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Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom

By dpreview staff on Nov 24, 2011 at 05:00 GMT
Buy on GearShop$349.00

Fujifilm has announced the X-S1, a premium-grade superzoom compact. The X-S1 is part of the company's high-end 'X Series' and is built around the same 12MP 2/3" CMOS sensor as the X10 compact. Despite the comparatively large sensor, it manages to include a 26X 24-624mm equivalent F2.8-5.6 zoom lens. It also features Raw shooting, a 1.44M dot electronic viewfinder and 460,000 dot rear LCD along with a rubberized coating and metal dials to emphasize its premium 'Made in Japan' status.

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Press Release:

Fujifilm X-S1: The bridge camera, reinvented

The Fujifilm X series of premium cameras has a third model – the X-S1 – and just like the two before it, this latest addition sets new standards in design and performance.

The X-S1 represents a new breed of bridge cameras. Built in Japan to exacting standards, the body has a high-quality look and feel with metal dials, a rubberised coating and superior handling characteristics that will appeal to the discerning photo enthusiast.

In addition, the X-S1 offers a premium picture-taking performance to match its looks. From the high-quality Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens through to the EXR sensor taken from the X10 and the wide range of functions, the X-S1 puts the photographer in complete control. 

Maximum optical versatility

The centrepiece of the X-S1 is the Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens. Offering a range of 24-624mm (35mm equivalent) it caters perfectly for every photographic need and features a bright f/2.8 maximum aperture at the wide-angle setting.

This optical range is boosted further by Fujifilm’s Intelligent Digital Zoom capability, which effectively doubles the focal range without the drop in picture quality normally associated with digital zoom functions. As a result, the X-S1 offers users an incredible 52x zoom range of 24-1248mm (35mm equivalent).

Optically, the lens comprises 17 glass elements, which includes four aspherical elements and two ED lenses, to deliver images with superb edge-to-edge sharpness and amazing clarity. The lens’ construction is of the highest standard, featuring metal cams for smooth zoom control and fast, precise framing.

The X-S1 is also ideally suited to capturing subjects close up. In standard mode, the zoom focuses down to 30cm, but by selecting Super Macro Mode, users can focus down to 1cm for frame-filling close-up images. Furthermore, the lens’ aperture is made up of nine blades for excellent bokeh effect photography.

Great results in every picture-taking scenario

The X-S1 features the same 2/3-inch 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor as the X10 which ensures high quality images regardless of the lighting conditions.

The unique EXR CMOS technology pioneered by Fujifilm allows the user to switch between three modes depending on the lighting conditions – or leave the camera to make its own choice in the Auto EXR mode.

Switching between the modes changes the performance of the sensor. The High Resolution option is perfect in bright conditions or when the very best picture quality is the primary aim. Wide Dynamic Range mode should be chosen in scenes of high contrast when the user wants to get details in both shadow and highlight areas of an image, while the High Sensitivity & Low Noise option should be selected for optimum results in low light conditions

Coupled to the EXR CMOS sensor is the high speed EXR processor, which offers a minimal shutter lag of just 0.01sec and a high speed continuous shooting capability of seven frames-per-second at full resolution (Large JPEG) or 10 frames-per-second at six megapixel resolution (Medium JPEG).

The X-S1 also takes high-quality movies. It captures Full High Definition (1920 x 1080 pixels) video with stereo sound at 30 frames-per-second, which is saved in the H.264 format.

Easy composition and image review

The X-S1 offers a powerful combination of high quality electronic viewfinder and rear LCD to ensure composing and viewing images is quick and simple, regardless of the lighting conditions.

The 0.47-inch electronic viewfinder (EVF) features 1.44 million pixels for superb image clarity and has a wide viewing area of 26 degrees to reduce eye strain. The bright EVF makes it easy to check settings or adjust focus manually.

On the back of the X-S1 is a high quality, tiltable three-inch LCD. It features 460,000 pixels making it easier for users to scroll through menus, assess exposure accuracy and view images. The LCD also offers a useful Daylight mode that overcomes the problem of viewing the screen in bright conditions.

Full user control and picture taking versatility

The X-S1 offers a superb level of functionality whether users want to make picture taking as simple as using a compact or as involved as a fully-manual digital SLR.

For simplicity, the X-S1 will assess the subject and then select the relevant scene mode for the perfect result, automatically switching the EXR CMOS sensor accordingly. Not only does it ascertain the type of scene being photographed, it can also calculate whether an image contains a person, features backlighting or has any subject movement. ISO settings are taken care of too by the Auto ISO mode, which selects the optimum setting between ISO 100 and 3200. Those after more ISO flexibility can select up to ISO 12800 (Small JPEG format only).

Photographers after full control are well catered for with the X-S1. The camera offers a full range of conventional shooting functions (program/aperture-priority/shutter-priority/manual), plus users can also fine tune levels of colour, image sharpness and tone. Additionally, the X-S1 provides four auto bracketing options, eight Film Simulation and white balance functions and a Raw file format.

Fujifilm X-S1 key features

• High quality Fujinon 26x optical zoom covering 24-624mm (35mm equivalent) with Intelligent Digital Zoom boosting range up to 1248mm

• Superb build quality and finish with rubberised coating and metal dials

• 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor

• Up to 10 frames-per-second shooting

• Large EVF with 1.44 million pixels and 26 degree viewing angle

• Tiltable three-inch rear LCD with Sunny Day mode

• Full HD video

• PASM modes

• Raw file format

• Film simulation modes

• Macro focusing down to 1cm

• Lithium battery providing up to 500 shots per charge

• Optical image stabilisation

• 360° Motion Panorama mode 

Fujifilm X-S1 Specifications

Number of effective pixels 12.0 million pixels
Image sensor 2/3-inch EXR CMOS with primary colour filter
Storage media Internal memory (approx. 26 MB) 
SD/ SDHC/ SDXC(UHS-I) memory card   *1
File format  
(still image) JPEG (Exif Ver 2.3 ), RAW (RAF format), RAW+JPEG
(Design rule for Camera File system compliant / DPOF-compatible)
(movie) H.264(MOV)  with Stereo sound
Number of recorded pixels L: <4:3> 4000 x 3000  <3:2> 4000 x 2664  <16:9> 4000 x 2248  <1:1> 2992 x 2992
M: <4:3> 2816 x 2112  <3:2> 2816 x 1864  <16:9> 2816 x 1584  <1:1> 2112 x 2112
S: <4:3> 2048 x 1536  <3:2> 2048 x 1360  <16:9> 1920 x 1080  <1:1> 1536 x 1536
<Motion Panorama>
 360゜Vertical  11520 x 1624   Horizontal  11520 x 1080
 180゜Vertical  5760 x 1624     Horizontal  5760 x 1080
 120゜Vertical  3840 x 1624     Horizontal  3840 x 1080
Lens  
(name) Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens
(focal length) f=6.1 - 158.6mm, equivalent to 24-624mm on a 35mm camera
(full-aperture) F2.8(Wide) - F5.6 (Telephoto)
(constitution) 12 groups 17 lenses (4 aspherical glass moluded lenses included)
Digital zoom Intelligent digital zoom approx. 2x (1.4) (up to 52 × when combined with optical zoom)
Aperture F2.8-F11(Wide)
F5.6-F11(Telephoto) 1/3AV step (controlled 9-blade aperture diaphragm)
Focus distance
(from lens surface)
Normal : Wide: Approx. 30cm / 0.9ft. to infinity
            Telephoto: Approx. 2.0m  / 6.5ft. to infinity
Macro:   Wide: Approx. 7cm - 3.0m / 2.8in. - 9.8ft.
      Telephoto: Approx. 2.0m - 3.0m / 6.5ft. - 9.8ft.
Super Macro: Approx. 1.0cm -1.0m / 0.4in. - 3.3ft. 
Sensitivity Auto,
 Equivalent to ISO 100/200/250/320/400/500/640/800/1000/ 1250/1600/2000/2500/3200/4000*/5000*/6400*/12800* (Standard Output Sensitivity) 
*ISO4000/5000/6400:M mode or lower, ISO12800:S mode
Exposure control TTL 256-zones metering, Multi, Spot, Average
Exposure mode Programmed AE, Aperture Priority AE, Shutter Priority AE, Manual
Scene Modes SP: Natural Light & Flash, Natural Light,  Portrait, Portrait Enhancer, Dog, Cat, Landscape, Sport, Night, Night (Tripod), Fireworks, Sunset, Snow, Beach, Party, Flower, Text
Shooting Modes EXR, AUTO, Adv., SP, C3, C2, C1, M, A, S, P,
Image stabiliser Lens shift type
Face detection Yes
Exposure compensation -2.0EV - +2.0EV  1/3EV step                           
Shutter speed (Auto mode) 1/4 sec. to 1/4000* sec. , (All other modes) 30 sec. to 1/4000* sec.
Continuous shooting
(TOP)
Super High:approx. 10fps  (Size M,S)
High:approx. 7fps  (Size L,M,S)
Middle:approx. 5fps  (Size L,M,S)
Low:approx. 3fps  (Size L,M,S)
* SD memory card with a class 4 write speed (4 MB/sec.) or better is recommended.
* The frame rate varies depending on the shooting conditions or numbers of frames in continuous shooting.
(others) Best Frame capture:
Super High:approx. 10fps  8/16 frames  (Size M,S)
High:approx. 7fps  8frames  (Size L,M,S)/16 frames  (Size M,S)
Middle:approx. 5fps  8frames  (Size L,M,S)/16 frames  (Size M,S)
Low:approx. 3fps  8frames  (Size L,M,S)/16 frames  (Size ,M,S)
Auto bracketing AE Bracketing:  ±1/3EV,±2/3EV,±1EV
Film Simulation Bracketing:  PROVIA/STANDARD, Velvia/VIVID, ASTIA/SOFT
Dynamic Rang Bracketing:  100%/200%/400%
ISO Sensitivity Bracketing:  ±1/3EV,±2/3EV,±1EV
Focus  
(mode) Single AF / Continuous AF (EXR AUTO, Movie),
Manual AF (One-push AF mode included)
(type) TTL contrast AF, AF assist illuminator available
(AF frame selection) Multi, Area, Tracking
White balance Automatic scene recognition
Preset: Fine, Shade, Fluorescent light (Daylight), Fluorescent light (Warm White),
Fluorescent light (Cool White), Incandescent light, Custom, colour temperature selection(2,500K~10,000K)
Self-timer 10 sec./ 2 sec. delay
Flash Auto flash (super intelligent flash)
Flash Range Effective range: (ISO AUTO(800))
Wide: Approx. 30cm - 8.0m / 0.9ft. - 26.2ft.
Telephoto: Approx. 2.0m - 5.0m / 6.5ft. - 16.4ft.  
Flash modes Red-eye removal OFF: Auto, Forced Flash, Suppressed Flash, Slow Synchro.
Red-eye removal ON: Red-eye Reduction Auto, Red-eye Reduction & Forced Flash, Suppressed Flash, Red-eye Reduction & Slow Synchro.
Hot shoe YES
Viewfinder 0.47-inch, approx. 1440,000 dots, TFT colour LCD monitor, approx. 100% coverage
Approx. 100% coverage
Diopter adjustment:  -5 - +3m-1(dpt) 
LCD monitor 3.0-inch, approx. 460,000 dots, TFT colour LCD monitor, approx. 100% coverage
Movie recording 1920 x 1080 pixels / 1280 x 720 pixels/ 640 x 480 pixels (30 frames / sec.)  with stereo sound  
Optical zoom (manual) can be used.
Photography  functions EXR mode (EXR Auto / Resolution priority / High ISO & Low noise priority / Dynamic range priority), Face recognition, Face Detection, Auto red-eye removal, Film simulation, Framing guideline, Frame No. memory, Histogram display, Best frame capture, Advanced mode (Motion panorama360, Pro focus, Pro low light), High Speed Movie (70/ 120/ 200  frames/sec.) , Electronic level, One-touch RAW, Advanced Anti Blur
Playback  functions Face Detection, Auto red-eye removal, Multi-frame playback (with micro thumbnail), Protect, Crop, Resize, Slide show, Image rotate, Voice memo, Histogram display, Exposure warning, Photobook assist, Image search, favourites, Mark for upload, Panorama, Erase selected frames, RAW conversing 
Other functions PictBridge, Exif Print,
35 Languages, Time difference, Silent mode, Sutter sound
                                                                                 
Ports  
(Video output) NTSC / PAL selectable
with Monaural sound
(Digital interface) USB 2.0 High-Speed
( HDMI output) HDMI Mini connector
( External microphone) φ3.5 Mini with Stereo sound
Power supply NP-95 Li-ion battery (included)
Dimensions 135(W) x 107 (H) x  149 (D) mm  / 5.3 (W) x 4.2 (H) x 5.9 (D) in.
Weight Approx. 920g / 32.5oz. (including battery and memory card)  
Approx. 880g / 31.0oz. (excluding battery and memory card) 
Operating Temperature 0℃ - 40℃
Operating Humidity 10% - 80% (no condensation)
Guide to the number of available frames for battery operation approx. 460 frames *2
approx. 500 frames (using EVF)
Accessories included Li-ion battery NP-95
Battery charger BC-65N
Shoulder strap
Lens cap and Lens cap cord
Lens hood
USB cable
CD-ROM
Owner's manual
Optional accessories Li-ion battery NP-95
Battery charger BC-65N
Shoe Mount Flash EF-42/EF-20
Remote release RR-80

*1 Please see the Fujifilm website to check memory card compatibility.
*2 CIPA Standard

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Fujifilm X-S1

Comments

Total comments: 383
123
Azkuma
By Azkuma (Nov 25, 2012)

Yes that Samsung has an impressive specification but frankly the current crop of super zooms being offered by companies all seem on the very 'cheap' side in terms of how they appear.

No doubt it's a solid performer but I for one prefer the weight and feel of the X-S1 in my hand and it really does have impressive build quality which I dare say no other SZ can match hence their price.

0 upvotes
cgarrard
By cgarrard (Oct 22, 2012)

I think Francis Carver needs to comment just one more time.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Oct 13, 2012)

http://www.samsung.com/us/photography/digital-cameras/EC-WB100ZBABUS-specs

This Samsung-cam also sports a 26x zoom, but it starts at an impressive 22.3mm instead of 24mm as w. X-S1. But, in true Samsung fashion, their own specs fail to mention anything about video capabilities, the size of the sensor (!!!) they have in the camera, etc. So far, I haven't been able to figure out who even buys Ricoh, Samsung, etc. odd brand cameras, and why?
Interesting note for eyeglass wearers, I could adjust the Fuji X-S1's viewfinder to fit my eyes, and I wear minus 6.5 diopter glasses. Fuji's owns specs claim you can only adjust EVF down to -6.5. So, reality surpasses the Fujifilm camera specs, wow!!

0 upvotes
Sephirotic
By Sephirotic (Sep 28, 2012)

I allways tought this was possible, never belivied the excuse " a larger sensor would make the lens of a superzoom unpratical", and in fact, fujifilm proved those that argued that, completely wrong.

I was imagining a 1/1.6 10mpx sensor like those of the S90, but they did it even better with a 2/3.
maybe this kinda of quality for a superzoom would canibalize on sales of bulky expensive zoom lens thenselves and some photographers would rather had a second camera just for zoom and as backup instead of a bulky lens for that matter. ANyway, price is a little killer tough.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Oct 13, 2012)

Canon and Fujinon have TV zoom lenses now that cover the same exact 2/3-inch sensor and have zooming ranges of 300x and even 400x. So, having a 26x zoom lens from the same manufacturer that can also deliver 300x zooming range optics covering the same exact physical size sensor is not really such an earth-shattering deal, is it?

0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Sep 21, 2012)

It looks like they are the only game in town, with a camera offering both a larger sensor and over 20x zoom in a fixed lens, at this price point (take a look around, all the others have tiny sensor - if you find one I've overlooked, please advise). They seem to have this one niche category all to themselves. It is surprising that this model isn't more popular.
Does anyone know if there are plans to replace or upgrade it with a new model, one year later (which would be right about now)? I would love to see this with an APS-C sensor instead, in the same size (given so many models are being introduced with aps-c in never before seen smaller packages).

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Sep 22, 2012)

I am having an "oops moment" right now.
I've just come to realize that 2/3" is barely larger, almost as small, as a 1/1.6" sensor. It's merely 1/1.5", expressed in a similar manner. It is not as big as 2/3" sounds. I think this would be great if it had a 1" sensor at the very least, now that we have seen what Sony has been capable of doing with optics to allow for the use a 1" sensor in as small a package as the RX100.

Comment edited 39 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Oct 13, 2012)

Largest sensor ever in a professional video camera/camcorder is 2/3-inch in size class -- i.e. the same exact sensor size that this Fuji X-S1 also has.

If you want a bigger sensor, you need to check out the digital cinema cameras and the digital photo cameras. 2/3--inch may not "sound" big, but $60,000 pro-class video camcorders still on sale today have the same exact sized sensors.

Timmbits, you have not overlooked an alternative camera to the Fujifilm X-S1 -- there simply isn't any, and definitely nothing for under US$700.

Lastly, Fujifilm had already pretty much replaced the problematic/defective sensor and lens in this camera with the improved/fixed-up sensor and lens, so if you like the X-S1 is in its second generation already. Those copied made before August 2012, and those made after this date. I doubt there will be an X-S2 w. a 2/3-inch sensor, however. If there will be, it would probably be another year yet, i.e. Autumn 2013.

0 upvotes
sycostephan
By sycostephan (Jul 23, 2012)

Come on dpreview, give us a review!!!!!!!!!!

1 upvote
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Sep 21, 2012)

Someone isn't sending enough advertising revenue...
or isn't greasing up others as they should be...
it appears!

Just saying! (not much you can do to change appearances... other than do something to change them!)

Comment edited 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Sep 21, 2012)

(unless, of course, the image quality is so bad that they just don't want to write a negative review... I hope that's not the reason)

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Oct 13, 2012)

As of 13 October 2012, there isn't a single video clip uploaded on Vimeo that was shot with the Fuji X-S1 camera. But this is more of an indictment on Vimeo and not on the camera, I feel.

You Tube has lots of X-S1 field tests and reviews, frankly, for video apps I have yet to see one that blows me away.

Camera itself handles amazingly well, probably the best constructed and best balanced camera + lens combo I had ever held. Unfortunately, the quality for video is not particularly good at all -- high data compression, poor codec, and an inability to change camera settings manually or semi-manually whilst shooting video add to the issue. You can manually zoom and manually focus while recording video, so at least that's something.

The X-S1's EVF is superb, too bad the LCD screen is only 460K rez instead of 921K.

Timmbits, were you getting it more for still pix or for video?

0 upvotes
rebride
By rebride (Jun 13, 2012)

New version of the S100fs it seems. I'd be interested if it had larger sensor.

1 upvote
Doug Sinnott1941
By Doug Sinnott1941 (Feb 25, 2013)

Much better than the old S100fs!
Better lens,quicker focussing,bigger viewfinder and rear LCD,proper Image stabilisation,much quicker to use,I could go on....
I assume rebride has never even handled the XS-1 for any length of time,or ever,as the two cameras are so different,(apart from the similar weight!)

0 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (Dec 29, 2011)

Fuji have demonstrated they can produce a decent CMOS APS-C sensor with the FinePix X100. They need to drop that sensor into the X-S1, dispense with the absurd mega zoom - which no one could hold steady at 624 mm, or anything like it - and provide a range of interchangeable lenses.

The result (assuming Fuji can get the operating software sorted - surely possible) would be a much needed dose of fresh air to the jaded amateur DSLR market where each of the incumbant players seem intent on merely offering more of the same. In the case of Canon's XXXD line that invariably means a cheap and tacky body, while for Nikon's D3100 and 5100 ugly with ghastly plastics is de rigour.

There's a gap out there alright, and the design of the Fuji X-S1 suggests Fuji could fill it if they had the courage to bring a high quality, compact interchangeable lens DSLR, with the looks of the X-S1 and an APS-C sensor.

So how about it?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Jan 14, 2012)

Done. It's called the Fujifilm X-Pro 1 camera and lens system, actually. Check it out here.

"dispense with the absurd mega zoom - which no one could hold steady at 624 mm, or anything like it."

I am soooo glad Fujfilm did not listen to you, simon65. Main reason for me to get the X-S1 is the fantabulous 26x Fujinon zoom. Why would you have something like that hand-held, anyhow? Don't you have a TRIPOD with a CAMERA HEAD on top???

Unfortunately, when you take STILL PICTURES, the X-S1 will record those nasty white orbs, just like the X10 does. But in VIDEO MODE, it seems to be immune.

2 upvotes
Seagull TLR
By Seagull TLR (Mar 17, 2012)

<which no one could hold steady at 624 mm> Ever heard of tripods?

2 upvotes
Phil of Cilcain
By Phil of Cilcain (May 25, 2012)

Can't agree with you re the 624mm being unusable. I recently visited Oulton Park and photographed Superbikes in action. Examples can be seen at http://www.flickr.com/photos/philcilcain/sets/72157629985750287/ They are pretty well all at 624mm, hand held, iso up to 800 depending on how the light was. The camera is not as good as I hoped it would be, image quality could be better, but it's a pleasure to use and it's super versatility makes it a winner.

2 upvotes
Timmbits
By Timmbits (Sep 21, 2012)

hi Phil, could you please elaborate on what is lacking in the picture quality? I'm about to pick one up, and would very much like to know before. thanks. :)

0 upvotes
Doug Sinnott1941
By Doug Sinnott1941 (Feb 25, 2013)

The whole point of a bridge camera is the need to avoid having the need to buy,and carry about several expensive lenses,and faffing about changing them,when the need arises.
On holidays,in particular,knowing you have a camera that can tackle anything,while still producing great prints when necessary,is why I used to leave my DSLR and gadget bag at home.
Over the years I have had both Panasonic Superzooms,and Fuji,and the XS--1is a superb camera in my view,a true alternative to a DSLR,certainly more flexible,and to say a 624mm zoom lens is "absurd" is really stupid.
I first bought a Superzoom years ago to photograph wildlife,particularly in my garden,as I couldn't really afford then the cost of a long zoom lens to fit my DSLR.
I have taken many photographs since then,and I do think Superzooms fill a large gap,and I have no trouble using my XS-1 at it's longest setting,and enjoy using it.
My DSLR and its heavy 18-200 zoom lens just can't match the flexibility of my XS-1 I'm afraid!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 16, 2011)

After downloading and reading the X-S1 owner's manual cover to cover and finding it lacking in so many places, especially re. the meager video capabilities, I just called our Fujifilm USA buddies to inquiry about their X-S1 in a little better detail.

1-800-800-3854, #1, #2

Wow, that was a good one, he-he-he-he! All I could find out from Fujifilm USA was that there is no X-S1, and in fact it may not be released for another 4 to 6 months. And also, that there will not be any "support" on it until after it is released, whenever that might in fact be. Then I was asked by the person on the other end of the line why would I not want to buy the X100 instead -- as that is available already!?

So, this X-S1 thingy will be a Summer 2012 camera, folks, at least in the USA. Those of us who would want something sooner than that will have to look elsewhere, unfortunately.

Thanks, Fujifilm, it's been real, dudes!

0 upvotes
grahamdyke
By grahamdyke (Dec 15, 2011)

What £699 in the UK, thats only £25 less than I just paid for my K-5, what are Fuji on? I want some of that dope...

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 14, 2011)

Upon reading the press release for the launching of the X-S1, we were really looking forward to order 3 or 4 copies of the X-S1 superzoom-cam with the 26x zoom, but since this one will most likely share the new 3/4-inch sensor found in the X10, I am not sure why it would not have this same unwanted white disc phenomenon? Or maybe by the time the X-S1 starts shipping, the firmware update will have been readied for both the 3/4-inch sensor X10, and the same sensor X-S1? Problem I can see now is, what if it is really the sensor (or processor) and thus it cannot be fixed via a firmware patch?

1 upvote
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Dec 13, 2011)

So is this the grail for Sony DSC-F828 owners (like me...) who've been waiting for something with a similar feel, and "large" sensor, but seeing only "travel super-zooms" with 1/2.3"?

True, the F828 had so much noise that the Panasonic FZ150 or Sony HX100V both probably are superior to it in IQ in every respect (I assume), but I've always been looking for something that truly seemed to be the F828's heir, with not only a long lens, but a nice substantial one.

1 upvote
Macist
By Macist (Dec 12, 2011)

Who is the target audience for these superzooms?

I'd guess predominantly travelers, who need a flexible, wide-range zoom in a compact package.

So why would then Fuji not include a GPS function?!

Automatic fail, for many.

Comment edited 17 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 14, 2011)

I doubt rather seriously you have to travel around the globe to benefit from the phenomenal 26x zoom range, EXR, and so on that the X-S1 is promising to deliver.

Re. GPS, it is a bad, bad idea all around. Especially in a serious camera. The $7,000 Canon 1D X does not have it, why should the much cheaper X-S1 need to have it?

Extra weight, extra and constant battery drain, complexity, the fact that many countries prohibit you to enter their territories with ANYTHING that has a GPS receiver in it, you being unwittingly tracked by government agencies, and so on. Thanks, Fujifilm, that there is no GPS in the X-S1.

1 upvote
CyberAngel
By CyberAngel (Dec 11, 2011)

and added a few conveniences:
a fully articulated LCD, GPS, and remote (IR or BT)
and bigger flash + bigger battery
did it already have 2*SDXC?
either film+photos or RAW+JPG or backup or continuing to 2nd SDXC or?

Let's also see the competition on larger sensor bridgecameras...

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 11, 2011)

Well, in response to the widespread users' complaints about the "white disc phenomenon," Fujifilm decided to respond with an all-out attack press release.

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2011/12/07/fujifilmplansfirmware

Well, if the X10 has this white disc flare issue, so will the X-S1 have it, since the two cameras share sensor.

It may be wise to wait a bit for the X20 and X-S2, maybe by then Fuji will have corrected these initial snafus.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 10, 2011)

If the X-S1's sensor will also revel in the X10's "white disc phenomenon," that won't be too good, will it?

Also, seems to me that the video functionality of the X-S1 is no better than what one can get out of a sub-$100 point-and-shooter. One single frame rate, all-auto everything. So lame, really. What a waste for an amazing 26x focal range advanced digital camera.

1 upvote
AriehZimmerman
By AriehZimmerman (Dec 6, 2011)

I would buy the Panasonic fz150 tomorrow if it had the much better EVF that the X-S1 is reputed to have. I will wait for the results from dpreviews review to decided.
I am more than a little disappointed that dpreview has not yet released a review of the fz150.

0 upvotes
mbrobich
By mbrobich (Dec 5, 2011)

For me having had 2x HS-10 and 3x HS-20, the 3 big factors will be a useable EVF, IQ and low light noise. Other than that I loved the HS-10, it had better optics than the HS20 although the 20 was a little faster and cleaner at higher ISO. And yes I do own real DSLR, Nikon D7000 and many lenses.(had D80, D200, D3100, D5100).

The XS-1 could be the backup camera I have been after for a long while.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 2, 2011)

X-S1 video capabilities (CON't):

Other specs of the Fuji X-S1 cracked me up a bit. Apparently the camera can do "HIGH SPEED MOVIE RECORDINGS." Great, right? Well, not so fast. It can shoot at 70fps but only in 640x480 pixel. It can also shoot at 120fps at 320x240. Finally, it can shoot at 200fps at 320x112 pixels. What a cruel joke on the part of Fujifilm, hmmm?

The Fuji X-S1's EVF is only 0.47-inch in size and the usual lower resolution (not like the Sony SLT a65/a77 OLED), and the LCD screen is also the low-rez 460K type. Light years from what Sony is giving you with their a65/a77, in other words.

Specs also fail to state whether the recording of video is at 30p or 60i. Also the manual fails to state whether you can play out the footage on both NTSC and PAL TVs?

Final assessment: camera looks okay for taking stills, although there are many larger sensor cameras out there now, at least of the M4/3 sensor type. But if the aim is mostly to shoot video -- pass on the X-S1.

0 upvotes
Bob Grzesiak
By Bob Grzesiak (Dec 4, 2011)

Guys...get a movie camera. Even if Ron Howard is using Canon DSLR's for movies, I'll be convinced when he shoots HIS movies on one.
People argued about the SR sensor Fuji made, but is was better color and DR than anything around. Look at the photos (before any photoshop work) and THEN judge the camera.
I'm still waiting for something to give me what Velvia 100 gave me (I didn't have to process it myself either!)

0 upvotes
mbrobich
By mbrobich (Dec 6, 2011)

Come on Francis, you can't really be comparing this Fuji to the A65/A77 are you ?? The Sony with a decent lens will be $1500. The street price for the Fuji here in Canada will be around $749. Pretty nice when you compare the HS-10/20 at $599 when they came out. Specs for video is only 30fps.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 10, 2011)

@ Bob: no professional video camcorder (2/3-inch sensor) in the world is comparable to something as mundane as a mirror-less "DSLR" (Lumix DMC-GH2), because with the unauthorized firmware hack (Driftwood) you can run a GH2 in intraframe GOP at 176Mb/sec or even at 200Mb/sec for superior quality video recording. Which will give you superior quality to just about everything else out there, save perhaps a Panavision Genesis, Sony F35/F65, and Arri Alexa Blue. And those ones go for under and over the $100K price mark.

@ mbrobich: Actually, I do compare the Fujifilm to the Sony, especially because I am debating between these two (as well as the GH2 from Panny). I am not particularly "shopping for price," more like for features & specs.

You cannot get a 26x zoom range lens for the Sony, that much is true. On the other hand, the new Sony HDSLTs have some features that the Fujifilm X-S1 lacks. Not necessarily comparing apples to apples here, I know, more like apples to pears.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Oct 13, 2012)

Re. the bodies, X-S1 is amazingly well covered with rubber coating and is super easy to balance with one hand. On the other hand, Sony SLT Alpha 57/65 are pretty cheap-feeling and totally impossible to balance, they tilt left so bad you think you will break your wrist holding the camera. Also, whereas the EVF in the Fuji X-S1 is very high resolution, flicker-free, and can be optically adjusted for someone wearing minus 6.5 diopter glasses, with the Sony SLT cameras it is next to impossible to get a good viewing position, since you have to press your nose too hard against the LCD screen, and even then have difficulty peeking through the Sony EVF.

Let's just say that after playing a bit with the X-S1, I would not even contemplate buying a Sony SLT Alpha body with that weird-sized hot show mount. Their only hope is the Alpha 99, but at $2,800, how many takers will be for that one? I mean, one can get cheaper full-frame cameras from Canon or Nikon now.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 2, 2011)

Why the Fuji X-S1 is pretty awful for video?

Fujfilm X10 footage I was able to see so far did not impress me at all, so I cannot help thinking that the X-S1's footage will be similar. Same sensor, same processor, same poor video capability.

The Fuji X-S1 has that amazing monster-zoom lens on it, 26x focal range and F1.8-5.6. Very nice. But that is not nearly enough. Re. the video part, it is like a $100 point-and-shoot -- auto everything and one single frame rate only. Auto white balance only in video mode, auto shutter, auto iris, auto everything.

Fuji X-S1 specifications fail to reveal the recording bitrate at all, so you know it's gotta be surely only 17Mb/sec. MOV container is not a good selling point, either. Also, specs fail to disclose maximum clip size recordable.

1 upvote
themacguy
By themacguy (Dec 2, 2011)

I own both the S9100 and the S100fs. Both are excellent, IMHO, for the use I intended. The only things I didn't like about the S100fs were the proprietary battery (I prefer AAs - who doesn't?) and the fact that the histogram can't be set to stay on without depressing the +/- button. Otherwise, I'm quite happy. I skipped the HS10/20 units as I didn't feel there was enough improvement to warrant another purchase at that time. I'll wait for the X-S1 to come down in price a bit (and be thoroughly debugged by the early adopters). Too bad about the continued use of proprietary batteries in the X-S1.

2 upvotes
Peter Daves
By Peter Daves (Jan 14, 2012)

Agree 100%. I started in digital with the S1000fd and then moved up to the S100fs. I still love using it and the results it provides.

I looked at the X-S1 in a camera store this week and was VERY impressed. In fact, this was the first time in 4 yrs that I have ever even be led to consider an alternative to my S100fs. However, I probably won't be making a move until my S100fs fails on me.

0 upvotes
Ibida Bab
By Ibida Bab (Dec 1, 2011)

Does anyone know when it ships to retailers in the US? It would be nice to buy one for Christmas, and an X10 for the wifey, so I can have both! :-)

1 upvote
kforever
By kforever (Nov 30, 2011)

of course the IQ's cannot be compared to DSLR which has APS-C or larger size sensor, but with X-S1 , you have so many benefit that DSLR cannot after for, such as after took for long distance zoom, you can make 1 cm close for macro that DSLR cannot beat even for FF and still have bonus colorful image as typical of Fujifilm result. And as X-series family, the lenses must get better fine tune than other series.

0 upvotes
Shewsbury
By Shewsbury (Nov 30, 2011)

Superzoom bridge camera is a matter of compromise. Why so many people complaining about the image quality of this kind of camera while in fact they don't even have to buy it. This kind of camera are for certain targeted consumer and not for those of you who have nothing to do but spend lots of time analyzing all the dots and pixels just to find flaws in any particular photo. For most "John Doe" on the streets or a typical family man wanting simple picture of their family and a little scenery that only will end up in Facebook, this and many other "typical camera" is good enough. If IQ is the highest priority, then shut up and go live with the DSLR or what ever "bigger format". Stop bullying this kind of camera coz you wont buy it anyway, in fact why are people so unhappy every time manufacturer release new super zoom bridge camera? Llet others enjoy this kind of camera coz they will be happy with it, it is something that you will never understand.

8 upvotes
Piet Maartens
By Piet Maartens (Nov 30, 2011)

Shewsbury is right. There is too much emphasis on technical details nowadays and too little on photography. Let’s not forget that a technically perfect photograph may still be boring and banal, whilst a good photograph (good composition, ‘decisive moment’ etc.) remains a good photo in spite of some (usually minor) flaws. I am considering buying this camera for a South Africa safari next year – I cannot justify spending more money on top notch equipment than on the rest of the trip – and I am sure it will give satisfying results for my amateur needs.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Oct 13, 2012)

Now (October 2012) that Fuji had fixed/replaced the troubled sensor and the lens telescoping mechanism and came out with a new firmware, the X-S1 is finally at the quality level where it should have been in January of this year. The reason folks complained about this camera is because it was not good when it come out. Now, it is totally good.

I would love to use it for videography, love the amazing zoom optic that is manual and thus can be professionally controlled. But I really dislike the auto-only video recording, the mystery codec and mystery bitrate that Fuji provides w. the X-S1. Even when I talked with Fujifilm USA the chap told me that this camera was never intended for video use. Too bad, 'cause there is nothing like it out there w. a comparable zoom range lens, not by a long shot.

0 upvotes
A Bull
By A Bull (Nov 29, 2011)

Can't anybody else do maths?
The sensor in this camera & the X10 is: 2/3"
That Equals= 16.933mm
So easily bigger then the Nikon V System Plus most offer Bridge & compact cameras.
Stop be so stupid as to think that you could make a lenses like this to go on a full frame or APS-C size sensor.
It would be big & heavy plus very expensive.
So This camera fills the cheap super zoom market sector with the X-10 as a high level compact.
Fuji have done there homework very well.
Also keep in mind that Fuji have already said they well do an interchangeable lens X version next year.
As they do not have a lens mount made for anything other than medium format now.
I could see them using the Leica M mount, as it is not licensed.
This would mean a full frame interchangeable lens rangefinder. Cheap M9 anyone?
Or make a APS-C mount, So a cheaper option.
Again they have done there homework.

1 upvote
Baba Ganoush
By Baba Ganoush (Nov 30, 2011)

The sensor in the XS-1 is not 16.9mm along its diagonal. Its sensor has dimensions of 8.8 mm x 6.6 mm, which corresponds to a diagonal of 11mm. The designations given to camera sensors do not specify the diagonal dimensions of the sensors but are only historical holdovers from the days of TV tubes: see

http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glossary/Camera_System/sensor_sizes_01.htm

It is only a coincidence that the diagonal dimension of a sensor is typically 2/3rds the size specified by the sensor's designation. This is true in the case of the XS-1 sensor, which has a 11mm diagonal.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Since the Fuji X-S1's image sensor is the same 2/3-inch as with all the world's high-end pro camcorders, the zoom range in mm is also identical to the top-notch Fuji, Canon, Zeiss, Angenieux, etc. video lenses. In this case, app. 6-159mm. The standard 2/3-inch sensor video camcorder zoom starts at 7.6mm and does not quite reach 159mm and a 26x zoom range. And something like that costs into the tens of thousands.

Which makes the X-S1 and amazing find at any price, even though it's imager's diagonal length is 11.0mm. But keep in mind that this camera only has a 12MP sensor (2/3-inch size). And for instance the Sony SLT a77 has a 24.2MP sensor (APS-C size). Between the two, I would say that the actual photosites (RGB pixels) would in fact be larger on the Fuji X-S1, making it function perhaps better (less noise being recorded) in low light. And you can even set the EXR for "High Sensitivity & Low Noise," very nifty.

1 upvote
SW Anderson
By SW Anderson (Nov 29, 2011)

Even though the X-S1's sensor is smaller than its LCD, I'm smitten. Maybe it's because I don't get prints the size of a sports bar flat screen TV. The EXR system's flexibility strikes me as a smart way of dealing with challenges different lighting conditions present. If this camera performs in line with its specs, the piggy bank gets it. :)

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Wow, you are making some correlation or whatnot between a digital camera's sensor size, LCD size, and the size of prints you can print from the images it captures?

That must be one novel way of comparing features and specs on a camera, I need to look into that more.

0 upvotes
ericsan
By ericsan (Nov 28, 2011)

Even Ricoh moves to APS-C sized sensor with their GXR zoom module (in 2012),Sony did it already with their ultimate & excellent Nex series, so i'm very sorry to say that small sensors deliver bad to average IQ...I will never come back to these bridge cameras since my disappointing experience with the Leica V-Lux 2 few months ago !!

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Well, the world's highest end $60,000 professional video camcorders all have 2/3-inch size sensorw. In fact, no huge, shoulder-mounted video camcorder would have anything larger but a 2/3-inch sensor. You've guessed it: it is the same size as the el cheapo Fuji X-S1 has.

You can get a VistaVision or FF sensor camera, just don't expect that you can also get a luggable 26x zoom ration zoom optic for it.

I love how some folks expect a full-frame sensor DSLR or DSLT with a monster zoom lens for something like 500 shekels. It's just not going to happen, folks.

1 upvote
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 28, 2011)

those who criticize this camera for having a small sensor are missing the point of the camera.

Go get yourself a Rebel/D5100 and live with your kit lens

7 upvotes
WengLim
By WengLim (Nov 29, 2011)

I completely agree!

Sure, bigger sensors mean better IQ. But bigger sensors NEED bigger lenses and very deep pockets! :D

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
ciao_chao
By ciao_chao (Nov 29, 2011)

Not totally true. You can find high performance bargain lenses for full framers. Paid £7 for a 400mm to go on a 5D...

0 upvotes
alandf
By alandf (Dec 1, 2011)

@ciao_chao: Where can I buy it; I need two? Is it readily available? Can it zoom down to 24mm (35mm camera equivalent)?

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
1 upvote
JPnyc
By JPnyc (Nov 28, 2011)

I want a creditcard-sized camera with a full size sensor and a 40x zoom, at a constant 1.2 max. aperture. cheap.
Call me again when it's ready (maybe in 50 years?)

3 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Got it! Price of that one must be under US$500. Hopefully 200 bucks or less, I mean.

1 upvote
ericsan
By ericsan (Nov 28, 2011)

Such a big camera with such a small sensor (even twice bigger than the average compact cameras) will NEVER deliver good IQ !! Fuji should have put a larger sensor such as the one in the X100 to offer DECENT IQ...this new product is a complete joke !!

1 upvote
whyukon
By whyukon (Nov 29, 2011)

The Fuji X100 has an APS-C sized sensor. If Fuji were to have put an APS-C sensor in the XS-1, then the lens would have to be correspondingly large. Just how big (and expensive) would a 624 mm equivalent zoom lens be for an APS-C sensor? Such a zoom (24-624 mm) does not exist in the APS-C sensor world... it would be monstrously large and heavy and expensive and technically very difficult to design.

Comment edited 32 seconds after posting
1 upvote
TTL35
By TTL35 (Nov 29, 2011)

Do the math ericsan, 2/3 is not twice bigger than the average compact camera (1/3), but 4 times.. because the measurement is diagonal, just like 40" TV is 4 times bigger than 20" TV, not twice ;)

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Yes, you are. Also, maybe Fuji did not want to do that and deliver a camera with a fixed 26z range superzoom lens that weights 6 pounds and puts the price of camera + lens into the thousands.

There is no pleasing some people, quite obviously.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Oct 13, 2012)

Besides, you will be buying this camera for the 24-624mm Fujinon optic that it comes with. The lens itself is probably worth more than what you buy the camera + lens together now under US$700 as of Oct. 2012).

If sensor size is more important to you than optical design and optical performance, then Fuji X-S1 is definitely not for you.

I am eyeing the Panasonic DMC-GH3 presently, but the only "superzooms" for it are some lame old Panny/Oly kit lenses that are dark and can only deliver a 10x zooming range. They are so lame in comparison to the lens on the Fuji X-S1, it's not even funny.

0 upvotes
CoLi
By CoLi (Nov 28, 2011)

I just saw the sample photos on fuji.com. At 100% view there is evident and visible noise at ISO 100 (the grass on the lower left corner in the lion's picture is very grainy and does not seem like ISO 100 to me). And some parts of the photos are not focused - see the buffalo's left horn (on the right side of the photo). Personally I expected more form this larger sensor. At full screen, the pictures look good though.

Comment edited 5 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Tried hacking the X-S1 yet so it can record in ISO 50 and ISO 25 settings? That might be helpful for practical noise reduction, I should think.

0 upvotes
Ganondorf
By Ganondorf (Nov 28, 2011)

I would have liked this camera better being smaller or having a better aperture, and slashing a bit of the 26x zoom. Don't really need that much. 24-400 would have been sufficient.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Sounds like you need to design your own camera and lens, then. Fujifilm obviously won't do what you need from them.

1 upvote
Baba Ganoush
By Baba Ganoush (Nov 28, 2011)

For those of you who think the sample pictures posted by Fuji are fine, I suggest you download the full-sized pictures and look at them with some care, for example, the picture of the lion. If you look carefully at that photo, you'll find that the whiskers and teeth of the beast aren't even in focus. Ditto with the picture of the bridge: at full size, you'll see that the focus is fairly soft. When I compare those early pictures released by Fuji with pictures I can take with my Panasonic FZ28, the Fuji comes in a poor second best.

What I'd like to have is a 2/3 sensor in a compact fixed-lens body like that of the Panasonic ZS5/6/7/10 series, which has a small P&S 1/2.3 sensor and 10X zoom. The ZS cameras are great travel cameras.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 28, 2011)

Sure, your whiskers and teeth will look sharper in a photo taken at 12 feet with almost any camera, if the light is good. But can you provide an FZ28 picture of that same lion at the same distance under similar conditions? That's the dilemma of superzoom comparisons. Hopefully, Dpreview can come up with a uniform "real world" test for all super zooms.

3 upvotes
Baba Ganoush
By Baba Ganoush (Nov 29, 2011)

How far away from the XS-1 camera do you think the lion was? I estimate 80 feet, maybe 100 feet tops. At that distance and at a focal length of 480mm (35mm camera equivalent) for my FZ28, a tack sharp picture would have been a slam-dunk.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Baba Galushka, why not just stick it out with one of the Panasonic Lumix cameras? For video shooting, there is nothing better right now than the Driftwood QuantMe 176Mb/sec crackware hackware, anyhow. And I think the Lumixes can do pretty decent stills as well, right?

0 upvotes
JPnyc
By JPnyc (Nov 27, 2011)

I am as excited as everybody else here about this camera and I KNOW I am knitpicking - but why is it that the X-S1 has 4 different surface textures from what I can see? From a mere aesthetic point of view this could have been done better, as both other X-series models are real beauties. Just saying ...

1 upvote
ThePartaker
By ThePartaker (Nov 27, 2011)

Oh dear it looks like I am going to be buying this one. I appreciate the idea of a bridge camera but the sensors prior to this one have just been too small. Please DP review it soon so we can see some real results not just speculation most of which is foolishness.

3 upvotes
Joe Ogiba
By Joe Ogiba (Nov 27, 2011)

Were are the video specs ? Full HD video means nothing, the iPhone 4s shoots full 1080p HD video. 28mbit/sec ? 1080p60 ? Continuous AF with power zoom during recording ?

1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 28, 2011)

The HQ setting appears to be 1920x1080 30fps h.264 MOV. The manual does not state the bitrates, but one might presume it is 17mbps. There is AF, but you can bet it might "hunt" in low light or at long zoom. The manual does not say much at all about video options or controls.

1 upvote
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Nov 30, 2011)

Does this camera even have a servo zoom, or is it only manual zoom? I saw nothing mentioned about a servo zoom. I think its only manual.

Video bitrate must be 17Mb/sec, but if it was 24Mb that would be superb. But it seems (the North American version) will only come with a a single frame rate of 30fps = 30p. That makes it a no-no for traveling, as most TV sets in Europe, South America, Australia, and other PAL countries won't be able to handle 60i/30p playback. That would be a crying shame, but these days, there is no reason at all to purchase a digital camera that can shoot at only one single frame rate. It should do, at the very least, 24p/25p/30p.

Fuji might have all but forgotten about us prosumer video shooters with this X-S1, I'm rather afraid.

0 upvotes
Underdog 3000
By Underdog 3000 (Dec 1, 2011)

Can you imagine a camera with a lens like this with servo? The battery would last maybe 50 shots? The nit pickers are in full force with this one.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

U-Dog 3K, most bridge cameras out there have servo zooms. All but one of the so-called superzooms do, in fact. This model from Fujifilm is one of the rare exceptions.

If you battery only going to last 50 shots, you should probably be shooting with a battery-free Instamatic or something like that, anyhow.

0 upvotes
Underdog 3000
By Underdog 3000 (Dec 3, 2011)

Franis - clearly from your past posts you are new to the English language. Don't wory, I won't tell. What is a bridge camera to you? To me a bridge camera has a sensor larger than 1/2.33. This one has a 2/3 sensor with a very wide range lense and a relatively wide f stop.
In the US we apreciate the dog and don't under-value or eat them. -- Regards

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 10, 2011)

@ Underdog 3K: Ingles is indeed my native language, and as it happens, I happen to teach at an American university. Also in English.

Why, which particular turnip truck did YOU fall off of, Good Buddy? Wauw-Wauw!!!

Regardless of your own foreign based misinformation, the Fujifilm X-S1 is none other but a bridge camera = advanced digital camera = superzoom camera. It's not a Super 8 film camera, in other words. Dawg gone it!

0 upvotes
utomo99
By utomo99 (Nov 27, 2011)

On Paper/ Spec this is a Good Cameras.
But we Need a Good Image. This is more important on Choosing Cameras.
I hope Fuji working hard to make this camera have a good images.
Otherwise people will buy other cameras. and Fuji loosing money by investing on R & D, but can not sell many cameras

Come on Fuji you can Do it.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 26, 2011)

It's an excellent camera and will definitely become the king of superzooms. But the more I think about it the less confident I become that this would be a good replacement to my compact camera setup (don't want to call them P&S because I use them exclusively in manual mode to achieve more creative results). I usually carry two compacts in a small camera bag. I find the bag more convenient than pockets as there is a place for key, batteries, and even wallet. It also reduces risk of dust getting inside the camera (the pockets are full with lint particles). The X-S1 will not fit even half way into this bag, while Nikon V1 with two lenses will as well as one FZ-150. The V1 has much larger sensor than X-S1 and FZ-150 and demonstrates amazing image quality and versatility. It is more expensive but the IQ and compact factor makes it much more appealing system for daily walk-arounds of a photo enthusiast (not interested in birding though).

0 upvotes
wutsurstyle
By wutsurstyle (Nov 26, 2011)

Thank You FUJI!! One of the few company's that listens to the customer base. *Ahem Pentax Q, Nikon 1. I love bridge cameras..my first one being the s6000fd. I own the 60D and Pentax k-5 and this is definitely on my shortlist. Fuji colors are truly unique and amazing. I like how the flash pops up a little forward for macro shots. Your marketing department and engineering must have some kind of synergy going on. Keep up the excellent work!

1 upvote
Adrian Mahovics
By Adrian Mahovics (Nov 26, 2011)

I had the HS10 and 20, also the 550EXR. I love them! Since I have DSLR (Canon and Sony) so I learned that photography is Veeery expensive!! Especially if you want to cover everything from wide to super zoom range! I really apreciate the mentioned fuji cameras to be usable on such a zoom range, etc. they are great, but by the end of the day we are the ones how press the shooter, we make the pictures. :) I can't wait to get this camera! Thanks Fuji! ;)

2 upvotes
PerpetuumMobile
By PerpetuumMobile (Nov 26, 2011)

The diffraction limited aperture (2/3 sensor @ 12MP) is ~4.3. That makes maximum zoom (aperture 5.6) useless (all settings with aperture higher that ~4.3!!!); you won't get any additional information in the image! (in real life, results will be worse than this theoretical limit!)

Would have been better to make the camera lighter/smaller while obeying the laws of physics!

0 upvotes
sh10453
By sh10453 (Nov 26, 2011)

I would be interested in reading a full article explaining what you said (diffraction limited aperture), and how the 4.3 figure is calculated, and what it means, etc.
I also want to know why 5.6 aperture in this case is "useless".

I am serious, and not being sarcastic at all.
I would like to understand the "physics" behind your brief statements.

As for the camera, and as far as I can see it, this is a leap forward in the A&S, and it's quite daring.

Guessing by the looks of the camera, it's about the size of an average DSLR, and I can understand that.
It must be quite an engine of electronics to handle the image and the impressive zoom range for such a large sensor.
Battery life remains to be seen.

I think I have just found my next A&S camera. I'll just wait until more reviews come out, especially from users.
I'm in no hurry, I have a number of A&S cameras with the larger sensors (1/1.7 or larger).

Looking forward to reading a detailed article from you on the subject.

==========

1 upvote
PerpetuumMobile
By PerpetuumMobile (Nov 26, 2011)

My english could be better! When I say 'diffraction limited aperture' I mean the aperture 'before the diffraction airy disk becomes larger than the circle of confusion' (...that's just quoted! ;)

read the full text here: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm

0 upvotes
martyvis
By martyvis (Nov 26, 2011)

PerpetuumMobile I wonder whether you get out of the lab or the library and take photos ;-) If someone says a camera is "useless" at a maximum zoom range, you make it sound like all you are going to get a picture of a ball of fuzz. I find that hard to believe.

1 upvote
PerpetuumMobile
By PerpetuumMobile (Nov 26, 2011)

It's physics! Try it! Just take a picture with a (compact) camera at a moderate magnification and low aperture (e.g. 4) and the take another picture with twice the magnification but relatively high aperture (e.g. 8 or more). Then magnify the first picture by the factor 2 and compare the results. Despite using more 'zoom' you will not have more information in the picture! If you use even higher apertures the picture will be worse than the magnified one!

But here:
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/digital-camera-sensor-size.htm
it is explained far better!

0 upvotes
sh10453
By sh10453 (Nov 27, 2011)

Thank you for the reply.

I respect your opinion, but I disagree with the word "useless".

Maybe the editors of DPR should test this claim in their evaluation (regardless of whether it is your claim, or the reference article's).

I remember one of my professors in graduate school who used to say "having a model of some sort (mathematical and statistical in those days), is better than having no model at all".

I would imagine that most of the pictures taken will not be at the max zoom range.

But regardless, the pictures that this camera will take at its max zoom, and at 5.6 aperture," is far better than having no picture at all".

0 upvotes
TomUW
By TomUW (Nov 27, 2011)

When he says "useless" he means "adds no value". In other words, you could have a smaller lighter camera and do digital zoom at a wider aperture to get the same or better quality of result at the extreme zoom levels. At 2lbs weight this camera is no compact!

0 upvotes
PerpetuumMobile
By PerpetuumMobile (Nov 27, 2011)

I like to talk 'black and white'! ;)

Of course the image (max zoom, and at 5.6 aperture) is not useless, but if you take the picture at lower zoom and lower aperture, you'll get the same information (quality) in the image.

0 upvotes
phototransformations
By phototransformations (Nov 27, 2011)

PerpetuumMobile, have you actually tried your experiment? I just did, with a Samsung TL500 set to f/3.4 at about 5.2mm and f/6.7 at about 8mm, and I see quite a bit more detail in the longer shot, even though it is well into the diffraction limited range.

1 upvote
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 27, 2011)

"The diffraction limited aperture (2/3 sensor @ 12MP) is ~4.3. That makes maximum zoom (aperture 5.6) useless (all settings with aperture higher that ~4.3!!!); you won't get any additional information in the image! (in real life, results will be worse than this theoretical limit!)

Would have been better to make the camera lighter/smaller while obeying the laws of physics!"

Most stupid claim ever. Do your homework first before posting non-sense. I can see huge difference in detail comparing 10x, 15x, 20x and 30x in HS10.

1 upvote
PerpetuumMobile
By PerpetuumMobile (Nov 29, 2011)

I doubt that jcmarfilph is interested in a sophisticated answer and I doubt that he even knows what diffraction actually is but if you want to get a little bit smarter type this into google: 'MTF' and 'slanted edge'. After you have thought out what that is an what it means: do the test again (do not forget to set up a reproducible environment and do some statistics)

OR: just be happy with your magic 'physics f......' camera! :)

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

Huh? U high on something, PerpMobile, or what? Must be a college professor of some sort, surely.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

I agree with everyone -- PerpyMobile must be a stuck lab rat with a dismal sex life. He hates everything - especially the Fujifilm X-S1, that much is readily obvious.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

WARNING, DP REVIEW READERS: PerpedMobile on the Nonsense Rampage!!! Sire, are you an out of work former physics prof, or what are you, Sire? Please, please say that NOT a photographer. That would be just too darn crude.

0 upvotes
telpix
By telpix (Nov 26, 2011)

The lens fully manual zoom?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

What is a "fully manual" zoom? Anyhow, it does not like it is a servo lens, the previous Fujifilm model wasn't, either.

Servo zooming is great whilst handheld, with this one you will need to be on support while you are zooming anywhere past 85mm.

0 upvotes
J Parker
By J Parker (Nov 26, 2011)

I'm looking forward to this camera. Over the years, I have found Fujifilm's bridge cameras to be excellent. While other companies were convincing consumers that more megapixels meant better pictures, Fujifilm was one of the few companies focusing on low light capabilities and dynamic range. Although I shoot with Nikon DSLRs, I have shot several professional events, including five weddings, with Fujifilm bridge cameras exclusively -- the DSLR is actually my backup camera. If this sounds absolutely absurd, consider this -- I shoot with Nikons, Sonys, Pentax, and Fujifilm cameras -- it is only with the Fujifilm images that clients are moved to ask what type of camera was able to produce pictures with such excellent color rendition -- and I've never missed a shot at a wedding because I was changing a lens or switching camera bodies. If this new camera is an advancement over the Fujifilm bridge cameras I've already used, it will be well worth the price.

4 upvotes
Neloy Sinha
By Neloy Sinha (Nov 26, 2011)

I'm happy just because of 2/3" sensor.There are none to few in the market of this size,yes size matters!It is BIG among the smaller siblings.I am not one who can afford an assortment of good/ prime leses.So a ready made solution is brought in a platter for commoner.I'm getting a mad in Japan camera, while except few premium brands rest are fabricated in China or Thiland.Think of 14 glass elements in the lens which contribute to the overall wt.All of us know the weight & price of a 70-300mm with 1.4x converter.So lets look at the package & price ratio rather than IQ, because in a bright day its predecessors have done a commandable job for home grown photographers who most likely have never sold their photographs for commercial purpose.It is good that inspite of a larger sensor they reduced the megapixel from 16 to 12 to reduce noise.To give clear picture the zoom range is also reduced to 624mm from that of 720mm.So over all Fuji thought of certain basic elements and came to a product.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

Thank you Neloy for that thoughtful analysis! Only question now is -- WHEN, HOW MUCH, and HOW MANY to get?

0 upvotes
coastcontact
By coastcontact (Nov 26, 2011)

There are a few things that disturb me about this camera even before seeing any independent test results. First, Fuji has never had a bridge camera that has landed in the top five. Second, the camera, according to Fuji, weighs 920g (32.5oz./2.03lb) and that’s too heavy for the non-professional who wants decent photos. Third, despite all the talk of larger sensors needed for better IQ, there is little evidence that many people are dissatisfied with the Canon SX40 or the Panasonic FZ150. Finally I wonder why the camera won’t be available until February 2012 when everyone knows that the biggest selling season is now.

0 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Nov 26, 2011)

@"First, Fuji has never had a bridge camera that has landed in the top five"

You must be kidding ...

S6500fd, S9600, S100FS, S200EXR ... all of them were miles ahead of the smaller-sensored competition, at least IQ-wise.

Truely enough, it was after the other manufacturers gave up on the concept of real bridge camera, ie after Pany FZ50, Kodak P880, Sony F828, Minolta A2 disappeared from the market without leaving a heir.

Devices without fully manual zoom ring and having sensors smaller than 1/2 are IMHO a slighty different category.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
1 upvote
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 26, 2011)

" First, Fuji has never had a bridge camera that has landed in the top five."

Have you been living in the cave for the past few years? As stated by the reply above. Fuji did a great job in bridge cameras.

"Second.. that’s too heavy for the non-professional who wants decent photos."

You won't find superb IQ in a chewtoy bridge cameras. This camera has all the necessary parts i.e solid build quality, lens, bigger sensor, to become the best bridge cam ever.

"Third... there is little evidence that many people are dissatisfied with the Canon SX40 or the Panasonic FZ150."

There is.. but they are just satisfied because of mediocre results. And that is expected from a tiny pinhead sensor so they are not asking for more. They will be more satisfied with the results of XS-1.

"Finally I wonder why the camera...."

Prolly fine tuning, QA etc. You don't wanna rush a product if it will suffer from early problems.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Nov 26, 2011)

"First, Fuji has never had a bridge camera that has landed in the top five."

Did you mean superzoom; that is, the HS10/HS20? They're entirely different animals with small sensors and in no way can be compared to a 2/3" one.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

If you don't mind me asking -- who do you work for, CoastCon? One of Fuji's competitors, most likely, right?

It must be pretty frightful to be so smart that you can write-off a camera as a loser-cam, even though the thing will not here store shelves until next eyar (in the USA). Wow!! Talk about the ability to peek into the future.

0 upvotes
coastcontact
By coastcontact (Dec 4, 2011)

The handle is “coastcontact” not coastcon. I do not work for any camera company and never have. Since I wrote my previous comment I have re-evaluated and now question the idea of a 2 pound camera at an extremely high price. That would be substantially greater than the FZ150 at 1.16 lb and the SX40 HS at 1.32 lb. I just read a comment in the Panasonic forum where someone pointed out that the FZ150 provides IQ equal to the Canon T3 in 95% of the situations and at a camera weight that isn’t a burden. I must emphasize that the cost of the XS-1 is too high for the average photo hobbyist.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 10, 2011)

Buying a camera by the pound is a novel concept. Usually, the heavier a camera and a lens, the better the material quality. Like, for instance -- metal or alloy vs. plastic or polycarbonate.

Zoom lenses and telephotos go up to 13 kilograms in weight (app. 28 pounds), so having a camera + a 26x focal range zoom lens for under 2 pounds of gross weight is a wonderful deal indeed.

The new PL-mount 30-300mm 10x zoom range from Canon weighs a whopping 13 kilograms, so I am not one to complain about 2 lbs for a camera w. the zoom lens.

0 upvotes
Kawika Nui
By Kawika Nui (Nov 26, 2011)

I'm mainly an action shooter (sports, breaking waves, etc.). My experience with the S100 were, luckily, much better than Phil44's. I have gotten very good results and was lookiing forward to the XS-1 for two reasons: (1) greater zoom (although I have my doubts on this one; experience indicates that about 15x is about the top limit for good IQ) and (2) mainly for the CMOS sensor, which *should have* increased the burst performance over the CCD sensor on the S100. Now that the specs are out, I won't bother with this camera. So you can shoot 7fps--for about 1 second at full res?!? What's the point? I actually learned to live with the slower (under 4 fps) burst rate of the S100, but really needed a bigger cache and/or faster transfer rate, which the CMOS sensor should be capable of. Fuji fumbled the ball on this one. To JoeDavid: not a good camera for traveling light. The S100 is about the same weight as my K-5 (with 55-300mm) and the XS-1 won't be much smaller or lighter.

0 upvotes
Phil44
By Phil44 (Nov 26, 2011)

As a very disappointed owner of a S100FS (which cost over $800 new when it came out) and two other Fuji digital cameras I would caution against too much enthusiasm. The S100FS was heavily promoted as a superb bridge camera but is full of flaws: noise in shadowy areas of the picture, a lack of true manual focus, purple fringing in high contrast images and a display that has lines in it when it gets slightly warm. I have a pro photographer friend that also owns a S100FS with the same results. I'm not saying this new Fuji isn't a great camera, only buyer beware!!

0 upvotes
JoeDavid
By JoeDavid (Nov 25, 2011)

I thought this camera might bea good camera when traveling light but then I ran across the samples that Fuji has posted. To me they aren't that great, especially for a $1000USD camera:

http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/x/fujifilm_x_s1/sample_images/

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 26, 2011)

Too early to tell coz those are snapshots only so take those as grain of salt.

Comment edited 42 seconds after posting
1 upvote
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Nov 28, 2011)

Those look horrible. Why would they even post them?

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 28, 2011)

No they are fine and they don't mean to be the best samples you will get from the camera. Only stupid people will believe/think that this camera will produce horrible results.

0 upvotes
Kametori
By Kametori (Nov 25, 2011)

Only one issue I like to see this one: some level of weather sealing like K-5.
Then this could be taken everywhere. It shouls be even easier to implement than in K-5.

0 upvotes
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 25, 2011)

From Fuji website (not sure how that compares to K5 though):
"The X-S1 has a body structure that keeps off moisture and dust.
The body is sealed around lids (for card slot, etc.) and the rubber ring on the lens prevents the entry of moisture and dust. Combined with the integrated lens that does not require replacing, the entire system delivers a high level of imperviousness."

0 upvotes
Kawika Nui
By Kawika Nui (Nov 26, 2011)

lbjack: Good points. But if you want to crop/enlarge, you need more resolution than a superzoom can deliver. Bigger sensor, more detail. If you're shooting surf pix at 200-300 yards, you have to have ASP-C size to be able to crop and enlarge the surfer and still allow people to tell who it is. The same issues arise for wildlife photos. It's true that the majority of snapshot takers don't make super-large prints. But 14x11 or 16x12 are very common sizes to hang on the wall. And ASP-C delivers much better IQ. Also, even the kit lenses with DSLRs tend to be better than those on superzooms. There are exceptions; I found my S100 superior to one Sony DSLR for many shots. But this is unusual. BTW, the XS-1 is not a compact by any stretch of the imagination. It's a big, relatively heavy camera.

0 upvotes
lbjack
By lbjack (Nov 25, 2011)

I think Fuji is recognizing that the vast majority of photographers are moving away from print towards digital display. Limitation of the display medium is moving away from that of the printer to that of the LCD.

I'm typing this on my 55" screen. A 48 x 27 projected light image is far superior to my eyes than any reflective image. And think of the cost of such a print! I'm not arguing against the art and craft of printing, just that given the movement of the market to digital display, the marginal advantages of interchangeable lenses over compact zooms become moot.

Thus Fuji can -- and must -- make a compact like this, that can compete not only with other cameras but with smart phones with 8 mpx or more sensors. In fact, I'd say that most people are asking, Why do I want a camera when I have my smart phone -- just like many of us are asking ourselves, Why do I need a DSLR when I can get compacts with great IQ? And I don't think it's just about getting older.

3 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Nov 26, 2011)

I am wondering what resolution you are running that projection at now. If you have a 2k or 4k screen at that size then maybe what you say is true.
But most people have a 1080p screen at that size, so a lot of what you are seeing is just pixel pitch.

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Nov 28, 2011)

Yeah, the problem is that you lose resolution on a screen.

My Panasonic G2 takes pictures at 4,000 x 3,000 pixels. How many people own a screen with that kind of resolution? (Anybody?) Anyone with a monitor that has lower resolution can only see a part of the picture at full resolution, or if they see the "whole" picture, they are seeing pixels averaged together.

So my prints still look better than the pictures do on the monitor, because I can see all of the resolution at once.

I've thought a lot in the past about what you're saying though, and you'll be right, as soon as monitor resolutions catch up to what these digital cameras can do.

0 upvotes
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