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Preview: Canon PowerShot G1 X large sensor zoom compact

By dpreview staff on Jan 10, 2012 at 00:01 GMT
Buy on GearShop$549.00

Just Posted: Our hands-on preview of the Canon G1 X large sensor zoom compact. Canon is swimming against the tide somewhat with the G1 X - a camera that embraces the large-sensors used by most mirrorless cameras, but foregoing the interchangeable lenses to create a relatively compact all-rounder. The camera combines a 28-112mm equivalent, F2.8-5.8 stabilized zoom with a 14MP sensor just a fraction smaller than those in Canon's DSLRs. Could this be the photographers' compact that we always wanted the G series to be? Read our preview to find out.

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Press Release:

Canon unveils The Master Compact – the revolutionary PowerShot G1 X

London, UK, 9th January 2012 – Canon today introduces the PowerShot G1 X – a revolutionary new compact camera with a large CMOS sensor, designed to produce DSLR levels of image quality and control in a highly portable metal body. Created for professional and serious photographers, the PowerShot G1 X creates a prestigious new category at the top of Canon's legendary G-series line-up, and redefines the
performance achievable from a compact camera.

A high-quality camera in its own right or the perfect complement to a professional DSLR, the PowerShot G1 X combines EOS sensor technology with DIGIC 5 processing power, a new precision Canon lens and extensive manual control – creating the finest compact camera Canon has ever produced. Designed to be highly portable, the PowerShot G1 X features a zoom lens which retracts into a discreet, robust metal body, providing photographers with an unimposing camera that delivers high quality images and superior handling.

Professional levels of image quality

Incorporating Canon-developed technologies and expertise trusted by professionals worldwide, the PowerShot G1 X offers a level of image quality previously only possible with a Canon DSLR. It's Canon's first compact camera to feature a large, 4:3 aspect, 14.3 Megapixel CMOS sensor measuring 18.7mm x 14mm – similar in height to the APS-C sensors used within EOS DSLR models. Featuring the same pixel size and structure as the EOS 600D, and a surface area approximately 6.3 times larger than the sensor in the acclaimed PowerShot G12, it provides DSLR image quality in a body small enough to carry anywhere.

The increased sensor size allows photographers to have greater control over the depth of field, with increased potential to creatively and artistically isolate a subject from its background. Improved dynamic range enables users to accurately capture shadows and highlights within the same frame, while the 14.3 Megapixel resolution allows for the output of large-sized prints, or permits images to be cropped for more powerful compositions.

The PowerShot G1 X also features a range of benefits that result from the advanced CMOS sensor technology developed within Canon's EOS range. On-chip noise reduction ensures images are clear, even at high ISO speeds, while a 4-channel read-out provides high speed image capture – ensuring fast, responsive performance in all conditions.

Combining the large sensor with the DIGIC 5 image processor, the HS System in the PowerShot G1 X sets new standards for low-light performance, with a maximum fullresolution ISO range of 100 to 12800 – a level never before seen in a Canon compact. Photographers can shoot using the ambient light in even the darkest of conditions, capturing natural shots with incredible detail and low noise – providing a powerful basis for low-light photography.

Precision lens technology

Developed using the same design, manufacturing and quality processes as the world renowned EF lens range, the lens in the PowerShot G1 X is built to achieve professional levels of image quality. Utilising Ultra high refractive index Aspherical (UA) elements and precision glass moulding technology, the lens achieves both a compact size and pin-sharp clarity for the most discerning of photographers. The lens retracts compactly into the camera body while offering a flexible 4x optical zoom range of 28mm – 112mm, giving photographers the option to use the zoom creatively and change the framing and perspective of their shot. A 6 blade aperture also combines with the largesized sensor to produce beautiful background blur.

To help ensure optimum image and Full HD movie clarity, the lens features a 4-stop optical Image Stabilizer (IS), allowing photographers to shoot in darker conditions and use shutter speeds up to four stops slower than would be possible without IS. The optical Image Stabilizer is supported by Intelligent IS which analyses the focal length, focal distance and type of camera movement and applies the most appropriate Image Stabilizer mode1. For example, when a panning motion is detected, Panning IS is activated and stabilises in only one direction for more artistic capture of movement across the frame. Hybrid IS technology is also included to capture macro subjects without the blur associated with shift camera shake.

The lens also includes an in-built 3-stop Neutral Density (ND) Filter, permitting the use of wider apertures in bright light to achieve a shallower depth of field, or to use slower shutter speeds to intentionally blur motion.

Extensive control

Following on from the control historically offered by the PowerShot G-series, the PowerShot G1 X offers Full Manual Control with shooting mode and exposure compensation dials for quick and intuitive access to a range of settings. For maximum control over the final image, the PowerShot G1 X fits seamlessly into the EOS photographer's workflow, supporting 14-bit RAW capture for smooth gradations and natural colours which can be fine-tuned using the supplied Digital Photo Professional (DPP) software.

Giving photographers the option to capture split-second action, the PowerShot G1 X features High-speed Burst HQ, capturing bursts of six full-resolution shots at 4.5fps to freeze fast-moving action. Alternatively, users can shoot continuously at 1.9fps right up to card capacity in JPEG format – ensuring longer sequences of action are captured.

High quality, Full HD movies

The PowerShot G1 X supports Full HD (1080p) movie capture instantly at 24fps, via a dedicated movie button. Taking advantage of the camera's large CMOS sensor, users can experience high quality movies, even in low light conditions, with the shallow depth of field associated with a larger sensor. Additionally, the 4x optical zoom can be used whilst filming, offering versatility, while stereo sound is also captured.

Professional handling

With its robust, stainless steel chassis and compact design, the PowerShot G1 X offers professional-quality handling. A large vari-angle, 7.5cm (3.0") PureColor II VA LCD screen allows photographers to shoot from virtually any angle or position, to get the composition they desire. The bright, high-resolution, 920k dot LCD provides a sharp, detailed platform for image framing and review, while an optical viewfinder (OVF) with dioptre adjuster gives photographers the option to shoot according to their individual style. A newly-integrated manual pop-up flash provides the option to add additional light to a scene, and, using the hotshoe, external Canon Speedlite flashes can also be used.

Advanced shooting modes

A range of advanced shooting modes are provided to assist photographers in capturing challenging scenes and situations. When shooting in very dark conditions without a tripod for example, Handheld Night Scene captures a high-speed sequence of shots, combining the data to produce one well-exposed image with minimal blur.

Additionally, High Dynamic Range (HDR) mode captures scenes with a particularly high range of bright and dark tones, taking multiple exposures and combining them to deliver rich detail in shadows and highlights.

Expanded potential through accessories

Ideal for EOS DSLR users, the PowerShot G1 X is compatible with a range of EOS System accessories, allowing photographers to instantly expand the potential of the camera. Canon's EX Speedlite flash units can be used for creative lighting, while the WP-DC44 waterproof case provides protection to a depth of 40m – ideal for shooting in the heavy rain or taking shots underwater – with full access to all controls.

An optional lens Filter Adapter, FA-DC58C, also enables photographers to use a range of filters, such as a circular polariser to enhance blue skies or remove reflections. For more even lighting when shooting macro subjects, a Macro Ring Lite adapter (MLA-DC1) allows Canon's Macro Ring Lite or Twin Lite flash units from the EOS System to be used.

Offering truly advanced levels of professional control alongside unprecedented image quality, the PowerShot G1 X is the ideal camera for professional and serious photographers who demand DSLR flexibility and quality from a compact camera.

PowerShot G1 X – key features:

  • Large 14.3 MP CMOS, DIGIC 5, HS System
  • Compact 4x zoom; Intelligent IS
  • 7.5 cm (3.0") vari-angle LCD; OVF
  • Full Manual, RAW, DPP
  • Full HD, HDMI
  • High-speed Burst HQ
  • Smart Auto
  • Extensive accessories
  • HDR mode and ND filter
  • Optional 40m waterproof case

Canon PowerShot G1 X Specfications

Price
MSRP$799, £699, €749
Body type
Body typeLarge sensor compact
Body materialMetal
Sensor
Max resolution4352 x 3264
Other resolutions4352 x 2248, 4352 x 2904, 3264 x 3264, 3072 x 2304, 3072 x 1728, 3072 x 2048, 2608 x 3264, 2304 x 2304, 1920 x 1080, 1840 x 2304, 1600 x 1200, 1600 x 1064, 1200 x 1200, 960 x 1200, 640 x 480, 640 x 360, 640 x 424, 480 x 480, 384 x 480
Image ratio w:h1:1, 5:4, 4:3, 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels14 megapixels
Sensor size1.5″ (18.7 x 14 mm)
Sensor typeCMOS
ProcessorDigic 5
Color filter arrayPrimary Color Filter
Image
ISOAuto, 100, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400, 500, 640, 800, 1000, 1250, 1600, 2000, 2500, 3200, 4000, 5000, 6400, 8000, 10000, 12800
White balance presets7
Custom white balanceYes (2)
Image stabilizationOptical
Uncompressed formatRAW
JPEG quality levelsFine, Normal
File format
  • JPEG Exif 2.3
  • RAW
  • DPOF 1.1
Optics & Focus
Focal length (equiv.)28–112 mm
Optical zoom4×
Maximum apertureF2.8 - F5.8
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampYes
Digital zoomYes (4x)
Manual focusYes
Normal focus range40 cm (15.75)
Macro focus range20 cm (7.87)
Number of focus points9
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCDFully articulated
Screen size3
Screen dots920,000
Touch screenNo
Screen typeTFT PureColor II LCD
Live viewYes
Viewfinder typeOptical (tunnel)
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed60 sec
Maximum shutter speed1/4000 sec
Exposure modes
  • Smart Auto
  • Program
  • Shutter priority
  • Aperture priority
  • Manual
  • Scene
  • Creative Filter
  • Movie
Scene modes
  • Movie Digest
  • Portrait
  • Landscape
  • Kids & Pets
  • Sports
  • Smart Shutter (Smile, Wink Self-Timer, FaceSelf-Timer)
  • High-speed Burst HQ
  • Handheld Night Scene
  • Beach
  • Underwater
  • Foliage
  • Snow
  • Fireworks
  • Stitch Assist
Built-in flashYes
Flash range7.00 m (via hot shoe EX series Speedlites, Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX, Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX)
External flashYes (Hot-shoe)
Flash modesAuto, On, Off, Red-Eye, Slow Sync, Fill-in
Drive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Continuous with AF
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive2 fps
Self-timerYes (2 or 10 sec, custom)
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing±2 (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB BracketingNo
Videography features
Resolutions1920 x 1080 (24 fps), 1280 x 720 (30 fps), 640 x 480 (30 fps)
FormatH.264
Videography notesMiniature Effect (HD, L) 6fps, 3fps, 1.5 fps
MicrophoneStereo
SpeakerMono
Storage
Storage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMIYes (Mini)
Remote controlYes (Optional (RS60-E3))
Physical
Environmentally sealedNo
BatteryBattery Pack
Battery descriptionLithium-Ion NB-10L rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA)250
Weight (inc. batteries)534 g (1.18 lb / 18.84 oz)
Dimensions117 x 81 x 65 mm (4.61 x 3.19 x 2.56)
Other features
Orientation sensorYes
Timelapse recordingNo
GPSNone

Additional Images

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I own it
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29
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Canon PowerShot G1 X

Comments

Total comments: 791
12345
nemark
By nemark (Oct 1, 2012)

This camera (as many other cameras) has 3:4 aspect ratio sensor. In this case, it is 4352 x 3264px. And as many other p&s cameras it also offers other ratios, and among them is 4:5. If you want maximum use of this sensor for that ratio, it should be 4080x3264px, but Canon always makes it a vertical 4:5 crop from a horizontal 3:4 sensor, so it is only 2192 x 3264 (almost half of max possible resolution for that ratio from a given sensor). Can somebody explain me why is it so and who needs it?

0 upvotes
tort
By tort (Mar 2, 2012)

I am going to buy this just because I have been buying and using religiously G series cameras since the G9 and love them for what they are.....they one thing I cannot stand is Canon going with a pop up flash! For me it is simply one more thing to get broken and break and a pain in the butt compared to having a flash built in ready to go in the previous versions. I would be curious to hear what their reason was for doing this, but unless it was out of necessity due to having limited room or something for the new sensor they f#$ked up in my opinion. My Panasonic LX5 for example always has the flash getting accidentally popped up when pulling out of its little carrying case...as I said one more moving part ready to get ripped off or break. Lame!

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Mar 14, 2012)

The G1X's lens is larger than on previous G-series bodies, so obviously they felt the need to increase the height of the flash and increase its distance from the lens to increase flash clearance. Just look at the G1X and G12 side by side:

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/canong1x/images/Sidebyside.jpg

Keeping the flash in the same position as previous G-series cameras would have obviously increased the potential for producing a lens shadow from the flash.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Seagull TLR
By Seagull TLR (Jan 29, 2012)

Canon PowerShot G1 X Camera User Guide
http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/7/0300006817/01/PowerShot_G1_X_CameraUserGuide_EN_v1.0.pdf

0 upvotes
dubstylz
By dubstylz (Jan 29, 2012)

All i know is... I WANT ONE, this will sit nicely along side my DSLR. It's that simple :)

Comment edited 11 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Nathebeach
By Nathebeach (Jan 22, 2012)

Wow. All this talk about fuzzy sections off center.
Let's say you have two cameras, one is a 35mm and one a 4 x 5, and both have "normal lenses." The DOF is radically different for each normal lens at the same F stop, even though both are so called normal lenses. It has to do with the distance the light travels. On large format cameras, like 8 x 10, just gettng the entire FOV, even stopped down, in focust is a challenge.

So when I hear all of this talk from you pixel peeping Toms, I think the point is being missed. Large sensors have their advantages and disadvantages. I personally like being able to have control of the DOF and I much prefer being able to achieve my desired bokeh at F2.8 rather then having to go to some extreme F1.4 where image quality suffers. To each their own I guess.

2 upvotes
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 19, 2012)

PowerShot G1 X (G1X)
Expected Release Dates:

FutureShop.ca (Canada): 2012-Feb-24
Vistek.ca (Canada): 2012-Feb-29
Amazon.com (USA): 2012-Mar-31

anyone else?

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 17, 2012)

Just wanted to see the counter role over to triple seven.

2 upvotes
Zuzullo
By Zuzullo (Jan 15, 2012)

User Manual download?
WHERE please?

Comment edited 15 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Jan 15, 2012)

NOTE! This camera, which is supposed to be advanced point-and-shoot, don''t have those stupid modes like SPORT, NIGHT PORTRAIT, etc, which Canon DSLR up to 60D have. Its mode dial, combined with exposure compensation is much better then any Canon DSLR mode dial. What a shame on Canon.

1 upvote
Sdaniella
By Sdaniella (Jan 19, 2012)

NOTE:
Higher end Pro/Prosumer EOS dSLR Models don't use compensation dials because they don't use them as often. Compensation is a P&S AE feature.
:)
Advanced Prosumer Shooters manage even faster shooting entirely in Full M (which is what G1 X offers). However, the compensation dial is available for those still in P&S beginner AE modes. Shame on you if you still use AE modes ('easy beginner' modes).
What is missing however, is the dedicated ISO button, which advanced EOS LV dSLRs do and should have, except 60D or lower. This is a disappointment given past G's had it.

0 upvotes
cgrubbs
By cgrubbs (Jan 21, 2012)

Don't be absurd. Every Pro photographer I know uses auto modes in one mode or the other. Me, I love to use Av mode and keep my aperture consistent to control depth of field, and then use use exposure compensation to bracket or adjust exposure as required by the lighting and subject.

4 upvotes
Shutterbug108
By Shutterbug108 (Jan 14, 2012)

A bigger zoom and a bigger grip like that of a bridge camera might be nice. Hope that can happen in the next iteration.

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

Holy crap. All the trash talk for the past couple of days has been proven as such, trash. The sample images are stunning. The lens is excellent. ISO shots throughout the range are in a class of their own.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Pretty bad sample images, you mean? Talk about fuzzy fuzz.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

I'm glad you're not buying this camera, Frank. I would feel like a real idiot if you and I had the same equipment.

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

Best of luck, Frank. I hope you don't waste any more time talking about a camera you think is such trash. Your time really would be better spent using whatever equipment you have. I've been looking around and after years of research I suspect I've found exactly the camera that suits my needs. Go concentrate your energy on one that suits your needs. Your opinion is clear, as is mine.
Peace out to this bizarre and disorganized comment section! Back to the forums!

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Does anyone know (or can guess) what the wide-open aperture will be at 75, 80 and 85mm? I'll be using those focal lengths far more often than 105 to 112 range, and I'm thinking it might be around f4 to f4.5, which would be very good. There have been some complaints about the f5.8 at 112, but to me that's a minor issue.

Comment edited 47 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

F4.5 sounds about right, but could be a bit higher maybe?

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Actually, F5.6 at 85mm, ha-ha-ha-ha!!!

And F4.5 at 50mm, he-he-he-he!!!

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

There have been comments about corner blur in the test shots posted on the French site. Something we usually don't have to worry about on a point and shoot might be coming into play: a narrow depth of field. The shots use a fairly wide aperture and partially zoomed in, and it appears that items closer to the plane of focus are less blurry. I don't doubt there is some corner softness, but items protruding a few inches are likely getting out of the DoF. At 3 feet the depth of field of a 7D at those settings is around 6 inches, roughly three in front and three behind

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
MortonH
By MortonH (Jan 13, 2012)

Pre-order price in Australia is AU$1,199. Way too high, which is a shame cos I really like it.

1 upvote
Razaghi
By Razaghi (Jan 13, 2012)

I had a G9. Because IQ is very important in my work and sometimes I need a small camera to carry, I bought a Sony Nex 5. I was really disappointed and after some months I started to use the G9 again. The shots made with G9 have better IQ, in low light it makes better stills and movies (low light movies by Nex are a disaster)... Try it yourself and compare.
Besides, with the standard lens is the Nex (and other mirrorless cameras with interchangable lenses) much bulkier. With other lenses, it is even as big as a dslr and for me missing its point.
Big senor means compromises on other fields, otherwise there is the S100 with 24-120 f.2-5,9, RAW and a sensor like the other G series cameras. I also would love to have a compact Nikon D3 or Canon1D, but it is not possible.
I will for sure try this one as my compact camera, of course only if its IQ will be better than my G9.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jan 13, 2012)

Interesting about the Nex 5, probably not true of the Nex 5n.

Too bad the Canon G9 and this new bigger sensor camera don't have an f/2.0 lens unlike the Canon G1, G2, G3, G5, G6, and oh the Panasonic LX5.

1 upvote
Razaghi
By Razaghi (Jan 13, 2012)

I think I am not going to risk buying another Nex. Nex5 has an APS sensor and still not to be compared with the G9. the IS is also not good. I have tried all possibilities on the Nex and still disappointed. if I want to risk my money, it will be G1x. of course I can not say anything about other 4/3 or big sensor mirrorless cameras.
For such a big sensor having an f.2, the lens would be enormous, for me missing again the point of having a light(er) camera to carry with, when needed. As you know, the size of the lens is relative to the F number, and of course the focal lenght.
I find it a pitty though that Canon has not equipped G1 with GPS... and I still do not know of any seperate GPS device by Canon.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Yes indeed, this camera should have a GPS and an f/8-f/16 lens.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

I know GPS makes me a better photographer.

2 upvotes
William Woodruff
By William Woodruff (Jan 13, 2012)

Perfect!

OK, maybe not perfect, but pretty darn good spec, and very close to the travel camera I had hoped they would build. Using a non-interchangeable lens has several advantages. First of all, it reduces complexity, size, and weight. That is always a good thing, but it is expecially important if you are trying to build a small camera with a big sensor.

F 2.8 is as fast it gets for zooms on any 4/3 or larger sensor. The size and weight penalties go up exponentially in building larger aperture lenses for larger sensor lenses. Good compromise for a travel camera.

Also, non-interchangeable lens allows for a simple non-ttl optical veiwfinder that adds very little size/weight. Compare this to almost every other compact camera's complete lack of optical. Compare to the the relatively few that have clumsy, expensive add-on evf's. Good compromise.

I assume (because it will be easy to do) that they will have digital lens correction built in. It should be a great compact camera.

8 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Very smart analysis, William. A lot of the complainers here just don't get it. But they don't have to. It's a wonderful world of all kinds of cameras, photographers, and photos.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

William, did you copy that straight out of the Canon media kit? Every negative this camera has you had immediately turned into a positive, wow.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

Kind of like when someone talks about their opinion as though it were fact read right from the gospel? Yeah, annoying.

0 upvotes
mrdarcy
By mrdarcy (Mar 29, 2012)

Hey Francis, do you work for Sony or Nikon or Fuji? I'm in the market for a G12 upgrade, must have optical viewfinder and not cost 000's, and the G1x seems ideal. What's the competition, I can't see anything obvious?

0 upvotes
Fujifilm Finepix F30
By Fujifilm Finepix F30 (Jan 13, 2012)

Stupid idea, Canon. You are no different from Nikon in releasing this new camera. Protecting your dsLR and lens business will not do you any good in the long term! Sigma and Tamron are releasing lenses for the NEX. Fuji is coming up with X-Pro1 with 3 excellent prime lenses to start with! Stop fighting the inevitable! Release your own version of Sony's NEX 7 or Fuji's X-Pro1 to stop them from eroding your Canon dSLR sales! Do it before its too late!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

You are a confused soul aren't you. Photographers (people who capture photographs) will never use a mirror-less system long term. I know I've tried to see what work I could do with them and I can tell you they are useless. The G serious has and always will be a Photographers back up camera not these wanna be mirror-less systems. I read an article a while back (have to pull it out again) that said the mirror-less market had the shortest life expectancy as either point and shooters would never upgrade any kit and people developing their photography while liking the product moved quite quickly to DSLR's as they had more control and an established accessories range. As for saying before it's too late. I believe the the mirror-less market will die off over time. Canon are one of the few companies to understand the long term market and not waste time on short term activities.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jan 13, 2012)

Right there's no one likely to upgrade the original "mirrorless" system, aka Leica M.

With a big sensor and a good lens, mirrorless cameras like the Nex 5n and the Samsung NX100+200 sure do nice lowlight work and the Samsung is pretty quiet too. (Hint to Sony).

The Fuji X-Pro1 is likely to follow suit.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

I haven't found a mirrorless system that could function as my primary camera, and as a backup I don't want another SLR-sized system. Pro's will always have another DSLR as their backup, although I can see some using a good mirrorless system, but having a body with the same mount as your expensive lenses would mean that pro would be the exception and not the rule.
No doubt mirrorless is great and will continue putting pressure on DSLRs, but it's just cheaper to use established technology in a larger package not to mention easier to get amazing performance.

0 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Dear Fujifilm Finepix F30: Keep in mind not everybody wants a tiny camera with interchangeables lenses. This Canon fills a much-needed and welcomed niche. What's great is that we have so many choices, and that there are several good cameras for everyone. Plus, people are not going to give up their Canon DSLRs, or any other maker's DSLRs, just because there are smaller cameras available. Some people like bigger cameras. I know I do.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

"Talking to Canon" is not a good idea, and probably an exercise in futility. Did you follow their previous camera release in November, the EOS C300? That did not go down too good so far, either.

"Photographers will never use a mirror-less system long term."

Well, they can certainly use a mirror-type DSLRs for another 8-10 years perhaps. After that, there won't be any more new mirror-type DSLRs made, if the present day trend keeps up. It'll be all a mirrorless world then. The writing is on the wall for the bulky, flipping mirror type, old school DSLRs. I just don't see how they would still be making those 15-20 years from now.

"Pro's will always have another DSLR as their backup..."

Well, even one DSLR with half a dozen lenses can be bulky, heavy, pricey. And then you'd add the same thing as a back-up?

0 upvotes
Fujifilm Finepix F30
By Fujifilm Finepix F30 (Jan 14, 2012)

Just to comment on the poster who said I'm a 'confused' soul. The Nex7, Fuji XPro-1 and other mirrorless interchangeable cameras with large sensors (APS-C and micro 4/3s) WERE NEVER intended by their manufacturers to be DSLR backups. Sony, Samsung, Olympus, Panasonic and Fuji - these manufacturers designed these cameras to REPLACE and KILL dSLR's. They are out to GRAB the dSLR market away from Canon and Nikon who have been dominating the photography world for so long. Sure, mirrorless still have some quirks, being relatively new technology compared to the mature dSLR technology, but with every iteration and development and with third party lens makers supporting them, it won't be long before it will be a mirrorless world. Those LATE to the party, will lose the market BIG TIME. Look at Kodak when photogrphy became digital. Look at Nokia when mobile phones became smart phones. Sure it won't happen overnight but it will be inevitable. If you can't win the game, you change the rules.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 14, 2012)

Hi Fujifilm
A lot of what you say is true. The one point you didn't cover is overall size. Until human hands shrink to an appropriate size to work with the tiny buttons and menu's in mirror-less cameras photographers will not use them in true photography. The laws of physics didn't apply to Kodak film to Digital or phones to Smart phones.
You have to have larger cameras that allow for quick intuitive access to required features.
The Digital Still Market will die in the period you state as Smart phone cameras are getting better for point and shoot. But a camera for photographers will still have to be large for the sensor, button control and allowing for larger lenses (balance). You can't change the physics...

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

@ Fujifilm: Agreed. A camera or lens mfr may "intend" to do many things. At the end, none of that matters. What matters is how many units they can sell of their wares.

@ Beany:

"The Digital Still Market will die..."

Really? What will replace it -- cell phones? Wow? Do all the world camera makers know this fact already, you think?

Regarding large cameras -- the Fujifilm X-S1 is mirrorless, and it is very large and very easy to handle with large hands/fingers. On the other hand, some of the "entry-level" Canikon DSLRs are sort of Toys R Us like.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 14, 2012)

Francis I said the entry level market will die. Manufacturers are working on making there cameras smarther, but if you look at consumer usage, FaceBook, Youtube and Filicker images are more and more from Smart Phone (Cell Phone) depending which part of the world your in. It's going to be an interesting couple of years

0 upvotes
Greynerd
By Greynerd (Jan 19, 2012)

The mirror in DSLR's is as doomed as the viewfinder was in compacts. I am sure the manufacturers would love to do away with this complex mechanism. Whether DSLR's are more effective than mirrorless will not really be a factor in their survival. DSLR's will survive only as very expensive specialist products if they survive at all.

0 upvotes
tutek
By tutek (Jan 13, 2012)

g1x has a very ugly bokeh. I thought to buy it, but not any more

0 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Bokeh, bokeh, schmokeh! Photoshop and it's numerous plugins, offer so many ways to handle this. I specialize in portraits and I never shoot wide open, or even just one stop down. I shoot at the sharpest f-stop and then handle depth of field and blur in post. But if Bokeh is the most important thing to you, then, for sure, you already have a camera and lens combination that does that. So, you don't need the G1 X. This camera is not intended to be everything to everyone.

2 upvotes
JBrian
By JBrian (Jan 13, 2012)

Why all the arguments? Is it going to be perfect? No. Is it a step on the right direction? Who knows.... Does it really matter? Of course not. All that REALLY matters is the person behind the camera right?

7 upvotes
choochoo22
By choochoo22 (Jan 13, 2012)

Where's the filter thread?

Am I the only one who thinks a camera in this class needs to accept threaded filters?

2 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

You're right, a filter thread would be nice. It's too bad that each of us can't get into the design rooms of these manufacturers and order up just what we want. I, for one, would have them make a camera that could do about 7 things, my favorite 7 things, and eliminate the other 101 things they do. My favorite camera is a Pentax 6x7II film camera, and it maybe does 6 things, but the results are fantastic. I also like the Holga, because it only does two things. And I like my pinhole cameras, which only do one thing. Wish somebody would make my perfect camera. In the case of this Canon, maybe they could eliminate about 50 things, and add a filter thread. Good call, ChooChoo!

0 upvotes
Dedi Kurniawan
By Dedi Kurniawan (Jan 13, 2012)

Yes You're right this big camera with 58mm would be nice ^.^"

1 upvote
PACoug
By PACoug (Jan 13, 2012)

Look very carefully on the end of the barrel. You will see a bayonet mount.

This is Canon's nod to the Lensmate system, which uses threaded filter rings to attach filters, and then instantly bayonets them onto the lens end. It enables the camera to use a smaller filter size and have absolutely no vignetting issues like the old tube mount system did.

Canon will most likely offer the rings at product launch. Get one for your polarizer and one for your graduated ND. You don't need to carry a separate ND because there's one built into the camera. You also may not need a UV 'lens protect' filter, since the G1x lens fully retracts and autocovers itseelf.

I prefer to have a UV filter on there as a dust cover, and deal with the added bulk of a lens cap to go over that. But you don't have to.

Bottom line: compared to previous G series cameras, you will really dig the quick-change filter bayonet system.

1 upvote
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Thanks, PA, this is great information. Just makes what looks liek a great camera better. Glad to know this, and it makes sense that they would have thought this through, since it's really a pro camera. My only problem now is whether to buy it now and pay $800, or wait a few months and pay $750 or even $700. But I admit I'm anxious to get my hands on it.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

@ PACoug: I don't see any "bayonet mount" on the front of the lens. Nor do I think that the lens "fully retracts" inside the body. Where are you coming up with this stuff from, I wonder?

0 upvotes
Shelly Glaser
By Shelly Glaser (Jan 12, 2012)

Did I miss something?

a. Canon says this camera has "DSLR sized sensor" but no Canon DSLR has a sensor this size - Canon's APS-C sensors are twice (area-wise) as large.

b. Why should anyone buy this camera when, for the same money he can get an interchangeable lens mirror-less Panasonic or Sony with same size or larger sensor?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

a. G1 X's sensor is slightly larger than Micro 4/3 sensor, but smaller than the APS-C sensor.

b. I guess this baby is mostly for folks who do not want to be carrying and switching lenses all the time, and are happy with the 28-112mm stock zoom that the G1 X comes with.

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

Shelly, you did miss something. Frank, bingo.

1 upvote
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Shelly, this is a great option for a lot of people. I'm going to try this camera instead of the Sony NEX because I don't want that tiny camera with interchangeable lenses. I want a decent size compact that's easy to hold that has a built-in lens that retracts, plus a high quality LCD, plus an optical viewfinder, plus a sensor bigger than four thirds and almost as big as APS, plus well made, etc. Go ahead and get the Sony NEX. I have a friend who uses one and loves it. But not everybody wants a small camera with interchangeable lenses. To each his own.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
thx1138
By thx1138 (Jan 13, 2012)

The 7D sensor is no where 2x the size. Why do people make things up to prove a point. This is a 1.8x crop sensor with area of 261.8mm^2. The 7D sensor has an area of 332mm^2, so the difference in area is 27%, not 100%. The sensor has the same pixel density as the 7D and supposedly has better noise due to digic V.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

Because I don't want to bother with interchangeable lenses at this level. I just want a good strong smaller than my DSLR camera to take out on a day to day basis.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

@ howardroark: Trolling is fine and dandy, but please, out of every one of your 100 comments on DP Review, could you please, please say something useful just once? Thank your for your anticipated consideration.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

LOL. I live to serve, Frank. I think pointing out that you're talking out of an orifice other than your mouth is a valuable public service. No one should look at the aperture of a lens and its focal length and think they now know everything about its image quality.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

640 COMMENTS!!!! about this advanced digital camera? With a paltry f/2.8-5.8 4x zoom lens that starts only at 28mm and goes only to 112 mm? A camera that uses a 1920s style viewfinder? And one that cannot even record simple 1920p30 video? In the year 2012?

Don't you people have anything better to do? :-)

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jan 13, 2012)

More money and more weight would equal a faster lens.

0 upvotes
PACoug
By PACoug (Jan 13, 2012)

Francis, this camera is so much more than you represent. I hope you are joking. I shoot a Leica X1 for precisely the same reasons folks are interested in this camera.

It has a good fixed lens, a large sensor and high quality in a small form factor. The X1 blows it into the weeds in every category except ease of composition of course, since no zoom means I have to zoom my own ass around to get the image composition I want. And yet I spent two thousand smackers on it and I'm glad I did.

Can you explain that? The award winning images on my walls can. They are better than most of my DSLR work.

The G1 X will not compete with the X1 on straight up image quality. But it follows a similar formula and includes a modest zoom for ease of composition. It will be worth the street price, which will shake out to be a few dollars less than the asking price.

I'm looking forward to seeing what it can do.

0 upvotes
Davidgilmour
By Davidgilmour (Jan 12, 2012)

But is it. Better than the Fuji X10?

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 12, 2012)

Technically yes, but then there are considerations like style and control lay out. Some may prefer the X10 for those reasons.

0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jan 13, 2012)

Well, the Fuji X10 has an f/2.0 lens.

0 upvotes
Razaghi
By Razaghi (Jan 13, 2012)

of course, because Fuji X10 has a much smaller sensor, a 2/3"... as far as I know

0 upvotes
PACoug
By PACoug (Jan 13, 2012)

And the Canon will get you by without all the little dramas of the X10.

Fuji will eventually correct the X10's faults, and then look out. But it will cost twice as much as this camera.

0 upvotes
peter42y
By peter42y (Feb 11, 2012)

In the last firmware update fuji was not able to correct the orb issue.

0 upvotes
harrisoncac
By harrisoncac (Jan 12, 2012)

Large sensor cameras?

Would like to know how this Canon G1 X holds up to Sony's NEX-5N.

Canon USD800 (28-112mm)
Sony CAD600 (28-82mm)

0 upvotes
Shelly Glaser
By Shelly Glaser (Jan 12, 2012)

Sony has larger sensor and interchangeable lenses...

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

Shelly, double check your math. The APS-C is not close to twice the area of this sensor. And to the op, 600 doesn't include a lens.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

Sony NEX does have a slightly larger sensor than the 1D X has, and it does use interchangeable lenses.

0 upvotes
Almeida
By Almeida (Jan 13, 2012)

The 1D X has a full frame sensor, no NEX sensor is that big.

1 upvote
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

It seems the BS brigade are out :o)

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

I'm going with ignorance rather than outright BS (implies lying, don't you think?). But making incorrect statements as though they are fact is almost worse than lying.

0 upvotes
PACoug
By PACoug (Jan 13, 2012)

Sony NEX does indeed have larger sensor and interchangeable lenses. If I want interchangeable lenses, I have a DSLR for that.

This camera can be carried all by itself. I've shot the G12, the S95 and the NEX 5. Honestly, the S95 makes better images at less than half the cost of the Sony, and it has a point and shoot sensor.

Canon has now stepped up to the plate with a point and shoot camera with a large, efficient sensor. Sure you have more flexibility with interchangeable lenses. Once again, DSLR gets you there with far more flexibility than the mirrorless joke cameras out there like the NEX. Sony's own DSLRs are far better than their mirrorless cams.

But this is the camera you can carry everywhere without worrying about $5k worth of glass in a kit bag coming along for the ride. I love the G12, but this thing extends its IQ capabilities tremendously, especially in low light.

I may sell both my G12 and my S95 pocket cam to get one.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Errata: G1X versus NEX. Canon is not exactly innovative with is "model names." They should have called this one "Canon Fleetwood Brougham d'Elegance" or something, people would remember that much better.

@ PACOug: sounds like a good plan for you!

0 upvotes
d99007
By d99007 (Jan 12, 2012)

Pro:
-Looks cool
-Large sensor

Cons:
- Slow lens that quickly kills the advantage of a large sensor as you move from wide to tele
- Not wide enough at 28mm
- Even bigger size than chunky G12
- Lack of auto lens cover
- Lack of dedicated ISO button
- Price

Not a bad camera, but if I'm going to carry this thing when traveling, open lens cover, take picture, close lens...I may as well carry my APS-C DSL camera with a small and fast pancake lens. it will be far better for that purpose.

I think I'll wait for another camera with a faster lens if I'm going to cash out $800

Comment edited 33 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Caleido
By Caleido (Jan 12, 2012)

You need to stop looking at it as an alternative for a 5DII with an 85 f1.2. It has the same lens as many small digicams and the almost the same specs like many kitlenses we see with entry dslrs. But this one has a bigger sensor than most compacts and will probably rival the IQ of previous generation DSLRs.

What did you expect? A constant f2.8? A 28-300 equivalent? That lens would have been huge and ridiculous. You can't ask for bigger sensor and keep the lens the same size as Canon IXUS.

The body is only marginally bigger than the G12.

I'm not buying one, but I see the glass as half full, not half empty.

1 upvote
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

The lack of a dedicated ISO button may not be an issue, if you can access it fairly quickly, and you do have the exposure comp on the topdeck. 28 is plenty wide for a lot of people. The size of this camera will make it very comfortable to hold, especially with one hand. $800 is high, but for those who are patient, this will be down to $700 in 6 or 7 months. Early adopters always have to pay more.

1 upvote
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

28mm maybe not wide enough for you but for me it's perfect. Size I believe is better for holding and working with and I don't want a auto lens cover on a lens this big. They can go faulty so at least we don't have to worry about that.

0 upvotes
PACoug
By PACoug (Jan 13, 2012)

If I'm not mistaken, the G1 X has a dedicated ISO dial on the top deck.

0 upvotes
d99007
By d99007 (Feb 14, 2012)

I can't stop looking at it as an alternative to DSLR considering it size and weight. There are many modern similarly sized DSLR's with much better performance than this canon. If the price was not double good P&S price then maybe I wouldn't expect a better lens. However if Olympus can put a sharp F1.8 - F2.5 for half a price on the same zoom range, perhaps it is not too unreasonable to expect something similar for twice a price from Canon. What is the advantage of a bigger sensor in the dark, when the lens is slower than even S95/s100? Not much especially considering the price difference.

0 upvotes
Dedi Kurniawan
By Dedi Kurniawan (Jan 12, 2012)

In my opinion i think G1X
* better to use manual zoom (for example : Olympus Pen, Fujifilm HS 20)
* interchangeable-lens (for example : Olympus Pen)
* can use AA batteries
* Remove the viewfinder

1 upvote
MortonH
By MortonH (Jan 12, 2012)

Canonrumors has a link to some ISO comparisons on a French website. They look pretty good.

1 upvote
Anstef
By Anstef (Jan 12, 2012)

This is ridiculous. There are at least 26 letters in the alphabet, more if you include accented letters and other symbols. Why on earth call this camera the G1X? These letters have been used and overused. Time for Canon to display some originality in naming convention rather than their usually moronic camera designations .. Mark III, mark IV, rebel???, Kiss??? Their head of marketing and for that matter everyone in their marketing dept should be fired.

1 upvote
dubstylz
By dubstylz (Jan 12, 2012)

I know it sounds daft but i recall reading somewhere that they didnt call it the g13 because the west is superstitious of the number 13 and they didnt call it g14 because the number 4 is considered bad luck in japan (also why they never did a g4 or g8 (multiples of 4 are bad too aparently) how much truth there is in that i dont know.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

Same can be said for every manufacturer of every product on the market. What a thing to get wound up about...

0 upvotes
Richt2000
By Richt2000 (Jan 11, 2012)

Arrrrrgh!
Why on earth ditch the manual ISO on the top plate for exp comp?
It was perfect before to have Av mode, f numbers on front dial and exp on back dial. That way you can control with one hand...

Having exp comp on that stiff top dial means uaing two hands and changing grip all the time. And ISO will have to require button presses.

Still the sensor should make up for that erganomic oversight... Looking forward to using this one!!!

Comment edited 11 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
lbpix
By lbpix (Jan 11, 2012)

Looks nice, but the clincher for me will be how good the viewfinder is. One site suggests it's better than most but not up to the Fuji X10 standard. A bigger sensor is nice but a decent viewfinder is far more likely to help me take good photos. My G9 gives good results but I'm frequently missing the moment -squinting at the LCD.
I'm glad Canon haven't made the lens interchangeable; what this is about is compact but good.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

The type of VF the G1 X uses has been around since the 1920s, perhaps earlier. Nothing to write home about, really.

These days, we have newer types, such as hybrid optical-electronic, all-electronic LCD, all-electronic OLED, translucent mirror LCD, and translucent mirror OLED. But Canon decided to give you the absolutely cheapest viewfinder with their G1 X, bar none.

Not that the lens they pasted on this thing is anything to write home about, either. And this 2012 model camera cannot even record simple 1080p30 video, phew.... They probably had the G1 X designed many years ago, and just now decided to bring it to market? I don't put anything past Canon now, not since their EOS C300 camera fiasco.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

I thought you had something better to do (see your post above...half those 640 are yours I think).

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

@ howardroark: only about 318, actually. But I will always be glad to correct YOUR sometimes erroneous comments.

0 upvotes
George Veltchev
By George Veltchev (Jan 11, 2012)

The Canon PowerShot G1 X seems more than a bridge camera to me. ! Bravo Canon...you can

2 upvotes
Picturenaut
By Picturenaut (Jan 11, 2012)

Surely a nice bridge cam. But I am dissapointed with Canon cause they obviously do not want to go for a competition to Sony's NEX series. I'd be very interested in a compact mirrorless Canon body with an APS sensor that I could use with my lenses when I do not want to take a bulky DSLR with me. Pretty sure that Canon loses a growing market if they hesitate too long.

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

Good news! The camera you are hoping for already exists. It's called the Sony NEX system. Check it out, it's not too bad, really.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

I have to find the article again. But the Mirror-less market while is strong now is expected to decrease over the next few years.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

Francis Carver: Have to disagree with you on the NEX serious. I used for short period of time and overall was disappointed. Ugly, hard to control and I've never been a fan of Sony's IQ. Each to there own though

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Understood, BeanyPic, thanks for the heads-up. Fact is though, to use the Canon lens on a Canon camera, you do need to buy one of their traditional mirror-style DSLRs, don't you?

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 14, 2012)

Hi Francis yes you do and isn't there so many to choose from just over 60 at last count. Wonderful

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

Tradition mirror style bodies being so quaint and old fashioned these days. Who cares about the image quality a lens can produce if you have to use a mirror to create a bright, sharp image in a beautiful 100% viewfinder. Yuck.

0 upvotes
Picturenaut
By Picturenaut (Jan 18, 2012)

Francis Carver: well as I wrote, I am quite aware of Sony's NEX series. But I want such a body for my selection of Canon lenses, and I am not prepared to change system. Some of my Canon lenses are much too good for a change. And overall I am still am happy with my EOS 7D, but sometimes it is a bit too bulky (and noisy).

0 upvotes
DaveAB
By DaveAB (Jan 11, 2012)

I wonder if there will be a Powershot G13 later this year? The G1X is larger than the G12, has a far larger image sensor, and cost $300 more (actually $400 more with the heavy discounts on the G12 lately). It wouldn't surprise me to see a G13 with the sensor from the new S100 come out at the $450-500 price point. If the same size as the G12, it would be a (barely) pocketable compact, unlike the G1X (unless you wear cargo pants).

1 upvote
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

They won't have a camera with the number 13 in it. It's bad luck. So I don't think it's going to happen

0 upvotes
Carlosox
By Carlosox (Jan 11, 2012)

I was waiting for something like this to turn up, but first impressions seem to disappoint. I'll have to wait and see its IQ before I go ahead and get the LX5 as planned.

0 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Think what you really want. The Canon G1 X and Panasonic LX5 are two different animals. One is tiny with no grip, and one is compact with a good grip. I bought the LX5, thinking I could put it in my pocket, but there's no good way to protect the lens; the lens attachment is awkward. You can't get a good grip on it (not with one hand) and then the sensor is really small, so low light performance suffers. The onboard flash is less than desirable, but if you buy a bigger flash with proper diffusion, you'll see it's bigger than the camera. I sent mine back after 10 days and then bought an Oly e-PL2, which has worked out great. But now I think this Canon will be an upgrade over the Oly -- bigger sensor, longer zoom range, faster lens, 922,000 dot LCD, plus optical finder, plus good grip, nice controls, and a great feel in hand. Sure, I can't put it in my pocket, but I've learned that tiny cameras with tiny sensors are not for me. I suggest you buy both and keep the one that's best for you.

2 upvotes
Harold66
By Harold66 (Jan 11, 2012)

Ahhh if they only had the same camera with a 24mm to 85mm instead...
I would have bought it right away

why does it take a while to almost any manufacturer to realize that 24mm is the most in demand wide angle ??
why don t they just take a look at THEIR lens sales ?

Harold

2 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Jan 11, 2012)

Because the idiots in the general population want more zoom, not a wider lens. Ever listen to people shopping at Best Buy or anywhere else? All they ask, is "how much zoom does it have?"

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Daniel Lowe
By Daniel Lowe (Jan 11, 2012)

"why don't they look at their lens sales"?

It is precisely their lens sales that they are thinking about, if this camera started at 24mm many people would buy this as a dedicated wide angle cam and wouldn't buy the more expensive lens for their DSLR.
Canon can't have that now!!.........

1 upvote
Greynerd
By Greynerd (Jan 11, 2012)

Because you can go as wide as you want with the Panorama modes without the massive distortion of 24mm. 24mm is fine as long as there are no vertical lines awayfrom the centre. I am one of the idiots that would rather the longer reach. I think 28mm is a reasonable short focal length. All cameras used to start at 35mm not so long ago.

3 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Jan 11, 2012)

It might be an issue of size and cost but in general, wide angle zoom performance is pretty awful once you go shorter than 28mm (assuming the zoom is also a telephoto which of course requires a totally different design). And since this is supposed to be pro level camera, soft corners, even at 24mm might not be acceptible.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

Canon is history. All they can deliver these days is a 28-112mm lens, all the while Fujifilm can deliver a bridge camera (X-S1) with a 24-624mm lens that is actually slightly brighter than this pathetic 4x range Canon. Who is buying stuff like the G1 X for $799? I haven't a clue.

0 upvotes
Chuckmet
By Chuckmet (Jan 12, 2012)

Francis, Your right you don't have a clue. The Camera's not available yet so nobody is buying it. I'm sure that all those Pro's hauling around their Fujifilm cameras have been the demise of Canon!

Comment edited 48 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

If the Canon G1 X is a "professional's camera," then Canikon is in deep, deep trouble.

Compared to the Canon G1 X, the Nikon 1-series cameras (J1, V1), hold double Ph.D. degrees.

0 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Because they wouldn't be able to make this 24-85 and keep it this compact with a large sensor. The best they could do would be 24 to 70 (maybe even just 24-67) and then at f3.5 to f4.5. Canon is probably aware that many people want a zoom that starts wider, so they might conceivably come out with a G1 XW, at 24-67. But then people would complain that 67 isn't long enough. Remember, there is no perfect camera. And let's face it, we all love owning 4, 5 and 6 cameras. So, loosen up the wallet and enjoy!

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

Francis Carver: Photographers who want a well built compact camera with easy control and not have to mess with inter-changing a lens. That's who buys it. If you really knew anything about lenses you'd know they more X times you give a lens the drop in IQ. Why do you think Prime lenses are so expensive and give the sharpest images. Research before you type. Also day to day photography need a sensible angle of view.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Okay, this here is a ZOOM LENS CAMERA, so there is no reason to bring in the prime lens brigade to the conversation, BeanyPic.

But I agree with you on one thing: "they more X times you give a lens the drop in IQ."

So, by that token, Canon blew it. This is a 4x zoom, and they should have used a 2x zoom instead, hello!
Seriously though.... as a zoom lens, this lens is nowhere. Kindly look around at the competition (non-Canon) cameras and lenses released just this week, okay? This thing here (Canon G1 X) has the lamest lens on it of them all, bar none.

Please provide some proof to the contrary, thank you. Remember, we are talking about mirrorless fixed lens cameras.

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 14, 2012)

Cheers Francis. Lets see how the G1X sells.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

As long as you make your comparisons in a vacuum Beany, you'll be okay. Since the mirrorless systems are the pinnacle of technology please don't discuss anything with a mirror in it as being any sort of real competition.

0 upvotes
kev777zero
By kev777zero (Jan 11, 2012)

if I have never gone into mirrorless cameras & found the joy of using ultra-wide angle, telephoto lenses, & large aperture portrait primes, this would of been my ultimate solution of high quality + compactness.

that being said I would whole-heartedly recommend this camera to anyone wanting to upgrade from P&S. many just stick with the kit lens on their ILC cameras, so you might as well get G1X with its longer focal length & larger apertures.

this camera would also be a better alternative for DSLR users who got mirrorless systems as a "carry everywhere you go camera." now they don't have to invest in 2 systems.

this is probably the best answer for Canon against the rising mirrorless market. save your DSLR users from full-on switching, & attract new users from mirrorless. my only con is price - at $800 new users might not understand it's value as there are plenty competition at that range. ~$600 and below you'll find a market of both DSLR users and P&S upgraders!

5 upvotes
CarlPH
By CarlPH (Jan 11, 2012)

I'm guessing they priced it that way so as not to affect the sales of their entry level DSLR offerings (1100D and 600D).

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

If you want to get into mirrorless, just about everything else out there is a better choice for the same or less money. You want a G1 X only if for some reason, you absolutely must have a Canon.

Sony has the NEX line, and they have absolutely nothing to worry about. And with those, you can actually change the lens. But with the G1 X, you are forever stuck with this retro-lens.

0 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Every serious photographer needs several cameras. I have a Pentax 6x7II for my fine-art work. I have a Pentax K5 for my serious non-fine-art work. I have 8x0 and 5x7 pinhole cameras, plus a 2 1/4 Holga. And then I have an Oly e-PL2 four-thirds for everyday pics. interestingly, the Oly gets more use than any of the others. It's a camera to grab for a quick pic. But I think this Canon could be an upgrade to my Oly. I like that I'll be stuck with the 28-112 lens because it retracts and makes the body more compact, and I don't have to buy any more lenses. I've got plenty of lenses for my other cameras, and I can get more. Each camera has a dedicated use. There is no one camera that can do it all, and not even 2 or 3 that can do it all. So, accept the Canon G1 X for the nifty niche it fills and be happy.

2 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

Francis Carver: You can try and try but your not going to turn everyone onto the ugly little toy known as the NEX line. When Sony decide to get serious about photography you might be able to make comment.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

I don't think it's the NEX line, it's any M4/3 or other mirrorless system. For some reason when some people buy a camera every other camera is, by default, garbage.

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Jan 11, 2012)

it just the lens that turn off the hype. Slow at 2,8-5,8 and you can't change that lens forever. Skip.

0 upvotes
pvphoto
By pvphoto (Jan 11, 2012)

Most of standard zoom lenses for m4/3 are in range 3.5-5.6 and even 6.7 on tele end - new 24-50 Olympus is 6.3 at telelphoto and tht is much larger tahn Canon G1X lens.
If you want 2.8 constant then buy SLR and Canon 17-55 2.8 and dont just ask something that is almost impossible construct.

5 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

Micro 4/3 now has f/0.95 and f/1.6 primes and f/2.8 zooms. In comparison, the none-removable lens on the G1 X is a pretty cheap job, no matter how we slice it. Nobody can get half-way excited about this lamester lens.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

Those of us who want good lenses buy a real slr. Fast does not mean good.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

You may be confusing camera type/form factor/sensor type with lens quality.

If you want top quality lenses, you need to purchase MEDIUM FORMAT LENSES. They blow away the full-format 135 "REAL SLR" lenses. They have to, since some of these MF cameras have 80MP sensors.

MF lenses are not all that much larger than FF 135 lenses, but much better optically. I especially like the Hasselblad prime and zoom selections. Not that I am personally using those, mind you.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

Yes, there are all manner of lenses. In the context of this website, a DSLR is the largest format available in the form of a full frame 35mm sensor. I don't recall seeing a single medium format camera reviewed here because those are mainly used by commercial photographers or rich people who don't need the camera to earn money.
Sensor format aside, lenses can't be summed up in their name. Two lenses called a 70-200 f/4 are not the same optically. They'll both have different issues with lens flare, chromatic aberrations, vignetting, distortion, and sharpness (that is to say, detail resolution). Doing side-by-side lens comparisons on the-digital-picture is a simple way to see the difference. DxOMark has some good visual aids in their reviews as well. I say again, fast does not mean good...UNLESS all you care about is maximum aperture. There are several other considerations when determining the overall quality of a lens.

0 upvotes
rocklobster
By rocklobster (Jan 10, 2012)

Al last, the spiritual successor to the G10 which tried to pack a similar number of pixels into a much smaller sensor in response to the megapixel race. The G series survived that minor hiccup and what I see here is a triumph for Canon for minimal increase in bulk with substantial increase in IQ.

Those who value an optical viewfinder (although not at the top of my list) would perhaps consider this to be a serious alternative to M4/3 if they are not fussed about zoom range.

2 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Jan 10, 2012)

A slightly smaller sensor would have enabled them to put in a faster and wider lens (25mm-100mm f2.0-3.5). Add to that a non-crippled video and EVF and this camera would have been a home run.

But most cameras are made for the masses, including this one, even if they describe themselves as "advanced amatuers." They want bigger zooms or more mega-pixels.

The technology is there, it can be done, but marketers have the final say. I think Olympus learned from the C-5060 C-7070 series that idiots far outnumber serious photographers and those cameras were discontinued in favour of idiot proof cameras with more zoom and more megapixels.

This camera, like the Fuji X-10, has come very very close to the ideal P&S, but still no cigar.

R

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

They will never hit the mark, and I'll tell you why. It will be one of two reasons: compromise of design because of cost considerations or because of market segmentation. They don't want to butcher their SLR market, P&S market, or their video camera market. Those areas are covered. They've now attempted to create a new market. They'll lose some in each segment, but they'll gain even more from each segment. SLR shooters will eat up the huge sensor and advanced amateurs who aren't quite up for an SLR will too. They'll even get some people who want to shoot HD video but don't want to pay for a video camera. Keep dreaming of the perfect camera because unless you have low standards you'll never get it.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
tfeltz
By tfeltz (Jan 11, 2012)

I’m sure this camera offers great image quality for a ‘compact’ camera, but given it’s bulkiness doesn’t quality as pocketable. I might as well take along my DSLR, if I have to have an camera dangling around my neck. I’m quite fond of my Canon S90 but I’m well aware of its limitations. Ideally, I would like to have a pocketable camera that would fit in my the pocket of my shirt or trousers (well, perhaps not tight jeans) that offers better image quality than the Canon S90 or S100. This ‘dream compact’ could be little thicker than the S100 (perhaps 25% more i.e. 35mm instead of 28mm), a slightly larger sensor (10MP 2/3”, like the Fuji X10), and a faster lens rather than a wider zoom range e.g. 28-85mm (equiv.) with F2.0 – F4.0, with controls and features similar to the S100. GPS should be eliminiated if that would reduce bulk, weight, and price, because it's just a gimick or niche feature.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

"most cameras are made for the masses, including this one, even if they describe themselves as "advanced amatuers." They want bigger zooms or more mega-pixels."

Well, anyone wanting "bigger zooms" should look elsewhere, because this baby only has 1950s style 4x focal range zoom. Whereaby cameras half this price come with 12.5x to 36x zoom ranges.

"They'll even get some people who want to shoot HD video but don't want to pay for a video camera."

Well, anyone wanting to shoot video should probably look elsewhere. $200 and up cameras today can shoot 1080p30 video. But this $799 Canon D1 X cannot.

But hey -- is a CANON. Doesn't that worth anything any more?

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

What is your obsession with 30 fps?

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

"What is your obsession with 30 fps?"

It's not really an obsession, but if you live in North America or anywhere else where there is 60 Hertz AC current, you need it. Try to record under fluorescent lights at 24fps, and you'll see what I mean.

Besides, we have NTSC and ATSC television in North America now, and both systems are 30fps (29.97).

Cameras just released now and priced at around $200 can do 1080p and 30fps. Not this $800 Canon, however. Its processor must be so weak, the camera has to drop down to Quasi-HD (1280 x 720 pixels) for a normal 30p type of video recording.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

I have an HD video camera (1080p) that shoots at 24 or 30fps. I have tried shooting here in North America using my HF100 and my 7D. Oh, and yes my pathetic 7D can only shoot 60fps at 720p also.
In the case of the G1 X I would imagine most of that $800 is going towards a larger sensor than, say, the new Panasonic SZ compact point and shoots that shoot at 1080p 30fps.
Canon is well known for drawing clear distinctions between their market segments. 1080p was a must, but they knew that most people would be fine with 24fps. Panasonic made a tiny point and shoot with 1080p at 30fps because they knew it would be useless in low light and the lens wouldn't help matters....there has to be something that implies value for the money.
In the case of the G1 X, the real value is in the sensor and what I'm sure will be a reasonable sharp, if somewhat slow, lens. The poor Fuji X-Pro1 only does 24p, too. But hey, the Sony NEX-5N is nice, but bigger...there's the rub.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

"Canon.... knew that most people would be fine with 24fps."

Slight correction: Canon thought that nobody would notice. Heck, howardroark, Canon had announced in November a $20,000 video camera (EOS C300) that can do 1080p30, although it cannot do autofocus and auto aperture. Okay, so maybe with Canon, you need $20,000 for a 1080p30 camera and $800 for one that can do only 1080p24 video, I don't rightly know. Their competition clearly thinks otherwise (most new Sony cameras can do 1080p30 AND 1080p60 as well).

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

Yep, and you pay for both. Get a Sony with a big sensor for good high ISO output, and pay cash. Get a Sony with a small sensor, and pay in loss of useful ISO range.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 10, 2012)

I don't understand all the people putting down this camera. A camera like this has been needed for years. That is a small camera with a decent sensor in it and a practical focal length range that still easily fits in a coat/cargo/vest pocket or in your camera bag with the rest of your gear. The is the first real alternative to a DSLR that actually makes sense.

With a traditional compact camera you have a tiny sensor with lots of noise and little to no DOF control.

With a mirror less interchangeable lens camera you are really just getting a DSLR with crappy ergonomics. They are no more convenient to use than a DSLR and once you put a practical lens on it it is almost as big as a DSLR anyway. There is very little practical differnce between using a MILC and a DSLR. Especially logistically speaking.

This camera strikes a perfect balance between all of the major camera types. The G1 X is the camera many people who bought MILC cameras really wanted.

14 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Jan 11, 2012)

Probably because its 550 grams, has a small sensor and has got a slow zoom glued to it.

One would be infinitely better off with a Panny GX1 or similar with a collapsible kit and the option for other lenses / EVF etc as needed.

This is basically a huge, expensive P&S with a lens which negates its slightly larger sensor.

0 upvotes
Josh152
By Josh152 (Jan 11, 2012)

LOL the gx1 has a smaller sensor and the only lens that compares to the canon is the kit lens which has less coverage and is actually slower on the wide end.

As soon as you change lenses on the GX1 you either get a camera that is just as bulky and cumbersome as a DSLR or has a fixed focal length which is just too limiting to the majority of photographers.

You can be pretty much guaranteed that the high iso on the canon will be a lot better than on the gx1. Which makes up for being slightly slower on the long end. I do not see how the lens "negates" the larger sensor. Chuck Westfall has even said the G1 X has better jpeg noise performance than the 7D.

The whole point of the canon is to have a more convenient camera than a system cam or a crop sensor DSLR but still close to or the same image quality with a useful focal range.

Also, as an aside, any camera that has PMAS on the mode dial instead just auto and scene modes is, by definition, not a point and shoot.

3 upvotes
pvphoto
By pvphoto (Jan 11, 2012)

Totally correct, and more important reasonable comment not just crying like baby - I want this I want that etc. etc., and usually these guys that only complaint have made very little right photos - they are just criticizers.

4 upvotes
tfeltz
By tfeltz (Jan 11, 2012)

Great form factor for those who want great quality but not a system camera. No dust-on-sensor problems with a fixed lens. But as a small and convenient second camera (next to a DSLR), the $800 price puts me off and it's not really small either i.e. not pocketable. I love my Canon S90 as a companion to my Canon 7D, because of it's size and price ... but it does have its limitations in terms of noise and DOF. The S100 offer a slight improvement over the S90 in terms of features and IQ, but not enough for me to justify an upgrade.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

Probably only current Canon owners would even consider this camera, especially at the double-than-real price. It's really a turkey-cam -- when you compare it to 99% of the competition.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

What a dumb thing to say, Frank.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

2 howardroark: you are really contributing NOTHING to the conversation, that's for sure. Not exactly a G1 X eggspert, are we?

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

Basing things on facts is rather useless. Next time I'll say things like "99% of all Fuji cameras are behind the competition." Made up statistics about subjective criteria are fun!

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 13, 2012)

Oh Francis Carver: Calm down. Let the photographers buy the right equipment while all the rest buy the little toy's.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Let me guess, BeanyPic: those so-called "real photographers" only buy BIG HE-MAN DSLRs and nothing else, correct? The rest of the gear is for us, the world's proverbial "little people," right? :-)

0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Jan 14, 2012)

Oh Farncis. You need a large camera for quick access. Many people believe that Mirror-less will kill DSLR's Maybe at entry level, but not and the Mid and High End. Entry level consumer cameras will die off due to Smart phone cameras. The High End Compact market will survuve due to the demand of control by Photographers.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 14, 2012)

I doubt smart phone cameras will take over very soon, but who knows. When smartphones are all cheap, have amazing cameras, and everyone has one...a decade or less?

0 upvotes
unlearny
By unlearny (Jan 10, 2012)

Why make a large sensor camera that is small and handy to use? This looks like another attempt on Canon's part to make a good camera. I am going to preorder this EPIC FAIL!

9 upvotes
Dan DeLion
By Dan DeLion (Jan 10, 2012)

Slow lens, big body, limited zoom, relatively small number of pixels – why make it?

1 upvote
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

You just described the shortcomings of every camera (digital, in the case of pixels) ever made. Photography is too imperfect to exist! Bah! Humbug!

Comment edited 19 seconds after posting
8 upvotes
boho
By boho (Jan 10, 2012)

wandering, if you feel so damn miserable, why don'y you walk the cliff, man?

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
pvphoto
By pvphoto (Jan 11, 2012)

Do not just comment lake that, 2.8 at wide and 5.8 at telephoto in compact with this dimensions and APS-C sensor, obviously uninformed guy , also about the zoom. Not additional comments needed - go by large DSLR and you will have all you want for 2K-3K $ and by the way buy large bag to put it into.

0 upvotes
raztec
By raztec (Jan 11, 2012)

You obviously don't understand much about digital cameras and the inherent short comings in having too many pixels or too much zoom.

4 upvotes
Dan DeLion
By Dan DeLion (Jan 11, 2012)

Got to love those equipment freaks! It's new – let's get one!

Here's a camera that doesn't fit in your shirt pocket, it doesn't have a 24mm lens or a 200mm lens, it doesn't have 24MP sensor. So it's not as good as an ELPH and it's not as good as a DSLR. But you can put it in your bag or on your desk and look at it. And, of course, the freaks will keep the box it came in so they can trade it in on the next new camera. - So much easier than taking pictures.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

Yay for totally arbitrary requirements that one must meet to even be worthy to capture an image!!!! Your wisdom is making me rethink my whole philosophy on photography!

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

@ howardroark sez: "Your wisdom is making me rethink my whole philosophy on photography!"

Yeah, have you by happen-chance looked into the amazing world of Fujifilm, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus cameras, among others? Nikon is not all that bad either, the way I hear it. :-)

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

Yes, I have. Fortunately my 7D fits my needs much better. Partially because the body is awesome. Partially because the lenses and lens selection is amazing. There are many, many other reasons, but suffice it to say before I buy a camera I spend months doing my homework. And one thing that I spend lots of time on is researching lenses. The body can be the most amazing piece of hardware ever constructed, but if the lens can't keep up there's no point.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

EOS 7D is indeed one of the most successful models from Canon of the past decade. They hit bulls-eye with that one!

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

Dang, no GPS? No Wi-Fi? No optical viewfinder with 100% coverage? No 1mm macro? It's thicker than 1 cm? Where's the OLED display at 3MP instead of a lousy 920K? It can't even do 4K video at 60fps! They couldn't put in a phase detect AF sensor on top of the contrast detect? I hate 4352 x 3264 sensors that aren't square! I want a pony!!!
I kid! This camera solves my problem. I've got a 7D for taking pictures of things that I can plan for. I have a D10 for taking pictures in the rain or at a watery locale. All I want now is a decent point and shoot that I can carry around and isn't a bulky mess like the SX20 that takes lousy pictures (as much as I enjoyed the zoom twice).
A point and shoot that takes pictures close to the quality of a DSLR without having to screw with another lens system offered by the mirrorless variety of cameras...or that screwy Sony Alpha 77 that INTENTIONALLY diverts some of its light to avoid a real mirror and prism viewfinder. Bring on the 2.8-5.8!

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
16 upvotes
R Valentino
By R Valentino (Jan 10, 2012)

Amen! I have a D700 and a couple of lenses and it's great. But I don't take it when I travel only for a day or two.

This is by far the best "mirrorless" solution. Congrats Canon. I may be coming back, but only for this. The D700 rocks.

6 upvotes
attomole
By attomole (Jan 10, 2012)

Coming to the same conclusion, if you want all that stuff you need an SLR, its the only platform that has truly fast lenses in the DOF stakes accepting Leica, AND all the major players have capable models at, not much bigger that this. and cheaper than this, otherwise / and get a true small sensor compact which are OK to 400 asa, or lets face it a decent phone.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 10, 2012)

Fujifilm had just launched an advanced digital camera with a 26x Fujinon zoom lens.

Canon had just launched an advanced digital camera with a 4x Canon zoom lens.

Brightness is the same with both lenses.

Both cameras cost exactly the same: US$799.

Which one would you get? The Canon, for the name recognition, right?

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

Painful that statement.
Your Fuji superzoom has a sensor that is 8.8 x 6.6mm. The G1X's sensor is 18.7x14 mm, roughly 4X the area. The Fuji is 4000 x 3000 whereas the G1X is 4352 x 3264. Now pixel size has to do with things other than area and the total number of pixels, but without exact numbers for the pixel pitch of the Fuji we can at least infer that it has smaller pixels than the GX1.
THIS is why most people will buy garbage. If you have to have a 26X zoom then you have few cameras to choose from, but you must also understand what you are losing to get that zoom. Oh, and you also need to understand that the size of the sensor, besides helping to produce all sorts of noise, is what makes that 26X zoom lens a 26X. Fuji's focal length is 6.1-158.6 compared to the G1X at 15.1-60.4. The Fuji is putting a lot of glass between the world and the sensor to get that kind of reach, which will decrease the sharpness of the lens itself..so the poor sensor will be outresolving your lens.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
13 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

17 elements in 12 groups, to be exact. The GX1 is using 11 elements in 10 groups. When you make a huge zoom lens, you have to not only get the zoom, you also have to correct for all the distortion and chromatic aberrations caused by the glass. No matter how advanced the coatings all that glass is going to cause problems. Some of these problems can be solved, and I've seen them solved in $1,500 professional lenses.

7 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jan 11, 2012)

attomole:

So the f/2 30mm Samsung NX lens is not fast, what about the 85mm f/1.54 Samsung NX lens that does indeed exist, even if it hasn't yet shipped?

Panasonic as a few fast lenses for the 4/3s series cameras.

The Panasonic LX5 (what you'd call a small sensor camera) does well above ISO 400 too, though use Adobe Camera RAW for extraction.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 11, 2012)

I believe what he was saying is if you're going to screw around changing lenses just buy a big SLR. Mirrorless systems still have the unfortunate limitation of not being as convenient as a point and shoot. You have to change lenses which means you have to choose lenses to buy, not to mention the small number available. Look at all of the EF and EF-S lenses available for Canon DSLRs. These limitations don't matter as much if you don't know how other lenses compare or what really matters when it comes to image quality. Those who want the best image quality get a big camera. Those who want a smaller camera have to compromise on image quality. And no matter how fast various lenses are, that is not the only measure of their quality by a long shot. A fast lens that isn't sharp might as well be a slow lens that is.
A point and shoot with a big sensor and a decent lens is a good compromise, especially if that means clean high ISO shots. 100% compensates for a stop or two on the lens.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

@ howardroark: I was talking about the lens, not the camera body itself or the sensor size inside. A zoom lens such as what is on the "new" Canon G1 X with these specifications has been available ever since the late 1950s-early 1960s. Re. the 26x 24-624mm that is on the Fuji X-S1, well many folks who are "clueless" would probably pick a 26x zoom over a 4x zoom, especially when the 26x Fujinon zoom is just as bright as the 4x Canon zoom.

I mean, who else is even releasing retro 4x focal range zoom cameras in January 2012 besides Canon? Anyone? And how many of the new camera introductions we can follow here on DP Review have short-range zooms that start only in a truly retro 28mm focal range? I mean, the competition's $200 and up cameras start at a 24mm or 25mm wide angle zoom setting, for cripe's sake!

Frankly, I don't think Canon could deliver a 2/3-inch sensor digital camera with a 26x zoom lens even if they wanted to. I can see in the G1 X what they can deliver instead.

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 12, 2012)

@Francis. Do you realize the max aperture of the lens does not mean sharp? Compare specs to output and learn what makes a good lens.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 12, 2012)

@ howrdroark: "Do you realize the max aperture of the lens does not mean sharp? Compare specs to output and learn what makes a good lens."

I guess you finally run out of veritable arguments, had you really? :-)

0 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 13, 2012)

Detail resolution is a complicated thing. Thinking that every picture taken at f/8 (or any other aperture) is of equal sharpness regardless of the lens is ignorant.

0 upvotes
lightsculpture
By lightsculpture (Jan 10, 2012)

I noticed that the maximum sync speed for the popup flash is 1/2000. I suppose this is the result of the lens shutter system. Note that no other mirrorless cameras can do this with their popup or bundled flash system.

This is one of my major gripe with my EPL2 in bright sunlight. It is difficult to use the popup flash as fill flash in bright daylight when the max sync speed is 1/180. I had to use f16 on one occasion and filters are just to cumbersome when I am on holiday and switching between indoor and outdoor environments frequently.

The built in ND filter is cool as well.

4 upvotes
Dick Sanders
By Dick Sanders (Jan 13, 2012)

Lightsculpture dude: I own the Oly e-PL2 which I use for everyday pics, a handy camera for quick snaps, and at close focus. But it has some flaws that this Canon may remedy. For examples: no optical finder, no focus-assist beam, slower lens and shorter zoom range. Plus, while the Oly has a good grip, you do have to put your thumb precisely on the rear thumb rest or you'll accidentally hit a couple of buttons that change settings. The Oly also won't focus in low light, so you have to use manual, which can still be very difficult in low light with the 430,000 dot LCD. I have found the Oly to give me very good results, but I think this Canon is going to be a significant improvement. I will buy from B&H and test it, and then I'll have two weeks to return it, if it doesn't beat the Oly. But unlike a lot of others here that expect the G1 X to do everything and be perfect, I just want it for high quality everyday pics, not fine-art work. Looks like it'll be great for that.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
gl2k
By gl2k (Jan 10, 2012)

compared to this little gem the Nikon 1 sucks ... sorry Nikon
hope to see some nice portrait shots with shallow dof sooner than later

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Jan 11, 2012)

Let's see, it's easier for Nikon to make fast lenses for the 1 series and oh, the lenses on the Nikon are interchangeable.

0 upvotes
Le Kilt
By Le Kilt (Jan 11, 2012)

LOL, try shooting your kids at 10 fps with this one !!!
Not the same market.

0 upvotes
keeponkeepingon
By keeponkeepingon (Jan 10, 2012)

Love it!

Will of course wait for the dpreview and make sure the IQ delivers! If so I may be "in for 1" !

M4/3, NEX, NX, and Fujifilm X-PRO 1?

All of those are bigger and (much) more expensive when equipped the lense to cover the same zoom range.

1 upvote
Ryanide
By Ryanide (Jan 10, 2012)

Is that a Depth of Field Preview button on the front below the lens?? That would be cool! Does the lens ring rotate for camera settings, or is it just the other 2 dials?

0 upvotes
Ruy Penalva
By Ruy Penalva (Jan 10, 2012)

A good addition to to general photography set. We should realize that an old photographer don't have a little bit of we have now.

4 upvotes
Franka T.L.
By Franka T.L. (Jan 10, 2012)

Sorry Canon, but I fail to see the point. If I want it pocketable, the S100 is fine, I can live with the shortfall of the small sensor. If I need better IQ right off the sensor. There is already the M4/3, NEX, NX, and now the Fujifilm X-PRO 1 which all allow my the liberty to tailor my own setup properly instead of relying on a none too speedy lens that's not quite wide enough but yet not quite long enough. And while at it, why the need for another form factor on the sensor when your upmarket model ( from the G series ) EOS already had an established APS-C of 1.6X factor.

Can we be frank, are you too reluctant to turn table on yourself just so you can protect your DSLR lowends ??

2 upvotes
howardroark
By howardroark (Jan 10, 2012)

Canon created a digital lens system long ago in the form of EF-S. Canon also realizes that most people who buy mirrorless systems probably don't care anything about mirrors or interchangeable lenses, they care about size and image quality. I hope Canon comes out with a new system that uses a mirror, allowing for the use of a decent viewfinder, and puts all the mirrorless cameras to shame.

4 upvotes
wallbreaker
By wallbreaker (Jan 10, 2012)

Movie mode1920 x 1080 (24 fps)..love the sensor though..

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Total comments: 791
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