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Nikon announces Nikon 1 system with V1 small sensor mirrorless camera

By dpreview staff on Sep 21, 2011 at 04:02 GMT

Nikon has announced the V1 enthusiast small sensor mirrorless camera. Built around what the company is calling a 'CX' format 10MP CMOS sensors, the cameras is part of the company's new Nikon 1 line. The V1 is intended as the higher-end model in the lineup and features magnesium alloy construction and a 1.4M dot electronic viewfinder. It also has an accessory port allowing the connection of the SB-N5 mini speedlight or GP-N100 GPS unit. Unlike the J1, it can switch between mechanical and electronic shutter. In common with the J1, in can shoot 1080i60 or 1080p30 video and combines phase detection and contrast detection autofocus, in movie shooting or 10fps continuous bursts. The 1" type sensor (13.2mm x 8.8mm) gives a 2.7x crop. The V1 kit with 10-30mm (27-81mm equiv.) lens will be $899.95 and will be available around October 20th. An adapter allowing the use of Nikon F-mount lenses will follow.

It may seem odd that Nikon would build its mirrorless system around a sensor so much smaller than the ones being used by its rivals. We think it makes a lot of sense for the company. Click here to read why.

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Press Release:

BUILT FROM THE GROUND UP: THE NIKON 1 SYSTEM BALANCES SPEED, STYLE AND SIMPLICITY TO CREATIVELY CAPTURE ALL OF LIFE'S SPONTANEOUS MOMENTS

The Nikon V1

The New Nikon J1 and V1 Cameras as Well as Four New Ultra-Portable Lenses are Engineered for Expressive Living

MELVILLE, N.Y. (Sept 21, 2011) – Nikon Inc. today announced a revolutionary new digital imaging system built from the ground up to empower users with new ways to tell stories through photography, driven by imaginative next-generation technology. The iconic new Nikon 1 system is designed to become one with the user and their lifestyle, providing a unique form of expression with amazing image quality, speed and portability.

From Nikon, a company with more than 75 years in imaging excellence, the Nikon 1 J1 is an advanced camera with interchangeable lenses that opens the door to a fresh way to capture pictures and High Definition (HD) movies. This Nikon 1 system represents a new category of camera that challenges conventional thinking, emphasizing a pocketable form factor with unbelievable speed, combined with the high image quality that only Nikon could create. Thanks to a wealth of innovative technologies, the Nikon J1 camera is a simple to use conduit for creativity, seemingly anticipating a consumer's needs in any situation. Moments are instantly captured using amazingly fast new hybrid Autofocus (AF), and blazing fast speed with continuous AF. Users can also shoot with confidence knowing that the Smart Photo Selector will automatically capture the best possible image without a second thought. Furthermore, just a touch of the shutter button instantly captures a high quality image while simultaneously recording Full HD 1080p movies, and the exciting new Motion Snapshot mode captures fleeting moments like never before with a combination of moving and still images, bringing memories to life. To accompany this exciting new form factor, Nikon created the entirely new 1 NIKKOR lens system that seamlessly integrates powerful precision optics into a camera platform to capture more of the world around the user.

"The needs of the consumer are changing and the world is becoming one of visual conversation, which paves the way for the next chapter in image capture devices. The new Nikon 1 system is the culmination of more than 75 years of optical excellence and relentless pursuit to the unrivaled technological advancements in camera technology," said Bo Kajiwara, Director of Marketing, Nikon Inc. "Nikon's new 1 J1 camera allows consumers to have confidence in a new way to express themselves, with amazing speed, versatility, ease of use and portability."

One Purpose: A Revolutionary New System

The new Nikon 1 system is a completely original concept, engineered specifically to strike the ultimate balance of performance, intuitive simplicity and portability to chronicle life like never before. This breakthrough platform lays the foundation for future technologies, and the Nikon 1 system has been created for the consumer who wants to capture, share and connect to life. The fully electronic lens system enables the camera to keep pace with an active lifestyle and delivers amazing images and Full HD 1080p movies to connect with friends and family. Whether it's a spontaneous outing or a planned trek abroad, the versatility of interchangeable lenses in a convenient form factor will allow a consumer to take the camera with them wherever life leads. Furthermore, the J1 camera makes a personal style statement with a variety of matching colored camera bodies and lenses.

The heart of the new J1 camera is the new Nikon developed CX-format, 10.1 megapixel High-Speed AF CMOS sensor that helps make this camera the pinnacle of portable performance. The newly developed CMOS sensor has been engineered for amazing image quality in a variety of lighting conditions, with a native ISO range of 100-3200 (6400 Hi-1) for maximum versatility. Images captured with this new sensor exhibit striking colors, vivid hues and rich detail so lifelike, it's the next best thing to being there as memories unfold.

Nikon's exclusive new EXPEED 3™ image processing engine drives the system and is the catalyst behind the camera's rapid response, fast AF and high-speed performance. In addition, the new dual core EXPEED 3 processor works to maximize battery efficiency while yielding images and movies with low noise and vibrant tones. The Nikon J1 is engineered for maximum ease of use, featuring a clean button layout and intuitive graphical interface. Distractions and menus are minimized; creating a clear path to the camera's advanced functions, further unleashing creative potential.

The Fastest One

From first steps to first date, life moves fast and the Nikon J1 is the camera to keep pace. The camera seemingly anticipates action with amazing autofocus, response time and operation. The new advanced hybrid AF system is the world's fastest autofocus1, allowing consumers to capture more of their world than ever before. The Nikon J1 features new focal plane phase detection AF that reacts instantly to deliver incredibly fast, split-second response. Wherever action is happening in the frame, the 73-point AF system will get the shot. This newly developed hybrid system continuously evaluates the scene at hand for optimal results, and can switch between phase detection and contrast detect AF to best suit the scene. Whether shooting in low-light conditions like a late night block party, or a fast moving pick-up game, photographers can capture details with confidence.

When the action is happening, users can also shoot at a fast 10 frames per second (fps), with full adaptive AF for frame after frame of images with incredible sharpness and detail. Additionally, the scene can be captured at full resolution up to a staggering 60 fps (AF locked), which is the world's fastest continuous shooting speed2. So go ahead and capture a best friend's high dive at the next pool party, and then confidently share every aspect of the leap with stunning detail.

The One That Inspires a New Way to Capture with Motion Snapshot

Motion Snapshot is a new approach to capturing images that will dramatically alter the way we perceive digital photography. By selecting the Motion Snapshot icon from the Mode Dial at the back of the camera, consumers can capture fleeting moments with staggering depth and emotion like never before. The result unites a frozen still image with a slow-motion movement set to a built-in audio soundtrack to create a portrayal of an occurrence with maximum impact. With Motion Snapshot, users are now able to relive memories in stunning detail, as real movement and depth are included in the image. Motion Snapshot provides a way to once again experience someone's hair flowing in the breeze or relaxing scenes like waves crashing or rustling leaves that evoke an emotional response.

Consumers are also able to create masterpieces of moving images from multiple files using the included Short Movie Creator software. This easy-to-use, intuitive software works in conjunction with Nikon's View NX2 to make managing photos and movies fun and easy. With these programs, users are empowered to organize, share and edit photos, Motion Snapshots and HD movies. Users are also able to connect and share Motion Snapshot files using Nikon's my Picturetown, an online resource at www.mypicturetown.com.

The One to Set Trends

Both the camera technology and exterior design were inspired by the pursuit of balance, as a device that lives in perfect accord with any lifestyle. The lines are clean and minimalist, the colors are vibrant, creating a stylish accessory for every personality. The design is meant to inspire creativity, with a simple interface and easy-to-use camera controls, intuitively placed for any user. Switching from modes and accessing advanced features is easy, enabling the user to further push creative boundaries, whether trusting the smart automatic settings or creatively exploring the full manual control modes.

Control highlights include a Mode Dial, with the four main common functions readily available, in addition to a Command Dial with common camera settings. The new "F" (feature) button is a new design element to Nikon cameras, which automatically brings up relevant menus and options based on what mode the camera is set.

The Nikon 1 system is further complemented by fashionable, premium accessories tailored to perfectly fit a user's lifestyle. These accessories include a custom fit body case set available in a variety of colors, as well as fashionable, color coordinated leather neck and hand straps.

The Smart One: Nikon's Smart Photo Selector

The new Nikon J1 is an advanced camera with interchangeable lenses that features new technologies aimed at creating better pictures, easier. Nikon's new Smart Photo Selector feature strives to deliver a perfect image every time. When a "can't miss" photo opportunity arises, users can switch to the Smart Photo Selector mode which uses the camera's pre-cache to start shooting and storing images. All of these images are analyzed within the camera, and the best photo is selected based on a number of factors including exposure, focus and advanced facial recognition. While the camera suggests the best image, five frames are recorded, providing the user a choice of their favorite photo. What's more, the J1 also includes favorite core Nikon technologies, such as Active D-lighting, Auto Scene Selector and Picture Controls.

One Device That Also Captures HD Movies

The new CX-format CMOS sensor produces breathtaking Full HD movies at 1080p (30 fps). Users can also shoot at a rapid 60 fps (1080i), or elevate the production with additional 30/60/400 and 1200 fps modes for super slow motion effects. The J1 is made to be flexible, and can capture both HD movies and high resolution images simultaneously. Simply press the shutter while recording to freeze the action with a high quality image file with sharp focus.

Additionally, the Nikon J1 applies noise reduction to movie files, giving the user amazingly sharp, crisp movies with deep black levels. This feature makes this the ideal camera for shooting movies when light is less than ideal, such as indoors or at night. A full HD movie can record a full 29 minutes, while the senses are further treated to sound sampled in full stereo for lifelike reproduction.

One Vision, Two Distinct Cameras

The Nikon J1 is the model designed for those consumers who use a camera as part of their connected lifestyle; always carrying it to bring passion and depth to visual storytelling. Both the camera and the lenses come in a variety of matching stylish colors, including white, pink, red, silver and black. Photos and movies are easily composed and shared on the bright 3.0-inch high-resolution LCD monitor. With the aid of the concealed pop-up flash, consumers can easily add fill flash as needed or shoot in most conditions including low-light.

The Nikon 1 V1 is for photo enthusiasts who value interchangeable lens versatility and desire a small form factor. In fact, it's the world's smallest and lightest camera in the world with interchangeable lens versatility and an electronic viewfinder (EVF)3. Aimed at the user excited about creating amazing images and movies, the Nikon V1 has added features including a 1.4 million dot high resolution EVF that automatically activates when the user raises the camera to their eye. In addition to the high-speed electronic shutter, the magnesium alloy body conceals a high performance mechanical shutter that affords tactile feedback and expanded shooting options.

The V1 camera also features Nikon's new Multi-Accessory Port for attaching options such as the new SB-N5 compact speedlight, or the GP-N100 GPS module. For those making movies, the V1 has a stereo microphone input for professional quality audio.

Price and Availability

The Nikon J1 and V1 will be available throughout the United States beginning October 20th. The Nikon J1 camera with 10-30mm lens kit will be available at a suggested retail price4 of $649.95. The Nikon V1 camera with 10-30mm lens kit will be available for a suggested retail price4 of $899.95. For more information, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

1: Based on performance with shooting using a standard zoom lens (10-30) at the maximum wide-angle position with AF-area mode set to Single-point (results based on Nikon test conditions)
2: The world's fastest continuous shooting speed: 60 fps (while the AF is locked in the first frame) (shot at full resolution (10M)). Among cameras with interchangeable lenses
3: Among cameras with interchangeable lenses with a built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF).
4: Suggested retail price listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time
*Comparison models include the Nikon D3100, Sony NEX-5, NEX-2 NEX-C3 NEX-5N, Olympus E-PL1s, E-PL2, E-P3, E-PL3, Panasonic G10, GF-2, GH2, G3 Samsung NX-10, NX100

Nikon V1 specifications

Sensor • 13.2 mm x 8.8 mm CMOS sensor
• 10.1 million effective pixels
Image sizes • 3872 x 2592
• 2896 x 1944
• 1936 x 1296
• 3840 x 2160
Aspect ratio 3:2, 16:9
Movie clips • 1920 x 1080 @ 60i/30 fps
• 1280 x 720 @ 30/15 fps
• 640 x 480 @ 30/15 fps
• 320 x 240 @ 30/15 fps

Slow-motion movies
• 640 x 240/400 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)
• 640 x 240/400 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)
• 320 x 120/1,200 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)
• 320 x 120/1,200 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)

Motion Snapshot Motion Snapshot
• 1,920 x 1,080/60p (59.94 fps) (plays at 24p/23.976 fps)
• 1,920 x 1,080/60p (59.94 fps) (plays at 24p/23.976 fps)
Sensor output is about 60 fps
File format • NEF (RAW)
• JPEG

Movie:
• MOV
• H.264/MPEG-4 Advanced Video Coding compression
• AAC audio
Lens mount • Nikon 1 mount
• Approx. 2.7x lens focal length (Nikon CX-format)
Focus • Hybrid autofocus (phase detection/contrast-detect AF); AF-assist illuminator
AF are • Single-point (135 points)
• Auto-area (41 points)
• Subject tracking
Lens Servo • Autofocus (AF): Single AF (AF-S); continuous AF (AF-C); auto AF-S/AF-C selection (AF-A); fulltime AF (AF-F)
• Manual focus (MF)
Focus distance • Standard mode 0.6m (wide) / 1.0m (tele)
• Macro mode 0.2m - (wide) / 0.9m (tele)
• Super Macro mode Closest focusing distance: 1cm
ISO sensitivity • Auto
• High Auto
• Manual ISO 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, Hi 1 (6400 equiv.)
Exposure compensation • +/- 3 EV
• 1/3 EV steps
metering TTL metering using image sensor
• Matrix
• Center-weighted
• Spot
Shuttter speed Mechanical Shutter
• 1/4000 sec. –30 sec.
• Bulb
Electronic Shutter
• 1/16000 sec. –30 sec.
• Bulb
Modes • Programmed auto with flexible program
• Shutter-priority auto
• Aperture-priority auto
• Manual
• Scene auto selector
Shooting Modes • Still image (3 : 2)
• Smart Photo Selector (3 : 2)
• Movie (HD 16 : 9, slow motion 8 : 3)
• Motion Snapshot (16 : 9)
White balance • Auto
• Incandescent
• Fluorescent
• Direct sunlight
• Flash
• Cloudy
• Shade
• Preset manual
Picture Control system • Standard
• Neutral
• Vivid
• Monochrome
• Portrait
• Landscape
EVF • 0.47-in., approx. 1440k-dot color TFT LCD viewfinder
• 100% coverage
LCD monitor • 3.0" / 7.5 cm LCD
• 921,000 dots
Continous shooting • Electronic (Hi): Approx. 10, 30, or 60 fps
• Other modes: Up to 5 fps (single AF or manual focus, S Shutter-priority auto or M Manual exposure mode, shutter speed 1/250 s or faster, and other settings at default values)
Connectivity • DC input
• Combined A/V & USB output
• USB 2.0 compatible
• HDMI
• Multi accesory port
Storage • SD/SDHC/SDXC
Power Li-ion Rechargeable Battery (EN-EL15)
Weight (no batt) 294g
Dimensions 4.42"W x 3"H x 1.7"D
(113mm x 76mm x 44mm)
312
I own it
35
I want it
36
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 948
12345
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (Sep 21, 2011)

Man, I'm really confused now. I don't like the look of any of this mirrorless stuff. But I still want a camera that's smaller than my DSLR. I was going to get a GXR but then there's the dust problem and there's doubts about its future. I was hoping Nikon would get it right but the sensor is so small and the lenses are so big and the price is so high. Canon, where are you?

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

*cough Fujifilm X100*

0 upvotes
eddie_cam
By eddie_cam (Sep 21, 2011)

MY EYES, MY EYES ...!
http://cdn.asia.cnet.com/i/r/2011/pg/62211090/sc003.jpg

3 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Sep 21, 2011)

That is the Mary Kay Edition that you get when you sell trunk load of Mary Kay cosmetics ;)

2 upvotes
zapatista
By zapatista (Sep 21, 2011)

Where's the Pink Lens?!?

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 21, 2011)

I would just like to see the focus system in operation. I tried the E-P3, and for all the high-speed accomplishments it is still saddled with the drawbacks of contrast detect. The small sensor at 2.7X isn't enough. I don't even like m4/3. The lenses will probably be very good, as Nikon knows how to build consumer lenses as well if not better than anyone. There is stuff in there that will attract some people. I hope it does well. If I won the lottery I would try one, but short of that, no way.

1 upvote
Vladik
By Vladik (Sep 21, 2011)

PURE DRECK! Nikon should take lessons from Fuji on design

3 upvotes
tlinn
By tlinn (Sep 21, 2011)

Sensor size and body size are big disappointments—particularly sensor size. Biggest thumbs up goes to the high speed movie modes. That is a killer feature that I'd love to see become widely available.

1 upvote
Antonio Rojilla
By Antonio Rojilla (Sep 21, 2011)

All they had to do was to put the new sensor in a P7100 body -and replace the OVF with the EVF maybe- and they could have had a winner: great ergonomics, lots of controls, flash, hot-shoe, VF, tilting LCD... That, or try to make this cameras as small as the XZ-1, pancake included. At their current size and with the lack of so many body features -they even lack a grip!- it's hard to see the point.

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

Yet the V1's image sensor is much bigger than the one in the p7100 yet the V1 is smaller than the p7100.

0 upvotes
stewf
By stewf (Sep 21, 2011)

“become one with the user and their lifestyle, providing a unique form of expression … created for the consumer who wants to capture, share and connect to life”

As press releases get longer, filled with more empty and hyperbolic drivel, they are easier to ignore, ultimately serving no purpose at all.

10 upvotes
tlinn
By tlinn (Sep 21, 2011)

As soon as I saw the word "lifestyle" I knew it was a compromised product.

3 upvotes
dbateman
By dbateman (Sep 21, 2011)

Amazing using a smaller sensor and still create a camera which is larger than the Panasonic GF1 and Olympus Pens. Also surprised to see the lenses are larger, 72mm filter thread (why).

But most disappointing is the interface. How do you get to Aperture priority? what does Auto Aperture priority mean? I don't buy compact cameras that don't have direct access to A-mode. I also prefer at least one Custom mode. I think version five in this system may be good. As it took Olympus a while to get to the EP3.

2 upvotes
eddie_cam
By eddie_cam (Sep 21, 2011)

My humongous FT 70-300's filter thread is only 58 mm. FT, you know ...

0 upvotes
mr moonlight
By mr moonlight (Sep 21, 2011)

I just don't get it. This camera would be useful if it was actually a small camera, but it isn't. My GF1 is smaller! With all the smaller 4/3 offerings out there, why would you go with something with such a small sensor? All that bulk and not even an optical viewfinder? Really? Maybe Nikon is trying to convince people that shallow DOF is no longer a desirable attribute?

Coming from Nikon I was expecting a much more interesting entry into the mirrorless market. Hopefully Canon steps up and busts out an APS-C interchangeable lens mirrorless with an optical viewfinder. Something to out do the m4/3 crowd and compete with the X100.

2 upvotes
Falcon31
By Falcon31 (Sep 21, 2011)

Why the predominantly negative responses? It is soo easy to say what could/should be better.
I think this system has a good chance to establish itself.

I am mainly interested in it as a p&s with std lens only and as a 2.7 crop factor camera that make it a nice safari combo with my 70-200 mm lens. No need to buy that big 500 mm.

The main thing is that it should be at an attractive price point that will make p&s shooters move to this system and not to a 4/3 or DSLR.

0 upvotes
mr moonlight
By mr moonlight (Sep 21, 2011)

Because we all were waiting for the likes of Canon or Nikon to come out with a mirrorless that would out perform or at least equal the current options on the market. This one doesn't. Yeah, if you try hard, you can find a specific use for it, but not one that doesn't already have a better solution. A extender on that 70-200 with an APS-C body will probably give you better image quality at higher resolution for less cash. If this camera was really small it may have had an advantage, but it isn't.

1 upvote
Neoasphalt
By Neoasphalt (Sep 21, 2011)

The only way Nikon can compete in IQ with m43 and compact APS cams is keep megapixels no more than announced 10 MP or go even less. If they wiil make 6 MP (absolutely enough for many users) sensor pixel density will be less (less noise) than any current m43 cam, except GH1.

0 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 21, 2011)

That is a misconception. You can get better noise results with more pixels that you downsample with software. What matters is the sensor size and efficiency. That being equal with more pixels you preserve more information.

0 upvotes
Montaigne
By Montaigne (Sep 21, 2011)

Disappointed not because of anything this announcement includes, but by what it does not.

As a DSLR user I have been waiting a long time to see at least the innovations of the D7000 in a higher end body, DX or FX. Both the D700 and D300S were made anachronistic by the D7000.

If Nikon is going to give priority to non-DSLR users then I may have to contemplate the unthinkable (it starts with a C) - unthinkable because of the money I have invested in N glass. Oh great Lord Nikon, can you at least tell me WHEN to expect the new DSLRs?

0 upvotes
Falcon31
By Falcon31 (Sep 21, 2011)

Suffering from digital rot?
My D700 is still as good as when it came out with me being the limiting factor.

0 upvotes
Cyril Reif
By Cyril Reif (Sep 21, 2011)

What a strategic mistake.....Nikon should have gone with Micro Four Thirds and competed head-to-head with Panasonic and Olympus...what cowards. They would have also created a great new market for Micro Four Thirds Nikkor lenses......and I've been a loyal Nikon user for over 40 years!

2 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Sep 21, 2011)

What makes you think Panasonic or Olympus would allow Nikon to join?

0 upvotes
Cyril Reif
By Cyril Reif (Sep 21, 2011)

...and what makes you think they wouldn't....the standard has already been licensed to many other lens manufacturers....and having Nikon join would only expand the market opportunity for every one.

0 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 21, 2011)

It is a pretty open standard.

I think m43 is the Goldilocks. Not too big, not too small, just right.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Sep 22, 2011)

There's a difference between allowing lens makers to join (which can make the system seem more attractive), and letting one of the market's biggest players join.

I'd also query whether you can have a 'pretty open' standard. If someone can prevent you joining, it's not open.

0 upvotes
BogdanSandulescu
By BogdanSandulescu (Sep 21, 2011)

Nikon, welcome in the point and shoot interchangeable lens era! :)

1 upvote
psandham
By psandham (Sep 21, 2011)

Just another step toward being able to use my fine Nikon glass for video.

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

for video? er, so your D7000/90/3s/5100/3100 can't shoot video?
Face it, this system is DoA.

0 upvotes
psandham
By psandham (Sep 22, 2011)

The bodies you listed are much, much larger than this series. I really don't want anything the size of my D700 or D300 for video.

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 22, 2011)

NEX bodies are smaller than DSLR? why don't use them anyway? the video is very high quality if you read reviews from HDSLR communities blogs. Esp. NEX5N with low noise video at iso 3200

0 upvotes
inthethick
By inthethick (Sep 21, 2011)

I really can't figure out which segment of the market would fall for this system. Every other edge this system has over the others (all the gimmicky motion modes) will be lost in the next iteration of the next M43 or NEX camera. The sensor size makes absolutely no sense at all. If Nikon means to capitalize on its F mount, the crop factor of 2.7 would mean all F lenses become tele (unless you have the few rare sub-24mm lenses).

It's disappointing to see a venerable giant lose all common sense.

4 upvotes
julienA
By julienA (Sep 21, 2011)

Would be curious to know how they implement phase-detect AF

3 upvotes
yukonchris
By yukonchris (Sep 21, 2011)

I would too. I'm still not sold on fixed translucent mirrors or anything else that gets in the way of light from the lens.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 21, 2011)

Hogan says they are using the main sensor for phase detect, first of its kind. I have no doubt Nikon will kill all the others on focusing. It's the rest of the camera I don't like, particularly the price.

0 upvotes
collinox
By collinox (Sep 21, 2011)

definitely not my cup of tea!
I was expecting an APSC sensor if not a full frame...

3 upvotes
mr moonlight
By mr moonlight (Sep 21, 2011)

I was expecting something worth purchasing and replacing my GF1, not this epic fail. Why would I want an oversized mirrorless camera with a tiny sensor for an outrageous price?

2 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Sep 21, 2011)

"One Device That Also Captures HD Movies"

Wow, just like my iPod Touch , phone and every camera I have purchased in the last five years.

5 upvotes
Kim Seng
By Kim Seng (Sep 21, 2011)

Well there are many choices of mirrorless cameras to choose from now. Some of cameras like Sony, Olumpus, Fuji and others are very good. It is our choices to buy any of them. We make sure we will get what we are looking. Some like big sensors, medium sensors and some small sensors. Some like big compact, some like medium and some like small. We will just wait what Canon have to show. I think all the manufacturers will get a fair share in the market as what I see it.

0 upvotes
Bill Force
By Bill Force (Sep 21, 2011)

"Turn out the lights, the party's over"...too late to the party occupied by Oly, Panny, Sony etc.
Nikon is a contradiction and must have completely different gruops working on different things that do not communicate, Their pro level cams are unbeatable and their consumer cameras are the worst P.O.S. (my wifes L-22) available. This new offering falls in the later category.
If you are in a war you don't bring a knife to a gunfight, this is definately a knife.
With some of the truly innovative small cameras available from other manufactures why a "me too" offering supposedly aimed at enthusiasts, B.S., they are trying to lie back on their laurels and sell the name. They will sell a lot to an unknowledgable public soley because of the Nikon label but eventually will turn into a "black eye" when compared to other offerings.
I bought my first Nikon "S" in 1952 and many since but not this P.O.S. wannabee.

2 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Sep 21, 2011)

Yes, and some people still want to believe an E-P3 w/EVF or a GH is smaller than a DSLR. The difference is minute. Same with DSLR vs NEX vs all m4/3. They are toys to enjoy, and the Nikon falls into the same category. If you don't like it, don't buy it. I won't. But I'm sure there will be takers. It appears to have a top notch focus system, and there are worse places to start.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 21, 2011)

i am really suprised that some member here are to stupid to compare the size of cameras.

there are still people here who say this junk is smaller in size then m43 cameras + lenses.

smaller in sensor size.. yes!

2 upvotes
mr moonlight
By mr moonlight (Sep 21, 2011)

It's actually larger! The GF3 is much smaller and has a m4/3 sensor. Plus it's a lot cheaper.

0 upvotes
yukonchris
By yukonchris (Sep 21, 2011)

As a photographer, I'm disappointed. As an Olympus user, I'm quite pleased.

Frankly, I don't see Nikon's 1 System threatening Olympus, Panasonic, Sony, or Samsung who offer better looking cameras with bigger sensors, and similar form factors. Sony's NEX models, in particular, look much better.

Also, if Nikon pumps tons of cash into promoting their tiny sensor range, it will only serve to reinforce Olympus' long standing assertion that the 4/3rds sensor really is the best compromise for most common photographic tasks, sitting as it does, well above this new camera's sensor in size, and only slightly down from APS-C in size. In short, Nikon may prove that 4/3rds is the sweet-spot in sensor design, providing both quality and compactness.

I don't think Olympus and Panasonic could have wished for a better scenario. The System 1 - Too large to be compact, too ugly to be chic, too small to be good. How's that for a sales line? Olympus and Panasonic should send Nikon thank you letters.

4 upvotes
Caleido
By Caleido (Sep 21, 2011)

How can you say this, when the samples floating around actually show the same or slightly better high ISO performance or jpeg-NR than Oly's aging sensor.

ISO 3200: http://pliki.optyczne.pl/Nik1/10/nik10_fot06.jpg

And I have an E-PL1. I agree on dof, but not on image quality.
Let's hope they start to pump out a new generation m4/3 sensor, as a response. Inertia is bad for everyone.

0 upvotes
inthethick
By inthethick (Sep 21, 2011)

Sensor capabilities can improve. It's the sensor size that will limit the system. There are not a whole lot of lenses you can use on the system with a crop factor of 2.7.

1 upvote
yukonchris
By yukonchris (Sep 21, 2011)

Of course, my initial post represents a gut reaction to the press release. It is important to recognize that one cannot really know how a camera will perform until one tries it out and views the resultant photos. It is entirely possible that Nikon has developed a remarkable sensor capable of outperforming sensors twice its size. It is also reasonable to recognize Nikon's claims of auto focus performance, movie recoding ability, and high speed mechanical shutter. They are offering stats here that seem quite remarkable. Improvements in these areas will promote more development from other manufacturers, and will ultimately benefit all photographers through new imaging opportunities whether or not the 1 System is ultimately a successful product.

1 upvote
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

"It is entirely possible that Nikon has developed a remarkable sensor capable of outperforming sensors twice its size. "
You mean: Sony has? Remember: all compact Nikon PAS use Sony sensors, and almost all Nikon DSLRs also use Sony sensors.

So, just face it. The 1 system has fall before landed. Epic fail? Not really, but fail it is.

0 upvotes
yukonchris
By yukonchris (Sep 21, 2011)

If you read my initial post, I think you will find that we are of the same mind in terms of sensor size. Having said that, it is only really fair to examine the output before attempting to describe the quality. Also, one needs to make a distinction between design and fabrication. While Sony may, or may not be fabricating the sensor (I don't remember reading who is), the design may have come from another source.

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

The only sensors I heard that Nikon designed were: on D70, D2s, D3, D3s. And of course Nikon has theirs own (and algorithm) image processor chip as others has its own. But I never heard about N ever designed its small sensor their-self. Fujifilm on the other hand, has. So, this Nikon 1 system or X-10 with EXR sensor? No brainer to choice.

0 upvotes
Ibida Bab
By Ibida Bab (Sep 21, 2011)

Made in China mass produced cheapo.

0 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Sep 21, 2011)

Right, just like the macs, ipods, iPhone, iPads and most other consumer electronics.

1 upvote
BMWX5
By BMWX5 (Sep 21, 2011)

and cars too :O http://www.usatoday.com/money/autos/story/2011-09-14/china-made-car-going-on-sale-in-us/50408790/1

0 upvotes
Ibida Bab
By Ibida Bab (Sep 21, 2011)

When it comes to my camera I will carefully select a Japanese or German made camera. No compromise. Other stuff: I could care less.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Sep 21, 2011)

And how many components of the 'German-made' or 'Japanese' cameras do you think are made in those countries, rather than China? I'd worry more about the quality control processes (and hence reputation) of the manufacturer than where the factory is, personally.

0 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Sep 21, 2011)

IR shows that there are plenty of noise even at ISO100:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/NIKONJ1/FULLRES/YDSC_0005.HTM

Here's another at ISO100:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/NIKONJ1/FULLRES/YDSC_0034.HTM

0 upvotes
DemonDuck
By DemonDuck (Sep 21, 2011)

Good grief! The hype -- oh, the hype. "...become one with the user and their lifestyle..." Does Nikon marketing really think anybody buys that kind of crap anymore?

1 upvote
stanic042
By stanic042 (Sep 21, 2011)

there is always the new generation ;)

0 upvotes
stanic042
By stanic042 (Sep 21, 2011)

there is always the new generation ;)

0 upvotes
stanic042
By stanic042 (Sep 21, 2011)

there is always the new generation ;)

0 upvotes
Matt Random
By Matt Random (Sep 21, 2011)

I have to admit that the high ISO samples look better than I expected. I'm interested to hear how well the AF performs. I' also interested to see the DOF control.

I just wish the V1 had a built-in flash. That accessory looks like a pain to carry around and I prefer to always have a flash available in case I need a little bit of fill. The lack of an articulating screen means no shooting down low or over a crowd.

0 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Sep 21, 2011)

too expensive. I might as well buy a Nikon D90 or a D5100.

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

You've missed the point which is size. D90 is big and bulky and draws much attention as well as strain on your back over a day. ;)

2 upvotes
johnparas11zenfoliodotcom
By johnparas11zenfoliodotcom (Sep 21, 2011)

yep-- if i want small for a reasonable price- I have my oly e-pl2. by the way I am a nikon DSLR user. I have the D90 now and have had teh D100, D200, D3000 and d3100 (sold them all-- D90 is the lone survivor)

0 upvotes
Bill Force
By Bill Force (Sep 21, 2011)

Redfox, you missed the point. Not to compare to a D90 but compare it to the offerings of the competition, they are not competing with themselves but for sure competing for the same market as Sony, Panny and Oly.

0 upvotes
nikongerl
By nikongerl (Sep 21, 2011)

I was wondering how long it would take Nikon to come up with this newer type of camera body.
KUDOS...Just bought a D7000 and someitmes I wish I had a lighter DSLR. Hmmmm...Santa is coming to town!

2 upvotes
mike geier
By mike geier (Sep 21, 2011)

they should be ashamed of themselves for this poor entry into the fray.....

1 upvote
Biggstr
By Biggstr (Sep 21, 2011)

DP Review points out in the text that Nikon probably chose the new CX (1") sensor to avoid competing against is long-standing market in DSLRs; that is, it wanted a system hobbled just enough in capabilities and IQ to keep potential DSLR customers from choosing the new system. It strikes me that that same strategy would dictate hobbling the lenses as well. Does this mean that we're unlikely to see "fast" lenses? If so, this would appear to give the enthusiast market in EVF and smaller form-factored ILCs to Panasonic, Olympus, Sony, and Samsung where better IQ and faster lenses are already available or quickly coming to market.

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

f1.0-f1.8 lens is would still be bulky, even for smaller sensor. Just look at those slow lenses. Filter size, 72mm, wth?!?!

0 upvotes
ooicl
By ooicl (Sep 21, 2011)

NEX-7 looks much more attractive...

5 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

Nah, it's looking less attractive. NEX has huge aps-c lenses.

0 upvotes
inthethick
By inthethick (Sep 21, 2011)

Adaptor mounts.

0 upvotes
Deusex
By Deusex (Sep 21, 2011)

NEX-7 is ugly camera, Panasonic GH or GF as well as E-P3 look much better

0 upvotes
Deusex
By Deusex (Sep 21, 2011)

NEX-7 is ugly camera, Panasonic GH or GF as well as E-P3 look much better

1 upvote
studiopeters
By studiopeters (Sep 21, 2011)

I used to work at a large technology company. We were always worried about cannibalizing our existing businesses.

To me, this looks the SLR boys at Nikon won the internal argument, and this is the largest sensor the mirror-less team was allowed to build.

Sony is in a much better position to compete in this arena, because they have a lot less to lose.

Will Canon go in to win, or wimp out over fear of their current SLR business?

This Nikon offering is not an attempt to win.

5 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 21, 2011)

Hmmm. A 2.7x crop factor suggests I can attach a 250mm lens and get the zoom equivalent almost the equivalent of 700mm with a DSLR. Sure, the 1" sensor is smaller, but I could never afford a 700mm F2.8 prime, and it would be very very big. This might be a way to get better sports or wildlife shots than a 1/2.3" sensor super-zoom, but without spending a fortune. The Panasonic 300mm m4/3 lens is not so fast or cheap, either.

3 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Sep 21, 2011)

You know that you can just mount that 250mm on a Nikon DSLR, then crop out the picture and you'll get the same reach right? There's no free lunch here.

0 upvotes
Ed Russell
By Ed Russell (Sep 21, 2011)

No, the pixel density of the larger sensors is lower. Even the D5100 16mp sensor can't get all the detail the 70-200 VR II has to offer.

1 upvote
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Sep 21, 2011)

Yes that's true, but to me lower density is a good thing. I understand other people have different needs.

0 upvotes
Michael Barkowski
By Michael Barkowski (Sep 21, 2011)

It has AEL-AFL and Exposure Compensation direct buttons - other ILCs miss one or both of these. Some are saying PASM modes are missing ... they are accessible in the menu, so there is no lack of aperture or shutter control. In digital electronics you pay a premium for compact size, so the price is no surprise. Phase detect AF and 60 fps continuous shooting demand a premium price as well.

For those who currently choose DSLR solely for their AF tracking speed and/or image quality needs, this may be the replacement, if they consider compactness to be worth something.

2 upvotes
VENTURE-STAR
By VENTURE-STAR (Sep 21, 2011)

Nikon may think this is a " revolutionary new digital imaging system built from the ground up to empower users," but it doesn't look particulary special or inspiring to me.

The styling is okay, but not brilliant and it worries me that Nikon are aiming much of this product range at consumers who may consider stupid colours more important than picture taking capability.

The selection of lenses in uninspiring and should Canon produce an interchangeable lens follow-on to their G12, the expensive Nikon 1 camera system will be blown away.

2 upvotes
007peter
By 007peter (Sep 21, 2011)

Nikon V1/J1 = *HP TOUCHPAD* epic failure. Actually HP is much better than Nikon, at least HP have the guts to admit it was total mistake, stop the producing Touchpad and do a FIRE SALE for just $99.

Hey, if Nikon call it quit on the mirrorless and sell them for $99, I buy one.

2 upvotes
MP Burke
By MP Burke (Sep 21, 2011)

The big advantage Nikon has is the name. I can imagine that part of Nikon's marketing strategy will be to give these cameras to well known professionals who normally use Nikon full frame cameras. They can then take a few photographs with the V system and help market it as the camera they use when they want a "pocket" or walk around system.

1 upvote
inthethick
By inthethick (Sep 21, 2011)

HP had the name too. They were the biggest producers of PCs. Come to think of it, Motorola, Nokia, all had the names.

0 upvotes
vFunct
By vFunct (Sep 21, 2011)

BTW I totally see Nikon doing the exact same type of camera with the DX and maybe even FX format as well.

In-place phase-detect AF with live-view would be great for pro users.

This is just a start..

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

said who?

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

said who?

0 upvotes
povetron
By povetron (Sep 21, 2011)

Looks like a good compact camera. Bigger sensor than enthusiastic compacts, smaller lenses than on m43 and aps-c. 10 MP sensor is an enough for the sensor of this size. The built in viewfinder also a advantage. But little bit overpriced for the camera of this sensor size.
Hope there will be some equivalent of fast prime standard lens. Anyway, I m looking for the review.

1 upvote
Deusex
By Deusex (Sep 21, 2011)

Right, but the problem that lenses will be bigger compare to µ4/3.

0 upvotes
Ejner Kristensen
By Ejner Kristensen (Sep 21, 2011)

I'm a Nikon afficionado, but the design of the V1 won't turn me to a mirrorless Nikon. It looks unfinished and unsexy.

3 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 21, 2011)

Needs more stickers or racing decals, perhaps. Perhaps a Louis Vuitton carrying case will adorn the "frog" with suitable princely attire.

0 upvotes
Ryan McCutcheon
By Ryan McCutcheon (Sep 21, 2011)

Of course this means that Canon will have to follow.

0 upvotes
altugo
By altugo (Sep 21, 2011)

...with APS-C size sensor and EF bayonet :-)

2 upvotes
ZinhaEq
By ZinhaEq (Sep 21, 2011)

@altugo You wish...

5 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 21, 2011)

T4i = T3i + 3D panorama mode.

0 upvotes
vFunct
By vFunct (Sep 21, 2011)

Nikon pretty much obsoleted the m4/3 and Sony NEX system.

The m4/3 & NEX systems are too big for discrete use (can't pocket them), and their sensors are too small for quality photography (might as well go with DX with fast AF). They're really useless.

Nikon just owned the market with this system.

4 upvotes
darkref
By darkref (Sep 21, 2011)

Did you just say that the m4/3 and NEX systems' sensors are ...too small? And I can only see one combinations of Nikon 1 system and a lens that is pocketable in those pictures. It's about as pocketable as the 4/3rd system with a pancake.

1 upvote
vFunct
By vFunct (Sep 21, 2011)

If they're concerned about sensor dynamic-range and noise, then they're going with a larger sensor: DX format, or even FX if they have money. If they're not concerned about sensor dynamic-range and noise, then they're just going to get something that lets them take quick photos: CX.

There is no reason to buy a m43 or NEX camera at this point. They're not as good as DX and not as portable as CX.

2 upvotes
darkref
By darkref (Sep 21, 2011)

I disagree with 'not as portable', V1 is 113mm x 76mm x 44mm, sony Nex 5n is 111 x 59 x 38 mm, and the lens sizes look similar. The V1 is also heavier.

0 upvotes
kongqueror
By kongqueror (Sep 21, 2011)

The lense mock-up shows it's just as big as u4/3. Depending on lense, its pocketable to not at all pocketable (which is the same predicament of u4/3). As someone not invested into a system yet, Nikon's J1 offering just falls flat for me compared to u4/3 and NEX options.

0 upvotes
Feyris_
By Feyris_ (Sep 21, 2011)

vFunct are you serious?

1 upvote
endika
By endika (Sep 21, 2011)

Ok I see: there's no way you find the m4/3 usable... but in fact the epl-3 (for example) is smaller than this V1 thing, and mounts a sensor that doubles the 13.2 x 8.8
I can't see much the advantage of this new Nikon system, other than the name, of course.

0 upvotes
Vlad S
By Vlad S (Sep 21, 2011)

Let's look at the numbers:
Nikon V1 is 113mm x 76mm x 44mm, 294g
Olympus E-PL3 is 109.5mm x 63.7mm x 37.3mm, 265g
Panasonic GF3 is 107.7 x 67.1 x 32.5 mm, 225g, 319g with a 14mm lens.

So the micro 4/3 are actually SMALLER than the V1 in every dimension, and there are several pancakes to choose from.

The Panasonic G3 is 115 mm x 84 mm x 47 mm, only marginally larger than V1, and has a flip-out LCD along with the viewfinder, if you are so concerned about being discrete.

And judging by the 400 ISO sample, they do have significantly better IQ, and DOF control almost as good as APS-C cameras.

I like the idea of the hybrid AF, and the pre-recording/best image selection, but in the end the IQ may not make it competitive with either micro 4/3 or NEX.

0 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Sep 21, 2011)

"Nikon pretty much obsoleted the m4/3 and Sony NEX system." <-- funny

"Nikon just owned the market with this system." <-- very funny

0 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Sep 21, 2011)

"Nikon pretty much obsoleted the m4/3 and Sony NEX system." <-- funny

"Nikon just owned the market with this system." <-- very funny

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

Yep, that's why there's so much commotion and over 600 comments to this announcement. Must be a new News comment format record!

Cameras have been getting smaller and smaller over the many decades of photography. Who would want to buy the NEXT that is small camera body but large lenses in respect to the camera when the V1 is here?

0 upvotes
darkref
By darkref (Sep 21, 2011)

Me? Because I don't care about putting cameras in my pocket? The lenses are not large, they are only slightly larger than the competition. They are sufficiently small enough to give a compact system. This V1 may be slightly smaller with a similar lens, but not small enough that I would want to sacrifice a huge amount of IQ.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 21, 2011)

vFunct you have absolutley no clue what your talking about correct?

probaly you are drunk... but get your facts straight.... at last LOOK at the pictures and compare the size.

lol what a nikon troll......

0 upvotes
bnny89
By bnny89 (Sep 21, 2011)

fanboy alert

0 upvotes
MarshallG
By MarshallG (Sep 21, 2011)

Looks nice, but the lack of manual control is a non-starter for me, personally.

5 upvotes
Foxwizgsk
By Foxwizgsk (Sep 21, 2011)

It does have manual control. Didn't you read the specs?

0 upvotes
eddie_cam
By eddie_cam (Sep 21, 2011)

Sample shots can be downloaded here:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/NIKONJ1/NIKONJ1GALLERY.HTM

The RAWs look great at ISO 800 and 1600!

Hey, you guys at dpreview, get a Nikon 1 cam! Need to compare noise with MFTs ... ;-)

1 upvote
putomax
By putomax (Sep 21, 2011)

hey eddie, thanks 4 the link
i had a look with raw photo processor
http://www.raw-photo-processor.com/RPP/Overview.html

IMVPO (in my very personal opinion) being a night photo session and all the jpegs look good, but the raws, the raws, ohhhhhhh RAWS are REALLY REALLY NICE!!! i specially like the kinda emulsion grain that's rendered with high isos.

it is "curious" the path nikon chose here... seems (sensor wise) opposed to sony's.

gashô

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 21, 2011)

i like the design, i like the concept and i really like the super16 sensor.

but the controls are a bad joke, i dont need to wait for a review for that.

the idea is good, now they have the niche between compact and mft. so if a compact upgrader buys this nikon, he/she can stay in system, skip mft and go directly to slr. thats a good idea.

but they forgot that even girls with pink cams want to learn photography and be creative in some way. and when a company like nikon (iam nikon user for the last 22 years) makes a new system and introduce that with a body lacking every possible manual control (in the control layout) its really sad.

why not challenge others? why not make a p7100 with a bayonett? why no 6mm 10mm 20mm 50mm prime lenses at startup???

ok include one zoom for those who cant live without. the consumer that they try to attract wont spend 900€ on this, those guys buyin mft BECAUSE its bigger than the nikon.

1 upvote
JackM
By JackM (Sep 21, 2011)

The best thing about this news? It means Canon will upstage them with an exciting announcement very soon. (whether it's a similar camera or not)

1 upvote
inevitable crafts studio
By inevitable crafts studio (Sep 21, 2011)

or they try to do the same. if canon would be willing to learn their g12 would have a mft sized sensor and a prime lens ^^

i think super16 is a good size, by ignoring mft they also tell the customer that mft is no real system or capeable of compete with an slr.

make small really small and big really big (sensor wise) is a good idea i think. i would never take my x100 and the d700 with me, but i would take a ricoh grd to my d700.

a grd sized camera with a lens mount, bigger sensor an evf and from nikon? i would instantly buy that before a mft, but only if the feature set of the cam at least matches the grd

1 upvote
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

Not until next year sometime which is why they've said they will introduce a very exciting product.

0 upvotes
BJN
By BJN (Sep 21, 2011)

At this stage in the game, Nikon's price is too high considering the point-and-shoot design of the camera. I suppose someone who just has to have Hello Kitty pink will pay anything for the experience, but the mirrorless compact market's getting crowded. Too crowded to support these high prices.

I don't see anything here for me, but that doesn't make the system a failure. Some price adjustments on the low end and more controllable bodies on the high end could work just fine. And I'm sure the Crayola box color options will appeal to the home market.

I'll be interested to see how the AF system performs, particularly with CF subject tracking and with respect to EVF blackout. If Nikon has any technological edge that justifies the price and makes the platform competitive, it would be in action tracking usability.

1 upvote
eyedo
By eyedo (Sep 21, 2011)

I'd never invest in a system like this.Sensor is too small and this looks like a proprietary hot shoe. I want to use my remotes and my SB-900s!
Sick of lugging around the D700 lens and heavy lenses!
The new Sony Nex-7 tempts me,this new Nikon does not.

1 upvote
Total comments: 948
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