime soon to purchase an addition camera to my FX DSLR.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Jan 9, 2012)

There is an EVF, and it articulates. I am not sure why people would want a battery draining EVF through the eyepiece. This camera seems to address all my complaints about the s100 and the G12. Will have to wait to see a real review and then see if that bigger sensor can perform well.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"I am not sure why people would want a battery draining EVF through the eyepiece. "

Particularly if it's of lower quality / higher latency etc. than that of the Nex-7 or the A65/A77...

0 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Jan 9, 2012)

So nearly good, but a clear miss from Canon.

No 24mm wide, no proper usable viewfinder, slow lens, poor battery life, very expensive, looks like a Sony Mavica from the 80's.

Nearly good but I'll wait for the G1X mark 2

5 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"No 24mm wide"

Canon seems to be hating 24mm - most of their cameras start at 28mm.

"no proper usable viewfinder"

This "tunnel" is better than nothing - can still be used for framing (and you won't really need MF).

"slow lens"

Come on - most kit zooms sold with APS-C and m43 cams (and even the Nikon 1!) are considerably slower. Only the biggest and most expensive kit glass (e.g., the new Sony A 16-50) are brighter.

"very expensive"

$800? Just compare the price to an (in size) comparable camera like the G3 + the 14-42X + EVF combo...

0 upvotes
rt22306
By rt22306 (Jan 9, 2012)

If it had a 24mm-135mm (equiv.) zoom, the reviews of this model would be required reading for me. Sounds promising and interesting though, but let's see what it can do.

0 upvotes
sorinx
By sorinx (Jan 9, 2012)

While I like the camera, I will not buy it. I do not want to pay 7-800EURO for a fixed lens camera.

1 upvote
John A Clark
By John A Clark (Jan 9, 2012)

Just what the market wanted ... 5 years ago...

7 upvotes
SteB
By SteB (Jan 9, 2012)

I can't quite work this out. Canon could have produced this camera years ago. Okay it wouldn't have had a Digic 5 processor etc. However, there was no technological barrier to producing this type of camera before m4/3 was announced. It hasn't even got an EVF. I was waiting to see what Canon produced because I'd really ike to consolidate my gear into one system, instead of having a Canon DSLR system, and a m4/3 compact system. But without an inter-changeable lens mount, and an EVF, it's about as useful to me as a chocolate fireguard, but a lot more expensive. It's also as much as a GH2, and not much smaller.

It's clearly a camera designed to avoid any conflict with Canon's DSLR system rather than being built for a particular demand. Because of this it'll have limited appeal. Standard zooms are my least used lenses.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 9, 2012)

for me, inevitable Canon sooner or later would do such a G1X and keep it an integrated system (not an interchangeable lensed one; although no surprise if they later do that in parallel as a mini-EOS)

it only goes to show that 43d and m43 sensors could also have been much larger too in the current body.

when 43d systems came out initially, they still lacked a 'compact' (any claim to it was defeated) 24-120mm equivalent, and when it did show up as their 12-60... it exceeded the size and weight of my older APS-C liveview CMOS sensored Sony R1. it took several generations of 43d and m43 models to bring it all down to below the R1 size (which is still lighter than any dSLR equivalent)... thus, nobody has truly offered ultra-wide fast zooms in 'compact' form (probably the most difficult to offer than any other combo)

0 upvotes
Esa Tuunanen
By Esa Tuunanen (Jan 9, 2012)

Wording is exactly that avoiding competing with their low end cash cow models of DSLR system.
Before low end DSLR was sold to everyone and their dog especially Minolta did quite a few well over pocket size "compacts" and Canon also wanted share of that prosumer market and released camera named PowerShot Pro1... which was killed shortly after to make room for first low end DSLR kits with paper weight quality optics.
And like Canon neither is Nikon wanting to create mirrrorless competition for their DSLRs.

Really pocketable compact with good zoom range isn't possible except with compact size sensor so this is pretty much marketroid design for brand blinded average Joe when you can have small mirrorless body and basic kit lens in same size with option of getting other lenses for special needs.

3 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 9, 2012)

ooo, ok... a 1.5" sensor (not 43d)... touch smaller than APS-C... unexpected but a pleasant surprise.

1 upvote
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Jan 9, 2012)

I suspect that Canon designs better CMOS sensors than Panasonic. It will be interesting to see how the image quality of this camera compares to that of micro four thirds cameras.

0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Jan 9, 2012)

TBD: With all of canon's prowess in CMOS sensor tech, this is the 5-th reincarnation of an old sensor (600D as the 4-th). A few generations behind today's NEX and MFT sensors. Additionally, the addition of the LiveView read circuitry to dSLR sensors typically increases the noise by more than few dB. Hence don't expect stellar *raw* noise and DR from the G1X sensor. Future versions of the sensor will improve, but this is just the 1st try with a known stable sensor (aka cheap). Mitch

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"A few generations behind today's NEX and MFT sensors. "

Well, not even the GH2 / G3 can come close to the DR and high ISO of recent Canon DSLR's... it's only Sony's stuff that is definitely better, not those of Pana.

0 upvotes
OneGuy
By OneGuy (Jan 9, 2012)

Bit too aggressive for unobtrusive shooting (might be the intent). It better fit in a pocket -- does not look cool around the neck (kinda techie-modular). But if it shoots great pictures ... (dpr should get 4-5 samples for the studio scene).

Don't know how the announcement can say 'sport' without saying 'auto focus speed is ...'

As to low light, if dpr doesn't do a low light shootout, they can at least arrange for one. I'll bring in my (3-year old design) GF1 w/20mm. I accept the no-IS handicap and we'll do it without a tripod.

Price? Oh, its your money.

0 upvotes
Dabbler
By Dabbler (Jan 9, 2012)

If someone ports the CHDK hack to this model it will have some really cool features! I have the V1 and am salivating at all the G1X knobs and buttons. The fastest Nikon zoom is f3.5, so the larger sensor and f2.8 make this camera tempting to me. This is clearly aimed at serious photogs, whereas the V1 is clearly marketed to the amateur crowd. Of course a lot of pros seem to like the Nikon 1, I'm a big fan of its wicked fast auto focus, but when the sun goes down I slip my Oly XZ-1 in my pocket ;-)

2 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 9, 2012)

But... this camera does not have a f/2.8 zoom, the lens is f/2.8-5.8, so it is pretty dim where you need light mostly, at the long end. With the V1 you can use the f/2.8 zooms as well as the f/1.4 primes also. This Canon has a fixed lens.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

"This is clearly aimed at serious photogs"

If that is indeed Canon's stated aim, they will fail at it indiscriminately.

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"If that is indeed Canon's stated aim, they will fail at it indiscriminately."

Indeed. It's NOT a "serious" camera - "only" a fairly inexpensive and compact second camera - or an everyday camera for the P&S crowd wanting something of better quality than, say, the S100 (apart from the lack of GPS and 24mm, of course).

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 9, 2012)

So far so good. Finally!!! My G10 replacement... ;) Well, maybe, but looks promising.

0 upvotes
SteB
By SteB (Jan 9, 2012)

"It's Canon's first compact camera to feature a large, 4:3 aspect, 14.3 Megapixel CMOS sensor measuring 18.7mm x 14mm – similar in height to the APS-C sensors used within EOS DSLR models."
I use a Canon system, but even I know that this is actually closer in size, and indeed aspect ratio to the 4/3 sensor 17.3 x 13.0 mm. The one in the GH2 is I believe 19mm wide.

0 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 9, 2012)

http://www.usa.canon.com/CUSA/assets/app/images/cameras/powershot/PS_G1X/features/g1x_feature_01d.jpg

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 9, 2012)

Why do you think DPR is wrong regarding the sensor size? 18.7x14mm is 4:3. Don't confuse the Four Thirds format sensor size with 4:3 aspect ratio. Both cameras are 1.33, or 4:3, the Olympus (or FourThirds) cameras with a smaller sensor, that's all.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Shame on Canon for coming it with a sensor that is less than 1mm different in either direction to that of an Olympus-Panasonic Micro 4/3 sensor. But then they somehow call it "large" and indicate some type of relationship to an APS-C sized sensor. Just how low can they go?

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

Not less than 1mm.

0 upvotes
John McCormack
By John McCormack (Jan 9, 2012)

The GX1 makes me love my XZ-1 all the more. Better luck next time, Canon. You've been resting on your laurels for way too long.

0 upvotes
Coffee and Camera
By Coffee and Camera (Jan 9, 2012)

What a great compact camera that could complement my SLR while maintaining almost the same IQ of raw file and high ISO capacity. I guess I should start now saving $66.58/month to buy this in a year. Hope it's price lowers by a hundred at that time.

here's the video link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Vs3UqMDdpg

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

I understand that if you buy any new DSLR from Canon, they will give away this G1X for free? :-))

Well, they really should.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

CONT. FROM BEFORE:

And the price is $800!! Whaaaaat?? They must have meant 400 bucks, surely, right?

Altogether now -- no, I don't really think so.

Re. how this thing looks -- was it really designed in East Germany in 1964, or what? Looks it, too. :-)

Frankly, I am not at all surprised at this G1X, based on their most recent camera attempts (EOS C300, etc), this is also rather weird camera-lens combo with lame specs. At almost any price.... let alone at a price of $800, wow!! Sadly, this is nothing better or worse than I am expecting out of Canon these days. Even though I did purchase Canon product myself as recently as June 1973, I am now thinking that my Canon brand royalty is slowly faltering. There G1X is not going to make me think otherwise.

Anything else up your sleeves, Canon dudes?

0 upvotes
Azfar
By Azfar (Jan 9, 2012)

'as recently as June 1973' ....

*cough*

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

"Re. how this thing looks -- was it really designed in East Germany in 1964, or what? Looks it, too. :-)"

What's wrong with that? The Practica cameras were actually pretty nice.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Well, I have a PRAKTICA BMS ELECTRONC SLR myself. Designed and built in the GDR from the good ole' days. I think it is stunning looking, actually. But the Canon G1 X built in 2012 is definitely uglier.

0 upvotes
NormSchultze
By NormSchultze (Jan 9, 2012)

And still no GPS . Thats a real deal breaker for travelers like me.

0 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Jan 9, 2012)

Really? You wouldn't buy a camera because it didn't tell you where you were?

3 upvotes
Bryan Costin
By Bryan Costin (Jan 9, 2012)

Automatic geotagging is pretty handy on vacations.

1 upvote
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Jan 9, 2012)

It might be handy but to dismiss a camera merely because it doesn't have a feature no camera had a couple of years ago??

6 upvotes
Applehead
By Applehead (Jan 9, 2012)

I prefer cameras without GPS. I don't want the cost, size, weight or battery drain, and only the latter is selectable of the four detriments if I like the camera otherwise. I know where I shoot my pics and label accordingly. I save the second six-pack for after the hike.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

"Created for professional and serious photographers."

Yeah, right. I guess that's because it has a combination kids & pets scene mode? But with a M4/3 sized sensor? Contrast-detect AF with only 9 focus points? And no chance in hell to go wider than 28mm, or closer than 112mm using the dark fixed lens? I mean, here is a really, really pedestrian little 4x range zoom that has a variable iris of f/2.8 to f/5.8. F-5.8 at 112mm? Whaaaaat?

Video mode is not much to write home about, either. Basic H.264, and then just to capture NTSC's 30 frames per second, the resolution has to drop down from Full-HD to 1280x720 only. Pretty lame, when less than $300 cameras can easily record 1080p30 video these days.

TBC

0 upvotes
Zds
By Zds (Jan 9, 2012)

Yeah, and fixed lens is now going to cut it either. Professionals and serious photographers know to ask for swappable lenses. Because jacket pocket bodies are replacing, not complementing prosumer DSLRs.

1 upvote
Bryan Costin
By Bryan Costin (Jan 9, 2012)

I think a lot of pros are fine with a fixed-lens camera, but I doubt they'd ask for this particular fixed lens. It's not wide, not long, and not fast. And not even that small.

3 upvotes
Esa Tuunanen
By Esa Tuunanen (Jan 9, 2012)

Advertising is legalized lying and unfortunately those who lie most get most buyers because average Joe is dumb as house brick and believes all crap shoveled down his throat.
And product announcement news of magazines and web sites never ever correct marketing lies and plain repeat all the crap excreted by marketing.

This thing doesn't offer any flexibility of system camera body or controls of higher end system cameras and neither it has pocketability of real compacts but its still advertized with those and will sell if not for else then because it's Canon.

2 upvotes
massimobenenti
By massimobenenti (Jan 9, 2012)

It will all come down to how good the combination between lens and sensor is. Sensor alone does not tell everything taking into account that YES size matters.
If they designed the zoom specifically for that sensor ...Canon wins again.

The only other appealing camera to me would be a new 12-16 MP (real) Sigma DP3, if ever. I mean by a quality standpoint. May be a Sony 7 but have shortcomings too (price being the first issue, way too high).

Anyway it would not have such appealing features as wireless flash with dedicated speedlites, HD movie, tilt screen...

Just a question to DPR staff ..Why then strong points are viewed as weaknesses. Why? It is obvious that a builit in sliding cap is not a plus! it is a strong minus! Just to make an example.

The zoom lens might have been a f/2,2-4 but that would have meant a much bigger size (I'd LOVE it even more). If 200/400 ISO will be good enough with this sensor that will not be a problem in my opinion.

Sorry for my English...tried my best.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

Apparently Canon had just invented the 4/3 / M4/3 sized sensor, folks! They call it a "1.5-incher," though.

Oh, wait up.... someone else had already invented it before?

Your English is good -- but IMO the camera is anything but. To be very deferential to it, it is probably a $250 camera with a $150 dark 4x zoom lens on it. What was Canon thinking with the 800 shekel list price, I haven't a clue, frankly. Anyone?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Jan 9, 2012)

So, compared to the Rebel T3i/600D: it's smaller, metal bodied and offers a slightly longer, similarly bright lens, plus extensive external controls.

And the launch price is $100 cheaper (comparing list-price to list-price). It's hard to see that as over-priced.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

Canon EOS Rebel T3i camera has an interchangeable lens system, so with a proper lens mount adapter, yuo can use any one of the world's finest optics on it. With the G1X here, you are stuck with the el-cheapo Canon fixed lens. Big difference in my view.

0 upvotes
Absolutic
By Absolutic (Jan 9, 2012)

Disagree with Richard here. T2i/T3i is already very small, has better optical viewfinder (while I agree that having any optical viewfinder is better than Electronic Viewfinder or none) and is priced similarly. However, if this lens started at 24mm and went to lets say, 120, 24-120, I'd probably look at it. Most small cams routinely start at 24 or 25mm these days, 28mm is pedestrian. In fact I was using my wife's SX230 few days ago and had to take a group shot at night, and I was surprised at how far back I had to go to take that shot (SX230 also starts at 28mm).

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 11, 2012)

Yeah, I had sort of thought that Canon was good at lenses, but when they make a zoom for the G1 X that can only go down to 28mm, I am not longer sure. Either they "lost it," or else they have cheapened it.

0 upvotes
patrick c tom
By patrick c tom (Jan 9, 2012)

With this sensor leap...could one expect a leap in IQ and maximum print size(20x30 or larger)...or will it be fairly modest...

0 upvotes
Applehead
By Applehead (Jan 9, 2012)

Print size comes down to pixel count, quality of color (luminance noise, amount of noise reduction needed, and color authenticity) in those pixels, and lens clarity. You can easily compare the pixel count here to other cameras, and remember, a doubling of resolution in pixels requires four times as many pixels, not simply double. As for color quality and noise reduction, the larger sensor should provide better color quality with less noise than that of a smaller sensor, and sharper images since less noise processing should be required. We don't know much about the lens clarity at this point. To evaluate the first two, go to various sites and compare test images from a Canon T3i to a Canon SX230HS, for example. While the pixel counts are not identical, you'll get a close answer to your question.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jan 9, 2012)

Honest question: is there a single m4/3 or NEX lens that offers the same focal lengths and aperture range as the G1X's fixed lens? How big or how small?

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Jan 9, 2012)

Don't ask about the size (apart from the new 14-42 X) ;-) And ALL kit zooms are darker at 28mm.

0 upvotes
DemonDuck
By DemonDuck (Jan 9, 2012)

It's almost as big and heavy as one of their low end DSLR's. Where's the advantage?

1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Jan 9, 2012)

Slightly smaller, and the single lens has a more comprehensive focal and aperture range than the typical T3i kit. The G1 X may also be less vulnerable to sensor dust.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jan 9, 2012)

The lens on a DSLR doesn't fold into the body.

4 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

"the single lens has a more comprehensive focal and aperture range than the typical T3i kit."

Yeah, it is a short range, 28-112mm zoom lens that is quite dark. And there is nothing you can do about it once you buy the G1X, either.

"The G1 X may also be less vulnerable to sensor dust."

Right, and so are all the world's $100 & up digital cameras.

0 upvotes
Nic Walmsley
By Nic Walmsley (Jan 9, 2012)

Having the option to put a small, fast prime on this would have been nice. Perhaps later this year Canon will release a similar camera with interchangeable lens mount?

For me, the look and feel is very boring, boxy... even cheap looking.

1 upvote
Pap38
By Pap38 (Jan 9, 2012)

Well depending on the IQ it may be what some of us are looking for. I’m tired of carrying lens all the time. The MFT allure hasn’t captivated me. Just give me a camera with a decent zoom range and adequate focus speed along with good IQ and I’ll be happy. Would suspect this one will arrive at a $700.00 range though. Time will tell.
pap

4 upvotes
eddie_cam
By eddie_cam (Jan 9, 2012)

Battery life just 250 shots? Ouch!

5 upvotes
Stollen1234
By Stollen1234 (Jan 9, 2012)

>Battery life is really bad

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jan 9, 2012)

It's a big camera with a big sensor, but I agree it would be better with more juice.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 9, 2012)

"It's a big camera with a big sensor"

Q: Since when is a Micro 4/3 sensor considered "big?" I guess it is bigger than if it was a 1/2.3-inch sensor, so that is what makes this one "big?"

0 upvotes
migus
By migus (Jan 9, 2012)

Likely more w/ LCD turned off... and in line w/ the latest crop of NEX and NX etc. that depend on their bat-draining LCD / EVFs. But it's still a small battery for such a hulking 'compact'.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 791
12345