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Adobe announces Photoshop Elements 10

By dpreview staff on Sep 20, 2011 at 09:30 GMT

Adobe has released version 10 of its Photoshop Elements image-editing software. New features include Guided Edits, which guide users step-by-step through the process of achieving certain image looks, and a range of image organization options. Several tools have been updated too, including the text and crop tools. There's also an option to upload videos directly to sharing sites such as Facebook and YouTube. The software will be available shortly for $99.99, alternatively users of any previous version can upgrade for $79.99. The company has simultaneously released version 10 of its Premiere Elements video-editing software at the same price; a bundle containing both programs will also be available for $149.99.

Press Release:

Adobe Unveils Photoshop Elements 10

New Release Highlights Intuitive Editing Features with Intelligent Organizational and Sharing Capabilities

SAN JOSE, Calif. - Sept. 20, 2011 - Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 software for Windows and Mac. The newest version of Adobe’s No. 1 selling consumer photo-editing software, Photoshop Elements 10 provides a complete solution with amazingly powerful yet easy-to-use features that continue to expand the possibilities for organizing, editing and sharing photo creations.

“Celebrating a 10-year history as well as a landmark 10th release, Photoshop Elements 10 is a showcase for innovation and expands the incredible things our customers can do with their photos,” said Winston Hendrickson, vice president of Digital Imaging Products, Adobe. “The new intelligent feature set and automated functionality in Photoshop Elements allow photo enthusiasts to elevate everyday photos from good to great.”

Making Photos Pop with Innovative Tools

Powered by the same engine as Adobe Photoshop, the industry standard for digital imaging, Photoshop Elements 10 utilizes intelligent technology that makes it easy to give everyday photos a boost. Photoshop technology is brought to life through easy to follow steps for achieving stunning photo effects in an approachable way with new Guided Edits, which are very popular and successful. These include innovations such as creating a shallow depth of field or designing a fun layout of snapshots with Picture Stack, or even adding a dream-like diffused glow with the Orton effect.

New text functionality, which scrapbookers will especially love, allows users to add curving, flowing text to a photo that automatically follows the outline of a subject, custom path or shape. In addition, special crop guides now help users at any level easily achieve interesting, visually appealing compositions. Also, the Smart Brush lets users paint unique effects onto specific areas of photos and now features 30 new effects like Pencil Sketch and Oil Pastel.

Organize Like Never Before

With Photoshop Elements 10, users not only have access to fun editing and creation features, but also the ability to organize photos. Object Search automatically finds objects within photos, such as a landmark, flower or pet. The Elements Organizer can even automatically detect duplicate or near-duplicate photos so users can clean up and delete the photos they don’t need and quickly group similar collections of photos. Also, photo enthusiasts who shoot video can now upload their clips directly to Facebook or YouTube.

Photoshop Elements 10 users can purchase Adobe’s integrated online service, Photoshop Elements Plus, which includes 20GB of storage for automatic online backup and sharing (up to 15,000 photos or four hours of DVD-quality video), as well as access to an extensive library of how-to's, artwork and Online Album templates for sharing online.

Sharing Made Seamless

Whether users are social networking or using sharing sites like Facebook, Flickr, YouTube or Photoshop.com, Photoshop Elements 10 lets customers share their photos directly from within the Elements Organizer and view them from virtually anywhere on the go, offering a comprehensive set of sharing capabilities for today’s increasingly social and mobile worlds. For Facebook lovers, Photoshop Elements integrates users’ Facebook Friend Lists for easily tagging photos that can then be shared directly to Facebook.

On top of all these new features and capabilities, Photoshop Elements 10 enables developers to create tablet and mobile applications that interact with the software via the included API. This opens Photoshop Elements 10 to a new world where the fun and interactivity of touch devices and Photoshop Elements intersect.

Pricing and Availability

Adobe Photoshop Elements 10 for Windows and Mac is available now at www.adobe.com, and will also be available soon at retail outlets such as Adorama, Amazon.com, Apple, B and H, Best Buy, Buy.com, Costco, Dell, Fry’s, New Egg, Office Depot, Office Max, Staples and Walmart. Photoshop Elements 10 Windows and Mac is available for a suggested retail price of US$99.99. New upgrade pricing allows past Photoshop Elements users of any version to purchase Photoshop Elements 10 for US$79.99. Users can also purchase Plus, available in the U.S. only, from within the product for US$49.99/year. (Prices listed are the Adobe direct store prices in the U.S.; reseller prices may vary. Prices do not include tax or shipping and handling.)

Information about other language versions, as well as pricing, upgrade and support policies for other countries is available at www.adobe.com/go/photoshopelements. For free training videos on Photoshop Elements, visit Adobe TV at http://tv.adobe.com

Education pricing for students, faculty and staff in K-12 and higher education is available from Adobe Authorized Education Resellers and the Adobe Education Store at www.adobe.com/education/purchasing/education_pricing.html. Visit www.adobe.com/aboutadobe/volumelicensing/education for more information about education volume licensing for higher education and K-12 institutions.

About Adobe Systems Incorporated

Adobe is changing the world through digital experiences. For more information, visit www.adobe.com.

 

Comments

Total comments: 24
Lesardi
By Lesardi (Mar 13, 2012)

It is my opinion that adobe ps elements is a terrible product. I was lead to believe that I could easily learn how to use this software, but was sadly mistaken. I have spent hours on the web, watching useless videos, reading useless step-by-step instructions, and I probably know even less now, than when I started. I have even tried to find local classes (you know, where there is a real teacher, in a real class room), but I have been unsuccessful. I have been ripped off, and while I am sure there are more than a few that don't understand how I am not in love with this useless (and very expensive) product, I am betting there are more people like me who feel we have had our hard earned money stolen from us

0 upvotes
Amentet
By Amentet (Apr 23, 2012)

What?? just beacuse you are not good with the product doesnt mean its bad. When i picked it the first time i found it very easy to use. If you are unsure about a product, try it first, thats whats trial are for!!

1 upvote
jenns
By jenns (Jan 6, 2012)

Why cant I make greeting cards? I did the whole fixing thing with my computer and uninstalling the software. I installed it back in and it worked! I was able to make greeting cards. But it was late at night and I just played a lil with that feature, turned of the comp and went to sleep. This morning I wanted to try more and it says the same stupid thing about "valid size not available for this creation" Not what do I have to do?

0 upvotes
sailonset
By sailonset (Oct 1, 2011)

Although I've purchased upgrades and have a fairly recent version that came with a Pro9000II, I'm still using PSE 2.0 with its integrated browser.

0 upvotes
grahamdyke
By grahamdyke (Sep 21, 2011)

PSE 10, Adobe haven't got PSE 9 working as designed yet!!! I guess all the defects in PSE 9 will have been ported over to PSE 10 and a load more added...

I've been using PSE since version 4, so that's 4,5,6,7,9 missed 8 and evey version has one thing in common, it got slower, bigger and more resource hungry. PSE 9 now has to be run on a Quad Core (2.4Ghz) PC with 4GB of memory to be able to do anthing productive.

Photo editing software has become like the latest cameras, Form over Function, frills and fripery, bloatware.

The true cost of an upgrade wont be $79 it will be $79 plus the cost of upgrading, or replacing your chosen platform, to cope with all the latest bloat...

6 upvotes
Philidors shadow
By Philidors shadow (Sep 28, 2011)

I agree completely.

I started with PSE 2, which was very powerful for the era, but buggy. Years later I upgraded to PSE 6, which looked more modern but offered very little improvement. It was buggy. To try to get rid of the bugs I eventually bought PSE 9. I got slower performance and yet more bugs.

At this stage I think PSE is very close to unusable. It feels like it's creaking at the seams with crud, it has so many bugs that everyone will encounter irritating issues, and it is poorly documented and poorly supported. I certainly won't be upgrading to 10.

0 upvotes
djd49
By djd49 (Feb 18, 2012)

I have no choice but to upgrade. I wondered why I can't use my Pse5 on my new pc. After 2 years I discovered its not comparable with Win.7.
Now I have a new DSLR camera and PSE5 won't work my raw photos.
After downloading a trial PSE10 I loved the difference from the old version.
I've ordered the CDs & looking forward to beginning a long learning process that will be very frustrating at times.
I never really got too far into 5 but I'm taking photography a lot more seriously now so I'll be putting in the hours it takes to learn this software.
I just can't afford the other options right now.

0 upvotes
jkrumm
By jkrumm (Sep 20, 2011)

One thing that Elements 6 was great at was stiching Panos using raw files. When I upgraded to Elements 9 I could only get this feature to work by either using jpegs or 8 bit tiffs. Seems they dumbed it down and in the process made the whole thing more difficult. I suspect 10 is no different that way. Still, I've heard they added better layer control in 9 (haven't tried it), and overall it's hard to beat if you don't mind working in 8 bit (shouldn't matter in most cases).

0 upvotes
littleroot
By littleroot (Sep 20, 2011)

A google search found this on a Flickr forum and I think it is pretty accurate for how Lightroom is different

From their website:

Lightroom excels at processing large volumes of photographs, creating the perfect negative, and outputting collections to web, print and slideshows. Photoshop remains the ultimate pixel-level, individual-image-editing and compositing application.

For example, you may have 2,000 photographs and need to quickly preview, sort and rate them, embed your copyright on each, correct white balance, change tonal and color values, and make monochrome copies (or add a wide array of other special effects). Then, you need to output to slideshow, print or web, and all under the pressure of time constraints. For this common type of photographic workflow, Lightroom is the ideal solution.

I will add LR makes images that look like photos, while PS and PSE go beyond that to do the "trick" stuff

1 upvote
Haelstrom
By Haelstrom (Sep 20, 2011)

I have LR and PSE 9. I like both in the own rights. LR is awesome. The ability to edit RAW images is its biggest plus. Now your not really editing the file. But more or less adding a layer over it. So when you export the file in your preferred format it will permanently apply those changes. You can do anything that Adobe Camera Raw can in LR. But, once you want to start smoothing skin, removing objects, creative layer effects, and things of that nature you will need to move to PSE. I highly recommend getting LR. Keep an eye on it at Amazon. I picked up LR3 for $150. I do 95% of my editing in LR and usually never go into PSE. But I have it when I need it and its a whole lot cheaper than PS 5. The organizer in PSE is just not in the same league as LR. The LR library is just absolutely awesome and well beyond PSE ability. Adobe will let you do 30 day trials for both. Check out the many LR podcast that are out there. I recommend Lightroom Killer Tips. Its done by Matt Kloskowski.

1 upvote
Swingline
By Swingline (Sep 20, 2011)

Picasa lets you reorder pictures by drag and drop but the new order is inside of Picasa only. Can you reorder as easily and then rename in LR?

0 upvotes
Sheri Pruett
By Sheri Pruett (Oct 2, 2011)

Lightroom rocks. Picasa doesn't come close. I recommend prints from more professional grade sources such as Mpix

0 upvotes
CacoCardoso
By CacoCardoso (Sep 20, 2011)

A LR feature is to be a 16 bit software. I guess that at least some of PSE and PS functions require reducing the files to 8 bit only.

0 upvotes
andersf
By andersf (Sep 20, 2011)

If both elements and Lightroom are organizers/editors and handle RAW images, what sets LR apart as a pro application (and motivates the price difference)? Is there a substantial difference in operation between elements and lightroom? Is there a feature matrix somewhere so one can compare LR3 with Elements 10?

0 upvotes
jerrith
By jerrith (Sep 20, 2011)

One of the biggest advantages of lightroom is that it doesn't edit your original file when you develop it in the development module. In stead all edits are saved in the image library of lightroom or if you so desier in a seperat .xmp file.
Another great thing in LR3 is the ability to apply the same development to multiple images instantaniously. It's literally a matter of copy/pasting development settings between images.
I find LR3 to be a very intuitive tool to quickly develop a batch of images from a photoshoot which allows me to more efficiently select/develop the photos I want to use in the photo album I am about to create for example.
I would suggest you download the evalutation version, follow some of the very good tutorials available on the adobe website and see for yourself if this is the tool for you or not.

0 upvotes
andersf
By andersf (Sep 20, 2011)

I thought non-destructive editing was par for the course (and really the only way to do it since editing a raw image makes no sense for the most part). Importing to jpg and editing that (picasa) can't be what PSE10 does can it? Presets/multiple editing also feels like a glaring omission even for an amateur tool, or perhaps especially for an amateur tool. I have been looking for an easy alternative to iPhoto for windows, but still found nothing (I.e. easy organizer, decent raw processing). I'll try the evaluation.

0 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Sep 20, 2011)

PSE and LR are very different beasts. There are parts of PSE that LR does not have and there are things in LR that PSE does not have.

For instance LR has the full ACR module (adobe camera RAW) while PSE has only certain "elements" of ACR. PSE has the lasso command and layers while LR has neither. LR is designed as a professional photographer's workflow solution while PSE is aimed at being a consumer photo processing/developing/"editing" program.

1 upvote
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Sep 20, 2011)

andersf: since at least PSE 5, PSE has been able take a JPG and "open as" a RAW file and make adjustments to it as if it were a RAW file (minus actual WB and tint settings, only deviations from "zero"). You cannot "edit" a RAW file, only change settings to be used during conversion to an actual image format for what RAW is not. RAW is a file format. There is no RAW image, it's only data.

And PSE is just that, "elements" or parts of Photoshop, generally the most popular parts and the more simple parts.

0 upvotes
GEORGE KARRAS
By GEORGE KARRAS (Sep 20, 2011)

LR utilizes a reference list for rendering images. So it is an image rendering software, and someone can do many things with reference list. PSE is a creative tool, bitmap based.
So if you want to make a new creation based on an image you need PSE. If your images are in the final creation and you need to prepare them for output, so you need LR.

0 upvotes
HarryLally
By HarryLally (Sep 20, 2011)

Does PSE contain an erasing tool that will e.g. enable you to delete TV aerials or telegraph wires from landscape shots? I did download a trial copy of LR3 but it didn't have an erasing tool so I decided not to buy it. Not to mention that it tried to take over my computer.

0 upvotes
theoschela
By theoschela (Sep 20, 2011)

Love my Lr3. Anyways - now that I see the new features in PSE 10 are not worth it to me - I'm excited! Because hopefully soon I can find a good price on PSE 9(!) - which has the features I'll use...
PSE 9's content aware feature is worth 1/2 the price, to me...

0 upvotes
andersf
By andersf (Sep 20, 2011)

George: I know and use LR, but I have long been looking for a simpler alternative. Only requirements: "real" raw processing, non destructive editing, and good/simple organizer for the amateur dslr shooter on a budget. No "selection" editing or other bitmap based tools required other than simple red-eye removal or simple sharpening brushes. So what I need is an iPhoto clone, and I'm surprised that the giants don't produce one (Microsoft, Adobe, Google don't have an option). Picasa ticks all the boxes but does not do raw (only a dumb conversion from raw to 8 bit, then works non-destructively on the 8bit image, which is stupid!). Iphoto on the other hand appears to be simple, non destructive and keep all the bits of the raw image so I can correct a 1-2 stop overexposure later on, which is all I want. But iPhoto is mac only!

0 upvotes
vdubreeze
By vdubreeze (Sep 21, 2011)

One might also look at it in reverse, which is how many do. Images go first into a program like LR or Aperture for conversion, global adjustment and roughing out the file to as close to desired as possible within their tools, especially exposure, color balance and overall look. But then the area based changes are more productively affected in a pixel editor like Elements, and even though you can use brush tools in the former they're much more limited than what you can do using selection tools and brushes in an editor like Elements. And since you can hook to the pixel editor from within LR (or Aperture), even though it must convert to TIFF it's still right there and can be output without leaving the program even though you've used another program to edit the image. The two kinds of programs are very complementary. I couldn't live with just one, because each one really isn't suitable to do what the other's strengths are, though in both cases there is wide overlap.

0 upvotes
vdubreeze
By vdubreeze (Sep 21, 2011)

One might also look at it in reverse, which is how many do. Images go first into a program like LR or Aperture for conversion, global adjustment and roughing out the file to as close to desired as possible within their tools, especially exposure, color balance and overall look. But then the area based changes are more productively affected in a pixel editor like Elements, and even though you can use brush tools in the former they're much more limited than what you can do using selection tools and brushes in an editor like Elements. And since you can hook to the pixel editor from within LR (or Aperture), even though it must convert to TIFF it's still right there and can be output without leaving the program even though you've used another program to edit the image. The two kinds of programs are very complementary. I couldn't live with just one, because each one really isn't suitable to do what the other's strengths are, though in both cases there is wide overlap.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 24