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Compact Flash Association announces XQD card format

By dpreview staff on Dec 7, 2011 at 20:39 GMT

The Compact Flash Association has announced the development of the XQD memory card format. The smaller XQD format is based around the PCI Express specifications, allowing write speeds of 125MB/sec and beyond. The association says the first example cards will be shown at the CP+ trade show in Japan, in February 2012. No details of capacities or which camera makers are likely to support the standard are given.

The XQD card is closer in size to the Secure Digital format but retains the greater depth of a Compact Flash card.

Press Release:

The CompactFlash Association Announces the Recently Adopted XQDTM Specification as a New Memory Card Format

CUPERTINO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The CompactFlash Association (CFA) is pleased to announce the release of the XQD specification as a new high performance memory card. This XQD specification is based on the PCI Express® specification, which provides a solid base for future performance scaling.

The CFA has adopted a new card specification with exciting performance and storage capabilities.

The key features of the XQD format include:

  • Optimized form-factor
  • Dimensions : 38.5 x 29.8 x 3.8mm
  • Durable & Robust
  • Scalable High Performance Interface
    PCI Express: 2.5Gbps today and 5Gbps Future
  • Actual Write Speeds
    Target 125MB/sec and Higher

To distinguish the new memory card format, an XQD compatibility mark has been created.

“The XQD format will enable further evolution of hardware and imaging applications, and widen the memory card options available to CompactFlash users such as professional photographers,” said Mr. Shigeto Kanda of Canon, chairman of the board, CFA.

XQD cards will be shown at the CompactFlash Association booth at CP+ 2012, February 9-12 in Yokohama, Japan.

Licensing for CFA members will start in early 2012. Please contact the CompactFlash office for more information.

Comments

Total comments: 84
Leok
By Leok (Dec 23, 2011)

XQD is NOT about better specs - SD does everything XQD promises. Its about making consumers buy more memory cards.

I hope the camera manufacturers stick to SD... but I'm not counting on it.

0 upvotes
RBFresno
By RBFresno (Jan 5, 2012)

Ah, the Nikon D4 announcement now makes (some) things clearer:
If you get a D4, one card slot will be CF and the other XQD.
So like it or not, that's the way it is.

0 upvotes
kombizz0
By kombizz0 (Dec 13, 2011)

What letters of 'XQD' are stand for?
Does anybody know?
Thanks

0 upvotes
ecube
By ecube (Dec 11, 2011)

The success and survival of any product depends not in its design, performance, experts and none-experts glowing review / opinion BUT on the consumers wallet. The Sony Betamax was superior than the VHS in all respect but the consumers bought more VHS equipment and tapes. The Blue-ray specs is better than the DVD but the market penetration is not as good as projected.

As few posted comments, I also am NOT a professional photographer who may need a better memory card than the current SD/SDHC format. More likely than not, my current digital camera and memory module would outlived me. I handle my cameras with care, hence, have yet to experience physical failures of memory cards.

In the unlikely event that I need (not want) a new camera, I'll stick with the ones designed for SD/SDHC memory cards.

0 upvotes
Pho3NiX
By Pho3NiX (Dec 10, 2011)

After reading some comments I gather than XQD will be like converting current SSD drive technology to a CF form factor. And many people ask what are the benefit.

The thing is that the rated speed is not the speed you get (in general). It may be the speed you get when when writing the first file on a fresh formatted card.

But from that point on the card have to do housekeeping operation a bit like a Tetris game to continue writing. When doing that, nothing new is written on the card so the effective speed is slower. If you decide to erase some photo, or change them on the card (ie rotate) then there's even more Tetris work to do in future writes.

All in all the mean effective real-life speed have almost nothing to do with rated speed. This is why there's different in real life speed against similar "Class N" SD card.

Again there's the question of cost to achieve said storage and speed. In general smaller means higher cost.

0 upvotes
Paya
By Paya (3 months ago)

This is mostly used for top professional cameras that need the speed when shooting, rotating and other editing works usually happens when you do have more time. but when shooting away on a camera such as D4s, you're usually working on a card that you format each time you off load previous photos. My camera uses SD cards and I do that all the time.
Even on editing the speed of the storage really counts, and its not just the speed of the head, but also the speed of data transfer. When I work on raws saved on my external hard drives, the speed really changed when I moved from USB 2 to USB 3. Not because of the speed of the Hard drive rps but because of the speed of data transfer between the hard and my computer.

0 upvotes
Lan
By Lan (Dec 9, 2011)

Really, no-one's worked out why it's called XQD yet?

It's obvious, it's been named so it can be used in the new version of Scrabble that allows proper nouns. How else would you get rid of those three in one hand? ;)

3 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Dec 9, 2011)

This looks like a replacement for CF and not SD/SDHC/SDXC cards that are used in 99.9% of cameras shipping today. With SDXC cards today having speeds of 95MB/sec and future SDXC cards running at 300MB/sec + with up to 2TB capacity I don't see this having much of a market outside of FF Pro DSLRs.

3 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Dec 9, 2011)

XQD? Geez, I hope they don't keep that name. SD and CF are fairly easy to say. XQD isn't. Plus, it sounds like "ex-cutie".

3 upvotes
GodSpeaks
By GodSpeaks (Dec 8, 2011)

It uses the PCIe interface, so I think this may be aimed mainly at video recording. I just hope they do not use pins similar to CF. More likely something similar to SxS.

0 upvotes
Zds
By Zds (Dec 8, 2011)

Considering SD cards are reaching speeds of 95MB/s now, I find it hard to believe SD interface would not be enough for all SLR and sub-SLR cameras in year or two. Today even laptop hard drives come in size of bubblegum stick, so it's hard to see the physical space would be an issue on SD either.

To me this looks like a stunt for CompactFlash association trying to be relevant without any actual *need* for yet another competing card standard.

If someone knows why we need this instead of just fast SD cards, I'm interested in hearing it.

2 upvotes
Klarno
By Klarno (Dec 8, 2011)

XQD. An acronym that rolls right off the tongue.

1 upvote
DanCee
By DanCee (Dec 8, 2011)

I'd prefer to have a robust and fast SD card.. it's small and used widely in lots of devices.. make it faster, make it stronger.. it's possible.

1 upvote
Antonio Chagin
By Antonio Chagin (Dec 8, 2011)

Could it be the future external hardrive?

2 upvotes
GearGuru
By GearGuru (Dec 8, 2011)

I was just thinking recently how, by today's technoligal standards, that removing a card and putting it in a wired card reader to transfer images seems a bit primitive. Here's what I'd like to see: 250 GB (for now) solid state drive built into camera body. When I'm done shooting, I fire up the computer, pair using Bluetooth, then proceed to download images from camera, wirelessly.

Until then...

I have used CF and SD. I much prefer CF for its size, durability, and simplicity. I have never bent pins or experienced any problems. On the other hand, SD are too small, fragile and flimsy. I've had more than a few SD cards break. One the shell cracked open and another the lock mechanism came out and on another the plastic struts that separate each contact broke off.

I understand that a new format may be needed to address performance issues, so I'm open minded on a new format. Let's just get it dialed in so we can limit the number and different types of media cards.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
MrPetkus
By MrPetkus (Dec 8, 2011)

Sure - except for the Bluetooth part. Bluetooth is <<way>> too slow to be practical with large image files. Swap Bluetooth out for 802.11.

2 upvotes
DanCee
By DanCee (Dec 8, 2011)

yeah Bluetooth is way to slow.. should adopt eyefi style file transfer on wifi.. so 802.11 n the fastest for now.

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Dec 8, 2011)

Shazam! Your wish is granted, oh great one:
http://www.trustedreviews.com/Eye-Fi-Pro-X2_Camera-Accessory_review
Well, except for the 250GB part...
... and the part about 'built in' (but you could always superglue the card access door shut I suppose ;)

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
photoaddict
By photoaddict (Dec 9, 2011)

I had pin issues in the past so I am glad to see CF go.

0 upvotes
ecube
By ecube (Dec 11, 2011)

GearGuru - there are WiFi type SD/SDHC in the market for almost a year. Between my wife and myself, we have fairly inexpensive digital cameras: 2 pocket size (Lumix & Kodak), 1 Fuji Finefix, and 1 Nikon D300. We also have two inexpensive digital video recorder. These gadgets use SD/SDHC cards. In all, we have a dozen of these cards, varying from 9 years to a few months. I have yet to experience ANY failure you described nor any failure at all. Are you, perhaps, a professional photographer working in very rough environment?

0 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Dec 8, 2011)

Oh come on!

WE DONT NEED ANOTHER CARD FORMAT!!!

SD is the STANDARD, make it less fragile and will be perfect.

Besides I have Canon, Canon users have already CF and SD (now in almost every model), do we really want a new DSLR with a different format?

NO THANK YOU!

9 upvotes
Colin Stuart
By Colin Stuart (Dec 8, 2011)

The whole "if it isn't broke, don't fix it" thing in technology DOESN'T WORK. You WANT innovation. And if you can greatly increase speed, capacity, and replace both SD and CF... it sounds good to me.

0 upvotes
Zds
By Zds (Dec 8, 2011)

The capacities and speeds of SDs double every year. I do not see the SD spec preventing those.

I mean, with SD cards up to 128GB, I do not _dare_ to put that many eggs into same basket. So the limit is not the card capacities, but how many you want to lose when a card breaks or gets stolen.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
3 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Dec 9, 2011)

Zds
this is a very clever comment,
an aspect that no one ever consider!

2 upvotes
ecube
By ecube (Dec 11, 2011)

In my earlier post, I mentioned having dozens of memory cards. Started with the then huge 528 mb for $49. As the capacity increased coupled with price drop, I bought 2, 3, 8, and 16 gb capacity. I stopped at 16 gb and limit its use to the video camera. I used the 8 gb on the DLSR and the smaller 4 gb on the pocket camera for the same reason Zds stated: Dare not to put many eggs into same (one) basket in case of equipment failure or lost. I also experienced 4 and 8 gb cards to be more cost effective than the huge 16, 32, 64 and 128 gb.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul
By Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul (Apr 19, 2012)

Screaming Canonian, Screaming and run for your life.

But hey girl, it's not consumer product. ;)

0 upvotes
kff
By kff (Dec 8, 2011)

If I am thinking about usability of new and traditional technlogies then I notice that such wireless technogies have more practical purposes. When I am thinking about internal memory (e.g.in the camera) and its connecting to more types external devices I prefer performance and save energy. I would buy a new camera but why? I am not professional photographer, I want to pay for sameting what I can use about minimal 5 years including accessories ...

We can see similar cases in the evolution of S-Video, DVI, HDMI, Display Port etc. what new interface whose head-piece are thinking about .... (TNT LCD, IPS, LED LCD, 3D etc.) ???

A god example for photography devices can be IBM's technologies such as Power 7, 7+ and 8 and their systems like System i (historical AS400, iSeries) or AMR's, AMD's a NVidia's technologies ...

Comment edited 9 times, last edit 12 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Oery
By Oery (Dec 8, 2011)

enough with "new" format already.......
why don't concentrate to make excisting form with better performance,
at least adopt a better shell.....

4 upvotes
john
By john (Dec 8, 2011)

i have compac camera, camcorder, DSLR, cell phone, mp3 player, I already own 5 kind of media cards, do we need to add another card? I just wish there are just 1-2 kind of cards, then the world will be more perfect

4 upvotes
wlachan
By wlachan (Dec 8, 2011)

SD is great except the plastic shells are too fragile. CF has pins that can be bent. XQD might just be the perfect balance.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
3 upvotes
The Squire
By The Squire (Dec 8, 2011)

Agreed. None of the current card formats are really physically robust. I have had a few SD cards fall apart on me with normal use. And CF cards have pins in the camera - the most fragile part of the card interface is attached to the $1000 device!

So, yes, lets hope this format can take some abuse.

1 upvote
KieranGee
By KieranGee (Dec 8, 2011)

I'm struggling to comprehend what people classify as "normal use" that causes their cards to practically dissolve in their hands.

4 upvotes
spidermoon
By spidermoon (Dec 9, 2011)

too fragile ? search for rugged SD card, there some strong SD card available. For instance, the new samsung card claims to be waterproof, shock proof, magnet proof.

2 upvotes
Doug Pardee
By Doug Pardee (Dec 8, 2011)

CFast was never intended for consumer applications — it's intended for industrial equipment — so I guess this is CFA's attempt to get back into the consumer world. Given the almost universal adoption of SD/SDHC/SDXC in current consumer devices, CFA's got quite the up-hill struggle. Maybe in some of the pro equipment. I guess we'll see.

And I have to agree... "SD" was inexplicable but at least pronounceable. "XQD"? Really?

2 upvotes
Phoque
By Phoque (Dec 8, 2011)

Secure Digital

5 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Dec 8, 2011)

You pronounce it "squid" ;)

Comment edited 14 seconds after posting
4 upvotes
Fois Giovanni
By Fois Giovanni (Dec 8, 2011)

Maybe "XQD" stand for "ExQuisite Device"

1 upvote
MrPetkus
By MrPetkus (Dec 8, 2011)

This is good news - PCI-e is mature and <<fast>>. The fastest MLC/SLC NAND storage units in use today are running over PCI-e. SD is not going to be this fast and will never catch up. Ever. Assuming cameras had the bus speed to take advantage of these cards, you'd have buffer speeds to card capacity.

2 upvotes
viking79
By viking79 (Dec 8, 2011)

SD UHS II has specifications up to 304 MB/s, so way faster than anything CF can offer. Something was necessary for pros that for some reason feel SD is inferior. However, I will say those XQD cards look more physically robust than SD, but still offer a small size so they should be able to fit dual cards without the massive amount of room required to do the same with CF.

Eric

1 upvote
jpr2
By jpr2 (Dec 8, 2011)

XQD uses the PCI Express interface, and the target for real-world write speeds is 125MB/s. The theoretical maximum is 5Gb/s, or around 600MB/s.

0 upvotes
Zds
By Zds (Dec 9, 2011)

Why do you think SD can't match the PCI-e speeds? Two serial interfaces, one designed for portable devices, another designed to live inside a PC. I do not see any reason why the SD would not stay better for mobile use.

Currently both SD and CF solutions cap at 95-100MB/s, so I suspect the interface speed is indeed not a limiting factor, but something else.

If you shoot Hollywood movies, or medium format, then XQD might be home there, but for DSLRs..

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Dec 7, 2011)

"XQD" .. did they use a random letter generator to come up with that

10 upvotes
The Squire
By The Squire (Dec 8, 2011)

eXtra Quick Digital?

1 upvote
Fois Giovanni
By Fois Giovanni (Dec 8, 2011)

Maybe stand for ExQuisite Device

1 upvote
Zenist
By Zenist (Dec 7, 2011)

Yeah it also depends on the camera speed.

0 upvotes
OliverCardona
By OliverCardona (Dec 7, 2011)

I though they were developing CFast as the next gen CF cards?

I'm not keen on a new format... I hope this will fail. CF and SD cards is already too much choice.

3 upvotes
HeezDeadJim
By HeezDeadJim (Dec 8, 2011)

Two options are too much "choice" for you? Really?

SD types have SD/HC/XC and Regular/Mini/Micro sizes and Class 2/4/6/10 speeds. CF cards have Type I&II. Clearly SD is the offender for too many unnecessary versions.

It's getting just as bad with video connections: HDMI/Mini/Micro v. 1.2/.3/.4 and Display Port/Mini.

The big advantage here is that this XQD is Solid State Drive (SSD) that some of us use in our computers for the main OS (read/write speeds of 250 MB/s, 170 MB/s). We already have DSLRs that use Dual-core processors and the advent of 4K cameras/camcorders, Class 10 SD cards just won't cut it.

1 upvote
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Dec 8, 2011)

I agree with you, in my opinion we should still use floppy discs, but the big old ones, or what about a punched card?? I wish all that came after failed! Screw new technologies, improvements, progressions, evolution, revolution, having things easier, having things better - screw all that! And btw: get off my lawn! ; )

3 upvotes
OliverCardona
By OliverCardona (Dec 8, 2011)

Yes, they should stick to the same formats and make them faster as they promised (CFast). I don't even want a smaller card like the SD, as I find it too small.

New cards mean new readers. If you have more than one body you probably have to have yet another type of spare card to carry.

If they can't improve on the CF form factor, then ditch it all together and let's stick with SD cards.

2 upvotes
HeezDeadJim
By HeezDeadJim (Dec 8, 2011)

The reason why there are mini/micro versions is for even smaller devices that could use the extra room for jam-packing electronics. Cell phones would be a little bulkier if they used CF or regular size SD cards.

And how often do you take that microSD card out of your cell phone? Probably rarely since you can just hook it up via USB to sync files (less chance of losing it).

You don't have use for a super small flash card. Some do. Some may have use for a huge pick-up truck. Some don't, so they offer the Smart car. By your logic, we should only have a truck, 4-door sedan, or a bicycle offered for transportation (forget all the nonsense in-between vehicles).

0 upvotes
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Dec 10, 2011)

SDXC is the only inexcusable one (that's actually out there, forget MMC, miniSD, etc.). They came out with a whole version to support 4GB->32GB. Really? Whole chance to revamp the standard and you... cover only about a 10x size increase.
Why is that? Because a lack of innovation has us using the same disk format those 5.25" floppies used ON OUR 32GB SD CARDS, and it finally gave its last gasp at that size.
Thanks, Microsoft.
Unbelievable how often the "640K is enough" mentality shows up. When you have 2MB, plan for 2EB or more with the next rev. of the filesystem.

0 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (Dec 11, 2011)

:D finally some sense!
Nothing is forever. If, just if, this format also would get speed that makees it the new HD formet in computers, it has a change of being something great. For a while.
... I'm still laughing when I think about the ppl who talked about "protecting their investment" when SD slot appeared in cameras and they just bought a 512MB CF card...
Nothing lasts forever.

0 upvotes
SNSD
By SNSD (Dec 7, 2011)

Yet another reason to speculate why the new Nikons are delayed

1 upvote
D1N0
By D1N0 (Dec 7, 2011)

Basically a small SSD and not a card at all. Speeds wil also depend on how fast a camera can interface.

1 upvote
RLPhotoAndImaging
By RLPhotoAndImaging (Dec 8, 2011)

Aren't all media cards SSDs?

3 upvotes
HeezDeadJim
By HeezDeadJim (Dec 8, 2011)

The "controller" is what separates a regular flash card from a "proper" SSD (it tends to yield higher read/write rates).

I'm not exactly sure how the newer SD cards are doing the high transfer rates, but the newer controllers for SSDs (at least the ones for computers) are getting faster and faster and extend the longevity of each cell.

0 upvotes
Zds
By Zds (Dec 8, 2011)

Indeed, SD cards hit 95MB/s today:
http://www.sandisk.com/products/dslr/sandisk-extreme-pro-sdhcsdxc-uhs-i-memory-cards

I do not see huge difference between SD and SSD when it comes to speed.

0 upvotes
Dirk Jan
By Dirk Jan (Dec 7, 2011)

I like it. It's proportions are like a miniature HD. A little more body to it compared to flimsy SD cards.

*wants to have a couple in his hand and churn them around like pebbles*

Whether this new standard is needed or not with current write speed requirements, I bet that there are a lot of manufacturers ready to embrace this, even if it's just to flaunt a novelty spec compared to the competition.

Comment edited 8 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Tariag
By Tariag (Dec 7, 2011)

What's the advantage over SD? Larger capacity?

0 upvotes
GSD_ZA
By GSD_ZA (Dec 8, 2011)

Speed

0 upvotes
Fois Giovanni
By Fois Giovanni (Dec 8, 2011)

But actually SD can be faster...

0 upvotes
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Dec 10, 2011)

Capacity. At any given state of SD technology, you can fit, what, four SD cards into one of these?
Does seem like it's complete overkill for any kind of still camera, though, unless UHS-I proves unreliable.
Mini laptops and 4K video?

0 upvotes
SHood
By SHood (Dec 7, 2011)

Looks like CF cards have reached their limit so the CF association needs a new format. But how many manufacturer will just switch to SD UHS instead.

2 upvotes
Deviantfotografer
By Deviantfotografer (Dec 7, 2011)

sounds cool, now will there be adapters for the regular CF format???

0 upvotes
tonywong
By tonywong (Dec 7, 2011)

Totally forgettable 'name', another standard that customers won't want to invest in, and too close in size and performance to existing standards.

The only good thing is that it is based on PCI-E specifications, but that's about all I can see. Without a major manufacturer announcing support for XQD, I'd guess it will be as popular as xD memory cards are now.

3 upvotes
korayus
By korayus (Dec 7, 2011)

Whats wrong with UHS SD cards? They are also fast and smaller.
I know CF cards are big but XQD isnt that smal as SD card.

2 upvotes
mrmut
By mrmut (Dec 7, 2011)

I don't see the point. CF standard is nice, fast, has a great form factor and is widely adopted. The smaller alternative is excellent SD card. Why add another one?

6 upvotes
DanCart
By DanCart (Dec 7, 2011)

the problem with compact flash is that data is transferred between the camera and the card by parallel communication and as the transfer speeds increase there is a problem of cross-talk and clock skew which affect this process, as cameras and devices continually demand greater speed very soon there will be a bottleneck in performance which they cant get past hence a new standard for faster data transfers

2 upvotes
Guy Parsons
By Guy Parsons (Dec 7, 2011)

The CF card is bad form factor.
In this day and age it's just too darn big, plus the worrying thing about its design is that it is wider than longer. Fumbling in the dark it is possible to try and insert it sideways. That explains a lot of bent pin problems.

2 upvotes
Tom Bird
By Tom Bird (Dec 7, 2011)

the point is: buy a new camera!

3 upvotes
f8pc
By f8pc (Dec 8, 2011)

I've had a friend get a pin broken off. Not great form factor.

2 upvotes
Michael Meissner
By Michael Meissner (Dec 8, 2011)

Note, CF cards in their current form top out at 128GB which we are just getting to now (CF cards are based on IDE ATA-5). There is the CFast format based on SATA, but that never caught on. I suspect the main home for XQD will be in embedded devices as a disk drive (where CF is already used today when laptop drives are too big), and not in digital cameras. It may be the high end video cameras will use it, but I don't play in that market.

0 upvotes
keysmith
By keysmith (Dec 7, 2011)

SD has many more years to live.. XQD is yet another slot for the moment..

1 upvote
DanCart
By DanCart (Dec 7, 2011)

this development has more significance for the CF devices and users, you are right SD cards have a long way to go and I dont see a replacement for them in the next decade. Only something cataclysmic can replace SD cards -after-all they are now the dominant form of memory cards. I do think this XQD will eventually replace CF cards in professional cameras and camcoders and anything needing high data transfer speeds. Its early days on these XQD it probably will be the end of the decade before they really take off big time, remeber how SD cards were anounced around 2000 and they only really started to dominate and take over 5 to 6 years later....

Comment edited 9 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Habemus_Canon
By Habemus_Canon (Dec 7, 2011)

Ahh, but does it use easily-bendable/breakable pins (the biggest point of failure in the current CF spec) or does it use the small more-robust tabs like SDHC and PCIe cards? If it still uses pins, it's DOA.

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
DanCart
By DanCart (Dec 7, 2011)

LOL ......every time I hear about bending pins and breaking pins in CF slots !

0 upvotes
Lee Jay
By Lee Jay (Dec 7, 2011)

I've had exactly one mechanical failure associated with cards, and it's an SD card. It lost it's lock switch, making it permanently locked, and thus useless. Thousands and thousands of insertions and extractions of CF cards have resulted in 100% reliability.

1 upvote
D-Man67
By D-Man67 (Dec 7, 2011)

A small piece of scotch tape overlaying the lock switch channel will help that. The same trick is used for missing 3-1/2'' floppy disk tabs.
The only type of card that will stay in a read-only state after loosing its (or damaged) lock switch are the Sony memory sticks.

5 upvotes
The Squire
By The Squire (Dec 8, 2011)

I think you have to be quite clumsy to bend CF pins, or unlucky enough to get a bit of grit in there while you try and ram the CF card in.

Certainly had a few SD cards break. Bent contacts and cracked cases.

Can't see the connectors in this press release. I would suspect it will avoid sticky-outy pins and go for USB/SD like connectors.

There's no doubt that for the first few years this will be sold for pro video equipment, so I would expect a robust design.

0 upvotes
Michael Meissner
By Michael Meissner (Dec 8, 2011)

There are some devices with a short enough track that you can put the card in upside down and smash the pins, which happened to me on a Vosonic portable storage unit. It didn't help that this device you put the card in face down compared to every other reader where you put it face up. In reading the various comments about it, I wasn't the only one who bent the pins.

1 upvote
Ibida Bab
By Ibida Bab (Dec 7, 2011)

Jesus! Another slot!

2 upvotes
DotCom Editor
By DotCom Editor (Dec 7, 2011)

The nice thing about standards is that there are so many of them.

13 upvotes
Archer66
By Archer66 (Dec 7, 2011)

What happened to CFast ?

2 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Dec 7, 2011)

Another standard milestone in memory storage.

My CF and SD diet cameras are getting nervous in their Pelicans...

1 upvote
Total comments: 84