Previous news story    Next news story

Nikon announces Nikon 1 system with V1 small sensor mirrorless camera

By dpreview staff on Sep 21, 2011 at 04:02 GMT

Nikon has announced the V1 enthusiast small sensor mirrorless camera. Built around what the company is calling a 'CX' format 10MP CMOS sensors, the cameras is part of the company's new Nikon 1 line. The V1 is intended as the higher-end model in the lineup and features magnesium alloy construction and a 1.4M dot electronic viewfinder. It also has an accessory port allowing the connection of the SB-N5 mini speedlight or GP-N100 GPS unit. Unlike the J1, it can switch between mechanical and electronic shutter. In common with the J1, in can shoot 1080i60 or 1080p30 video and combines phase detection and contrast detection autofocus, in movie shooting or 10fps continuous bursts. The 1" type sensor (13.2mm x 8.8mm) gives a 2.7x crop. The V1 kit with 10-30mm (27-81mm equiv.) lens will be $899.95 and will be available around October 20th. An adapter allowing the use of Nikon F-mount lenses will follow.

It may seem odd that Nikon would build its mirrorless system around a sensor so much smaller than the ones being used by its rivals. We think it makes a lot of sense for the company. Click here to read why.

Jump to:

Press Release:

BUILT FROM THE GROUND UP: THE NIKON 1 SYSTEM BALANCES SPEED, STYLE AND SIMPLICITY TO CREATIVELY CAPTURE ALL OF LIFE'S SPONTANEOUS MOMENTS

The Nikon V1

The New Nikon J1 and V1 Cameras as Well as Four New Ultra-Portable Lenses are Engineered for Expressive Living

MELVILLE, N.Y. (Sept 21, 2011) – Nikon Inc. today announced a revolutionary new digital imaging system built from the ground up to empower users with new ways to tell stories through photography, driven by imaginative next-generation technology. The iconic new Nikon 1 system is designed to become one with the user and their lifestyle, providing a unique form of expression with amazing image quality, speed and portability.

From Nikon, a company with more than 75 years in imaging excellence, the Nikon 1 J1 is an advanced camera with interchangeable lenses that opens the door to a fresh way to capture pictures and High Definition (HD) movies. This Nikon 1 system represents a new category of camera that challenges conventional thinking, emphasizing a pocketable form factor with unbelievable speed, combined with the high image quality that only Nikon could create. Thanks to a wealth of innovative technologies, the Nikon J1 camera is a simple to use conduit for creativity, seemingly anticipating a consumer's needs in any situation. Moments are instantly captured using amazingly fast new hybrid Autofocus (AF), and blazing fast speed with continuous AF. Users can also shoot with confidence knowing that the Smart Photo Selector will automatically capture the best possible image without a second thought. Furthermore, just a touch of the shutter button instantly captures a high quality image while simultaneously recording Full HD 1080p movies, and the exciting new Motion Snapshot mode captures fleeting moments like never before with a combination of moving and still images, bringing memories to life. To accompany this exciting new form factor, Nikon created the entirely new 1 NIKKOR lens system that seamlessly integrates powerful precision optics into a camera platform to capture more of the world around the user.

"The needs of the consumer are changing and the world is becoming one of visual conversation, which paves the way for the next chapter in image capture devices. The new Nikon 1 system is the culmination of more than 75 years of optical excellence and relentless pursuit to the unrivaled technological advancements in camera technology," said Bo Kajiwara, Director of Marketing, Nikon Inc. "Nikon's new 1 J1 camera allows consumers to have confidence in a new way to express themselves, with amazing speed, versatility, ease of use and portability."

One Purpose: A Revolutionary New System

The new Nikon 1 system is a completely original concept, engineered specifically to strike the ultimate balance of performance, intuitive simplicity and portability to chronicle life like never before. This breakthrough platform lays the foundation for future technologies, and the Nikon 1 system has been created for the consumer who wants to capture, share and connect to life. The fully electronic lens system enables the camera to keep pace with an active lifestyle and delivers amazing images and Full HD 1080p movies to connect with friends and family. Whether it's a spontaneous outing or a planned trek abroad, the versatility of interchangeable lenses in a convenient form factor will allow a consumer to take the camera with them wherever life leads. Furthermore, the J1 camera makes a personal style statement with a variety of matching colored camera bodies and lenses.

The heart of the new J1 camera is the new Nikon developed CX-format, 10.1 megapixel High-Speed AF CMOS sensor that helps make this camera the pinnacle of portable performance. The newly developed CMOS sensor has been engineered for amazing image quality in a variety of lighting conditions, with a native ISO range of 100-3200 (6400 Hi-1) for maximum versatility. Images captured with this new sensor exhibit striking colors, vivid hues and rich detail so lifelike, it's the next best thing to being there as memories unfold.

Nikon's exclusive new EXPEED 3™ image processing engine drives the system and is the catalyst behind the camera's rapid response, fast AF and high-speed performance. In addition, the new dual core EXPEED 3 processor works to maximize battery efficiency while yielding images and movies with low noise and vibrant tones. The Nikon J1 is engineered for maximum ease of use, featuring a clean button layout and intuitive graphical interface. Distractions and menus are minimized; creating a clear path to the camera's advanced functions, further unleashing creative potential.

The Fastest One

From first steps to first date, life moves fast and the Nikon J1 is the camera to keep pace. The camera seemingly anticipates action with amazing autofocus, response time and operation. The new advanced hybrid AF system is the world's fastest autofocus1, allowing consumers to capture more of their world than ever before. The Nikon J1 features new focal plane phase detection AF that reacts instantly to deliver incredibly fast, split-second response. Wherever action is happening in the frame, the 73-point AF system will get the shot. This newly developed hybrid system continuously evaluates the scene at hand for optimal results, and can switch between phase detection and contrast detect AF to best suit the scene. Whether shooting in low-light conditions like a late night block party, or a fast moving pick-up game, photographers can capture details with confidence.

When the action is happening, users can also shoot at a fast 10 frames per second (fps), with full adaptive AF for frame after frame of images with incredible sharpness and detail. Additionally, the scene can be captured at full resolution up to a staggering 60 fps (AF locked), which is the world's fastest continuous shooting speed2. So go ahead and capture a best friend's high dive at the next pool party, and then confidently share every aspect of the leap with stunning detail.

The One That Inspires a New Way to Capture with Motion Snapshot

Motion Snapshot is a new approach to capturing images that will dramatically alter the way we perceive digital photography. By selecting the Motion Snapshot icon from the Mode Dial at the back of the camera, consumers can capture fleeting moments with staggering depth and emotion like never before. The result unites a frozen still image with a slow-motion movement set to a built-in audio soundtrack to create a portrayal of an occurrence with maximum impact. With Motion Snapshot, users are now able to relive memories in stunning detail, as real movement and depth are included in the image. Motion Snapshot provides a way to once again experience someone's hair flowing in the breeze or relaxing scenes like waves crashing or rustling leaves that evoke an emotional response.

Consumers are also able to create masterpieces of moving images from multiple files using the included Short Movie Creator software. This easy-to-use, intuitive software works in conjunction with Nikon's View NX2 to make managing photos and movies fun and easy. With these programs, users are empowered to organize, share and edit photos, Motion Snapshots and HD movies. Users are also able to connect and share Motion Snapshot files using Nikon's my Picturetown, an online resource at www.mypicturetown.com.

The One to Set Trends

Both the camera technology and exterior design were inspired by the pursuit of balance, as a device that lives in perfect accord with any lifestyle. The lines are clean and minimalist, the colors are vibrant, creating a stylish accessory for every personality. The design is meant to inspire creativity, with a simple interface and easy-to-use camera controls, intuitively placed for any user. Switching from modes and accessing advanced features is easy, enabling the user to further push creative boundaries, whether trusting the smart automatic settings or creatively exploring the full manual control modes.

Control highlights include a Mode Dial, with the four main common functions readily available, in addition to a Command Dial with common camera settings. The new "F" (feature) button is a new design element to Nikon cameras, which automatically brings up relevant menus and options based on what mode the camera is set.

The Nikon 1 system is further complemented by fashionable, premium accessories tailored to perfectly fit a user's lifestyle. These accessories include a custom fit body case set available in a variety of colors, as well as fashionable, color coordinated leather neck and hand straps.

The Smart One: Nikon's Smart Photo Selector

The new Nikon J1 is an advanced camera with interchangeable lenses that features new technologies aimed at creating better pictures, easier. Nikon's new Smart Photo Selector feature strives to deliver a perfect image every time. When a "can't miss" photo opportunity arises, users can switch to the Smart Photo Selector mode which uses the camera's pre-cache to start shooting and storing images. All of these images are analyzed within the camera, and the best photo is selected based on a number of factors including exposure, focus and advanced facial recognition. While the camera suggests the best image, five frames are recorded, providing the user a choice of their favorite photo. What's more, the J1 also includes favorite core Nikon technologies, such as Active D-lighting, Auto Scene Selector and Picture Controls.

One Device That Also Captures HD Movies

The new CX-format CMOS sensor produces breathtaking Full HD movies at 1080p (30 fps). Users can also shoot at a rapid 60 fps (1080i), or elevate the production with additional 30/60/400 and 1200 fps modes for super slow motion effects. The J1 is made to be flexible, and can capture both HD movies and high resolution images simultaneously. Simply press the shutter while recording to freeze the action with a high quality image file with sharp focus.

Additionally, the Nikon J1 applies noise reduction to movie files, giving the user amazingly sharp, crisp movies with deep black levels. This feature makes this the ideal camera for shooting movies when light is less than ideal, such as indoors or at night. A full HD movie can record a full 29 minutes, while the senses are further treated to sound sampled in full stereo for lifelike reproduction.

One Vision, Two Distinct Cameras

The Nikon J1 is the model designed for those consumers who use a camera as part of their connected lifestyle; always carrying it to bring passion and depth to visual storytelling. Both the camera and the lenses come in a variety of matching stylish colors, including white, pink, red, silver and black. Photos and movies are easily composed and shared on the bright 3.0-inch high-resolution LCD monitor. With the aid of the concealed pop-up flash, consumers can easily add fill flash as needed or shoot in most conditions including low-light.

The Nikon 1 V1 is for photo enthusiasts who value interchangeable lens versatility and desire a small form factor. In fact, it's the world's smallest and lightest camera in the world with interchangeable lens versatility and an electronic viewfinder (EVF)3. Aimed at the user excited about creating amazing images and movies, the Nikon V1 has added features including a 1.4 million dot high resolution EVF that automatically activates when the user raises the camera to their eye. In addition to the high-speed electronic shutter, the magnesium alloy body conceals a high performance mechanical shutter that affords tactile feedback and expanded shooting options.

The V1 camera also features Nikon's new Multi-Accessory Port for attaching options such as the new SB-N5 compact speedlight, or the GP-N100 GPS module. For those making movies, the V1 has a stereo microphone input for professional quality audio.

Price and Availability

The Nikon J1 and V1 will be available throughout the United States beginning October 20th. The Nikon J1 camera with 10-30mm lens kit will be available at a suggested retail price4 of $649.95. The Nikon V1 camera with 10-30mm lens kit will be available for a suggested retail price4 of $899.95. For more information, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

1: Based on performance with shooting using a standard zoom lens (10-30) at the maximum wide-angle position with AF-area mode set to Single-point (results based on Nikon test conditions)
2: The world's fastest continuous shooting speed: 60 fps (while the AF is locked in the first frame) (shot at full resolution (10M)). Among cameras with interchangeable lenses
3: Among cameras with interchangeable lenses with a built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF).
4: Suggested retail price listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time
*Comparison models include the Nikon D3100, Sony NEX-5, NEX-2 NEX-C3 NEX-5N, Olympus E-PL1s, E-PL2, E-P3, E-PL3, Panasonic G10, GF-2, GH2, G3 Samsung NX-10, NX100

Nikon V1 specifications

Sensor • 13.2 mm x 8.8 mm CMOS sensor
• 10.1 million effective pixels
Image sizes • 3872 x 2592
• 2896 x 1944
• 1936 x 1296
• 3840 x 2160
Aspect ratio 3:2, 16:9
Movie clips • 1920 x 1080 @ 60i/30 fps
• 1280 x 720 @ 30/15 fps
• 640 x 480 @ 30/15 fps
• 320 x 240 @ 30/15 fps

Slow-motion movies
• 640 x 240/400 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)
• 640 x 240/400 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)
• 320 x 120/1,200 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)
• 320 x 120/1,200 fps (plays at 30p/29.97 fps)

Motion Snapshot Motion Snapshot
• 1,920 x 1,080/60p (59.94 fps) (plays at 24p/23.976 fps)
• 1,920 x 1,080/60p (59.94 fps) (plays at 24p/23.976 fps)
Sensor output is about 60 fps
File format • NEF (RAW)
• JPEG

Movie:
• MOV
• H.264/MPEG-4 Advanced Video Coding compression
• AAC audio
Lens mount • Nikon 1 mount
• Approx. 2.7x lens focal length (Nikon CX-format)
Focus • Hybrid autofocus (phase detection/contrast-detect AF); AF-assist illuminator
AF are • Single-point (135 points)
• Auto-area (41 points)
• Subject tracking
Lens Servo • Autofocus (AF): Single AF (AF-S); continuous AF (AF-C); auto AF-S/AF-C selection (AF-A); fulltime AF (AF-F)
• Manual focus (MF)
Focus distance • Standard mode 0.6m (wide) / 1.0m (tele)
• Macro mode 0.2m - (wide) / 0.9m (tele)
• Super Macro mode Closest focusing distance: 1cm
ISO sensitivity • Auto
• High Auto
• Manual ISO 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, Hi 1 (6400 equiv.)
Exposure compensation • +/- 3 EV
• 1/3 EV steps
metering TTL metering using image sensor
• Matrix
• Center-weighted
• Spot
Shuttter speed Mechanical Shutter
• 1/4000 sec. –30 sec.
• Bulb
Electronic Shutter
• 1/16000 sec. –30 sec.
• Bulb
Modes • Programmed auto with flexible program
• Shutter-priority auto
• Aperture-priority auto
• Manual
• Scene auto selector
Shooting Modes • Still image (3 : 2)
• Smart Photo Selector (3 : 2)
• Movie (HD 16 : 9, slow motion 8 : 3)
• Motion Snapshot (16 : 9)
White balance • Auto
• Incandescent
• Fluorescent
• Direct sunlight
• Flash
• Cloudy
• Shade
• Preset manual
Picture Control system • Standard
• Neutral
• Vivid
• Monochrome
• Portrait
• Landscape
EVF • 0.47-in., approx. 1440k-dot color TFT LCD viewfinder
• 100% coverage
LCD monitor • 3.0" / 7.5 cm LCD
• 921,000 dots
Continous shooting • Electronic (Hi): Approx. 10, 30, or 60 fps
• Other modes: Up to 5 fps (single AF or manual focus, S Shutter-priority auto or M Manual exposure mode, shutter speed 1/250 s or faster, and other settings at default values)
Connectivity • DC input
• Combined A/V & USB output
• USB 2.0 compatible
• HDMI
• Multi accesory port
Storage • SD/SDHC/SDXC
Power Li-ion Rechargeable Battery (EN-EL15)
Weight (no batt) 294g
Dimensions 4.42"W x 3"H x 1.7"D
(113mm x 76mm x 44mm)
318
I own it
35
I want it
36
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 948
12345
waxwaine
By waxwaine (Sep 23, 2011)

Nikon copying Pentax?
Nikons developers are not well payed to be more creative.
Next innovation from Nikon could be a 645DX :P

1 upvote
lightsculpture
By lightsculpture (Sep 23, 2011)

I really have no issue with the size of the sensor. However, this market segment is about making different compromises to get the right balance of size, image quality and price.

Image quality aside, the sacrifice that Nikon made in the area of sensor size here doesn't seem to translate to significant gains in the other aspects such as a smaller size or lower price (than competing NEX or m43 cameras). This makes one wonder, why bother with such a considerably smaller sensor then?

2 upvotes
lightsculpture
By lightsculpture (Sep 23, 2011)

I really have no issue with the size of the sensor. However, this market segment is about making different compromises to get the right balance of size, image quality and price.

Image quality aside, the sacrifice that Nikon made in the area of sensor size here doesn't seem to translate to significant gains in the other aspects such as a smaller size or lower price (than competing NEX or m43 cameras). This makes one wonder, why bother with such a considerably smaller sensor then?

0 upvotes
calking
By calking (Sep 23, 2011)

All this whining about a small sensor in a SMALL camera. shoot with a small dslr or a nex or fuji x100 and post back here which public museum or private gallery in the USA your work is being shown so we can see how great your photography is with a big sensor digicam.

Talented photographers take compelling images with a cell phone, compact P/S, Nikon 1, X100, old film camera, etc. Some of the best photos I've ever shot came off a Canon SD 500.

No one here has actually used these new cameras but many seem to already know exactly how they perform. LOL... yeah, sure ya do.

Thom Hogan points out this might be excellent as a sports cam for a "normal" person (meaning non-OCD, non-ADHD, non-energy-drink slurping gear freak). If you already have a good compact cam, 4/3(m), and a good DSLR, why worry about some other niche like this? I dont recall a bunch of ranting about a coolpix release.... oh, it's those EXPECTATIONS again that this would be a mirrorless D3s in P/S size. I forgot.

1 upvote
zapatista
By zapatista (Sep 23, 2011)

Well, the point is these new cameras as advertised are more expensive and sometimes larger than comparable m4/3 or other MILC's. However, I look forward to seeing what people say about the focusing system for the new Nikons.

1 upvote
_tangent
By _tangent (Sep 23, 2011)

*sigh*. Whenever there's a remotely technical discussion about photography, there is always at least once helpful soul who feels the need to remind the rest of us that a "good" camera with cutting edge technology doesn't automatically equal great images (and as an aside, that we're not entitled to an opinion about photography unless we've been exhibited). Thanks for that, calking. Now i know where i've been going wrong all these years. Often, i don't even bother to look in the viewfinder. I just buy the most expensive camera i can find, close my eyes, and depress the shutter, hoping for world class images. Heck, sometimes i just hurl the camera at my subject and hope it fires off randomly.

No one is saying that it won't be possible to take good photographs with the V/J1. We're just complaining about the feature-set in comparison to the competition.

6 upvotes
Cailean Gallimore
By Cailean Gallimore (Sep 23, 2011)

Nikon make great DSLR's and lenses, but this... Who wants it? The sensor size is the deal breaker for me.

2 upvotes
backayonder
By backayonder (Sep 22, 2011)

As Nikon users we should all applaude this camera. If the camera boosts Nikons profile and profits then ultimately it can only be advantagous to all of us.
Whether you want a D4X, D400 or a better p&s with a Nikon badge.

0 upvotes
gaspard_savoureux
By gaspard_savoureux (Sep 22, 2011)

Some good stuff (slow motion movies, included viewfinder, macro mode, shutter speeds), some bad stuff (where is my PASM ? sensor size, new mount) : all this makes me say "wait and see", thinking that this camera might not be for me, but that is a step in the right direction.

0 upvotes
Lensjoy
By Lensjoy (Sep 22, 2011)

Seems like a bit of a yawn to me. The 1" sensor is bigger than what's in enthusiast P/S cameras such as the Canon S90, but the interchangeable lens design screams for a better sensor than 1".

What I want is the 1" sensor in a nice, small P/S body for better low light performance and better image quality. That would make more sense, and represent a breakthrough in the enthusiast P/S market. Instead, we get this.

0 upvotes
Jim5k
By Jim5k (Sep 22, 2011)

I wanted smaller, but without sacrificing image quality. Why is Nikon so resistant to making a non-SLR APS-C camera? It seems absurdly easy to do. Just leave the mirror and pentaprism off of any dSLR.

I was a dedicated Nikon user in the film days, but I feel abandoned by them. Why no digital FM-2? They're still making the FM-10 - do they think we want film? Not me - I just want the manual control. So far the closest thing I found is the Panasonic G2. Super camera. Even works well with my old AI-S lenses (w/ adapter). Just wish it had an APS-C. The Nikon 1 went in the wrong direction for me. Looks like I'm "stuck" with M4/3rds.

2 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Sep 22, 2011)

"Why is Nikon so resistant to making a non-SLR APS-C camera".

Because of exactly what you say you want: "I wanted smaller".

Unless the sensor is smaller then the lenses won't be smaller, they will be exactly the same lenses as the ones on your APS-C SLR. OK, so they could shrink the body a little - it's already happened , it's called a D3100 or something (I'm not so good with the numbers).

I fail to see the point of a tiny body if the lens is still massive. It helps a bit, but it's marginal. The whole idea is to make everything smaller, lenses included.

0 upvotes
calking
By calking (Sep 22, 2011)

hallelujah to to that!
I don't see what all this negative hype at DP is about this camera. Just like the 4/3 format, this isn't a "compact" system by any means -- it aint going in anyone's pocket with a hotshoe flash and a damned zoom.

I say quit all the woe-is-me whining about a novelty format. Get an Olympus e420 or a D3100 if you want APS-C sensor! How much "bigger" is it than one of these mid-range camera systems.

The Fujifilm X100 seems to have already been forgotten here....if you want excellent image quality in a mid-sized format, quit crying about wanting a D3s in a coolpix body and go buy the X100!

buncha whiners here.

0 upvotes
Jim5k
By Jim5k (Sep 23, 2011)

I have a question about lens vs. sensor size. Isn't the current Nikon F-mount the same one as the one used on 35mm cameras to cover a full 35mm frame? Wouldn't lenses be smaller if they abandoned the F-mount and engineered the lenses to just cover the APS-C frame? I remember the Pentax 110 SLR system - it had very small lenses. Follow-up question: Are the Sony NEX lenses smaller than comparable Nikon F-mount lenses?

0 upvotes
Magnus W
By Magnus W (Sep 23, 2011)

wetsleet, your argument is a little hampered by the fact that Nikon's lenses for this system ARE NOT SMALLER than the competition.

0 upvotes
Jim5k
By Jim5k (Sep 24, 2011)

Wetsleet - I don't want small if it's too small, and the Nikon 1 is too small for me. Let me rephrase my wish: I want the top of the line sensor (APS-C) without the bloat associated with a mirror & pentaprism and a mount engineered for a 35mm frame.

In short: Keep the APS-C, just drop the archaic ties to 35mm that make the camera fatter than it needs to be. (If you need backward compatibility, do it with adapters). The NEX-5 nailed it. I was just hoping for was a Nikon, but so far they are avoiding this niche like the plague.

As for whether lenses would be smaller if Nikon dropped the F-mount limitation, does anyone have a side-by-side picture of a Sony vs. Nikon 18-55mm lens?

0 upvotes
troakie
By troakie (Sep 26, 2011)

A Sony DSC R1 perhaps?!

0 upvotes
troakie
By troakie (Sep 26, 2011)

A Sony DSC R1 perhaps?!

0 upvotes
mr moonlight
By mr moonlight (Sep 22, 2011)

Announcing the V1. Priced for the enthusiast, designed for novice.

6 upvotes
Ernest M Aquilio
By Ernest M Aquilio (Sep 22, 2011)

I hope this camera sells 1,000 units for every negative comment posted here and in the forums.

2 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 23, 2011)

Why would you hope that? Do you own Nikon stock?

Nikon sucks in the compact land. That does not make their DSLR any worse. Utter failure of Nikon 1 would not change that.

I predict it would not be a failure. They will make money on it. Does not make it any better though. m43 is a better system.

1 upvote
Ernest M Aquilio
By Ernest M Aquilio (Sep 24, 2011)

Just stirring the crap pot and you took a whiff

0 upvotes
Vincent Jacobs
By Vincent Jacobs (Sep 22, 2011)

Myeh, not interested. I'll go back to whining about how Nikon missed an opportunity to release the D4X that I can't afford, don't plan to learn how to use, but absolutely need.

3 upvotes
CIASpook
By CIASpook (Sep 22, 2011)

A lot of you people are a bunch of crabby camera clowns.

If you don't like the camera, don't get it!! No one is trying to ram a small sensor down your throat. These cameras are for a different market. There ARE people that don't care for the typical compact cameras but don't want SLRs. This camera will meet the needs of those photographers.

Get your heads out of your rear ends and grow up!!

6 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 22, 2011)

The typical "crab" is a person who has invested big in some "system camera," but (if honest) not really pleased with the results, which makes the person very uneasy about their choice. Thus, they constantly try to reassure themselves, principally by knocking any other sort of camera.

I'm no Nikon person, but admire the company's dare to introduce a wholey new mirrorless camera type. Real reviews will be interesting to read. If the product is to reach shelves in 30 days, surely Dpreview and others will have units to test.

1 upvote
CIASpook
By CIASpook (Sep 22, 2011)

I remember being told that if I buy a Nikon D70, I'll never be able to take sunset photos like I had with my CoolPix 5700 because of the "blooming" issue. :P

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 22, 2011)

The problem is that many of us waiting for Nikon released some decent (big sensor) mirror-less camera, hence those rumors run wild a few months (years!) back. The Nikon stock also has a positive effect because of these rumors just a few days ago.

We imagine that, after Fujifilm X-100, Nikon has something better in its sleeve to compete with the likes (non-interchangeable big sensor digicam and/or another MILC, 4/3 mount or NEX/Samsung). To our surprise, Nikon decided not to granted anyone wishes and came out with a "Pentax Q competitor" instead. BUT, Nikon didn't admitted that this is "toy-ish" system camera just like Pentax, but instead sugar coated with marketing language: for enthusiast, lifestyle bla bla bla. This system probably has some R&D surveyed based on those in Ginza or Harajuku, Japanese spesific yuppies lifestyle, etc. Not for the rest of the world.

0 upvotes
BIJ001
By BIJ001 (Sep 22, 2011)

>Nikon decided not to granted anyone wishes and came out with a "Pentax Q competitor" instead.

Thom Hogan put a nice write-up on his site about why this choice of sensor size makes sense for Nikon some time ago. A similar reasoning is presented here on this site.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 22, 2011)

A 1" sensor is not toy-ish. Nor is it an over-crowded niche. Why fight with Fuji, Sony, Panasonic, or Olympus? Occasionally, a Jobs notion like "a camera for the rest of us" can pay off. But lets wait for real reviews and objective shoot-offs.

2 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 22, 2011)

You are absolutely right in one regard: we will not get this camera.

But everybody would have been better off having another choice to Pen and NEX.

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Sep 22, 2011)

"You don't really need a BIG sensor... you NEED a small sensor...
These aren't the cameras you're looking for... move along now."

Please Nikon, don't wave your Jedi hand on some of us, we are not that gullible...

6 upvotes
bricci_mn
By bricci_mn (Sep 22, 2011)

Hello everybody!
Just lurking for years here around at DPreview, but much more than rarely I have written something... Now it's my turn...
Long awaited "Big N" and "Big C" mirrorless alternatives to Panasonic and Olimpus (m)4/3 finally came, and then... The Nikon ones are such a "intermediate-of-intermediate" format between 4/3 and Pentax Q format, which, in my very very humble opinion, none of the small form factor enthusiasts will invest on unless they want to carry around the "coat of arms" of one of the two great japanese makers...
Will Canon come out with something very similar, I think, then we will see where they would go any farther...
In my opinion, the success of V1 and J1 (V1 is probably FAR better in terms of everyday useability) is only reassumed on a mere consideration of both availability and quality of lenses and accessories whith which they'll feed the market.

0 upvotes
bricci_mn
By bricci_mn (Sep 22, 2011)

They are two giants, all the ads on magazines and sites are about them and their products... Could Panasonic and Olimpus and their still (very) rare contributors (Voigtlander, Sigma, Tamron, Zeiss, Schneider...) survive this?
I have a GF1 with 14-45 + 45-200 and all a vast set of orgasmic Leica lenses commonly used on M7 and M9 which my father owns, and I am still waiting for a REAL replacement for this body that can satisfy my edonism.

Panny still hasn't done anything to satisfy me and people like me who don't think GF2 and GF3 are to be considered such substitutes. Will Canon create something similar to Nikon or 4/3-world?

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

i hope canon will do a LOT better then nikon.

but then... you never know how the managers think.
it´s likely that they will just release a mediocre system like nikon.

1 upvote
Antonio Rojilla
By Antonio Rojilla (Sep 22, 2011)

"Long awaited "Big N" and "Big C" mirrorless alternatives to Panasonic and Olimpus (m)4/3"

There you have your problem: this is hardly an alternative to those systems. I guess we'll have to wait till DX and FX evolve and lose their mirrors to see a proper alternative. This may take two more years (the latest Sony EVF is now 'almost' good enough even for demanding pros and in-sensor phase detection AF will be ready for DSLRs very soon). Let's see what the future brings. For now, let's enjoy NEX and M4/3! :)

1 upvote
Jim5k
By Jim5k (Sep 22, 2011)

I hope Canon's mirrorless targets serious photographers and not the Aston Kutcher crowd. I am extremely disappointed in Nikon's attempt. Essentially I was hoping a Panasonic G2 with an APS-C sensor. Why are Nikon & Canon are so averse to making a mirrorless APS-C camera? I think the SLR is a dinosaur - that technology was needed in the film days. The future lies in the LCD (with or without viewfinders). And I'm shocked Nikon and Canon aren't leading the way.

0 upvotes
bricci_mn
By bricci_mn (Sep 23, 2011)

@Jim5k
I surely agree with you.
In my family I grew up with (in purely casual order) Hasselblad 501C, fabulous micro-camera Rollei 35T which nowadays works like a charm, Voigtlander Exakta, Leica M7, Leica M9, Yashica P&S with high quality 35mm Zeiss Tessar lens, Panasonic Fz10, FZ18, LX2, Fuji's and a myriad of others to introduce ourselves into the digital world starting from the bottom.
As you may see, despite I'm not a child, but not an old man, I checked every kind of use starting from simple point and shoot to the most "thought" picture needed using medium format.
Not much done with common SLR, 'cause of we didn't need them.
In family we reached an answer: now it's time to digital.
I add also: now it's time to forget mirrors.
Not to abandon the concept, but limit it only to a niche of high end SLRs.
Let's do it NOW. But will the makers want to give us future technologies NOW? :)

0 upvotes
Kartika Sari
By Kartika Sari (Sep 22, 2011)

absolutely not for nikon pro users, cant use old SB series with this. :(

unless for those who have budgets

1 upvote
Antsl
By Antsl (Sep 22, 2011)

Toy... that is all this is... a toy... and you know what happens with toys... everyone thinks they are cute and fun for a few months until a better toy comes along and then it gets left to gather dust in a cupboard.

What is sad is that Nikon had the opportunity to be the first company to create a compact, pro-sumer level mirror-less camera... something that would rival the Leica M9 and give professionals, not an alternative, but an additional format to work with on assignments... and they have absolutely blown it.

Very disappointed Nikon...

8 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Sep 22, 2011)

I was really hoping for n x100 type camera that didn't give me nose-bleeds. This just doesn't seem to be an answer to anything.

1 upvote
3dreal
By 3dreal (Sep 22, 2011)

Agfa Optima 1035 sensor and other similar model are only a bit smaller but had fixed 40/2.8 lens. Very good build with hotshoe. On the other hand: Canon AF35ML with 40/1.9 is only a bit wider. Has a good grip and slow continuous shooting 1p/sec. I have missed some unique shots caused by this slowness. But on the other hand also some because i had chosen the wrong slow digital P50. Everything gone until cam was on. Nikons new system will help us not miss anything anymore. But we need a speedy 2.0-lens between 15 to 20mm.

0 upvotes
atoz
By atoz (Sep 22, 2011)

Ugh, all that hype for a tiny sensor and oversized lenses.
What a waste of time, resources and energy.
They should have followed Fuji's X100 lead,
and pulled out an epic Nikon S-100 digital 'rangefinder'.

And by the way, D800 anytime this year?!

4 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Sep 22, 2011)

d800? Probably not. It's just 3 years old while the d300 and d3 are both 4 years old.

0 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Sep 22, 2011)

d800? Probably not. It's just 3 years old while the d300 and d3 are both 4 years old.

0 upvotes
vastoulis
By vastoulis (Sep 22, 2011)

Nikon V1 dimensions: 113mm x 76mm x 44mm
Olympus E-P1 dimensions: 126mm x 70mm x 36.4 mm
NEEED I SAY MORE?
Sorry Nikon, if I decide to fork out some cash for equipment this Christmas it makes much more sense to look at the Panasonic Lumix G X Vario PZ 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 ASPH OIS. This way I get an approximately same sized camera with twice as big a sensor.
Nice colours on the J1 though!

6 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 22, 2011)

It really sounds like the focusing on the V1 is miles ahead of the nex and m4/3. Focusing speed, ability, and quality have been the crux of m4/3 and the nex. What good is a high quality camera if focusing is slow and inaccurate?

2 upvotes
zapatista
By zapatista (Sep 22, 2011)

It really sounds like you're a Nikon fanboi.

4 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 22, 2011)

Focusing on Olympus and Panasonic cameras is fast and accurate.

What is more important, they got glass. Good, bright glass.

5 upvotes
zapatista
By zapatista (Sep 22, 2011)

The V1 is the pretty much the same size as my G3:
113x76x44 mm's (V1) vs.
115x84x47 mm's (G3)
IQ I'm sure is better with the G3 and less resolution but a touchscreen fully articulated LCD. Oh yeah, an the G3 is at the very least $200 less (I got mine for $570 inc. tax direct from Panasonic).

2 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 22, 2011)

It's either smaller or it's bigger or it's the exact same size. The V1 is smaller than your g3.

1 upvote
zapatista
By zapatista (Sep 22, 2011)

Thanks for that astute observation.

1 upvote
peeech
By peeech (Sep 22, 2011)

Panny G2 body still available at B&H for $299. Bargain?? You bet your Nikon!!!

0 upvotes
zapatista
By zapatista (Sep 23, 2011)

LOL

0 upvotes
Neoasphalt
By Neoasphalt (Sep 22, 2011)

Sample image quality and sharpness from Nikon site looks quite good, but 913g (V1 + 10-100mm 4.5-5.6) they call an uprade from P&S...???
Even bigger sensor GF3 + 14-140mm is 724g.

1 upvote
putomax
By putomax (Sep 22, 2011)

IQ looks good for the size of sensor, IMO
nevertheless that combo is heavy indeed

ô

0 upvotes
Stephen_C
By Stephen_C (Sep 22, 2011)

What a disaster. I had high hopes. I guess it is slightly better than the Pentax Q, but that is not exactly high praise.

I understand that they were afraid of draining sales of their low-end DSLRs, but at this price what would they have lost? They intentionally made a lousy product to protect DSLR sales, but now people will buy Olympus, Sony, and Panasonic mirrorless cameras.

This system is larger, more expensive, and worse than the competition. Not exactly where you want to be.

4 upvotes
Oliver Cardona
By Oliver Cardona (Sep 22, 2011)

We have to wait and see what the image quality is going to be like, but on paper it is not promising.

The specs and price do not match either. Depends where Nikon wants to place this in the market; it is definitely not an enthusiasts' camera.

0 upvotes
Artur81
By Artur81 (Sep 22, 2011)

the lenses are VRII. So Vr is in the lens.

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 22, 2011)

Thanks, do you know how to use the "reply" link?

2 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 22, 2011)

I can't seem to find a note about this. Does the Nikon 1 have in-body image stabilization via a moving image sensor or even optically in the lenses?

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Sep 22, 2011)

It's in three of the four lenses announced so far.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

then learn to read... im not nativ english but i found the info.

0 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 22, 2011)

<then learn to read... im not nativ english but i found the info.>

me neither but i'm charmed by your poetics

gashô

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 22, 2011)

Henry: vibration, nor VR, nor stabilization are mentioned in the press release. Go and zoom in on lens photos if you wish but I was looking through the official information from Nikon as posted here!

2 upvotes
guyv
By guyv (Sep 22, 2011)

Actually VR is mentioned for some lenses in the separate press release for the lenses. So I infer there is no in-body stabilization.

0 upvotes
Timothy Stark
By Timothy Stark (Sep 21, 2011)

This camera isn't about photos. It is a "lifestyle" product. I'll bet few readers, even fewer commentors on DPR own any recent Bang & Olafson gear. I believe B&O was once leading edge. Now its a (very) upmarket Bose.

If you have corporate currency such as Nikon's history, you'd better cash in; or your competitor will. If the CEO doesn't the board will fire his butt out the door. Nikon has the currency. BMW has the currency. You cant buy a true low end BMW in North America. BMW's management doesn't give a hoot for the guys who drove 2002's back in the day. Now a performance BMW has 500+ H.P. to move its almost 2400 kg bulk.

This Nikon fits the same niche as small wall-mounted speakers; most BMWs and iPhones. I won't buy any of this stuff, but a lot of people do.

I take pictures with a 5D w/ Contax lenses, drive a 1989 944 s2 (supercharged and intercooled), and listen to vinyl with a tube pre-amp & old Castle speakers. I'm not a lifestyle guy, but that market is big and growing.

3 upvotes
Photographer124
By Photographer124 (Sep 22, 2011)

Hehe, you are just plain old , nothing wrong with that :)

0 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 22, 2011)

Tube amp, vinyl and 89 944?

Yes, you are not "lifestyle". I would call it "pretentious".

I actually think that Olympus will fit you better. More "niche". And just as long history as Nikon has.

3 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

time to die dinsosaur....

:)

0 upvotes
cactusgeorge
By cactusgeorge (Sep 22, 2011)

Hmm, A $900 lifestyle camera with interchangeable lenses? Also if Nikon were in the business of cashing in they would have done it years ago. This camera a bit of a slap in the face for Nikon users in that we hold Nikon to a higher standard.

1 upvote
Stephen_C
By Stephen_C (Sep 22, 2011)

Leica makes the lifestyle camera. They even make a digital version.

0 upvotes
zapatista
By zapatista (Sep 22, 2011)

How long until the V1 is on "special" for $599.99?

0 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 22, 2011)

well, there is no mercy...

nevertheless you have a lifestyle, i have a lifestyle, even tilariths has a lifestyle. so the question is how can we "criticize" a big photo-business company's new product for being endorsed to a different "lifestyle" than yours?
money money money money
market market market
people people
photo
you

0 upvotes
calking
By calking (Sep 22, 2011)

You know what? You nailed that one! A panasonic LX5 for 3 times the price with a Leica badge.

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Sep 21, 2011)

Giorgetto Giugiaro!
Where are you?

4 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 21, 2011)

It seems that m43 and Nex system was designed by DLSR people.

Heck, Olympus pretty much abandoned DLSR market (and their own excellent glass to an extend it is slighly less usable on m43).

Nikon, apparently, used their compact people to design it. With huge pushback from DLSR folks not to step on their turf.

Fail.

3 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 21, 2011)

i can really SEE what you're talking about, seriously
and it's funny, ja ja ja

ah... these litle love soap operas...

^

0 upvotes
psandham
By psandham (Sep 22, 2011)

Pass - here's why if will succeed:
http://bit.ly/qC9Uv1

0 upvotes
tkpenalty
By tkpenalty (Sep 22, 2011)

no samsung? :P

0 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 22, 2011)

F-mount on 3x crop sensor? What is the point?

1 upvote
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 22, 2011)

..and I do not see autofocus support on that adapter?

1 upvote
Christopher G
By Christopher G (Sep 21, 2011)

Am I in a bad dream.

3 upvotes
Red G8R
By Red G8R (Sep 21, 2011)

The V1 3" screen has 921K-dots according to Nikon's site, not 460K as listed above.

0 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 21, 2011)

that would make more sense

0 upvotes
Camillo
By Camillo (Sep 21, 2011)

Clearly this were not designed by Giugiaro as Nikon cameras usually are.

1 upvote
Camillo
By Camillo (Sep 21, 2011)

If it was 149 bucks cool! but for 899? they must think we're freaking stupid! I've never been embarrassed by Nikon before this....

6 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 21, 2011)

camilo compadre
is nikon paying the school of your kids?

safety valve .... fuuiixzzhhhhh

just making acquaintance of you

ô

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

i would pay 250$... no more.

and only for the pink one because it will make my neighbor puke.

4 upvotes
peeech
By peeech (Sep 22, 2011)

Pink??? Marketing strategy for the females??? Gives some idea as to Nikky thinking about this camera. Makes me wonder... Does any other MFT maker have one in PINK??

0 upvotes
Paul Janders
By Paul Janders (Sep 21, 2011)

It's hard to believe that the company that designed the F5 also designed this monstrosity. Somebody needs to loose their job over this.

2 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 22, 2011)

To use the word "monstrosity" would imply something being very large and monster like. This is not the case, it is a small camera. Back to english class you go!

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

no it´s is not a smal cameral... not compared to m43 and the small sensor size you get.

it´s disappointing large for that small sensor compared to m43.

0 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 22, 2011)

Back to english class you go!

or not because maybe paul is in such a shock, poor fellow,
that this camera has gain a monster dimension...
:P

ô

0 upvotes
Philip Corlis
By Philip Corlis (Sep 21, 2011)

well, no one will ever call this thing a real beauty. its a homely little mutt at best. I agree with so many others here - the sensor size decision is a real head scratcher. I suppose it will make for some relatively small and inexpensive lenses of dubious quality. Nikon's choice for niche market makes this camera one ho hum release.

Too bad they wasted all that money on those '"empty hands" around the globe. Who knows how ironic they will seem in the future.

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

well on a german board someone said it´s fantastic.. full of improvements and innovations and has a great handling... but then he is probably a retard...

0 upvotes
JB Digital
By JB Digital (Sep 21, 2011)

Mmm I think it's not a good name (V1) it was a special rocket to get to England developt by Germany in the 2e world war!

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

and it missed a lot.... just like the camera.

2 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Sep 21, 2011)

Nikon has one month to come up with a BETTER offering...

3 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

What a joke of a comment!

2 upvotes
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 21, 2011)

Design and execution looks like a Walmart special.

3 upvotes
Paul Janders
By Paul Janders (Sep 21, 2011)

I think the folks at Walmart would actually have better taste than this. This thing looks like somebody in Nikon's design bureau gave their kid a pencil, said "draw a camera for me" and used this as the basis for the design. This is one fugly camera.

0 upvotes
Ivanaker
By Ivanaker (Sep 21, 2011)

This is the best thing you could say about this camera. If a kid drew a camera, this is how it would look like. This is example of Platon`s ideas, this is how a camera should look like, pure and simple. I agree that it doesnt look anything special, but it isnt suposed to be something special, its just a camera, a tool and nothing else.
this nikon just became the Archytype of cameras, the way we imagine it.

0 upvotes
Paul Janders
By Paul Janders (Sep 21, 2011)

Let me guess…you're not designer are you?

1 upvote
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

it looks like S H * T... just say it

2 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Sep 21, 2011)

The R&D team failed, but there is a chance to get things gracious. Nikon should not create an upper category for the small sensor, but rather this new one being its standard small sensor from now on. That would be a good move.

In the field of mirroless, they should join the 4/3 format, the best sensor size in this category in my opinion (though their pride would not let them); and kill the DX format and invest more in the FX.

This system shows nice technological improvements, but one thing I don't get is why the lenses are not bright. You spend more than 600 dollars on a kit containing a standard zoom lens equivalent to a 27-81 mm with an aperture of ƒ/3.5-5.6 is ridiculous.

Nikon seems lost to me at the moment, comparing to Canon and Sony. Even Canon still not fighting in the mirroless field, they still pass me confidence. It's like, I feel good about them. I don't expect any nonsense like this system of Nikon.

4 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Sep 21, 2011)

Epic Fail.

3 upvotes
zanypoet
By zanypoet (Sep 21, 2011)

No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

small sensor = crappy IQ

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

If you read all the info and the article of the interview with Nikon, you'd see it is targeted at P&S upgraders. So for P&S upgraders, the V1 image sensor is BIG with much better IQ!

2 upvotes
oldfogey
By oldfogey (Sep 21, 2011)

Before being so dismissive look at the test RAW shots at IR - their ISO3200 shot (YDSC_0011.NEF) is remarkably good - unfortunately there aren't any studio comparison shots yet but I suspect this new sensor is going to be able to match the larger SONY sensor on the NEX3/5. With some small but fast, longer lenses and image stabilization, this system could develop into a sports photographer's system of choice.

0 upvotes
mr moonlight
By mr moonlight (Sep 22, 2011)

P&S upgraders???? WTF???? There's a lot of choices for P&S upgraders out there... G12, P7100, GF3, EPL3, X10... Their price point is on the way high end of the spectrum more along the lines of the X100 and NEX5N which are geared towards photographers wanting something smaller than their DSLR's who are willing to drop the $650-1k plus lenses. Someone wanting to upgrade from their Canon Elph. I see them picking up a DSLR or a M4/3rds for less cash rather than this. The only thing it has going for it is the AF system. Maybe it's amazing, but for that price and with such a small sensor. Really, you'd need f.95 lenses to get a shallow enough DOF where you could really take advantage of a fast AF. I don't think this will develop into any photographers system of choice. Perhaps parts of it will, but in it's current state. I say...

...Epic Fail.

2 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Sep 22, 2011)

The G12, P7100 are both in the P&S category, fixed lens digicam. Still point and shoot really. They have creative controls but the very small sensor make it so there's not much reason to just not use full auto with exposure compensation. No depth of field control like a larger sensor camera which the V1 is much larger than the 1/1.7" sensor classification.

0 upvotes
BMS1
By BMS1 (Sep 21, 2011)

I couldn't believe this is the actual design of the camera...it looks more like a camera prototype/ mock up you see at PMA. :( VERY expensive too!

3 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 21, 2011)

last nex 7's sample gallery -->151 comments
announcement of N1 system ---> so far, 669 comments

1 upvote
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 21, 2011)

It reflects the level of disappointment.

Disappointed people are more likely to voice an opinion.

1 upvote
putomax
By putomax (Sep 21, 2011)

... good or bad but talking ;)

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

Yes more buzz over the V1 than interest in the nex7. Nikon has learn from those that entered the EVIL market first and took that into their design. Canon coming last, we'll see what they offer next year!

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Sep 21, 2011)

Yup, Canon will be interesting, personally I hope they won't go the same route to protect their extremely successful Rebel line...

0 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 21, 2011)

(sexy voice)
call for passengers, flight 717
- smart DP staff, releasing bombs with timers -

... 717 comments and growing
and so many of not interested people, fiuzzz

yes canon - ball

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Sep 22, 2011)

disappoint and you will see many comments.....

0 upvotes
putomax
By putomax (Sep 22, 2011)

755, with present

maybe (and it's really a maybe) people, WE, have a "dislocated" idea of what kind of consumers (how big) we are...
just maybe

ô

0 upvotes
dalakin
By dalakin (Sep 21, 2011)

maybe you guys missed the pink version. other than that, I don't see the point.

1 upvote
tilariths
By tilariths (Sep 21, 2011)

Olympus E-PM1 comes in pink and with a better lens selection.

0 upvotes
derfla1949
By derfla1949 (Sep 21, 2011)

I cannot say anything about the qualities of this Nikon product, but in my position as mFT user I am certainly disappointed with the N strategy.
Maybe I was hoping for too much, but would it not have been very nice to have an additional supplier of interesting lenses and some time later even interesting bodies in the mFT world?
This N move just seems to signal lack of self-confidence.

1 upvote
psn
By psn (Sep 21, 2011)

This is like the Minolta Vectis S system... remember it? No? This, too, shall pass.

4 upvotes
Magnus W
By Magnus W (Sep 21, 2011)

At least the Vectis system was splashproof, adding a LITTLE utility to an otherwise really stupid system.

In some ways I think this system is the most stupid ever released, in hard competition with the Pentax Q for sure but at least that camera is very small and decidedly earmarked as a "toy".

This camera is marketed as a photographic tool but is neither desirable as such or as an object.

0 upvotes
Izu
By Izu (Sep 21, 2011)

Or Pronea S...

1 upvote
Fredrik strm
By Fredrik strm (Sep 21, 2011)

Yes it is a stretch that a 25% sensorsize can be as good. Sensors can't become much better than they are. They already read 99% of all incoming photons. There is no way to make up data unleass you gather more photons.

/F

1 upvote
armen
By armen (Sep 21, 2011)

hmm... sensors can't become much better than they are?
I believe it's not about how much light is gathered but rather the signal to noise ratio.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Sep 21, 2011)

The greatest margin of improvement is in between the 1/2.3" P&S benchmark and the 1" size Nikon has picked here. There is a diminishing marginal return, in terms of IQ and cost, after that point, especially in the case of video. No, it won't be a full-frame, but beat P&S models, be pocketable with a pancake, and present telephoto results that are otherwise unafordable or not available. Or can you point out an F2.8 250mm lens option for a m4/3 or NEX?

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

judge from the iso 400 sample, I would say: nope. pocketable pancake, nope. Look at that "slow" lens, similar in size and weight as NEX lenses. 10-100mm weight as 18-200mm NEX lens, with almost the same dimension. the 10mm pancake lens, almost as 17mm NEX pancake lens.

0 upvotes
armen
By armen (Sep 21, 2011)

This new mount and form factor is going to give us some sweet cameras in the years to come.

Though these first two are clearly disappointing, for me the disappointment is the body and interface design not the new mount and form factor.

There are many valid reasons for this mount and sensor size. I'm guessing that in 5 years time this will give us all the IQ we want, including low light performance and variable depth of field.

With advancements in sensor tech there won't be much reason to carry around FF or even APS-C sized sensors in a few years time.

Just look at the 4/3 as an example, Panasonic's best has IQ on par with APS-C, though it's much smaller.

Now this new format from Nikon iis only half the size of 4/3rds. Is it such a stretch to think it can't be as good?

4 upvotes
dbateman
By dbateman (Sep 21, 2011)

I don't think the sensor in M43rds is much smaller.
APSC (Canon) is 22.2 x 14.8
APSC (Sony) is 23.5 x 15.6
M43rds is 17.3 x 13

I end up croping most of the diference from 17 to 22/23 in making 8x10 prints. And 13 to 14 or 15mm is not much

Nikon now has 13.2 x 8.8. And a lot of the 13.2 I would crop to make 8x 10 prints. 8.8 to 13mm is a lot.

0 upvotes
ezradja
By ezradja (Sep 21, 2011)

you just can't avoid physic law! That's why the bigger the sensor the better. And that's why much smaller sensor can't have much smaller lens. There's limitations. Nature limitations.

0 upvotes
yukonchris
By yukonchris (Sep 22, 2011)

"With advancements in sensor tech there won't be much reason to carry around FF or even APS-C sized sensors in a few years time.

Just look at the 4/3 as an example, Panasonic's best has IQ on par with APS-C, though it's much smaller."

This is exactly what I was talking about in my earlier post. Nikon's introduction of this small sensor camera will do for Olympus and Panasonic what they were never able to entirely do for themselves; convince Nikon and Canon users out there that smaller sensors have advantages. Falling between this new sensor and APS-C, 4/3rds seems smarter all the time!

0 upvotes
Absolutic
By Absolutic (Sep 21, 2011)

Just reviewed and downloaded images from J1 posted at digital-resource and I am not happy with what I am seeing. These images look like typical images from point-and-shoot camera. They just dont look like images from DSLR, or even m4/3. Detail is not there. I hope it is just a prototype, and actual camera would be better. I do like the idea that I can put my 85 1.4D on this thing and have a 200+mm F/1.4 lens on my camera, which would be phenomenal for concerts etc. I will reserve my judgment until I see more samples.

3 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Sep 21, 2011)

Slapping a huge 85 f/1.4 on the V1 isn't the goal of the camera. Read the info provided by Nikon's head of R&D and you'll see their target is P&S upgraders. They see the high end EVIL camera market to be a niche` market that won't be a place to sell much.

0 upvotes
Absolutic
By Absolutic (Sep 21, 2011)

Well, 85 1.4D is actually not a huge lens. 50 1.8 is a tiny lens, x2.7 it would be 135 F/1.8. Not sure how large the adaptor will be in real life (hard to judge from the pix) and whether it would AF with older AF lenses is a big question as 1 series clearly does not have a motor for lenses (I don't see any sort of a screw on lens mount)

0 upvotes
Artur81
By Artur81 (Sep 22, 2011)

Hi, the size of the adapter is roughly the size of a pancake lens and AF-S and AF-I lenses will AF with it :)

0 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Sep 22, 2011)

Yes there is an Fmount adapter coming for the Nikon 1.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 948
12345