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Nikon launches AF-S DX Micro Nikkor 40mm F2.8 macro lens

By dpreview staff on Jul 12, 2011 at 04:03 GMT
Buy on GearShop$276.95

Nikon has announced an inexpensive macro lens aimed at entry-level DSLR users. The AF-S DX Micro Nikkor 40mm f/2.8G offers true 1:1 macro in a compact, lightweight package. With its inbuilt silent wave motor it will autofocus on all Nikon DSLRs, including those that lack in-body AF motors such as the D3100 and D5100. It uses an internal focus system with close-range correction to attain a minimum focus distance of just 16cm / 6.4", equating to approximately 5cm / 2" from the front of the lens. It will be available from 25th August, at an MSRP $279.95.

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Press Release:

GET CLOSER TO CLARITY: THE NEW NIKON AF-S DX MICRO NIKKOR 40mm f/2.8G BRINGS FAST MACRO ABILITY TO DX-FORMAT SHOOTERS

Images Packed with Stunning Detail and Amazing Sharpness Have Never Been So Near

MELVILLE, N.Y. (July 12, 2011) – Nikon Inc. today introduced the new lightweight and versatile AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 40mm f/2.8G lens to provide Nikon DX-format shooters macro capabilities at an affordable price point. Ideal for intimate details or general portraiture, the new AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 40mm f/2.8G lens has a minimum focusing distance of just 0.53 feet (6.4 inches) to allow users to capture extreme close-up photographs and High Definition (HD) video with a life-size 1:1 reproduction ratio.

“This new NIKKOR lens is an ideal accessory lens for those who are ready to explore a totally new perspective, whether it’s extreme close-up detail or general still images and movies with flattering out of focus elements,” said Lisa Osorio, general manager of marketing at Nikon Inc. The new Micro NIKKOR lens delivers new and added versatility to the Nikon DX-format digital SLR system and provides DX-format shooters with compact optics that deliver excellent color reproduction and stunning sharpness.”

Weighing in at approximately nine ounces, the extremely compact and lightweight lens is an ideal “next” lens to complement any DX-format shooter’s growing D-SLR kit. The natural focal length (60mm, FX equivalent) and large f/2.8 aperture are ideal for a wide variety of applications, whether capturing close-up details in flowers and insects or shooting flattering portraiture with a pleasing bokeh.

For fast and whisper quiet autofocus operation, the new Nikon 40mm Micro lens also features Nikon’s exclusive Silent Wave Motor technology, which allows photographers to get even closer without disturbing a subject. For complete control, the AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 40mm offers users both manual-priority autofocus (M/A) and manual focus (M) modes to quickly and easily switch focus modes on the fly. To help ensure amazing lens performance at close distances, this new lens employs Nikon’s Close-Range Correction System. With this system, the lens elements are configured in a "floating” design wherein each lens group moves independently to help achieve critical focus. Additionally, Nikon’s Super Integrated Coatings are applied to help reduce instances of lens flare and ghosting. The seven blade diaphragm also helps to create a more natural out of focus component.

The versatile and compact nature of the AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 40mm f/2.8G lens combined with its affordability make it a great travel companion for any DX-format D-SLR, including the new Nikon D5100 and popular D3100. 

Price and Availability

The versatile AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 40mm f/2.8G will be available in August for an estimated selling price* of $279.95. For more information, please visit www.nikonusa.com.

*Estimated selling price listed only as a suggestion. Actual prices are set by dealers and are subject to change at any time

AF-S Nikkor 40mm F2.8 Micro specifications

Minimum Aperture • f/22
Angle of View on DX • 38°50’
Number of Elements (Groups) • 9 elements, 7 groups
Minimum focus distance • 16 cm (6.4")
Reproduction ratio • 1:1
Aperture Diaphragm Blades • 7
Filter Thread • 52mm
Size • 6.4 cm wide x 6.9 cm long (2.5" x 2.7")
Weight • 280g (9.9 oz)
MRSP • $279.95
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Nikon AF-S DX Micro Nikkor 40mm F2.8

Comments

Total comments: 97
Frank Bungartz
By Frank Bungartz (Nov 8, 2011)

Like the much older 60mm Micro Nikkor this lens has ONLY a front lens filter thread. This means that the R1C1 Macro Flash can only be attached to the front lens element and not to the barrel of the lens. The weight of several macro flash heads (up to eight possible) is considerable.
For the 60 mm Micro Nikkor Nikon therefore provides the more than flimsy UR-5 adapter ring, so that the R1C1 can be attached to the barrel and not the front element of the lens. The new 40 mm DX Macro does not permit this. The R1C1 can ONLY be attached to the front lens, not the barrel. This incurs considerable wear on that extruding and moving front element and essentially means that this new MACRO lens is incompatible with Nikon's own Macro flash. Incredible!

0 upvotes
ReubenCohn
By ReubenCohn (Mar 13, 2012)

Confirmed this fact with Nikon support: "The R1C1 is not recommended for this lens because the flash units can only mount to the front of the lens and not the lens barrel. This would add too much weight to the front of the lens. "

0 upvotes
D3man
By D3man (Oct 1, 2011)

Buy a 35mm 1.8, its a great lens.

0 upvotes
cyris69
By cyris69 (Aug 31, 2011)

I'm new to macro/and DSLR's for that matter, I have a Raynox DCR-250 which I use on my Nikon D5100 with the kit lens and the Nikon 55-200 VR. I just purchased the set of Zeikos ZE-CVAFN Auto Focus Macro Extension Tubes, and a New Harbor macro ring LED light. Haven't gotten them yet but should be here by Friday.

I was wondering if I would be better off with sticking with the tubes and a diopter or go with this lens? Or, I was thinking about picking up this used lens here: USED Nikon AF 60mm F2.8 D Micro, http://robertscamera.com/used-refurb/used/lenses/autofocus/macro/af-60mm-f2-8-d-micro-1714.html For 265$

Thanks!

0 upvotes
entomopixel
By entomopixel (Oct 31, 2011)

I think this lens will result in images with better sharpness, than using the DCR-250 on the kit lens. I have a D90 with a 60mm macro lens. I also have the DCR-250 which I add to the 60mm macro to increase magnification beyond 1:1, but I loose some sharpness. I also combine the 60mm + extension tubes plus the DCR-250 for even more mag. see my images at http://www.flickr.com/photos/entomopixel/ and email me there if you have more questions.

0 upvotes
JulMaass
By JulMaass (Jul 16, 2011)

wow that's cheap! and fast!

1 upvote
digby dart
By digby dart (Jul 14, 2011)

Excellent news, lets hope it has the quality to match its 60mm micro equivalents. I hope this heralds a new wave of aps-c traditional primes, not the full frame sizes we seem to have had to contend with up till now.

0 upvotes
Louis Dallara
By Louis Dallara (Jul 14, 2011)

Do really need another lens???

0 upvotes
TheTeh
By TheTeh (Jul 13, 2011)

It should have been a 20mm f2.8!

0 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Jul 18, 2011)

If you're going that road it should at least be F2, as a 35mm angle equivalent should be. Like a DX version of the current 35/2.

0 upvotes
LarryK
By LarryK (Jul 13, 2011)

Wow,

Surprising how many people here don't seem to understand the purpose or significance of this lens.

Disappointing even for a gear forum.

2 upvotes
expoboy52
By expoboy52 (Jul 13, 2011)

I agree LarryK. I'm kind of confused here. People are talking about their wonderful AF-S35/1.8 DXs and other Nikkor lenses as if they are macros. Isn't the purpose of this new lens to allow enthusiasts to photograph small items, say insects, stamps, coins, etc., with a true 1:1 macro with the side benefit of a relatively fast "normal" lens function? If it tests well, and I have little doubt that it will, I'll be buying one. I can't justify $500-900+ for one of Nikon's other macros.

1 upvote
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Jul 17, 2011)

Well the way I see it is... what would be of more use to more people: a macro lens or a fast wide angle prime? It just seems like a missed opportunity. What is there a bigger market for... lenses made to shoot small items, or lenses made to shoot low light scenes?

0 upvotes
ecka84
By ecka84 (Jul 13, 2011)

This might be a great lens for food, product and ... stuff photography.

2 upvotes
kingsix87
By kingsix87 (Jul 13, 2011)

At first glance it is a wonderful lens, but actually Ken Rockwell is quite right. I own AF-S 35/1.8 DX and since i sold my other lens it is the only lens I have. It is almost perfect, but I'd rather have it somewhere around 28-31mm for more "normal" angle. Like the wonderful ( and awfully expensive ) Pentax 31mm limited. The new 40mm macro lens is a bit short for macro, a bit long for normal and a bit dark for a prime. Nevertheless if I didn't have the 35/1.8 I would have considered it because of the versatility - you always have to compromise when you want all-in-one lens. Especially if your other lens is a dark travel zoom like 18-135, 18-200, etc...

1 upvote
alwye
By alwye (Jul 13, 2011)

+1
waiting for more review on the lens, especially the sharpness at infinity, if that comes out positive, I might get one, otherwise, I stick with my 55mm f2.8 AIS.

0 upvotes
hexxthalion
By hexxthalion (Jul 18, 2011)

apples and oranges, this is a MACRO lens

1 upvote
rakita
By rakita (Jul 13, 2011)

I wonder what bokeh would look like with only 7 ordinary blades. Why not 9 rounded?

0 upvotes
ZinhaEq
By ZinhaEq (Jul 13, 2011)

Well, it would make its cost higher, which nobody wants. They did the same to 50mm f/1.8G and there is no bigger problem with only seven blades. Like amateurs, who are going to buy this lens, are going to notice any difference in bokeh anyway...

1 upvote
rakita
By rakita (Jul 13, 2011)

I've got that 50mm lens and I'm not happy with it's bokeh.
See this for another 7 blade lens (35mm) entitled "Ryan shopping for bad bokeh at f/1.8"
here http://kenrockwell.com/nikon/35mm-f18.htm#bokeh

0 upvotes
ZinhaEq
By ZinhaEq (Jul 14, 2011)

If you are very demanding for bokeh, then you should've got yourself 50mm f/1.4G, which has nine blades...

1 upvote
rakita
By rakita (Jul 14, 2011)

Yes, you're right. I just thought that all modern lens labeled "micro" should have 9 rounded blades because bokeh is important for micro-macro photography. OK, it's cheaper, but don't label it that way. See this compare:
http://kenrockwell.com/nikon/40mm-f28.htm#comp

0 upvotes
Faisalee
By Faisalee (Sep 2, 2011)

@rakita: number of aperture blades is not every thing that contributes to good or bad bokeh. As long as the blades are rounded and retain the round circle shape, their job is done :)

There are many 9 blade lenses having "bad" bokeh and there are 7 rounded blade lense with creamy and smooth bokeh "AF-S 50 1.8G" is one of them :)

0 upvotes
CriticalI
By CriticalI (Jul 13, 2011)

Stifling a huge yawn.

C'mon Nikon, stop boring everyone - there are a lot more urgent lens upgrades that you could have done.

4 upvotes
D Gnatat
By D Gnatat (Jul 13, 2011)

Good toy

0 upvotes
timelyrain
By timelyrain (Jul 13, 2011)

I would like AF-S DX 24/2.8G(35mm equivalent), AF-S DX 28/2.8G(43mm equivalent).

1 upvote
PatMann
By PatMann (Jul 13, 2011)

Very nice, very cute. I have a macro lens already, but if I didn't, this might tempt me.

Now how about some high-specification D400 lenses, including some wide DX primes we really NEED, at least 5 years overdue:

9-18mm f/4 DX
16mm f/4 PC DX
16mm or 18mm f/2 DX
24mm f/2 DX
50-135 f/2.8 VR DX
300mm f/4 VR
400mm f/5.6 VR

I'm just saying.

1 upvote
PatMann
By PatMann (Jul 16, 2011)

Make that a 24mm f/1.4 DX

1 upvote
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jul 13, 2011)

One of the first reviews i seen for this lens on ken rockwell blog. 5 image samples

0 upvotes
Faisalee
By Faisalee (Jul 13, 2011)

I thought KR reviews without owning / using the lens? :p

2 upvotes
Tomas_X
By Tomas_X (Jul 12, 2011)

Very cheap, sharp & macro & close-up & near normal DX lens. Good arguments for existence of the lense.
But I will not buy it. I have DX platform (D300) and I would upgrade from AF 85/1.8D to AF-S DX 70/1.6G, rounded aperture blades to have SWM lenses only for the motorless future and AF-C predictive AF for moving people small DOF shots.
I would love AF-S DX 24/2G, AF-S DX 20/2G and AF-S DX 16/2G too.
I would love some DX VR II f/2G in the range 30-50mm for very low light handheld shots. Or I would upgrade form AF-S DX 17-55/2.8G to AF-S 16-60/2.8G VR II.
Many people would like AF-S DX 60-250/4 VR, as is Pentax lens.

0 upvotes
ecka84
By ecka84 (Jul 13, 2011)

What planet are you from?
Welcome to Earth :)

0 upvotes
jmmgarza
By jmmgarza (Jul 12, 2011)

My first Nikon lens purchase was a macro back in 1972. This lens will be great for consumer-level cameras. Are you ready for close-ups of roses, kittens and dolls. Not me.

3 upvotes
camerosity
By camerosity (Jul 12, 2011)

should be another hot seller at that price. I use my 55mm f2.8 Micro-Nikkor all the time. Good one Nikon!

2 upvotes
alwye
By alwye (Jul 12, 2011)

Nikon's reaction to all these M4/3 craziness. One more reason you should stick with Nikon DSLR. Imaging that, 40mm f2.8 on APS-C equals 30mm f1.4 in M4/3, and macro, try to get that for $279 from Olympus or Panasonic, lol.

4 upvotes
CatalinArghir
By CatalinArghir (Jul 12, 2011)

NOT true, 40/2.8 in APS-C = 30/2 in M4/3. Mirrorless cameras still have a better selection of wide/semi-wide pancakes (or plan primes for that matter) than nikon DX. IMO a 40/2.8 is pointless, as is the 85/3.5. There are enough macros already... where are the 24, 28 and 35mm equivalent DX primes ??? where is the 70/1.4 DX portrait???

9 upvotes
CatalinArghir
By CatalinArghir (Jul 12, 2011)

Moreover, Nikon has now a fine selection of AF-S lenses. I don't understand why Nikon hasn't released motor-less bodies for the higher end? For example: a DX motor-less 0.95 pentaprism body and a FX motor-less plastic D700 (much lighter and cheaper)...

1 upvote
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Jul 12, 2011)

Are you jealous of a really good and mature system like micro 4/3 is ?

I advice you to be better informed on what micro 4/3 is and the advantages it have

I say this but I like Nikon, Nikon offers much better lenses than Canon and cameras are stronger, but micro 4/3 system is a small wonder for those who really know the advantages

3 upvotes
Mssimo
By Mssimo (Jul 12, 2011)

You must be talking about DOF because the amount of light a lens lets in has nothing to so with sensor size. (the 25mm f1.4 pani/leica will get the same shutter speed on a G3 as a 50mm f1.4 will get on the 5D)

I'm not even factoring in the light loss phenomenon on larger sensors. http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/an_open_letter_to_the_major_camera_manufacturers.shtml

Main point..its not apples to apples. Im not sure why you think this lens has anything to do with mirrorless cameras. Its a nice budget lens that is going to sell tons because of all the (vending machine bodies) on the market.

0 upvotes
julieng
By julieng (Jul 13, 2011)

If it is such craziness, care to explain why that new lens would be a reaction?

There is really no other explanations why Nikon would care to offer consumer grade macro lens?

How about getting your hands on a m43 and test it thoughtfully before dumping any such sweeping statements ?

0 upvotes
alwye
By alwye (Jul 13, 2011)

I have a D90, as well as an E -P2, got it when it first came out, and I love it. All I tried to say was I wish Olympus and Panasonic can make some budget lens like this one. Last check the only M4/3 macro will set you back $700+ and the new 25mm costs $600.
M4/3 is a fantastic system, I'm aware of that, but still long way to go to catch up Dslrs, pushing out a $900 new body every 3 months is not the way to go, focus on the lens development.
M4/3 fans are very defensive here, calm down!

0 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Jul 18, 2011)

"Nikon offers much better lenses than Canon" - What a load of bull ! Canon has loads of things that Nikon doesn't, and Nikon has loads of things that Canon doesn't. Now if they would work together, that would be some line-up. But neither of them is better than the other at this point aside from personal preference.

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Jul 12, 2011)

A definite must have lens .

2 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Jul 12, 2011)

Why? There's no way this could be better than the 35 1.8 for the vast majority of users.

Like someone else said, DX users need a wide prime. A 1.8 in the range of 12-20mm would be great, especially for cheap. I don't think such a lens exists yet.

0 upvotes
elihusmails
By elihusmails (Jul 12, 2011)

This is better than the 35 f/1.8 in terms of macro capability.

0 upvotes
sportyaccordy
By sportyaccordy (Jul 12, 2011)

Definitely. But outside of marco, at least on paper, the 35 1.8 is way more of a "must have"

0 upvotes
Faisalee
By Faisalee (Jul 13, 2011)

better than 35 1.8? Those are two different lenses, different focal lengths different max aperture and of course different closest focusing distance :)

35 1.8 is a lowlight / good light normal lens where as 40 f2.8 is a macro lens! This dosent mean that you cant use it for other things, of course you can! even low light when you got clean high iso capabilities in the new high sensitivity sensors ;)

0 upvotes
G1Houston
By G1Houston (Jul 13, 2011)

"There's no way this could be better than the 35 1.8 for the vast majority of users."

Imagine using this lens for a tight head and shoulder shot. The 40mm will be longer than the 35mm, and this helps to blur the background by compression. Furthermore, a macro lens is expected to give a flat field when shooting close to your subject without perspective distortion. The 35/1.8 will create perspective distortion when shooting up close.

3 upvotes
Dr Nick Taylor
By Dr Nick Taylor (Jul 12, 2011)

Call me old fashioned, but what use is a macro lens without an aperture ring?

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Jul 12, 2011)

Old fashioned. Aperture is controlled by camera settings these days. If you want an aperture ring, use a manual focus film SLR. For the most part if it's not controlled electronically these days, aside from focal length on a zoom lens, it isn't going to be encorporated.

2 upvotes
Paul Pasco
By Paul Pasco (Jul 12, 2011)

Same as all "G" lenses and all the bodies this lens is intended for have aperture control.

1 upvote
shigzeo ?
By shigzeo ? (Jul 12, 2011)

You could always use any of Nikon's mid-high end cameras, too. As far as I know, the D80-D7000 and all of the pro models from D200 onward can use manual lenses.

I have a D200 and all of my most used lenses are Ai-S lenses. My old macro was a 105 2,8D, which could work electronically or in one-step increments from the aperture ring.

I also prefer using the ring to the dial, primarily because without having the camera on, I can tell what setting it is at, and the bloody rubber where I change the aperture all the time, doesn't go loose.

0 upvotes
aebolzan
By aebolzan (Jul 12, 2011)

Seems that people forget that in the "old good days" we used to use something called "bellows" for macro photography....now we can only reach 1:1 ratio in the "new fashion" macrophotography.....seems that we have lost something in the way.....Nikon has lost the capability they had in the field of macro photography, who knows why.....

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jul 12, 2011)

Aperture control is still present through the camera, so I don't get your logic. Look at all the macros done with Canon cameras and not a single Canon lens has an aperture ring since the switch to EF mount.

1 upvote
aebolzan
By aebolzan (Jul 12, 2011)

well, let me know how do you control the aperture of the lens through the camera when you use a bellows... :)

0 upvotes
jmmgarza
By jmmgarza (Jul 12, 2011)

The aperture on Nikkor G lenses is operated by a specific wheel on the camera - in various modes. Try it out. It works quite nicely on contemporary Nikon DSLR cameras.

0 upvotes
cmflyer
By cmflyer (Jul 12, 2011)

@shigzeo: All the Nikon DSLR's can use just about every Nikon lens ever made. I love shooting my old AI E series 50mm 1.8 fully manual! I also have a 35-105 with macro focus ring, but it weighs a ton. This new lens sounds awesome.

0 upvotes
ExposureMeter
By ExposureMeter (Jul 13, 2011)

I use my 105mm f/2.8G VR for extreme macros without an aperture ring. Also use the 105 G lens with PB-6 bellows with a modified cable release to stop it down, works for me.

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jul 13, 2011)

What can you do with an aperture ring on a DSLR? The aperture is controlled by the dial on the camera, not on the lens. I have 6 lenses (2 of them are macro) and none have aperture rings and never really missed that feature. I do appreciate the internal focusing, which was not very common in the "good old days" with aperture rings, especially not on a macro lens.

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jul 13, 2011)

@aebolzan: You can use bellows even today but you need an adapter if you want to use G lenses. I think Novoflex makes those. I made one for my previous Olympus system but it is sold a long time ago.

0 upvotes
AlvinLeyva
By AlvinLeyva (Jul 12, 2011)

Yawn...

2 upvotes
Steve Balcombe
By Steve Balcombe (Jul 12, 2011)

Strange release from Nikon. I've read the previous comments and I fully understand this is not a 'bug lens', but a 50 mm working distance at 1:1 is extremely close whatever the subject.

Very nice to see an affordable macro lens though - that's a very keen price.

1 upvote
skwillt
By skwillt (Jul 12, 2011)

I am not into the numbers, but when you look at it from the point of view of the final print, and not magnification itself, you need only 1:1.5 with this lens to get the same result as with a 60mm lens on FX at 1:1. And at 1:1.5 this lens would have a working distance similar to the 60/2.8 at 1:1.
And as already said, the 60mm (or even 55mm) focal length is widely used on FX for non-insect applications.

1 upvote
Steve Balcombe
By Steve Balcombe (Jul 12, 2011)

Well, ok, but it's sold as a 1:1 macro not 1:1.5 so it has to perform as a 1:1 macro. You can use the 60/2.8 or indeed any other macro lens on DX and get the benefit of a greater working distance at 1:1, or at 1:1.5 or whatever you need. The only macro lens I know of (just from memory) with a smaller MWD is the Sigma 50mm.

I'm not trying to make more of this than it merits, but at the same time you can't just dismiss it as unimportant - WD is a key feature of any macro lens.

0 upvotes
Allan Gendelman
By Allan Gendelman (Jul 12, 2011)

I'm still waiting for a 50mm DX lens. That's one of the essential lenses. How can you release a camera and not have a 50mm option for it?

0 upvotes
Matix
By Matix (Jul 12, 2011)

Actually there is a classic '50mm' for the DX. It is the relatively new AF-S 35mm DX f1.8, on a DX camera it is 52mm in film terms, whereas the 50mm you refer to is 75mm on a DX. Works for me, a great lens for less than $200.

3 upvotes
pete_mb
By pete_mb (Jul 12, 2011)

There are four 50mm Nikon autofocus lenses that work perfectly on DX, and two of them even AF on the low-end models. Hardly 'no option'! Why would you want a DX-only 50mm as well?

2 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Jul 12, 2011)

There is a low priced 50mm lens made by Nikon. What would be the point of making it DX/aps-c only? None.

1 upvote
shigzeo ?
By shigzeo ? (Jul 12, 2011)

I agree. I don't see the need for a 50 DX lens. 50's are not going to get cheaper because they are DX. The cheapest AiS 50's cost 50-80 used, maybe less. The cheapest new lens, the 50 1,8D works perfectly on every Nikon camera since the 1970's, has autofocus on motor-equipped bodies, and is cheap!

No need for a 50Dx.

1 upvote
Allan Gendelman
By Allan Gendelman (Jul 12, 2011)

I don't want a 75mm lens. I want a 50mm because I do a lot of portraits. If people weren't interested in having 50mm's, then Nikon wouldn't make them. I'm sure people would love a 50mm DX. I sure would.

0 upvotes
pete_mb
By pete_mb (Jul 13, 2011)

Not even sure what you mean Allan. If you mean you want a lens with the equivalent field of view of a 50mm on FX, then you've got the 35mm f1.8 - an inexpensive, DX-only prime - perfect.
If you mean you want a genuine 50mm focal length lens that works on DX, well, both the 1.4G and 1.8G 50s work perfectly on any DX camera. (With an equivalent FOV of 75mm, yes).
What does that leave out, what are you missing?

1 upvote
pete_mb
By pete_mb (Jul 13, 2011)

In other words - how would a theoretical 50mm DX differ from the 1.4G and 1.8G when mounted on a DX camera??

0 upvotes
G1Houston
By G1Houston (Jul 13, 2011)

You are confused by final FOV vs the actual focal length of a lens. A 50mm lens is a 50 mm lens in terms of its focal length, a physical property of the lens, although on different format, the FOV is different. To get a FF equivalent 50mm FOV on a DX camera, you use the AFS 35/1.8 for $200.

0 upvotes
Guidenet
By Guidenet (Jul 12, 2011)

Sounds to me like another great inexpensive choice for DX users. That is an extremely low price. What a bargain. It has the same field of view as 60 on full frame. Back in the old days, we really only had 55mm focal lengths for most macro lenses. I still have a superb pre-ai converted in 55 f/3.5 that takes encredible images on my D700. I also have a new 60 f/2.8 AFS G Micro.

The advantage to these shorter focal lengths is ease of tracking. Try tracking a flying butterfly with a 100mm or 200mm macro lens. The field of view is so narrow, tracking becomes nearly impossible. With this focal length, it will be much easier. I wish it were FX capable.

Nikon is doing a wonderful job meeting the needs of the DX shooter as well as producing superb optics at extemely low prices. We've now got the 35 f/1.8 at $199, the new 50 f/1.8 at $219 and this new Macro at $279. There's less and less reason to consider 3rd party or sub-quality glass. Here you get real Nikon glass and design.

11 upvotes
ecka84
By ecka84 (Jul 12, 2011)

These are exactly my thoughts :). Nikon is making the right move with those cheap DX primes.
Wake up Canon! One EF-S prime isn't enough.

1 upvote
stanic042
By stanic042 (Jul 12, 2011)

very nice :)

0 upvotes
The A-Team
By The A-Team (Jul 12, 2011)

Kudos to Nikon for making even more affordable lenses for DX users. Canon could learn a lesson or two.

9 upvotes
LensLineup
By LensLineup (Jul 12, 2011)

how cool, gonna be very popular at that price
and it's little too, excellent - looking forward to seeing one and the results

next ... please, can we have a small DX wide prime, thanks!

5 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Jul 12, 2011)

You can see some small samples on their website.

http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/specoalpurpose/micro/af-s_dx_micro40mmf_28g/

And a few more on Flickr France:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nikonfrance/sets/72157627176026648/with/5929270371/

0 upvotes
G1Houston
By G1Houston (Jul 13, 2011)

These images are lovely coming from a sub $300 lens. One should pay particular attention to the use of this lens to shoot head-shoulder shots, not just flower/food macro.

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Jul 12, 2011)

Those poo-pooing the focal length should remember that 50-60mm macros for FF cameras have nearly always been sold. It's not a good bug macro length, but good for many things. Plus it can be nice just to not have to worry about MFD on a near-normal prime.

At any rate, as a Canon shooter, I am jealous of yet another reasonably affordable prime for DX Nikon. Canon has made a whopping ONE in the past decade (60mm macro).

6 upvotes
Totomo Yap
By Totomo Yap (Jul 12, 2011)

A new choice for DX DSLR owner !

0 upvotes
DBCossini
By DBCossini (Jul 12, 2011)

The wonderful world of macro for the Nikon masses cool!

0 upvotes
Taikonaut
By Taikonaut (Jul 12, 2011)

40mm is still rather short for a macro lens even on a cropped body.

2 upvotes
focalmatter
By focalmatter (Jul 12, 2011)

Hardly. The 60mm f/2.8G ED AF-S Micro is one of Nikon's most beloved lenses and with good reason. The shorter focal length gives it a wider angle of view for macro shots, and can even be used as a general purpose lens (albeit a smidge long). It's tack-sharp and produces amazing results.

Meanwhile, the 60mm costs $580, more than double the cost of this DX-only lens. While the proof will be in the sample photos, I don't expect the focal length to detract from this lens' utility in the slightest.

2 upvotes
enkindler
By enkindler (Jul 12, 2011)

The issue is that via the specs the subject will be about 11 cm or ~ 4" in front of the lens at 1:1, not much room to get light in there.

It is good and cheap and it looks like the MTF is great but I'll stick to my 200mm AF-D for Macro

1 upvote
ianz28
By ianz28 (Jul 12, 2011)

Yeah a nice $1000 - 200mm macro lens that requires the use of a $500+ tripod setup to achieve decent results.

Of course 200mm is perfect for insect life but what about when one wants a wider field of view and shorter working distances. Product photography is just one example where a shorter focal length macro lens is helpful.

And don't forget the ease of hand-holding a shorter focal length.

1 upvote
enkindler
By enkindler (Jul 12, 2011)

1:1 has the same field of view no matter the focal length, did you mean perspective?

I think this will be a nice sharp lens but for budget macro a reversed lens would probably be better IMHO.

The DOF at 1:1 is tiny with any lens, once again due to magnification, which the 1:1 is and not focal length, which the 40mm is, so you either have a tripod and stack or you deal with a tiny DOF.

But yes, I waited for years to get the "ultimate" Nikon macro lens, I used backwards lenses long before that.

It is a nice inexpensive lens, it will be interesting to see how it works in the wild.

1 upvote
rockjano
By rockjano (Jul 12, 2011)

"The issue is that via the specs the subject will be about 11 cm or ~ 4" in front of the lens at 1:1, not much room to get light in there."

Now that is the problem. It is a nice lens for available light but for macro you often need flash for light and for contrast, and that is almost impossible with 11cm. But it is a nice lens no question with a good price.

1 upvote
Dave Lively
By Dave Lively (Jul 12, 2011)

Focus distance is measured from the sensor. With about 4 inches of camera and lens the working distance is going to be about 2 inches,not 4. If this is used as more of a close up lens taking pictures of objects 2 or 3 inches in size it should work well. But for really small subjects the short working distance is going to be a problem.

0 upvotes
Entropius
By Entropius (Jul 12, 2011)

I recently got a similar lens for Four Thirds (35mm 1:1 macro), and while it is an excellent lens (sharp, cheap, light), there is the lighting problem. I've never appreciated the wireless flash mode on my camera more.

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jul 13, 2011)

Taikonaut: 40mm on a DX is the same as 60 on an FX. I think that the 40mm will also have longer working distance than the 60mm has, which is very useful in macro to be able to catch more light.

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jul 13, 2011)

@ Entropius: Don't forget that the Oly 35mm macro is an external focusing lens, extending a lot at 1:1. Try use an internal focus lens and you'll be surprised about the differences...

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Jul 13, 2011)

@ rockjano: At 1:1 the 105 has 14 cm while the 60 has 5 cm working distance. If this lens really has 11cm working distance than it is excellent and is what I suspected. I will probably buy it and add to my other two macro lenses. It will be very useful if the IQ and the bokeh is as good as the other two, which I have no reasons to doubt.

0 upvotes
TechOutsider
By TechOutsider (Jul 12, 2011)

Nice! A competitor to Sony's 30mm f/2.8 macro lens! Fortunately the Nikon has the slightly longer focal length - a 30mm macro is all but a joke ;).

5 upvotes
Argote
By Argote (Jul 12, 2011)

Then again the 30mm is only $199 and can often be found on sale for $174. I used to have it and it has great optical quality though the working range is indeed short and I changed it for a 50mm (which I plan to change for something even longer).

0 upvotes
mali ivica
By mali ivica (Jul 12, 2011)

http://photo.net/columns/mjohnston/pentax-35mm-lens/optical-discussion/ theres also the excellent Pentax Da 35mm Limited Macro. it offers a better build, less buld and requires a 49mm filters but for a bigger price (~500 $)

0 upvotes
Total comments: 97