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Canon announces seven EF Cinema lenses

By dpreview staff on Nov 4, 2011 at 01:47 GMT

Alongside the EOS C300, Canon has launched seven EF Cinema lens series, all of which carry a new 'CN-E' designation. Two zooms, a 14.5-60mm T2.6 L and 30-300mm T2.95-3. 7 L, will each be available in EF and PL mounts and be compatible with both Super 35mm-equivalent and APS-C cameras. Meanwhile the 24mm T1.5L, 50mm T1.3L and 85mm T1.3L primes will come in EF mount and be compatible with all sensor sizes up to 35mm full frame. All of the lenses feature manual focus and aperture control, and include an 11-blade aperture diaphragm for attractive defocus effects.

Press Release:

CANON CASTS EF CINEMA LENSES IN STARRING ROLE FOR NEW CINEMA EOS SYSTEM


New Lens Series Debuts with Seven Models and more in the wings

HOLLYWOOD, California, November 3, 2011/TOKYO, November 4, 2011— Canon Inc. and Canon U.S.A., Inc. today announced the introduction of seven new 4K EF Cinema Lenses, an all-new series of video cinematography lenses that, in addition to the company’s current lineup of interchangeable EF lenses for EOS single-lens reflex (SLR) cameras, form the core of Canon’s new Cinema EOS System. The launch of the Cinema EOS System marks Canon’s full-fledged entry into the digital high-resolution production industry. The new professional digital cinematography system spans the lens, digital cinema camera and digital SLR camera product categories.

Canon’s new EF Cinema Lens lineup includes four top-end zoom lenses covering a zoom range from 14.5 mm to 300 mm—two models each for EF and PL lens mounts—and three single-focal-length lenses for EF mounts. All seven new lenses are capable of delivering exceptional 4K optical performance and offer compatibility with the Super 35 mm-equivalent image format. The three single-focal-length EF lenses can be used with cameras equipped with 35 mm full-frame sensors.

The seven new lenses represent the starting cast of Canon’s new EF Cinema Lens series, a star-studded lineup that will continue to grow in the future with the introduction of new A-list zoom and fixed-focal-length lenses.

Wide-Angle and Telephoto Cinema Zoom Lenses for EF and PL Mounts

  • CN-E14.5–60mm T2.6 L S / CN-E14.5–60mm T2.6 L SP *
  • CN-E30–300mm T2.95–3.7 L S / CN-E30–300mm T2.95–3.7 L SP *

The four new Canon zoom cinema lenses comprise the CN-E14.5–60mm T2.6 L S (for EF mounts) and CN-E14.5–60mm T2.6 L SP (for PL mounts) wide-angle cinema zoom lenses, and the CN-E30–300mm T2.95–3.7 L S (for EF mounts) and CN-E30–300mm T2.95–3.7 L SP (for PL mounts) telephoto cinema zoom lenses. Each lens supports 4K (4096 x 2160 pixels) resolution, which delivers a pixel count four times that of Full HD (1920 x 1080 pixels), and offers compatibility with industry-standard Super 35 mm-equivalent cameras as well as APS-C cameras*.

Employing anomalous dispersion glass, effective in eliminating chromatic aberration, and large-diameter aspherical lenses, the zoom lenses achieve high-resolution imaging from the center of the frame to the outer edges. Each lens is equipped with a newly designed 11-blade aperture diaphragm for soft, attractive blur characteristics, making them ideally suited for cinematographic applications.

The focal length range of 14.5–300 mm covered by the new zoom lenses represents the most frequently used focal lengths in theatrical motion picture production, a range that often requires a combination of three or more separate zoom lenses. Canon’s new wide-angle and telephoto cinema zoom lenses, however, offer a wider angle and powerful zooming to provide complete coverage across this range with just two lenses. The new wide-angle cinema zoom lenses will offer the industry’s widest angle of view among 35 mm digital cinema lenses with a wide-angle-end focal length of 14.5 mm*2.

Zoom, focus and iris markings are all engraved on angled surfaces for improved readability from behind the camera. With a focus rotation angle of approximately 300 degrees and a zoom rotation angle of approximately 160 degrees, the lenses facilitate precise focusing performance while making possible smooth and subtle zoom operation.

The new top-end cinema zoom lens lineup can be used with standard manual and electronic movie industry accessories, as well as matte boxes. Featuring a unified front lens diameter and uniform gear positions, the lenses do away with the need to adjust or reposition accessory gear when switching between other lenses in the series.

Pricing and availability
Both the Canon CN-E14.5–60mm T2.6 L S (EF mount) lens and the Canon CN-E14.5–60mm T2.6 L SP (PL mount) lens are scheduled for late January 2012 availability for an estimated list price of $45,000 each. The Canon CN-E30–300mm T2.95–3.7 L S (EF mount) and Canon CN-E30–300mm T2.95–3.7 L SP (PL mount) lens are scheduled for late March 2012 availability for an estimated list price of $47,000 each.

Single-Focal-Length Cinema Lenses for EF Mounts

CN-E24mm T1.5 L F / CN-E50mm T1.3 L F / CN-E85mm T1.3 L F *
Like their wide-angle and telephoto cinema zoom lens co-stars, Canon’s new CN-E24mm T1.5 L F, CN-E50mm T1.3 L F and CN-E85mm T1.3 L F cinema lenses deliver 4K optical performance. The three lenses, designed for use with EF mounts, are compatible with not only industry-standard Super 35 mm-equivalent cameras, but also 35 mm full-frame, APS-H and APS-C sensor sizes. The trio incorporates anomalous dispersion glass and large-diameter aspherical lenses for high resolution imaging throughout the frame, and features a newly designed 11-blade aperture diaphragm for gentle, attractive blurring.

With focus and iris markings that are easily visible from behind the camera, Canon’s three new fixed-focal-length lenses support convenient film-style operation and, offering a focus rotation angle of approximately 300 degrees, facilitate precise focusing performance.

The CN-E24mm T1.5 L F, CN-E50mm T1.3 L F and CN-E85mm T1.3 L F support standard manual and electronic industry accessories and matte boxes, and have a unified front lens diameter and uniform gear positions, eliminating the need for adjustments when switching lenses.

Pricing and availability
The Canon CN-E24mm T1.5 L F (EF mount) and CN-E50mm T1.3 L F (EF mount) lenses are scheduled to be available in late July 2012.  The CN-E85mm T1.3 L F (EF mount) lens is scheduled to be available in late August. The Canon CN-E24mm T1.5 L F (EF mount) lens will have an estimated list price of $6,800. The Canon CN-E50mm T1.3 L F (EF mount) lens will have an estimated list price of $6,800. The Canon CN-E85mm T1.3 L F (EF mount) lens will have an estimated list price of $6,800.

*1 Not compatible with 35mm full-frame or APS-H camera sensors.
*2 As of November 3, 2011, according to published competitive data.

Comments

Total comments: 74
Eleson
By Eleson (Nov 15, 2011)

where did all the comments go ?

0 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Nov 6, 2011)

Just think of the primes as limited editions (prototypes?) for some as yet unannounced "stills" camera for the masses. Interesting that not only can they be focused manually but they have manual aperture control and will suit a FF sensor. This is a major departure from the current EF electronically controlled aperture. Is Canon about to obsolete it's current EF range of lenses? - hardly dare one might think.

Pricing? Adjust demand to cover the hand assembly of very specialist lenses which would never be expected to sell in any quantity. Too big a demand? They will put the price up.

0 upvotes
dr_X
By dr_X (Nov 6, 2011)

Manual aperture control is standard and necessary for most film shoots and likely would not be carried over to still cameras.

1 upvote
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 9, 2011)

since these lenses are designed for PL mount, it may be possible to mount them on Nikon bodies ... and they have manual aperture control for that purpose!

0 upvotes
DerekDenyer
By DerekDenyer (Nov 19, 2011)

they are EF mount not PL. Their new cine cameras come in 2 flavors PL or EF.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Hello Tom, you can any old 3rd-party manual focus, manual aperture ring lenses from $250 and up. No reason to spend $5,000 to $45,000 for a Canon glass if that is all one needs.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 6, 2011)

does anyone know the range of the "flange-back adjustment" (like 54-44mm minimum)?

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Nov 5, 2011)

OK, a little basics...

The two zooms are T2.6 lenses. That's a T stop, relative to how much light a "perfect" lens of f2.6 would let through. Even with modern lens coatings, a complex zoom needs to be about 1/2 stop faster, so these are really

14.5-50mm f2.2
30-300mm f2.45-3.1

Picture that, a lens half a stop faster than your 17-55mm APS lenses, with a 4.1x instead of a 3x zoom range. Since it's faster, the elements are thicker, so there's less room for them to move. But since it's a longer zoom range, they need to move more. So, the lens designers start with a basically impossible task: take something that isn't able to move as far as a conventional lens, but somehow, make it move even farther.

To get an example of how hard this is, Zeiss builds a cine zoom that's only 3:1 (15.5-45mm T2.6), more like the 17-55mm f2.8 we're already used to, and they change $29,000 for that. They only tackled half the problem, the "make it faster" part, and it still costs 10x a 17-55mm f2.8.

2 upvotes
Jeff Greenberg
By Jeff Greenberg (Nov 5, 2011)

$45K & $47K? Are they helium injected to make them ultra-light?
What is trade-in value of EF 17-55mm f2.8?
Will I sell more stock images with them?
Like, $92K net more within a year or two?
Just askin'.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Nov 5, 2011)

The 17-55 f2.8 is a 3.23:1 zoom at f2.8.

The 14.5-60 T2.6 is faster, with a larger zoom range. This is a T2.6 lens, which, for a complex zoom probably means f2.2. So, half a stop faster, and they pushed the zoom range to 4.14:1, and kept the image quality at 4k cine levels, not "power zoom" wedding videographer levels.

0 upvotes
jasonasselin
By jasonasselin (Nov 18, 2011)

+ no fov change when focussing and v. little abberations.

edit. whoops someone said that down there already.

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Nov 4, 2011)

I think the secret to the prices is that it shall be possible to focus without the FOV changing and it shall be possible to zoom without the focus changing. Thats why they are so expensive - and thats why they are so long. It takes lots of glass and mechanics to achieve those requirements.

Comment edited 36 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Nov 4, 2011)

If both the focus and zoom is motorized it is very easy to accomplish both with standard lens designs.
These overpriced lenses will be obsolete in a few years for sure.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 4, 2011)

fly-by-wire is the word, maybe

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Nov 4, 2011)

Maybe - but have you seen such lenses on still cameras?

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Nov 4, 2011)

@malcolm82 Motorized zoom and focus? These are not toy digicam lenses. These are professional cine lenses similar to the excellent cine lenses made by Fujinon, Cooke, and Zeiss which are the industry standard. None of these will be obsolete any time soon, if ever.

0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Nov 4, 2011)

Why would motorized lenses only be for toys? Don't canon lenses have a focus motor? It is only a matter of time before professional video camera's are used with auto focus rather than a focus 'puller' and fly-by-wire (thanks yabokkie) control for zoom makes a lot more sense than rotating zoom rings manually.

0 upvotes
Roland Karlsson
By Roland Karlsson (Nov 4, 2011)

I think you are missing something. Cine lenses are not some kind of paparazzi tools the need auto focus. They are tools for making well planned movies. They are made for exact and simple setting of e.g. focus. Therefore they are manual focus with an exact distance scale. And they are designed for not changing FOV when focussing - and not changing focus when zooming. Some kind of auto focus that tries to do focussing while zooming would look very cheap in the movie. And an image that changes size when changing focus would be unacceptable. This costs.

Then maybe you can fix this cheaper with some kind of electronic solution - maybe. But .... I am not sure about that --- and anyhow .... thats not how they do it.

This is the same as the cine cameras probably also have manual exposure and white balance. Exposure that changes during filming scenes and white balance that do likewise is NOT anything you see in quality film.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Nov 5, 2011)

I would not suggest they use autofocusing that hunts or switches focus randomly where you dont intend it, i expect much more advanced systems that are scene aware and that you can direct much like you would a human focus puller. Though this is not even necessary to make motorized lenses preferable since even manual fly-by-wire control would be preferable and once you have that it is very easy to let the different motors work together to keep the focus constant while zooming or the fov constant while changing focus and also to implement follow focus.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Nov 5, 2011)

It will never be possible to shoot cine with autofocus, Malcolm, because the focus is part of the script.

Have you ever seen a cross focused dialog? The camera doesn't move, the subjects don't move, the focus puller focuses on whoever is talking, and he knows who that's going to be, in advance, because he has a marked-up copy of the script.

Roland nailed part of it. Another part is that the 14.5-60 T2.6 is an ultrafast zoom with a huge range. The 17-55 f2.8 that one poster mentioned is 3.23:1 zoom at f2.8. This is a T2.6 lens, which, for a complex zoom probably means f2.2. So, half a stop faster, and they pushed the zoom range to 4.14:1, and kept the image quality at 4k cine levels, not "power zoom" wedding videographer levels.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

These lenses will have a shrinking market, because these days, everybody is or soon will be shooting with really cheap digital cameras and lenses.

0 upvotes
GarageBoy
By GarageBoy (Nov 4, 2011)

5 digit lens prices, welcome to the cinema world. Now you guys know why used Angenieux and Kinoptik lenses are quite a bargin
Where your IQ needs to be good enough so that an image can be blown up to something larger than most walls in your home...

If you're just balking about the price, you have no idea what you're getting into

3 upvotes
AshMills
By AshMills (Nov 4, 2011)

14-60 seems a tad steep at $45,000

(being twice the price of the closest Zeiss- http://www.zeiss.com/cine)

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Nov 5, 2011)

The closest Zeiss is the 15.5-45 T2.6. That's a 3:1 zoom ratio. The Canon is 55% more, not "twice the price".

This is a 14-60mm T2.6 goes wider and longer, a full 4.1:1 zoom ratio. That extra at the long end sets the price. What's the price difference between a 500mm f4 and 600mm f4, or a 50mm f1.4 and 85mm f1.4. Just the longer range is enough to get the 55% price increase, let alone the 4.1:1 zoom range.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 4, 2011)

sad thing is, that a majority of photographers here have no clue what they are talking about when it comes to this kind of cameras.

please guys.. when it comes to cinematography get a clue first before writing comments and make yourself look like a noob.

16 upvotes
QuarterToDoom
By QuarterToDoom (Nov 4, 2011)

Maybe DP shoudl stick to "photography" equipment as last time I check this wasn't a Cine site.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 4, 2011)

ask you mom (or the God) why she gave/created you with only two "video cameras." still isn't a thing that can survive, or survive for long. don't read the Daily Prophet?

0 upvotes
Farlee
By Farlee (Nov 4, 2011)

yabokkie, your nuanced comments make fools of the non-believers here. Please post often. You are stimulating me.

2 upvotes
RPJG
By RPJG (Nov 4, 2011)

"Each lens supports 4K (4096 x 2160 pixels) resolution"

What does that mean - do Canon sell many lenses that *don't* support such resolutions, especially given the number of pixels on heir DSLRs?

4 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Nov 4, 2011)

Usually Canon lens can resolve bit more than just 8 mpix. Last time I checked, most can at least 21 mpix. :D

0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Nov 4, 2011)

Strange they use the 4096x2160 resolution instead of 4096x2304 since the c300 is 16:9 why would they change this in the future? I wish the 4096x2160 resolution would be abandoned, it would make no sense to change the aspect ratio of future tv's again.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 4, 2011)

they should be good for 8K, not far in the future, or Canon will get backfire.

0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Nov 4, 2011)

For the price the c300 should have a 8192x4608 full frame diagonal sensor capable of 60p raw recording. The c300 is ridiculously over priced and under spec'd.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Nov 4, 2011)

Overpriced? Why does a Sony F3 offer such a resolution at 60p? No, and it's in the same price range. And there are much lower specified cameras costing 2 to 3 x's the price of the Canon C300.

0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Nov 4, 2011)

I am well aware of the insane prices of these professional camera's. All these manufacturers seem to be in agreement of charging ludicrous prices for very weakly specified camera's which is why the startup company RED is now taking over with their still very overpriced EPIC at much lower prices.
From what ive read there was a lot of skepticism towards RED years ago, which is because it just doesnt make any sense that a small startup would be able to do better than these huge electronics companies if you actually are under the naive assumption that they are trying to release the best they can at the prices they are charging. Obviously they simply dont care and are fine with selling the bare minimum the pro market is willing to accept paying the extremely premium price for.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Nov 5, 2011)

If you think pro video cameras from the Sony F3 to the Arri Alexa are the "bare minimum" you probably haven't seen theses cameras and what they can do.

0 upvotes
malcolm82
By malcolm82 (Nov 5, 2011)

In terms of processing power meaning resolution and framerate yes they absolutely are the bare minimum and not much different than consumer camera's. Connectors and other cheap to implement features do not justify these prices.

0 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (Nov 4, 2011)

When it comes to lens pricing, look at this video:
http://www.sonyalpharumors.com/.../sony-tidbits-nex-fs100-presentation-video/

It is a Sony video, but nevermind that, someway along the video, they remark that the same optical lens is sold in different costumes, and when dressed like a video lens the price goes up alot!
Having continous aperture, and not calling it aperture :) may not warrant the price difference.
Maybe that gives some insight into why manufacturers want to make these lenses. Lucrative! "Special needs " can be just empty sales talk at times ...

0 upvotes
Karl Gnter Wnsch
By Karl Gnter Wnsch (Nov 4, 2011)

The T-stop is a much tighter constraint than the F-stop. It takes into account the transmission losses incurred by the lens elements and their (imperfect) coatings. The lens design on the zooms do have another constraint to facilitate zoom while filming: They have to be strictly parfocal, which makes life really hard for the engineers. This is reflected in the price these lenses cost.

3 upvotes
Wally626
By Wally626 (Nov 4, 2011)

My old Minolta zoom was parafocal, focus zoomed in then back-out to frame. I guess with the new auto focus systems it is not as important any more to be parafocal, you have to pay to just get constant aperture. Of course my old zoom was only 2X.

0 upvotes
Jonne Ollakka
By Jonne Ollakka (Nov 4, 2011)

These cine lenses have minimal to no breathing. They have housings that make attaching FF to them much easier and reliable.

0 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (Nov 4, 2011)

I'm not saying these are bad lenses, I know very little about the demands from its users. I'm just quoting the presenter in the video. The same optical lens is much more expensive when sold as a Cine lens than as a SLR lens. Maybe this is the only example of that, but I wouldn't bet on it. Of course this example is a fixed FL lens.

0 upvotes
vtinitus
By vtinitus (Nov 5, 2011)

Thanks for sharing the video link. I'm not a video guy (I'm merely a semipro photographer) but it really gave a good explanation of some technological differences between still and movie recording - and it was remarkably 'unbranded' with exception of the last few minutes.
Anyway, it again made me feel that a lot of technological advances are still kept away from the lower budget still markets(don't flame me for this, I'm about hardware only here). Especially the 6 color sensor technology he mentions makes me wonder how this could improve our beloved still cameras. If someone has more details on this, I'd appreciate posting them here or better yet in a feature article.

2 upvotes
bigbill25
By bigbill25 (Nov 4, 2011)

So, are these the first "L" EF-S lenses?

It looks like a Super-35 frame is almost identical in size to APS-C. I wonder why they didn't go with the EF-S mount. That would have helped the optical engineers designing the wide angles...

--Bill

0 upvotes
BrianPriceUK
By BrianPriceUK (Nov 4, 2011)

I see the lenses only cover APS-C, not FF on DSLRs.

0 upvotes
Almeida
By Almeida (Nov 4, 2011)

Wrong, the lenses have a FF image circle, are EF lenses in their essence.

1 upvote
AshMills
By AshMills (Nov 4, 2011)

Wrong. They do not have a FF image circle.

0 upvotes
CarVac
By CarVac (Nov 4, 2011)

Only the primes have FF image circles. Interested to see how they perform (not like I'll ever buy one); they probably have larger lens elements than their still counterparts for zero vignetting.

1 upvote
Almeida
By Almeida (Nov 5, 2011)

Right, was talking about the primes.

0 upvotes
here 2 infinity
By here 2 infinity (Nov 4, 2011)

It's interesting to see the reactions and comments from the audience here on Dpreview, who will be mostly still photographers and videographers. It must be quite a shock to see these lenses come into your reading space. I come from Both worlds, and have owned many Cooke and Angeneux lenses, and have paid big for them. I am a bit dismayed to see Canon coming into an already crowded field of Motion picture lens manufacturers, when their market has been traditionally smaller independent shooters. Look at the success of the XL1 and 2 series back in the 90's. I was so hoping to see them give Panasonic some competition in the AF100 range, with a modular video system that does what Panasonic did not do, which was make a customizable camera with decent quality glass, similar to what Fujinon has done for years. A huge market has opened up with the DSLR revolution, and this C300 camera and these MP lenses do nothing to fill that void.

2 upvotes
netgarden
By netgarden (Nov 4, 2011)

Well, there are how many pro cinematographers that will buy these, vs. Millions who would love to purchase some revised, new dslr lenses?

Canon has been very busy! More power to them, i wish them the best.
And i hope they also listen to their loyal bread and butter customers.

0 upvotes
LukeDuciel
By LukeDuciel (Nov 4, 2011)

lol, they are apparently busy trying to pull new bread and butter.

2 upvotes
technic
By technic (Nov 4, 2011)

yes, the WA zoom is close to the sometimes rumoured EF-S L 15-60mm, for which there are many thousands times more customers, assuming a decent price. I guess Canon compensate for the small sales numbers by making about 100x more money for each Cine lens that they sell ...

Let's hope some of this filters through to the consumer market products. For now it explains why not much has been happening on the lens front (especially for EF-S) lately :(

0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Nov 4, 2011)

Close maybe as far as range goes. Constant T2.6 is something like F2 - F2.2. That would be really expensive APS-C lens..

Tho true, regular L lens for APS-C would be much more welcomed, than niché cine system.

0 upvotes
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Nov 5, 2011)

Probably more than buy the 600mm f4, the 1-5x 65mm MP-E, or the 85mm f1.2, and yet, Canon makes all those. ;)

0 upvotes
zzapamiga
By zzapamiga (Nov 4, 2011)

$45,000-$47,000 each!!!

1 upvote
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Nov 4, 2011)

$47,000 for a lens? What a ripoff

3 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Nov 4, 2011)

Cine lenses are really expensive. Especially the zooms because the optical formula and light has to stay perfectly even throughout the range.

That said, these are quite a bit more expensive that what Zeiss or Angenieux charges for the same thing. The Zeiss PL 15.5-45T2.6 is only $29k.

0 upvotes
julieng
By julieng (Nov 4, 2011)

My guess is that it is an extremely small production aimed at producers, not stock-building free lancers: expect the overhead for design, production and quality control not to be diluted much in the retail price.
Not to the average consumer's budget, then again, the same can be said of technical cameras, premium medium frames backs and all those goodies you never see at the camera store.

0 upvotes
LukeDuciel
By LukeDuciel (Nov 4, 2011)

well... it's actually a bargain in her respective league...

2 upvotes
ksgant
By ksgant (Nov 4, 2011)

And don't forget, a lot of movie production rents their equipment from rental houses. Like Panavision for instance, you can't just go out and buy one, they're all "rented".

At least that's how it used to be. I'm sure times have changed.

0 upvotes
markusheinisch
By markusheinisch (Nov 4, 2011)

"Cine lenses are really expensive. Especially the zooms because the optical formula and light has to stay perfectly even throughout the range."
I do not get it. What is the difference between a high end L-zoom and one of the new C-lenses that justifies 47K $?
Just wondering about the prices. Looks like the competition is not lead by prices.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 4, 2011)

get a clue what you are talking about before saying it´s a ripoff.
cine lenses are not as cheap as DSLR lenses.

http://matthewduclos.wordpress.com/2010/04/29/still-vs-cine-lenses/

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Nov 4, 2011)

Well, in cine zoom (or fixed), you need to have fixed size of things, eg. correction for "focus breathing". Aperture must be stepless and as rounded as possible. Lowest possible distortion, CA. And it must be fast (cause its for APS-C usually). Plus focusing is done bit differently for cinematic use.

But are they worthy that price jump? No, not really, you can do similar or same stuff much cheaper, its just not that simply as "go and buy".

Comment edited 54 seconds after posting
1 upvote
rbach44
By rbach44 (Nov 4, 2011)

Also consider that most of these lenses are essentially perfect optically. Even the best L lenses are extreme compromises compared to these lenses, which is why they're one tenth the price.

And remember that these aren't for the guy taking pictures of flowers in his backyard, these are for hollywood movies. A $45k lens (which most will RENT anyway..) is really just a drop in the bucket.

1 upvote
Joseph S Wisniewski
By Joseph S Wisniewski (Nov 5, 2011)

"these are quite a bit more expensive that what Zeiss or Angenieux charges for the same thing. The Zeiss PL 15.5-45T2.6 is only $29k."

Well, since we're using "only" and "Zeiss" in the same sentence, which is a rare thing...

The Zeiss Zeiss PL 15.5-45T2.6 is only a 3:1 zoom. The Canon 14.5-60mm is a 4.1:1 zoom.

And...

Zeiss PL 15.5-45T2.6 is only a 45mm lens. The Canon 14.5-60mm is a 60mm lens. Compare the price of a Canon 50mm f1.2 to an 85mm f1.2, or a Zeiss 50mm f1.4 to an 85mm f1.4. Or a Canon 500nn f4 to a 600mm f4. ;)

0 upvotes
marianco
By marianco (Nov 4, 2011)

Note that these are all MANUAL-FOCUS lenses.

Cinematographers do not use autofocus. They preset their focus ranges and manually move the focus point as the subject moves.

These $7000 lenses are not going to be that useful for DSLR users.

Of course at these lens prices, who is going to complain about the price of a IDx? They are fairly inexpensive for professional cinematography, though certainly a league above photography when it comes to price and need for deep pockets.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
oysso
By oysso (Nov 4, 2011)

it will be useful for DSLR users for filming video.
The normal EF lenses are not tuned for having good transition while zooming or focusing. ( when focusing the image change in size for most DSLR lenses which is not nice on film )

1 upvote
Makinations
By Makinations (Nov 4, 2011)

Any camera gear that looks that cool has a home on my cameras. Maybe not the e-pl1...

3 upvotes
Breitling
By Breitling (Nov 4, 2011)

Anyone need such lenses on their cameras?

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Nov 4, 2011)

yes.

but we don´t need stupid questions... ;)

3 upvotes
nathan_lake
By nathan_lake (Nov 4, 2011)

These lenses probably cost more to make than an L class lens, but not that much more. Just think about it though. How many of these do you think they will sell? A few hundred...a few thousand maybe. They have to recoup their R&D and then make a reasonable profit all while selling only a fraction as many of them.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (Nov 5, 2011)

Yes, poor Canon. Perhaps we should take up a collection, for them.

Come on already. Make a better camera, and for sane prices.

0 upvotes
cuboirs
By cuboirs (Aug 17, 2012)

all my glass is L series and BELEIVE me i would NEVER even think of dropping that on a lense thats MORE than likely the same as L series dressed up as CINE lenses.....

0 upvotes
Total comments: 74