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Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom

By dpreview staff on Nov 24, 2011 at 05:00 GMT

Fujifilm has announced the X-S1, a premium-grade superzoom compact. The X-S1 is part of the company's high-end 'X Series' and is built around the same 12MP 2/3" CMOS sensor as the X10 compact. Despite the comparatively large sensor, it manages to include a 26X 24-624mm equivalent F2.8-5.6 zoom lens. It also features Raw shooting, a 1.44M dot electronic viewfinder and 460,000 dot rear LCD along with a rubberized coating and metal dials to emphasize its premium 'Made in Japan' status.

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Press Release:

Fujifilm X-S1: The bridge camera, reinvented

The Fujifilm X series of premium cameras has a third model – the X-S1 – and just like the two before it, this latest addition sets new standards in design and performance.

The X-S1 represents a new breed of bridge cameras. Built in Japan to exacting standards, the body has a high-quality look and feel with metal dials, a rubberised coating and superior handling characteristics that will appeal to the discerning photo enthusiast.

In addition, the X-S1 offers a premium picture-taking performance to match its looks. From the high-quality Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens through to the EXR sensor taken from the X10 and the wide range of functions, the X-S1 puts the photographer in complete control. 

Maximum optical versatility

The centrepiece of the X-S1 is the Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens. Offering a range of 24-624mm (35mm equivalent) it caters perfectly for every photographic need and features a bright f/2.8 maximum aperture at the wide-angle setting.

This optical range is boosted further by Fujifilm’s Intelligent Digital Zoom capability, which effectively doubles the focal range without the drop in picture quality normally associated with digital zoom functions. As a result, the X-S1 offers users an incredible 52x zoom range of 24-1248mm (35mm equivalent).

Optically, the lens comprises 17 glass elements, which includes four aspherical elements and two ED lenses, to deliver images with superb edge-to-edge sharpness and amazing clarity. The lens’ construction is of the highest standard, featuring metal cams for smooth zoom control and fast, precise framing.

The X-S1 is also ideally suited to capturing subjects close up. In standard mode, the zoom focuses down to 30cm, but by selecting Super Macro Mode, users can focus down to 1cm for frame-filling close-up images. Furthermore, the lens’ aperture is made up of nine blades for excellent bokeh effect photography.

Great results in every picture-taking scenario

The X-S1 features the same 2/3-inch 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor as the X10 which ensures high quality images regardless of the lighting conditions.

The unique EXR CMOS technology pioneered by Fujifilm allows the user to switch between three modes depending on the lighting conditions – or leave the camera to make its own choice in the Auto EXR mode.

Switching between the modes changes the performance of the sensor. The High Resolution option is perfect in bright conditions or when the very best picture quality is the primary aim. Wide Dynamic Range mode should be chosen in scenes of high contrast when the user wants to get details in both shadow and highlight areas of an image, while the High Sensitivity & Low Noise option should be selected for optimum results in low light conditions

Coupled to the EXR CMOS sensor is the high speed EXR processor, which offers a minimal shutter lag of just 0.01sec and a high speed continuous shooting capability of seven frames-per-second at full resolution (Large JPEG) or 10 frames-per-second at six megapixel resolution (Medium JPEG).

The X-S1 also takes high-quality movies. It captures Full High Definition (1920 x 1080 pixels) video with stereo sound at 30 frames-per-second, which is saved in the H.264 format.

Easy composition and image review

The X-S1 offers a powerful combination of high quality electronic viewfinder and rear LCD to ensure composing and viewing images is quick and simple, regardless of the lighting conditions.

The 0.47-inch electronic viewfinder (EVF) features 1.44 million pixels for superb image clarity and has a wide viewing area of 26 degrees to reduce eye strain. The bright EVF makes it easy to check settings or adjust focus manually.

On the back of the X-S1 is a high quality, tiltable three-inch LCD. It features 460,000 pixels making it easier for users to scroll through menus, assess exposure accuracy and view images. The LCD also offers a useful Daylight mode that overcomes the problem of viewing the screen in bright conditions.

Full user control and picture taking versatility

The X-S1 offers a superb level of functionality whether users want to make picture taking as simple as using a compact or as involved as a fully-manual digital SLR.

For simplicity, the X-S1 will assess the subject and then select the relevant scene mode for the perfect result, automatically switching the EXR CMOS sensor accordingly. Not only does it ascertain the type of scene being photographed, it can also calculate whether an image contains a person, features backlighting or has any subject movement. ISO settings are taken care of too by the Auto ISO mode, which selects the optimum setting between ISO 100 and 3200. Those after more ISO flexibility can select up to ISO 12800 (Small JPEG format only).

Photographers after full control are well catered for with the X-S1. The camera offers a full range of conventional shooting functions (program/aperture-priority/shutter-priority/manual), plus users can also fine tune levels of colour, image sharpness and tone. Additionally, the X-S1 provides four auto bracketing options, eight Film Simulation and white balance functions and a Raw file format.

Fujifilm X-S1 key features

• High quality Fujinon 26x optical zoom covering 24-624mm (35mm equivalent) with Intelligent Digital Zoom boosting range up to 1248mm

• Superb build quality and finish with rubberised coating and metal dials

• 12 megapixel EXR CMOS sensor

• Up to 10 frames-per-second shooting

• Large EVF with 1.44 million pixels and 26 degree viewing angle

• Tiltable three-inch rear LCD with Sunny Day mode

• Full HD video

• PASM modes

• Raw file format

• Film simulation modes

• Macro focusing down to 1cm

• Lithium battery providing up to 500 shots per charge

• Optical image stabilisation

• 360° Motion Panorama mode 

Fujifilm X-S1 Specifications

Number of effective pixels 12.0 million pixels
Image sensor 2/3-inch EXR CMOS with primary colour filter
Storage media Internal memory (approx. 26 MB) 
SD/ SDHC/ SDXC(UHS-I) memory card   *1
File format  
(still image) JPEG (Exif Ver 2.3 ), RAW (RAF format), RAW+JPEG
(Design rule for Camera File system compliant / DPOF-compatible)
(movie) H.264(MOV)  with Stereo sound
Number of recorded pixels L: <4:3> 4000 x 3000  <3:2> 4000 x 2664  <16:9> 4000 x 2248  <1:1> 2992 x 2992
M: <4:3> 2816 x 2112  <3:2> 2816 x 1864  <16:9> 2816 x 1584  <1:1> 2112 x 2112
S: <4:3> 2048 x 1536  <3:2> 2048 x 1360  <16:9> 1920 x 1080  <1:1> 1536 x 1536
<Motion Panorama>
 360゜Vertical  11520 x 1624   Horizontal  11520 x 1080
 180゜Vertical  5760 x 1624     Horizontal  5760 x 1080
 120゜Vertical  3840 x 1624     Horizontal  3840 x 1080
Lens  
(name) Fujinon 26x optical zoom lens
(focal length) f=6.1 - 158.6mm, equivalent to 24-624mm on a 35mm camera
(full-aperture) F2.8(Wide) - F5.6 (Telephoto)
(constitution) 12 groups 17 lenses (4 aspherical glass moluded lenses included)
Digital zoom Intelligent digital zoom approx. 2x (1.4) (up to 52 × when combined with optical zoom)
Aperture F2.8-F11(Wide)
F5.6-F11(Telephoto) 1/3AV step (controlled 9-blade aperture diaphragm)
Focus distance
(from lens surface)
Normal : Wide: Approx. 30cm / 0.9ft. to infinity
            Telephoto: Approx. 2.0m  / 6.5ft. to infinity
Macro:   Wide: Approx. 7cm - 3.0m / 2.8in. - 9.8ft.
      Telephoto: Approx. 2.0m - 3.0m / 6.5ft. - 9.8ft.
Super Macro: Approx. 1.0cm -1.0m / 0.4in. - 3.3ft. 
Sensitivity Auto,
 Equivalent to ISO 100/200/250/320/400/500/640/800/1000/ 1250/1600/2000/2500/3200/4000*/5000*/6400*/12800* (Standard Output Sensitivity) 
*ISO4000/5000/6400:M mode or lower, ISO12800:S mode
Exposure control TTL 256-zones metering, Multi, Spot, Average
Exposure mode Programmed AE, Aperture Priority AE, Shutter Priority AE, Manual
Scene Modes SP: Natural Light & Flash, Natural Light,  Portrait, Portrait Enhancer, Dog, Cat, Landscape, Sport, Night, Night (Tripod), Fireworks, Sunset, Snow, Beach, Party, Flower, Text
Shooting Modes EXR, AUTO, Adv., SP, C3, C2, C1, M, A, S, P,
Image stabiliser Lens shift type
Face detection Yes
Exposure compensation -2.0EV - +2.0EV  1/3EV step                           
Shutter speed (Auto mode) 1/4 sec. to 1/4000* sec. , (All other modes) 30 sec. to 1/4000* sec.
Continuous shooting
(TOP)
Super High:approx. 10fps  (Size M,S)
High:approx. 7fps  (Size L,M,S)
Middle:approx. 5fps  (Size L,M,S)
Low:approx. 3fps  (Size L,M,S)
* SD memory card with a class 4 write speed (4 MB/sec.) or better is recommended.
* The frame rate varies depending on the shooting conditions or numbers of frames in continuous shooting.
(others) Best Frame capture:
Super High:approx. 10fps  8/16 frames  (Size M,S)
High:approx. 7fps  8frames  (Size L,M,S)/16 frames  (Size M,S)
Middle:approx. 5fps  8frames  (Size L,M,S)/16 frames  (Size M,S)
Low:approx. 3fps  8frames  (Size L,M,S)/16 frames  (Size ,M,S)
Auto bracketing AE Bracketing:  ±1/3EV,±2/3EV,±1EV
Film Simulation Bracketing:  PROVIA/STANDARD, Velvia/VIVID, ASTIA/SOFT
Dynamic Rang Bracketing:  100%/200%/400%
ISO Sensitivity Bracketing:  ±1/3EV,±2/3EV,±1EV
Focus  
(mode) Single AF / Continuous AF (EXR AUTO, Movie),
Manual AF (One-push AF mode included)
(type) TTL contrast AF, AF assist illuminator available
(AF frame selection) Multi, Area, Tracking
White balance Automatic scene recognition
Preset: Fine, Shade, Fluorescent light (Daylight), Fluorescent light (Warm White),
Fluorescent light (Cool White), Incandescent light, Custom, colour temperature selection(2,500K~10,000K)
Self-timer 10 sec./ 2 sec. delay
Flash Auto flash (super intelligent flash)
Flash Range Effective range: (ISO AUTO(800))
Wide: Approx. 30cm - 8.0m / 0.9ft. - 26.2ft.
Telephoto: Approx. 2.0m - 5.0m / 6.5ft. - 16.4ft.  
Flash modes Red-eye removal OFF: Auto, Forced Flash, Suppressed Flash, Slow Synchro.
Red-eye removal ON: Red-eye Reduction Auto, Red-eye Reduction & Forced Flash, Suppressed Flash, Red-eye Reduction & Slow Synchro.
Hot shoe YES
Viewfinder 0.47-inch, approx. 1440,000 dots, TFT colour LCD monitor, approx. 100% coverage
Approx. 100% coverage
Diopter adjustment:  -5 - +3m-1(dpt) 
LCD monitor 3.0-inch, approx. 460,000 dots, TFT colour LCD monitor, approx. 100% coverage
Movie recording 1920 x 1080 pixels / 1280 x 720 pixels/ 640 x 480 pixels (30 frames / sec.)  with stereo sound  
Optical zoom (manual) can be used.
Photography  functions EXR mode (EXR Auto / Resolution priority / High ISO & Low noise priority / Dynamic range priority), Face recognition, Face Detection, Auto red-eye removal, Film simulation, Framing guideline, Frame No. memory, Histogram display, Best frame capture, Advanced mode (Motion panorama360, Pro focus, Pro low light), High Speed Movie (70/ 120/ 200  frames/sec.) , Electronic level, One-touch RAW, Advanced Anti Blur
Playback  functions Face Detection, Auto red-eye removal, Multi-frame playback (with micro thumbnail), Protect, Crop, Resize, Slide show, Image rotate, Voice memo, Histogram display, Exposure warning, Photobook assist, Image search, favourites, Mark for upload, Panorama, Erase selected frames, RAW conversing 
Other functions PictBridge, Exif Print,
35 Languages, Time difference, Silent mode, Sutter sound
                                                                                 
Ports  
(Video output) NTSC / PAL selectable
with Monaural sound
(Digital interface) USB 2.0 High-Speed
( HDMI output) HDMI Mini connector
( External microphone) φ3.5 Mini with Stereo sound
Power supply NP-95 Li-ion battery (included)
Dimensions 135(W) x 107 (H) x  149 (D) mm  / 5.3 (W) x 4.2 (H) x 5.9 (D) in.
Weight Approx. 920g / 32.5oz. (including battery and memory card)  
Approx. 880g / 31.0oz. (excluding battery and memory card) 
Operating Temperature 0℃ - 40℃
Operating Humidity 10% - 80% (no condensation)
Guide to the number of available frames for battery operation approx. 460 frames *2
approx. 500 frames (using EVF)
Accessories included Li-ion battery NP-95
Battery charger BC-65N
Shoulder strap
Lens cap and Lens cap cord
Lens hood
USB cable
CD-ROM
Owner's manual
Optional accessories Li-ion battery NP-95
Battery charger BC-65N
Shoe Mount Flash EF-42/EF-20
Remote release RR-80

*1 Please see the Fujifilm website to check memory card compatibility.
*2 CIPA Standard

Additional Images

86
I own it
36
I want it
18
I had it
Discuss in the forums

Comments

Total comments: 383
123
simon65
By simon65 (Nov 25, 2011)

I still don't understand Fuji's thinking, ok ok, they're angling at tourist snappers who want something a bit better, but still if they want to go to all this DSLR type trouble they should go the whole way and slip an APS-C sized sensor inside it, and employ an interchangeable lens system.

The camera body itself does have some merit. Indeed it looks far better built than your average Canon XXXD and far easier on the eye than the Nikon 5100 (which isn't difficult, the 5100 is a dog).

We know its possible to install APS-C sized sensors in small bodies, Sony, Panasonic and Samsung have proven that, Fufi should have done likewise and they might have had an Canon XXXD killer on their hands. It's a missed opportunity.

0 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Nov 25, 2011)

After I see Sony, Panasonic or Samsung lens with focal lengths of 24-620mm with max apertures f2.8-5.9 in a small body, then I may start considering your comment as not being completely clueless.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
7 upvotes
Lan
By Lan (Nov 25, 2011)

The whole reason you don't use a dSLR for this sort of thing is that a 600mm f/5.6 lens for an APS-C sensor would weigh a ton, and cost a fortune.

This is a 400mm f5.6:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Canon-400mm-5-6-USM-Lens/dp/B0000C4GAP/ref=wwwadrianwarr-21?ie=UTF8&qid=1322243997&sr=8-1
Priced at £1000 and weighing in at a svelte 1.25kg...

There's also no dSLR lens that compares in zoom range, or anything even near it. The longest range I can think of is the Tamron 18-270 VR, but that's nowhere near 600mm even taking the field of view crop into account.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (Nov 26, 2011)

@ Rachotilko

You've missed my point. When you move into the DSLR market IQ is everything. That means a larger sensor. Zoom range is secondary, and a fixed lens with a zoom range of up to 600 mm on a cropped sensor is just plain silly.

0 upvotes
geoson
By geoson (Nov 26, 2011)

Why would you consider the XS-1 "moving into the DSLR market"? Fuji's entry into THAT market is the upcoming mirrorless system. The XS-1 is a superzoom, and spec wise, a good one.

0 upvotes
bobbarber
By bobbarber (Nov 28, 2011)

m43 would be the sweet spot for this kind of thing, not APS-C.

The key here is size. The lens would have to be too big for an APS-C sensor.

That is why m43 has a bright future.

If you are concerned with "absolute image quality", then you don't shoot with APS-C or even full frame. You shoot medium format digital or large format film.

If you shoot consumer DSLRs or EVILs, then you are admitting that size and convenience matter to you along with absolute image quality. What we are learning is that m43 is the sweet spot that balances size and IQ. Even NEX has lenses that are too big.

1 upvote
Faisalee
By Faisalee (Nov 28, 2011)

@Simon65: Zoom range is secondary on a DSLR? Why in the world do they (Canon, Nikon etc) have 300, 400, 600 and 1200mm lenses then?

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

simon65, if Fujifilm worked for you and did exactly what you had said that they should, this blog would be about an APS-C sensor camera with interchangeable lenses. We have dozens of those out there already. The X-S1 -- ain't it.

Hello, is anybody home? Also, why mix the camera's looks and its sensor size -- what does one have to do with the other?

Anyhow, Sony, Panasonic, and Samsung should obviously be the camera brands you should be blogging on, not Fuji.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

"Zoom range is secondary on a DSLR." By golly, now I've heard it all, folks. Some folks obviously HATE Fujifilm cameras so much, so why are they trolling here, I wonder? If you cannot think of anything good to say about it, kindly STFU, okay? The rest of us will appreciate it, definitely.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

There is a VGA speed video mode, but no time lapse. The latter might have been more useful.

Hmmm. According to the manual, there are distinct "dog" and "cat" modes. This should settle a lot of bickering, woofing, and yowling.

The "natural" setting that takes one shot with flash, the other without, might be useful if the subjects don't move between one and the other. Fortunately, the flash shot comes second, since people usually move right after they see the flash.

0 upvotes
wjansen
By wjansen (Nov 25, 2011)

The older Fuji big sensor superzoom gave very impressive results. As an avid bird photographer, I'm very much looking forward to this camera. Would love to see some real world samples as I have seen on previous 2/3 semspr fujis. I'm getting too old to lug around a DSLR with a 600 f/4--just not going to happen. Thsi camera may open up new possiblilties for us old bird geeks!

2 upvotes
Dennis Linden
By Dennis Linden (Nov 25, 2011)

it is quite possibly better than the new Nikon v1 for such purposes.

1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

Hope someone gets to confirm if the EVF is usable. The LCD might be hard to use in bright sun or long zoom.

This is the sort of camera one might want to be weather resistant. But the introductory remarks don't address any dust or weather sealing.

Optical stabilization at 624mm focal length might be very difficult indeed, although perhaps more feasible than with a 1/2.3" sensor in need of slower shutter. At that lenght, video can seem "shaky" even on a tripod.

0 upvotes
drakkar
By drakkar (Nov 26, 2011)

EVF Has a 1.44 Mpix of resolution. What do you need? More Mpix?
Hey man, this camera is a much better in terms of sealed body vs other bridgecams. And has a metal dials and rubberized coating.
Optical Stabilization its much better than sensor shift.
And with bigger sensor than competition, you set more speed shooting at same focal.

1 upvote
McLuhan
By McLuhan (Nov 26, 2011)

The Fujifilm guys from Fujifilm Canada already revealed that the EVF is the same type of the one used on X100, 144 mega pixel should be adequate for manual focus with a fully manual fucos ring. I own one HX100v and tried Sony A55 with its 144 mega pixel EVF using manual focus and found it enough to perform manual focus at least in acceptable indoor lighting envirnmont and should be execellent for outdoor use in the day.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

What a totally useless "comment" this one is, OMG! No merit to it at all.

0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Nov 25, 2011)

This really does look like a nice camera, and a good step in the right direction.

I would have preferred a smaller zoom range (say around 24-480mm) so the camera could be smaller and lighter, and probably cheaper. But as it stands, it will probably well outperform my old FZ30 thanks to the improvements in technology since 2006.

I predict this will be a hit, and a category killer for Fuji. At least among shooters who take photography seriously....

Comment edited 26 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
jaykumarr
By jaykumarr (Nov 25, 2011)

Yes, But Fuji is late. It is just stupid to flood the camera in the market after the season is over. If Fuji had mind to release or even announce this camera on par with Panny FZ47/FZ150, they would have sold 20% more. Which is equivalent to 50% increase in profits (as production cost is not linear).

0 upvotes
Faisalee
By Faisalee (Nov 28, 2011)

@Jaykumar: I believe at that time they had HS10/HS20 doing sale for them :)

1 upvote
Ibida Bab
By Ibida Bab (Nov 25, 2011)

I am just so greatful that Fujifilm has the vision to bring back awesomeness and excitement to photography. Many young photographers don't even know what it means to have the reliability and quality of a Made in Japan camera, with the new Fuji line they will hopefully learn. One thing for sure I am in line for one of these.

3 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Nov 25, 2011)

What? Are 'young photographers' cameras falling apart a big problem these days?

3 upvotes
needforspeed009
By needforspeed009 (Nov 25, 2011)

Finally, a decent replacement for my FZ50. I'm definately selling my FZ-50 and getting this thing.

2 upvotes
anthony mazzeri
By anthony mazzeri (Nov 25, 2011)

Are the listed size dimensions correct? At 135mm(W) x 107mm(H), it makes this camera wider and higher than even a Nikon D7000.

It's almost a kilo in weight as well. A (Brooklyn) bridge camera. ;)

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Nov 25, 2011)

And where do you get a 26X 24-624mm equivalent F2.8-5.6 zoom lens from for ANY ASP-C camera? :-)

Comment edited 40 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 25, 2011)

I am also frustrated with the size of the body. I thought the main reason for the large size of a DSLR was the mirror mechanism. The X-S1 doesn't have one. So why making it as huge as DSLR? I think they could have made the body much more compact if the wanted to. But they probably wanted to keep attractive proportions b/w the body and the lens barrel. Personally, I think it would look better if they tried to make the body smaller and deeper, wrapping around the barrel. Kind of like what other superzooms do.

0 upvotes
grafli
By grafli (Nov 25, 2011)

Well, I guess they decided to go with a bigger Sensor instead of compact body.
They could have made it smaller of course, with a smaller sensor or less bright lens...
But I like thayt they decided to make a quality product.

1 upvote
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

VadymA: The other super zooms have smaller 1/2.3" sensors, which is why they can be more compact. The Fuji has a larger sensor, but the body and lens snout are compact relative to a DSLR with less focal length. At least the lens is retractable, too, which is not the case with "system" cameras.

1 upvote
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 25, 2011)

I understand that the size of the sensor is a factor. But only for the length of the camera, not for width and hight. I think they could easily make it smaller with the same length of the body. Then it could fit in a small camera bag.

This is just my personal preference, but I think the size will be a factor for many when the hype is over. If Nikon will deliver a superzoom lens for V1 (maybe 300-400mm), it will be a much smaller system with larger sensor.

0 upvotes
anthony mazzeri
By anthony mazzeri (Nov 25, 2011)

Menneisyys, the zoom lens isn't the point. It's the size of the body.

I agree with VadymA re the width and the height, they could have made the body as small as the X10 (with an EVF) which has the same size sensor. It's supposed to be a super zoom in a compact package as an alternative to a big DSLR, so why make the body just as big as that DSLR when it doesn't need to be?

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

The Fuji X-S1 is obviously way too huge, way too monstrously heavy, and let's face it, way too expensive for a lot of our readers and bloggers.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

Anthony and VadymA, the pair o' you should maybe team up and start up your own camera design company, hmmm? Obviously, the Fuji folks at Japan don't know squat. If the two of you had any input into the X-S1, it would probably be half the weight and quarter the size of the iPhone, hmmm?

0 upvotes
G Davidson
By G Davidson (Nov 25, 2011)

This sounds like a fantastic camera, with a high-quality EVF and larger than normal sensor. The size and weight invite comparisons with a DSLR, but you'll never get such a wide-ranging lens on one, in fact all the 18-200-odd super-zooms are not just a lot shorter, but only go wide to about 28mm equivalent. I'm intrigued to see the real-world results.

1 upvote
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Nov 25, 2011)

Yup, no superzoom (10x+) lens for Nikon1, m43 or let alone ASP-C start at below 27mm equiv...

0 upvotes
Daniel Lowe
By Daniel Lowe (Nov 25, 2011)

This could quite possibly be the best bridge camera ever produced - by anyone!
I think it's ultimate popularity will come down to how well Fuji have designed the lens, and a good clean user interface.
But so far so good, especially due to the stunning images emerging from the fuji X10, which shares the same sensor.

Really looking forward to the possibility of owning this camera.

3 upvotes
Francis Sawyer
By Francis Sawyer (Nov 25, 2011)

At least it has a decent wide angle.

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
diarmuid1
By diarmuid1 (Nov 25, 2011)

Can anyone tell me why Fuji havent implemented GPS into this camera?!?!
Its perfect for travels/trips (except the size) and geotaging would be very usefull and desired feature! (at least for me)

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

GPS tends to work only if you turn a camera on and leave it idle, or move it gently, for a few minutes. In some cases, it might update the readings in 15 seconds; in other cases, it might take three minutes. If you turn the camera on only for a few seconds to capture this or that shot, you get a wrong GPS reading, which can be worse than none at all. And, honestly, don't most of us remember where we saw or photographed things? Does the GPS reading convince a skeptical viewer that a shot is better or more authentic? Do viewers object: "You're lying. That can't be Lincoln Street in Peoria. Show me the GPS!" Do people also want to know the barometric pressure or temperature?

3 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Nov 25, 2011)

Non collapsible lens cameras should always be on and have intelligent sleep algorithms to conserve power when there is no user interaction. This is how I use my DSLRs. The only time I turn them off is when they go back into storage.

Comment edited 51 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Marty4650
By Marty4650 (Nov 25, 2011)

As Cy stated so well..... GPS is currently a dubious feature in cameras, because in order to use it you must leave the camera switched on continuously. It works, but it can frustrate anyone who wants to have instantaneous shooting ability. Plus it doesn't work at all indoors or in areas with lots of tall buildings.

Perhaps someday this feature will be perfected, but right now it's just a big battery drainer, useful only for people who can't remember where they took a photo.

0 upvotes
NoelArmourson
By NoelArmourson (Nov 25, 2011)

Perhaps an external GPS solution similar to the Pentax O-GPS-1 will be a future option. Until then, desired geotagging must be accomplished the old-fashioned way with a hand-held GPS and Geosetter.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 26, 2011)

why we can carry mobile phones everyday but not a camera with GPS? the next model of Pentax Q may be an ILC: interchangeable lens cellphone.

0 upvotes
martyvis
By martyvis (Nov 27, 2011)

Most people these days have a phone with GPS. Just enable GPS track logging on your phone and use the various on and off-line tools to apply GPS tagging to the EXIF data from your camera. (As long your camera timestamps are synced close to correct GPS time it is a very straightforward).

This is the "old school" way of geotagging and is unrestricted by camera models.

0 upvotes
diarmuid1
By diarmuid1 (Nov 29, 2011)

I do not agree:
1 if you do not like GPS you can always switch it off (battery saving)
2 It can take few minutes to synchronize but only for the first time in the area, next are much faster
3 you can always make a picture regardless if GPS is synchronized or not (and for example move GPS data from picture you make 3 minutes later)
4 I'm not treating it as a proof that I have been there but for my own information (fe: next summer we are going to visit Baikal lake (Siberia) - I do not know cyrulica (Russian font) so without GPS it will be hard to remember the name of village/town/place) It will be great advantage for me to have such feature - not necessary use it all of the time.
5 In 2 years we are going to round the world trip – reasons same as in 4 – it will be much easier for us to check where picture was taken

0 upvotes
Steve oliphant
By Steve oliphant (Nov 25, 2011)

This is a great camera, cool to see the 2/3" sensor coming back, this should have good image quality at high ISO do to the large sensor.The canon sensor is way bigger with it's 1.6 crop to 35mm and will have better high ISO performance, but to get the range of the fuji camera you need a lens like the 100-400mm and the 15-85mm, this will be some where around $ 2500.00 in total.So if you are going to go birding/wildlife that sort of thing the fuji is great choice for the buck, but if you are going after land scape/people/low light sports, big game animals safari trips a 75-300is will be $730.00 and will give you 480mm equivalent to 35mm,and if you have to, you could buy a 1.4x teleconverter from kenko and get 630mm equivalent with a loss of 1 stop of light,by the way, only the kenko or the old black tamron will work to keep auto focus.The canon and the fuji are very different cameras, you need to tell us, or the guy you buying your camera from what you need to do with the camera.

2 upvotes
HarrieD7000
By HarrieD7000 (Nov 25, 2011)

If you don't need the long focal length, you be better off with the Canon. Be aware the 24-135 acts as a 38-216 compared to a 36 mm equivalent. The main reason I switched over to a DSLR was the shutter release time. Because no compact or bridge camera can compete on that with a DSLR.

0 upvotes
Steve oliphant
By Steve oliphant (Nov 25, 2011)

Well there very close and the olympus E-p3 is faster on a one shot mode then a D3s or any camera, at a crazy 120hz focus speed.

0 upvotes
Anada
By Anada (Nov 25, 2011)

But Nikon V1 is even better!

0 upvotes
Menneisyys
By Menneisyys (Nov 25, 2011)

"But Nikon V1 is even better!"

Can't compare an UW superzoom to an enthusiast camera without even a UW zoom (or even pancake) lens.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 25, 2011)

> at a crazy 120hz focus speed.

that's Panasonic's new sensor readout technology to improve the old contrast AF. you still have to drive the lens back and forth to find the place as before.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

Nikon V1 is a $300 camera that is crazily overpriced. Nikon had apparently lost its marbles of late.

0 upvotes
Merida2010
By Merida2010 (Nov 24, 2011)

Somebody please advise me: if I were going to buy this Fuji model, OR the Canon T3i (which, with a 24-135 lens is just about the same price), which one should I get? Please don't tell me neither, or that both are junk, or that I should look at 25 other models. Just tell me which of these two makes more sense, and why. Thanks to any and all who will give me some advice.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 24, 2011)

Nope coz 24-135 won't be enough. Get the Tamron 18-270mm PZD instead. Matching other features of XS-1 would be pricey i.e getting D5100 or T3i + Tamron 18-270mm PZD.

1 upvote
Midwest
By Midwest (Nov 24, 2011)

If you're willing to spend a little extra on lenses - the 55-250 and 50mm f1.8 - the Canon will be the superior picture taker, with better high ISO image quality, a faster lens at portrait focal length, the Canon's screen tilts and swivels (not just tilts); the Canon is much more like a professional camera.

The Fuji looks very interesting and for some people it will be perfect. I'm glad to see they've finally abandoned the AA batteries of the HS20. It looks to be much better with its manual controls than the typical / lesser bridge cameras. But it is another incremental step trying to reach what the Canon already has - larger-sensor image quality.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
mwhyte
By mwhyte (Nov 25, 2011)

Ok here is my 2 cents. I love bridge Cameras. If you get this camera (XS-1) you should do so because in your own personal mind the pros out weigh the cons. In my mind the pros do out weigh the cons when compared to a DSLR

For me the Pros are:

1.) I don not have to change a lens (One lens for wide and tele)
2.) Lighter than a DSLR with multiple lenses to cover 24-624
3.) Cheaper than a DSLR with multiple lenses to cover 24-624
4.) Adequate image quality for 95% of the situations that I output my images to which is to say mostly to the screen

The Cons are:

1.) Lower image quality at high ISO ....though I am fine shooting below 800 iso almost all of the time....in which case I believe the XS-1 will do quite well
2.) More flexibility with lenses, you can change a lens and put on a super bright F1.8 lens if you want to, but I find this a hassle..

Again these are my personal reasons, you should make your own pro and con list based on what is important to you...

For me I love it so far!

0 upvotes
ZorSy
By ZorSy (Nov 25, 2011)

Not as simple: what camera do you have at this moment? WHat is your main interest in taking photos (landscape/portrait/indoors/outdoors/social/travel etc). This sort of cameras are ultimate travel/holiday camera, not really required to fit in the pocket but to hang around the neck with the lens covering capturing the whole Saint Peter Square and then zooming onto the Pope....(just kidding, but you get the drift). As other poster suggested, 18-270 would suite better as 24-135 (37-200 eq) isn't wide enough, nor long enough but that is not the point. Nobody should be a ble to answer that question from practical (usage) point of view - real user forums may be better (including FUji/Panasonic/Sony forums, not DSLR ones as one would be frown upon even mentioning chip smaller than APSC) and examples people post there should give enough clues how worthy is a particular product. But if set to one-lens option, superzooms, though heavy, expensive and big are still worth checking out.

1 upvote
pizzolog
By pizzolog (Nov 25, 2011)

November 24, 2011
A camera is a tool.
You need to first figure out what is it you would like to achieve, this is to say, in what application do you want to take pictures.
Are you for example a fashion photograph,
Are you traveling on a family vacation,
Are you shooting a basketball game,
Are your predominate photographs taken indoors of your friends at parties??
Then pick The Camera that best fills that need, within your allotted budget.
Doing anything else just doesn’t make sence.

2 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

The Fuji is for people who want to take pictures of things that are far away or tiny, as well as obtain decent results with closer objects. Something like a T3i or D5000 would be better for subjects at close or medium distance, but require very expensive lenses to "get close" to birds, beasts, or planets.

0 upvotes
JPnyc
By JPnyc (Nov 27, 2011)

I'm trying to decide between the exact same choices and think the added versatility will offset the lost high ISO IQ. But if it's true that the X-S1 really is bigger than a T3i with a zoom attached to it, I might have second thoughts. On the other hand, I will never be tempted to buy another lens for the superzoom, whereas with a DSLR, the first kit usually is just the beginning and after a while you'll end up with so much gear that you'll start to look again for a more portable option ... aarrggh ... maybe I should just keep my G12!?
So there you have it, back to square one here as well. Sorry!
:-)

0 upvotes
techmine
By techmine (Nov 24, 2011)

If it produces same picture quality(real life samples) as X10 (I own one), I would buy this. Articulating LCD, manual zoom control and hotshoe makes it a great potential. Look at the body of this one, DLSR ergonomics...wow.

0 upvotes
simon65
By simon65 (Nov 24, 2011)

This is surely the craziest most ill considered camera since, well since Fujifilm's last mega gigantum zoom dino.

But why I ask is a company of Fujifilm's quality and pedigree even bothering with this nonsense?

They should be focusing on building Leica rivaling high end mirrorless cameras with large sensors, mid range zooms, and compact dimensions.

Instead we have this tosh. Any quality inherent in the sensor is going to be spoiled by the absurd zoom. The thing's not even compact or light. Hell if you want to lug 1 kg around with you buy a Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Good grief Charlie Brown.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 24, 2011)

Nope. People like you, who don't understand that this camera will fill the gap between DSLR and pinhead superzoom camera, is non-sense.

1 upvote
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 24, 2011)

JCM... Looks like you are very sceptical about "pinhead" superzooms. Yet you applaud to the camera with a sensor size comparable to just about two "pinheads" (which is what 2/3'' is versus 1/2.3''). Yes, it is twice as better in numbers; but is it enough for much superior image quality?

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 24, 2011)

Of course it is. Just look at S100FS IQ, unmatched by any pinhead superzoom to date. XS-1 will be better than that especially on high ISO and long-end-zoom results.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

Wrong. Fuji is introducing a better 2/3" sensor super zoom device in a niche where presently buyers must chose only among various 1/2.3" sensor models that funciton well only with LOTS of light. There may be some distortion at the wide and long ends, but offer an inexpensive alternative to the larger cameras, whose lenses cost too much to justify the expense for anyone but a pro or spendthrift.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

@ValadymA, the world's $25,000 to $65,000 professional shoulder-mount video camcorders all have 2/3-inch sensors. All of them. Yet, according to you, it is not large enough or good enough in a sub-$1,000 bridge camera?

If I may ask you in all politeness -- what camera(s) and lens(es) do you now own, Sire?

0 upvotes
capanikon
By capanikon (Nov 24, 2011)

Could Fuji have made this camera any uglier? The overall idea is a good one, but their case designer needs to be fired.

2 upvotes
leoand elsa
By leoand elsa (Nov 24, 2011)

I agree with VadymA. FZ150 or XS1? Please will DP do a comparison ASAP?

Fmian quality is relative. Given that some of us wish to use a superzoom, some offer better quality that others. i would like to have DSLR quality but do not wish to carry around a big bag of lenses, or have to change them in the field to go from wide to telephoto. :)

1 upvote
daza
By daza (Nov 24, 2011)

Not necessary, even the fuji hs20 wins over the fz150. So the difference between the X-S1 and FZ150 is huge.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 24, 2011)

LOL attempting to compare FZ150 against this beast is foolishness. FZ150 has its own segment and i.e pinhead megazoom together with SX40, SX30, HS10, HS20, HX100V. Fuji created the premium segment of bridge camera which is where the XS-1 will be seating for a while.

3 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Nov 28, 2011)

Sure, quality is relative. This camera should perform better than all the other superzooms that came before it.
I've been selling cameras for the last 8 years and the Fuji S series superzooms has had a great sales history. We didn't have to sell them, they sold themselves. Customers (mainly the elderly) would jump strait for them cause the 'handling' (ie. grip) was like an SLR, but it was lighter and had gobs more zoom.
What most never figured, and still don't understand is that reducing the size of the light path and recording medium through the camera system has severely negative results. Also, the more complicated your lens is, the harder it is to correct distortion, CA, and maintain sharpness. It's always been that way with film, and it's the same with digital. There is nothing technology can do about it.
I don't think this will sell as well as Fuji did in the past. The market is saturated with more brands now, and customers have been spoilt with smaller sizes.

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Nov 24, 2011)

Since when does 'quality' and 'superzoom' belong in the same sentence?
Apart from that one...

1 upvote
Steven Blackwood
By Steven Blackwood (Nov 25, 2011)

+1 on that, brother.

0 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

To some folks, "quality" means no long distance shots at all, or a $4k lens on a DSLR. Well, some folks do try to photograph distant / small things, can't get close, and don't want to spend a fortune on a RPG-sized device that is a bother to swap for the next shot.

0 upvotes
fmian
By fmian (Nov 26, 2011)

For about $1000 you can get a 550D and Tamron 70-300 VC lens.
Or for another $1000 you can get the fixed Canon 300mm IS.
That's 25%-50% of the price you mentioned ($4000)
If you crop an image down to the max focal length that the X-S1 offers, I assure you, you will get a better quality result with the DSLR.
But at the end of the day, just get whatever makes you happy.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

fmian, you may need to re-think your math on that comment. A Tamron 70-300mm zoom has a zoom range of only 4.28x. The Fujifilm X-S1 zoom's has a zoom range of 26x.

Are you seriously making an argument that somehow a 4.28x and a 26x zoom range lens are really pretty much the same? Oh well... whatever.

Even better is your "comparison" of a 1x fixed focal length lens to a 26x zoom lens. Now, that's a good one, an instant classic, no less. Keep going, I did not mean to stop or hinder you.

0 upvotes
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 24, 2011)

I agree with those who think that Fuji samples are just bad. They are worse than what I am getting from my old P&S Canon A620. Yet, I refuse to believe that a modern camera would not be able to deliver better IQ than a 6-year old P&S. So I am confident that in my hands it will be an excellent replacement to my good old A620.

Of course, as a compact camera enthusiast, I wish that such stellar build quality was wrapped in a more compact body. Oh well, the value/cost ratio still seems to be much higher than any DSLR with similar body size. Now in my mind there is a battle between FZ-150 and X-S1. Not sure who is gonna win yet.

0 upvotes
daza
By daza (Nov 24, 2011)

there is no battle between X-S1 and fz150, i didnt like the samples that japanfuji posted about X-S1 but this doesnt mean that this is gona be the quality that we would expect from this camera, just look x10 pics in flickr. I really should love a camera like the X-S1 but the size and the price make me wait a little more for a fuji hs30 with 1/2" and only 12mp and half the price of the X-S1.

1 upvote
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 24, 2011)

From what I've seen, the FZ150 delivers impressive image quality for the size of the sensor, excellent 1080p video with smooth zooming, RAW, high burst speed, and much more compact than S-X1 at half price (around $390 on amazon now). For my needs, it is a perfect camera. Since I don't buy cameras every year, I might end up with buying both and then either selling one or giving to my kids for practice.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 24, 2011)

No there is no battle between XS-1 and FZ150 because it is a huge mismatch.

0 upvotes
VadymA
By VadymA (Nov 24, 2011)

I see that my statement was misunderstood (ESL is to blame). I was referring to the battle "in my mind" only. As it will be hard for me to pick because both cameras are very appealing for their own reasons. But I was not trying to put both cameras in the same category as S-X1 is obviously superior. No doubt about it.

0 upvotes
jcmarfilph
By jcmarfilph (Nov 24, 2011)

FZ150 is a motorized slow toy camera. This is the real bridge camera. Manual zoom, manual focus, superb IQ even in high ISO.

2 upvotes
drakkar
By drakkar (Nov 25, 2011)

???? FZ-150 vs FUJI XS-1??? Are you kidding??? Has you read it the specs? Do you saw any pics from Fuji X-10??? Do you watched the FujiGuys´s video about this New Super BridgeCam?
And, have you read it the DPREVIEW´s main title?
"Fujifilm releases X-S1 PREMIUM EXR 26X Superzoom"!!!!!
Please note the word PREMIUM!. AND "Rubberized coating and metal dials to emphasize its premium 'Made in Japan' status."
And from FZ-150 specs "Manual Focus (Jog dial and cursor key button)". Do you compare this with Fuji XS-1 Manual rubberized ring focus???
2/3" fuji sensor vs 1/2.33" tiny pana sensor.
And MANUAL FOCUS ON VIDEO MODE!!!
This is the new revolution bridgecam concept.

2 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

VadymA, just get the smaller and lighter of the two cameras mentioned, and you'll be happy. The smaller one will probably set you back less money-wise than the pricey X-S1 would. Weight costs money, see?

0 upvotes
cassano
By cassano (Nov 24, 2011)

The samples look reasonably good for me. The samples cannot be compared to those of x-10 (or other premium compacts) at the pixel-peeping level, mostly in terms of detail rendering. Color and dynamic range is still best in class. With a 2/3 sensor, it should deliver much better high ISO images than other super-zoom with tiny 1/2.3 sensors. Of course, we have to wait for real high ISO samples to say so. For me, personally, I am more interested in color/DR/noise
instead of pixel-peeping. Even the softest sample looks good on my 24" LCD.

It's another one-of-its-own-kind camera, considering its sensor size and zoom range, and the metal body, etc.

I would be willing to buy it if it's priced around $600.

3 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 24, 2011)

in theory, this will translate into a 16-420/7.2-14 lens on APS-C, and is good enough for airshow on a sunny day. will Sigma or Tamron really make such a lens (for Sony)?

0 upvotes
jaykumarr
By jaykumarr (Nov 24, 2011)

but problem is focussing and seeing the aircrafts in real time. the LCD view is say .04 seconds slower than real time, then we will get photos only by luck

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 26, 2011)

ESPN crews can shoot golf balls which is hundreds of thousands smaller isn't it? I know of no one who has ever successfully focused on a flying golf ball with an SLR camera. may be we will be able to do it in the future but currently only via the tube or LCD.

0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

yabokkie, what exactly is a "16-420/7.2-14 lens," please?

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

actually how about Pentax Q with 28-135 lens? it will be equal to 154-742.5 but of course you will lose AF and IS and the package will look ridiculous

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Francis Carver
By Francis Carver (Dec 1, 2011)

Yeah, the new Fiat 500 looks fabulous!

0 upvotes
MarTay6
By MarTay6 (Nov 24, 2011)

I for one have become a Fuji fan. I have an S200 EXR, an HS20 EXR and just recevied an X10. I love the build quality, the fit/finish/feel especially of the X10- and I love Fuji's menu structure- makes more sense to me than any other brand (especially my Oly E-PL2)- as well as adequate external controls to access the things you need to during shooting. There's no doubt I'll be adding this XS-1 to the collection.
Cameras have been continually improving in specifications; what has deteriorated over time is the "fit/finish/feel"... the build quality. I praise Fuji for bringing this back in affordable cameras, and if for that reason alone, I will remain a loyal Fuji fan.

1 upvote
ThePhilips
By ThePhilips (Nov 24, 2011)

I like the idea. But let's see how they have implemented it. IOW, DPR we want the review! ;)

I kind of never liked the bridge cameras because they kept IQ from P&S. I'd rather have IQ of a DSLR with controls of P&S than the other way around. That option (even X-S1 considered) seems to be still missing.

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

did you try the Sony R1? despite the slow response the IQ is more like DSLR

0 upvotes
Seagull TLR
By Seagull TLR (Nov 24, 2011)

Fujifilm X-S1 Ower's Manual

http://www.fujifilm.com/support/digital_cameras/manuals/pdf/index/x/xs1_manual_01.pdf

0 upvotes
spidermoon
By spidermoon (Nov 24, 2011)

it's almost the same than the X10. And i really appreciate compagny that releases such instruction manuals, long time before camera avaibility, it's helps a lot to figure out how the camera works. There is a great addition in scene mode, Dog and Cat, but there is still no soccer, baseball, or basket mode :(

0 upvotes
PHOTOJOE55
By PHOTOJOE55 (Nov 25, 2011)

Spidermoon, You're right about the instruction manual. It's a big advantage to see it first, it's well laid out, clear and easy to understand, even for newcomers. It even gives a simple explanation of histograms. Their video is short but it's excellent! I don't think any of us would resist, if someone put this camera in your hands and said "here, check this out". Yes it's a little strange, but I think this camera will have a following and I bet it will sell very well. Fuji is alive and well without film!

0 upvotes
JB Digital
By JB Digital (Nov 24, 2011)

and all I can say is that it looks neat. Here is the promo video link http://youtu.be/Z1pmDKP2QQA

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
1 upvote
leoand elsa
By leoand elsa (Nov 24, 2011)

OK just had a look at the sample pics - thanks guys. To be honest i don't think they are great. similar to any other (1/2.3) bridge and not in my opinion any where near as nice as a DSLR. I agree with an earlier comment. Fuji should hav echosen better pics! Look at the sample pic canon show for their Sx 40HS, it is immaculate . (in my opinion)

Oh shame about battery life too. There must be room in there for a bigger battery. I know EVF use power but DSLR's can get nearly 2000 pics on a charge!

happyden it is £699 in UK so guess around $799 in the uS. I'm sure you will be able to pick one up on ebay or at B & H for less than $ 500 in a few months :)

0 upvotes
deleted12
By deleted12 (Nov 24, 2011)

And what is the price for this beauty? $500, $600, more?

0 upvotes
leoand elsa
By leoand elsa (Nov 24, 2011)

CONTINUED

I wish the tilting screen rotated to face forward like canon and Panasonic. Why not Fuji? I too think the lens is ugly but no biggy. Could use a few more handheld night landscape, multiple image features. in camera HDR etc. Interested to see what the digital zoom with no drop in IQ is about???? Hopefully Canon, Nikon and pana will respond soon with their versions. Then maybe I'll but my $ where my mouth is. Nice step forward Fuji. 9 out of 10.

1 upvote
nekrosoft13
By nekrosoft13 (Nov 24, 2011)

because of stupid things called patents. they can't just copy Canon or Panasonic tilt screen design.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Nov 24, 2011)

I actually prefer this design. it won't do the job say 10%-20% of times but will work way better, faster, and safer the rest of times. I would like to have the one on Sony A77 if I could.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
leoand elsa
By leoand elsa (Nov 24, 2011)

Are we starting a Fuji XS2 wish list already? :) I am pleased that Fuji have released this cam. It is close to the ideal for me. Looking at the Canon SX 40HS, Pana FZ 150 etc, my question was , how about a larger superzoom with a larger sensor. 4/3 would make a 24- 600 (or 800) eqv, lens too big. I thought, 1/1.7 or better still 2/3 about right. Here it is! Well done Fuji. If image quality is better than the 1/2.3 bridge cams then job done! If not then what was the point, I'll buy an FZ 150. i am still torn between something like a canon 60D with Tamron 18-270 and a superzoom bridge. Pana GH 2 14-140, is great. Expensive however and I am one of those "idiots" who actually want a 600mm eqv + focal length. It is all about the IQ on this new Fuji for me. If it doesn't deliver then it is back to buying a DSLR and a bridge!

1 upvote
jaykumarr
By jaykumarr (Nov 24, 2011)

Perhaps, adding a direct optical view finder would increase the value a lot for this gem of a camera.

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

it's hard to be direct unless you add a mirror
but then the flange distance will be longer and the lens will be different story

0 upvotes
jaykumarr
By jaykumarr (Nov 24, 2011)

fully agree with you..
yes, but still a small mirror reflection would be great

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Nov 24, 2011)

The mirror and optical finder size is a function of sensor size. This would have an optical finder so small as to be unusable.

0 upvotes
jjlad
By jjlad (Nov 24, 2011)

I'm an s100fs shooter ..both for fun and profilt and one thing I like about the EVF is that wysiwyg. (I also shoot Nikon D7000 ..but my s100fs is always close at hand).
This one is definately worth a look!

0 upvotes
RJNedimyer
By RJNedimyer (Nov 24, 2011)

Geeeez!! It is small compared to my DSLR, and the 4 to 6 plus lenses I would have to carry to cover its range. So that is not the question. The questions are quality of the images and, speed of the RAW [my S9100 was 10 seconds per shot in RAW], street price and handling, and HIGH ISO Shots quality along with other smaller questions.

If it passes these tests I may get one as my primary back u-p and carry around since it is sa SMALL by comparison.

Yes!!! Irealize it is larger than a micro with their limited quality and abilities but otherwise it is a great size and yes I would like a Micro camera [Shirt pocket size] for my wife and as a replacement for my F30. But this is a much more practical camera size.

1 upvote
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

this camera could be a camera user's dream! large DOF UWA to Super-tele, wide aperture (sort of), high flash sync speed.

1 upvote
max metz
By max metz (Nov 24, 2011)

This promises to be the ultimate super zoom, if the lens quality is up to the task, the sensor and controls are already proven in the x10. The flexabilty of a super zoom can be extraordinary, a higher quality version such as this has been a success waiting to happen, ones thing is certain - being an x series Fujifilm the build quality is likely stellar. If I was starting out, with what I know now, this would be a far far better option than an entry level aspc dslr with kit lens.

0 upvotes
Corpy2
By Corpy2 (Nov 24, 2011)

The GH2 plus 100-300 is significantly smaller than a dSLR with anything near that zoom ability. And I will bet my last dime that the image quality the GH2 does is better than what this camera will do.

0 upvotes
bushi
By bushi (Nov 24, 2011)

"The GH2 plus 100-300 is significantly smaller than a dSLR with anything near that zoom ability"
...and significantly more expensive than carefully-chosen DSLR + similar lens combo - let alone this baby ;)

4 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

and I bet you will miss the shot when you have to change lens...

4 upvotes
Cy Cheze
By Cy Cheze (Nov 25, 2011)

GH2 + 100-300mm = more expensive and slower aperture. At the 100mm wide end (200mm 35mm equiv) you are already at a telephoto lenght, so you'd have to change lense to get a shot of that same bird as it comes close.

0 upvotes
JackM
By JackM (Nov 24, 2011)

I don't get it. If I'm going to lug around a camera this big, it's going to be a real DSLR. I like to choose lenses for myself, thanks.

Fuji would be wiser to develop the X100 concept further, like with interchangeable lenses and more fast primes. They could really build a niche around that body. Only Leica can/will compete.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Nov 24, 2011)

I think you'll find this camera is a lot smaller than a DSLR with a 600mm equiv lens.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2247/2150440053_9870562f42.jpg

As for developing the X100 concept further they are releasing an X100 style EVIL camera with a "better than full-frame quality sensor" soon.

2 upvotes
Corpy2
By Corpy2 (Nov 24, 2011)

I think you don't understand. There are a lot of people who are secretly afraid of "changing lenses" and all that kind of "technical" stuff. They'll never admit it, though. This serves their market.

2 upvotes
jaykumarr
By jaykumarr (Nov 24, 2011)

// "changing lenses" and all that kind of "technical" stuff. // no.. it is difficult.. keep not a baby but just a bag in your hand, then you will understand how difficult is changing lens. basically, you handle three things. body, lens to fix, lens to move.

1 upvote
Albino_BlacMan
By Albino_BlacMan (Nov 24, 2011)

Lol at this http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2247/2150440053_9870562f42.jpg

goodluck shooting at 600 at anywhere other than bright sunlight. Hi ISO will be like every other small sensored camera, so as soon as they clouds come out you'll be stuck at 24mm

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

real SLR with kit lens? good luck with zooming with your legs!

1 upvote
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Nov 24, 2011)

I just pray it sells well. If it fails sales-wise, nobody's gonna produce similar thing again. And that would be pretty sad.

0 upvotes
hcamp
By hcamp (Nov 24, 2011)

after buying the HS10, I would say to myself: FujiFilm NEVER MORE in my life.
Even if this camera has an image quality and auto focus speed a little bit better then HS10 (which is very very bad in HS10), it is not enough yet if compared with other brands like Canon or Sony.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
bushi
By bushi (Nov 24, 2011)

it is funny statement. Have you tried HS20/HS30? HS10 was a flop, for all intents and purposes, and you didn't have to buy it to learn that.

This camera is positioned to be the next big thing after Panasonic phased out their original, manual zoom FZ series (with FZ50 being the last of the siblings), with the sensor/software speed tried & tested in X1 already.

Precisely what a lot of enthusiasts would like to have - an upgraded Panasonic FZ30/50, with modern speed of operation, wide angle, significantly better low-light capabilities (EXR sensor+technology advancements) and better viewfinder.

3 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

what do you mean? canon DSLR with EF 24-600mm f2.8-5.6 is better than Fuji's? yeah yeah...

0 upvotes
glutamodo
By glutamodo (Nov 24, 2011)

Has there even been a price range announced for this yet? What did the S100FS list for when it first came out, $700-800USD? I can't expect that this would be much cheaper.

Too bad this still has that awful Tonka Toy zoom grip seen on the earlier mockup. It would be nice if you could peel that thing off and fit something better.

I'd have liked to see what the included lens hood will look like.

460-500 shot battery life out of an NP-95?? I doubt it, sounds like typical Fuji pipe-dreams. Granted, in the small F30/31 that battery is great but I can't see a battery that small doing that well in a camera like this.

Dimensions and weight - I kind of thought that with the smaller filter size compared to the S100FS, the SX-1 might end up smaller and lighter, but the specs are surprisingly similar, unzoomed. Only 2 grams heavier and a bit taller.

0 upvotes
bushi
By bushi (Nov 24, 2011)

/460-500 shot battery life out of an NP-95?? I doubt it, sounds like typical Fuji pipe-dreams./

..really, these batteries are cheap as dirt, so instead of complaining, buy yourself one-two spares, depending on your needs, for the price of a rechargeable AAs four pack...

0 upvotes
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Nov 24, 2011)

Sorry…
Manual zoom.
Flash button on left side of camera.
Left handed manual focus

Still a big gaping hole for a single-handed quality compact travel zoom.
Something you can operate with one hand, while the other is holding on to kids, a belay line, etc.

1 upvote
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Nov 24, 2011)

An objection to left handed manual focus: I guess you're new to cameras. That's the way focus--manual that is--worked on every SLR starting in about 1950, Leica Ms too.

As for manual zoom, that's faster, more accurate, and for video it's quiet, doesn't use up the battery either. Also it's how good SLR zoom lenses zoom, still today.

4 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

why don't you get yourself a S95?

0 upvotes
bushi
By bushi (Nov 24, 2011)

...but it is not traveler ultrazoom, so you are missing the whole point. This is enthusiast's bridge - ultrazoom. One that people like me will certainly handle with both hands, and thanks to the controls layout, without getting my eye off the viewfinder, and shooting away happily

1 upvote
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Nov 24, 2011)

Good luck one handing 600mm on any camera! :)

3 upvotes
javieralcivar
By javieralcivar (Nov 24, 2011)

Oops! Fujifilm did it again by creating something that doesnt compete in crowded markets and still is a great deal price wise.

2 upvotes
danaceb
By danaceb (Nov 24, 2011)

This thing has a 2/3" sensor, it will blow away all the rubbish with 1/2.3" sensors out there. Bridge ultrazooms have been garbage for far too long.

Comment edited 56 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Jack A. Zucker
By Jack A. Zucker (Nov 24, 2011)

don't forget the other superzooms use much smaller sensors so the IQ on this will be superior. Mushyness may just be a function of sharpening

0 upvotes
spidermoon
By spidermoon (Nov 24, 2011)

Fuji has gone where no one has gone before :) But IQ is so-so, foliage, fur and grass are quite mushy, and like the X10, the background is fuzzy, maybe it's the EXR effect. But at least a zuperzoom camera with high def evf, not the old 200Mpx one, but an old low-res LCD.

0 upvotes
Aleo Veuliah
By Aleo Veuliah (Nov 24, 2011)

Fuji as made again the best bridge camera on the market

Well done

7 upvotes
javieralcivar
By javieralcivar (Nov 24, 2011)

Yes they did, I cant se nothing that competes price wise with this setup for nature photography on a tight budget.

0 upvotes
Kai-Uwe Och
By Kai-Uwe Och (Nov 24, 2011)

I am sure many owners will be disappointed because of unsharp pictures, when they try to use the 624mm tele setting in combination with those typicall stretched out arms! :-)

A 24 or 22mm lower end makes more sense for creative photography, than this crazy tele range!

1 upvote
Andy Crowe
By Andy Crowe (Nov 24, 2011)

But it does start at 24mm!

1 upvote
Corpy2
By Corpy2 (Nov 24, 2011)

The same disappointment people who buy a finder-less Panasonic camera will feel if they try to use a zoom lens too! :)

0 upvotes
bushi
By bushi (Nov 24, 2011)

/ when they try to use the 624mm tele setting in combination with those typicall stretched out arms!/

..you sure have noticed it has a viewfinder (and a decent one at that, to say the least)? Using it like you have described, would be a very silly thing to do.

0 upvotes
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Nov 24, 2011)

Not "my type" so to say, but it could be the first bridge camera that could make sense to buy. Finally something with sensor larger than 1/2.3". I hope (for others) that it will perform well - there are good hopes - the X10 seems to be a great camera.

Now, Fuji - go and make some real stuff :)

1 upvote
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Nov 24, 2011)

When are ~400k dot LCDs going to go away? I've been using ~900K dot since the Sony A700 back in 2007. That's 4 years ago.

3 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Nov 24, 2011)

ask Panasonic

0 upvotes
shaocaholica
By shaocaholica (Nov 25, 2011)

Does Fuji only source LCDs from Panasonic?

0 upvotes
Bluetrain048
By Bluetrain048 (Nov 24, 2011)

Actually, I quite like it. Many applications don't need full image quality all of the time, but sometimes you have to go the heavy dslr route just to get the level of handling, performance and control that makes photography fun.

Only thing is, I see just one control wheel. What is it with the phobia of external controls? The more controls the better, especially with something so squarely aimed at enthusiasts.

1 upvote
Peter1976
By Peter1976 (Nov 24, 2011)

Hm... not sure, but it might be that producing external controls cost more than programming the interface to control things.

0 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Nov 24, 2011)

Different people have different needs. We, the bridgecamers, have been asking Fuji for exactly this for some time. You might not like the concept, many of us do. It is all-in-one package, there's no need to clean the sensor, it is small (yes, it is, given the capabilities).

Ad published samples: preproductions samples are not really representative, and this has been especially the case for Fuji preproduction samples.

3 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 24, 2011)

I think you mean "there is no 'way' to clean the sensor". The 'need' to clean it is still very much there, as the air pumping action of that lens can not help but furnish a continuous supply of dust.
Or did they include some counter-measures? I don't notice any in the spec, but maybe?

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Rachotilko
By Rachotilko (Nov 24, 2011)

As far as I know, the sensor on non-interchangeable lens is hermetically enclosed. I am not familiar with the exact mechanics and maybe I'm wrong altogether.

0 upvotes
bushi
By bushi (Nov 24, 2011)

...I am not an engineer, but I could think straight away of a two ways of keeping dust at bay, so while the internal zoom (AKA Panasonic FZ30/50) would be ideal, it is not a challenge at all to make it dust-proof, really

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 24, 2011)

...Fuji, who do employ engineers, don't share your higher cryptic know how, so instead they recommend you just send the camera in to them every 2 years to have the dust cleaned out.

Comment edited 18 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
bushi
By bushi (Nov 25, 2011)

OKay, my "higher cryptic know-how" include things like for example velvet-like gaskets in the lens barrel, that would allow air through, and stop any dust - that was my first immediate thought. But that would be prone to wear out with time, so, you might use traditional gaskets, and just create pressure-compensation openings in the barrel, covered with that anti-dust filter. So there you have two solutions already.

...and other solution, is even simpler - just close/seal the opening between the camera body and lens, with a piece of glass (simplistic description, for brevity, but I hope you get the idea). Therefore any "pumping action" occurring, will be contained to the lens itself, and could not impact the sensor in any way.

It wasn't really that hard to think about, was it, it took me less time to think it then to type it here. No high-horse tone about them superior engineers needed, thanks.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 13 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 25, 2011)

sheesh - makes you wonder why Fuji never thunk of that. Maybe Apple already patented your idea?

But seriously, I think at least one camera has used the glass plenum idea. If I remember it was either Foveon or Olympus. Sadly nothing in the Fuji spec to indicate any thought of dust awareness however.

0 upvotes
wetsleet
By wetsleet (Nov 25, 2011)

indeed - it was Foveon (well, Sigma)
http://www.sigma-sd.com/SD1/features.html
However, that can work on an SLR where the reflex mirror mandates that the rear element of the lens be some distance from the sensor. In a bridge camera there is no such constraint, so I suspect that the rear element is much closer to the sensor. This would mean that a glass dust seal would necessarily be closer still to the sensor, negating its effectiveness in reducing the visibility of dust in the image.

0 upvotes
Klimt z
By Klimt z (Nov 24, 2011)

Thank you Fujifilm

1 upvote
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