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Adobe faces criticism for change of upgrade policy

By dpreview staff on Nov 22, 2011 at 21:53 GMT

Photoshop trainer and author Scott Kelby has published an ‘open letter’ to Adobe requesting it re-thinks its product upgrade policy. The company, in a recent blog post about its ‘Creative Cloud’ online computing service, revealed that it will only allow owners of the most recent versions of Photoshop and Creative Suite to upgrade to the CS6 versions, when they become available. This moves away from its traditional position of allowing owners of the previous three versions a discounted upgrade. The company is offering a 20% discount for these owners to bring themselves up-to-date in time for the policy change.

The move, seemingly aimed at encouraging users to move to the monthly license for the cloud service, rather than buying a ‘perpetual license,’ will mean owners of Photoshop CS3 who might have expected to have the option of upgrading to CS6 will now have to first pay $159/£127/€199 (ex. tax) to move to version CS5. Users of the comprehensive ‘Creative Suite Master Collection CS3’ will face a rather more daunting $1,119/£985/€1279 (ex. tax) bill to put themselves in the position to receive a discounted upgrade to the CS6 version. Kelby’s letter acknowledges there may be a business case for the change in policy but asks Adobe to delay the policy change until CS7, so that users have more time to make an informed decision about their upgrade options. The 20% discount on upgrade prices is valid until December 31st 2011.

Comments

Total comments: 398
1234
Marcin 3M
By Marcin 3M (Nov 23, 2011)

If I quit PS upgrade game, there will be only one alternative - free, open source software. FS is the is only place where are no ideas like "cloud computing", being in fact a way of paying taxes to the one setting stupid "intellectual property" rights.
Now, Adobe is the only real reason to keep me with MS Win system. No Photoshop/ID/ILL - no Windows.
I hope for a quicker development of Gimp, Scribus and Inkscape and DigiKam as asset management. I'll be missing Adobe, but as a occasional user of ID and ILL - i can live without it, knowing that Gimp is almost matured software.

2 upvotes
chlamchowder
By chlamchowder (Nov 23, 2011)

I agree - Photoshop will be dead once free raw converters get far enough. I hope UFRaw/dcraw really improve their noise reduction soon.

0 upvotes
Octane
By Octane (Nov 23, 2011)

Plain greedy! They force you to pay for an upgrade you never wanted and didn't feel worth paying for! Way to go Adobe. :(

Come up with more reasons to upgrade to each new version. Add features that people really feel are worth paying for, then they will. Forcing them with this lame policy is just wrong. The reason I skipped a version was exactly because I felt like the features were not worth it.

I read somewhere that Photoshop was one of the most pirated software. This is sad for Adobe, but they are really not helping their situation here.

1 upvote
nikonjohn
By nikonjohn (Nov 23, 2011)

It was a tough choice to move from NX2 to Adobe products. The cost was one of the issues and if I hadn't had upgrade privileges from a copy of elements that was on my computer, I wouldn't have upgraded at all. I initially started with CS4 and was disappointed with it. I upgraded to CS5 and Lightroom after trying them out and discovering the improvements. I like the Adobe editing tools and will likely continue with my upgrades now that I have them BUT Kelby hit the nail on the head. Any approach that doesn't give the users with older versions some credit for their previous purchases is a pretty strong incentive to never go down the Adobe photoshop road.

0 upvotes
Neodp
By Neodp (Nov 23, 2011)

Gimp

2 upvotes
Geo Wharton
By Geo Wharton (Nov 23, 2011)

Adobe thinks we can't get along without them.
There are many substitutes.

1 upvote
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Nov 23, 2011)

Adobe has monopole on the market with Photoshop and used that for their advantage, obviously. I guess the amount of new licenses went down - something must have triggered this decision.

It would be about a time for a product that can hold a candle to Photoshop to appear. But there is none that can play the same league.

I do not expect to get good software for free - but something that does not cost as much as a new Laptop for non professional photographers like many of us around here. I am not going to sell my best camera to afford a software to work on the files from the camera I have just sold :(

Comment edited 3 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Aaron MC
By Aaron MC (Nov 23, 2011)

They have a monopole on the market? Holy crap. I know some physicists that would be incredibly interested in talking to Adobe. ;-)

0 upvotes
Tom Caldwell
By Tom Caldwell (Nov 23, 2011)

Smartest guys have been using Corel (who?) Paintshop Pro for years but Adobe sewed up the market with freebies and became a household name for image editing. People just assume that you use Photohop these days, now the chickens come home to roost. It is not essential to run a huge conglomerate to make good software as many small teams have shown, but it is necessary to be a huge conglomerate to get market share. And by golly they need their money to stay in that position. People might rant and rave but corporates who can pass the cost on also get looked after and stay with the incumbent. Do you want to be with the force? Or use no-name brand that is nearly as good?

You small guys actually are a nuisance with your demands for free software, poq, there are plenty of obliging guys out there working for peanuts who would actually love you to pay them something, anything will do.

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
eNo
By eNo (Nov 23, 2011)

Paintshop Pro? Been there, done that. Unreliable, slow and more memory hungry than CS5, believe it or not. Many of its features, including what few plugins are available, don't function in 16-bit mode. Layers are there, but nowhere the flexibility and power of CS5. I used PSP X2 for three years (and tried X3 -- not much better) to manage some good processing of photos for fine print output. Now I realize how crippled I was, even at my most skilled and proficient PSP X2 usage.

1 upvote
Earthlight
By Earthlight (Nov 23, 2011)

I used to use PSP but swore to never again install anything Corel after starting to get bizarre warnings about "no CD in the tray" etc. Plus at the time at least they only had a precious few 16-bit functions.

After going Adobe I felt this huge relief: everything just worked and was reliable. Now I'm tied to PhotoShop because of all my actions and the huge amount of .psd files on my hard drives. There really is no way to switch now and frankly I loath the idea.

That said, in case they go nuts and start skinning me every 18 months it might be time to stick with the CS5 and only update LR in the future. Darn.

1 upvote
Paul Lawrence
By Paul Lawrence (Nov 23, 2011)

Hi Earthlight - I started with the very first Paintshop Pro - one floppy disk! Amazing at the time! Since then Picture Publisher (clunky and poor colour ) Photoshop v3 and upgrades thru to v11(aka PSCS4 Stonehenge) Early versions of PS were VERY stable and very reliable BUT I now regularly have PS tell me it is sorry it has stopped working and will close. I have to try to remember to save regularly now having completely lost too many hour of work. I think Adobe want to lose my custom, even after buying into Lightroom and its upgrades, this week one customer service person who couldn't help passed me to another who then just hung up the phone on me. That is very rude at best and can hardly be described as customer service!

0 upvotes
Earthlight
By Earthlight (Nov 23, 2011)

Sorry to hear that Paul. My CS5 and CS4 before it have been running smoothly. I only occasionally have trouble with Bridge. PSP was a nightmare, I still get a headache just by thinking about it. I feel liberated now in terms of possibilities within the software. That said the European Adobe prices are a highway robbery.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
1 upvote
sagge
By sagge (Nov 26, 2011)

It is a pity that Microsoft rules so much with their OS. However, in comparison with the cost of many of the other programs, the monopoly cost of Windows still is relatively small. My main message is: avoid Mac, Adobe and the other greedy guys. They rely on the professional world's tendency to use similar stuff for compatibility and to get stuck in its own glory myths.

For a photographer, the exception is Adobe Lightroom. This program is excellent at still (for how long?) a reasonable price. Then add Corel Paint Shop Pro X4, an excellent program even handling CMYK! If you still want more done, buy an Adobe plug-in for PSP X4, and you will have no limitations.
Another hint: for the PDF format, skip Adobe and buy Nuance PDF Converter Professional v7 or Corels PDF program. For the flash part, SWiSH Max4 is a very good alternative to Adobe. Etc. etc. Just drop your prejudice, and you and your wallet will be much happier!
$$$ The world is full of better possibilities! $$$

0 upvotes
sagge
By sagge (Nov 26, 2011)

PSP X4 is a much more developed program than X3 and earlier versions. You can work in 16-bit mode as well. I experience no exceptional slowness, and I have an older computer, the only slight advantage is that it has an Intel Core 2 Quadro processor,while the 4GB internal memory in XP SP3 really is nothing special today.

0 upvotes
sean000
By sean000 (Nov 23, 2011)

Adobe must be following the lead of AutoDesk. They have a graduated upgrade price depending on the version, but they are getting stricter about it and cutting off older versions from discounts. Their goal is to require AutoCAD users to maintain an annual subscription rather than paying for upgrades when they want.

I am tempted to upgrade to Photoshop CS5 (from CS4) but I almost never use Photoshop these days. Most of my photos are developed in Lightroom 3, and maybe 15% are processed with Nik Silver Efex or Color Efex. Only 5% or so ever see Photoshop.

If Adobe is going to insist on a monthly or yearly license fee in the future, they will need to create more pricing tiers. There are a lot of amateurs who use their software who can't write off the cost of their products.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
hotdog321
By hotdog321 (Nov 23, 2011)

Not satisfied with massive profits, Adobe want to make obscene profits. As a CS5 user, I am going to be looking--hard--for another photo editing program. DPP might work, and it's . . . free.

1 upvote
PhotoArtKC
By PhotoArtKC (Nov 22, 2011)

For some people, it would probably be LESS expensive to simply license a new copy from scratch when CS6 comes out than it would be to "upgrade" to CS5 and then pay to "upgrade" again to CS6. Way to go Adobe, just what professionals already scraping to make a living needed was to pay for double upgrades.

1 upvote
lita
By lita (Nov 22, 2011)

Well, just think about the mortgages these poor Adobe people have to pay! Do you have any idea the kind of maintenance costs they face to keep up mansions in Silicon Valley and Monterrey... It's just horrendous!!! No, really. You could empathize a little bit, no? And flying private jets, oh, my, my... Wallets are howling in pain, no doubt. It is so awful. Please, shed a tear!

Somebody is going to have to keep financing these people's lifestyle, and guess what, that's us. Yep. Very soon, no more discount at all when you upgrade. Get use to it.

BTW, I guess this is the final nail in the coffin of having soft proofing in Lightroom. Gee, imagine if we didn't need Photoshop anymore!

GREED SUCKS!

2 upvotes
mgolczewski
By mgolczewski (Nov 23, 2011)

I think you're half right. The guys at the top aren't hurting, they'll just lay off more developers, QA, and engineers and make the ones that are left do more for the same rate of pay. It's called "productivity".

0 upvotes
James Madara
By James Madara (Nov 22, 2011)

Adobe has priced themselves out of the consumer market. I have an older version of Illustrator I use once in a while. I considered upgrading when CS5 came out, but I can't afford to stay updated.

Corel PaintShop Pro handles 95% of the image editing I do. I'm not surprised this is from the same company that failed to evolve Flash and Acrobat.

1 upvote
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Nov 23, 2011)

Adobe is deeply in the consumer market, and priced appropriately. Photoshop Elements is well under $100 on the shelf at Costco.

What you're really saying is that Adobe has priced themselves out of the enthusiast market, and that would be an OK statement. Enthusiasts feel they are too good for GIMP or Elements, but don't want to pay or don't have the pro income to pay pro prices.

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
1 upvote
Renard DellaFave
By Renard DellaFave (Nov 23, 2011)

Precisely. We want to play with "pro" features, but don't make money with them. Ergo, since fun isn't worth as much as a professional productive asset, the price should be much lower than what professionals pay. But, I guess there aren't enough enthusiasts for Adobe to care. It's a problem with a lot of software. There's "lite" and "pro" of a lot of things where, for me and many (but not enough) others, "lite" is a joke, but "pro" is ridiculously overpriced. One audio editor, for instance, I might run once every six months for an hour or two, but it would cost as much as the guy who uses it daily and makes money with it. Something wrong with that model. Pay-per-use (or hour, etc.) is the only alternative I know of, but since that makes you never want to run the program, it's not a great option either. IDK. Wish it were a bigger market so some more creative solutions would come out.

0 upvotes
Tony Sleep
By Tony Sleep (Nov 22, 2011)

What a lovely company. Still, the counterfeiters will be chuffed to bits.

0 upvotes
Nikonworks
By Nikonworks (Nov 22, 2011)

I gave up on photoshop because of its upgrade policies over the years.

I use Arcadias'a PhotoPerfect and it is fantastic for its price point.

I use it every day. Does everything I need, even batch.

0 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Nov 22, 2011)

This is exactly why so many people (myself excluded...of course) use pirated versions of Photoshop and aren't willing to shell out $900 every few years for a new version. Not condoning it...just saying.....

7 upvotes
Sascha Rheker
By Sascha Rheker (Nov 22, 2011)

The really strange thing is, that these companies aren't understanding that bullying and those who bought their product is not a very intelligent way to fight pirated versions, when the first thing the pirates do is to remove the bullying part of the software.

The funny result of this is: The pirated version is more fun to use/install.

1 upvote
James Madara
By James Madara (Nov 22, 2011)

Adobe needs to be more friendly to amateurs, beginners, and students.

2 upvotes
Clint Dunn
By Clint Dunn (Nov 23, 2011)

Agreed. IMHO if Adobe sold full-blown versions of Photoshop for say $200....they would sell probably 10 times the number of copies they do now at $900. The average student/amateur photographer can't afford/justify the money for Photoshop. The result, pirated software.

2 upvotes
OliverCardona
By OliverCardona (Nov 23, 2011)

I'm not a fan of Adobe but to be fair to them, Photoshop Elements at $99 is not a bad deal, and will do 99% of most enthusiasts want from Photoshop CS5.

But still think that the price of the full version is outrageous,

1 upvote
tmy
By tmy (Nov 23, 2011)

clint, totally agree.
i've been behind the idea of a "cheaper" photoshop for years. lots more people would just buy it rather than go thru the hassles of pirated versions. there will always be a group that would love to use the pirated versions, but there would be a big jump to sales. Here in Australia, lots of people I know that are able to, buy the CS package with "academic" discounts, but those forced to have to pay the ridiculous "full" price usually get a cracked one...
Having come from Photoshop 5.5 (not CS5.5) myself, I think that my current CS5 will not be going for anymore upgrades for some time....
and I am a longtime Adobe fan!!
silly greed...
Occupy Adobe??

0 upvotes
Ionian
By Ionian (Nov 23, 2011)

There is a cheaper photoshop - it's called Photoshop elements. Adobe makes the software, right or wrong they have every right to charge what they want. I don't get you people telling Adobe, "If you don't make photoshop affordable, then I'll steal it". What logic is that?

0 upvotes
jenbenn
By jenbenn (Nov 22, 2011)

the cloud is probably the worst offer for amateurs and students .you end up paying alomst twice over the year compared to what an initial full license plus an upgrade every two years cost. Part of the value of a computer programm is that its available when you need it. With a monthly subbscription this is not realizable unless you subscribe for the full year.

1 upvote
Sascha Rheker
By Sascha Rheker (Nov 22, 2011)

What is even worse is Adobes ridiculous policy that you have to deactivate your lincense to be able to install another copy on another computer. Or even on a replacement HDD in the very same computer.

I'll never forget the day when my notebook HDD died on a friday afternoon. 1700 CET.

I had a spare drive and all the software CDs and DVDs to fix this.

But guess what: Of course the HDD didn't deactivate the Photoshop installation before going south, so I had to wait till monday to reach someone at Adobe to deactivate this crap from their end.

And of course, someone who didn't buy Photoshop but who uses a cracked version, will never encounter this problem.

Thank you Adobe!

7 upvotes
rgolub
By rgolub (Nov 22, 2011)

While I like to whine about Adobe as much as anyone (and I think Adobe in the Cloud is just a bunch of wet vapor), I think you were doing something wrong.

About two months ago, I upgraded MacBooks - cloned the old drive contents onto the new one. When I fired up Photoshop, it wanted to reactivate but managed to do so without having to contact anyone. I did subsequently deactivate the old HDD but I think you have a 30 day trial period in the interim.

It was a pleasant surprise as I figured I would again have to be dealing with what passes for Adobe support these days. Perhaps there is some home for the dinosaur.

0 upvotes
Fred Dominic
By Fred Dominic (Nov 23, 2011)

I don't think he was doing anything wrong. They usually allow you to activate on two computers at the same time. You probably had not yet double activated on your new laptop.

I had this problem once when I had activated twice (on my desktop and a laptop) and the laptop crashed, and I had to call them to get it working again (something that took a very long time).

0 upvotes
Fritz Byle
By Fritz Byle (Nov 22, 2011)

I've always felt that Adobe's upgrade policies have been fair and I have upgraded regularly, though not every single version. This change really sticks in my craw, for several reasons:
- It forces me to pay twice to upgrade my current CS4 to CS6, when I don't need or want the upgrade to 5.5
- It forces me upgrade to 5.5 prior to December 31. Lovely of them to spring this on me right around the Holidays, when I have other expenses I need to cover!
- So nice of them to slip this out in a blog post, instead of communicating it to me directly and explaining their rationale (if there is one other than greed).
- I can now look forward to at least a $200 outlay every two years to stay current. Even if i don't need the new features. I'm thinking I'll say "thanks, but no thanks Adobe."
Bottom line, I think I *will* take them up on their nice offer to upgrade to 5.5 at a reduced price, and then I will respectfully decline to ever give them another cent.

8 upvotes
Sascha Rheker
By Sascha Rheker (Nov 22, 2011)

Yes, very true!

Why do I have to have an Adobe-ID, why do I need to give them my email-address, if they don't use it to inform me that I'll need CS5 to get CS6.

And I'm quite shure: You won't be able to buy a CS5 Upgrade anymore as soon as CS6 will be in stores.

0 upvotes
david kohn
By david kohn (Nov 22, 2011)

I think we all know what will happen when this policy is implemented.

2 upvotes
John Crawley
By John Crawley (Nov 22, 2011)

Boycott Adobie. All of us. Bring this monopoly down.

2 upvotes
ELLIOT P STERN
By ELLIOT P STERN (Nov 22, 2011)

So much for thinking that DNG was going to be a standard

1 upvote
Alternative Energy Photography

It's about time this began to get more visibility.

Additionally, I don't want to use the cloud and I am not interested in any fussy "subscriptions". I don't even like having to "subscribe" to phone, internet, and cable television!

0 upvotes
Sascha Rheker
By Sascha Rheker (Nov 22, 2011)

The whole cloud thing is nice, as long as they don't force me to use it!

And only as long as it does not make my live MORE complicated!

I don't want to be forced to pay for 3G or the expensive hotel Wifi abroad just to be able to use photoshop on my notebook in the evening.

And I want my computer to work in areas without 3G or Wifi.

1 upvote
mgolczewski
By mgolczewski (Nov 23, 2011)

Get used to it. The whole industry is moving away from you storing applications on your devices and forcing you to store stuff "in the cloud". The subscription model is a guaranteed revenue stream that might take years to fully take over, but I predict it's inevitable.

0 upvotes
zakk9
By zakk9 (Nov 22, 2011)

Adobe has just created the best argument ever to change to Aperture.

2 upvotes
MrPetkus
By MrPetkus (Nov 22, 2011)

Aperture? That software is a joke. Adobe puts way more resources into supporting new cameras and faster than Apple ever did.

0 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Nov 23, 2011)

To be fair, Apple's gotten a lot better and faster lately on the camera support. We'll have to see if the policy applies to Lightroom, because the announcement says it applies to Photoshop/the Creative Suite, which Lightroom is apparently not a part of.

Unfortunately for Adobe, this new policy leaves such a bad taste in the mouth that people are going to think less even of the apps that are not (yet?) affected by it.

And as strident as the parent post is, if you need Photoshop, Aperture is simply no substitute for that. If Aperture can sub for Photoshop in your workflow, all that means is that you never needed Photoshop in the first place.

0 upvotes
mgolczewski
By mgolczewski (Nov 23, 2011)

Agreed. I use both (Aperture and PS) though I use Aperture way more than PS these days.

1 upvote
mandophoto
By mandophoto (Nov 23, 2011)

Aperture is great software, not perfect and only for Macs, but ANYONE who thinks Lightroom is perfect has been drinking the Adobe Cool Aide.

Aperture keeps me from using Photoshop, but when I use Lightroom I revert back, as I'm sure Adobe planned.

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Nov 22, 2011)

Leaders in de facto industry standard software products are running out of innovative features in their perennial "UPGRADE" path...

This manuever smells like coming out of the ledger handlers rather than the true think tank programers.

Hmmm... it applies the same to camera brands...

2 upvotes
kevs0001
By kevs0001 (Nov 22, 2011)

Scott has a lot to lose if the 'average' Photoshop user doesn't upgrade. No wonder he's speaking out.

7 upvotes
Steve oliphant
By Steve oliphant (Nov 22, 2011)

Die Adobe Die too much money ,there way to greedy, i used photoshop for years but no more for me i use aperture and Pixelmator now .i don't like greedy companies like Adobe who wont even give you the raw files for new cameras on old versions ,hope you go under.......

8 upvotes
jaysonmc
By jaysonmc (Nov 22, 2011)

But there is NO Photoshop CS5.5
so do Photoshop CS5 users get to upgrade to Photoshop CS6
or do I have to buy more than Photoshop (i.e. master collection CS5.5) just to go to Photoshop CS6? Makes no sense...

0 upvotes
jaysonmc
By jaysonmc (Nov 22, 2011)

Nevermind, Adobe own posts clarifies. CS5 is eligible. DPreview needs to fix their blurb above...

0 upvotes
sigala1
By sigala1 (Nov 22, 2011)

Adobe is using their monopoly power to increase profits.

1 upvote
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Nov 23, 2011)

I would say (as was mentoined later) - fewer and fewer people actually need the new versions and tend to update every 2nd or 3rd generation only as Photoshop already has pretty much what they need.

Adobe is probably just trying to keep their profit stable. Maybe they should invest time and effort to some kind of new stuff, not just try to milk old cow.

0 upvotes
Laszlo Podor
By Laszlo Podor (Nov 22, 2011)

Well, I am not surprised after they stopped supporting Camera Raw for CS4 when they released CS5.

3 upvotes
rgolub
By rgolub (Nov 23, 2011)

Adobe could win quite a bit of support back by either allowing ACR to update on older versions of Photoshop or go back to what they did in the beginning - keep it a separate, inexpensive program that can be upgraded without taking PS with it.

0 upvotes
Danny
By Danny (Nov 22, 2011)

When someone, somewhere puts a Photoshop-alike (open source/freeware) killer online, this company will be in serious trouble. We are living in a freaking bad economic time for crying out loud! And I, as a CS3 owner have to make a quick move now until december or I am out of the loop for CS6............

2 upvotes
MrPetkus
By MrPetkus (Nov 22, 2011)

Open Source projects don't have the the resources to just emerge with a Photoshop killer. But I'm assuming you've already used the excellent Gimp and donated $$ to that project?

1 upvote
slncezgsi
By slncezgsi (Nov 23, 2011)

I did use Gimp a bit in the past and found it strongly unintuitive (for a Photoshop user). I may check it out again soon. I have no idea how is the project doing in the last few years.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Nov 22, 2011)

If he doesnt like, just go somewhere else. Easy peasy. Crying about it will do nothing.

0 upvotes
akluiber
By akluiber (Nov 22, 2011)

Giving exposure to wide consumer sentiment about the stupidity of a business decision can certainly have effect. See Netflix.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
8 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Nov 23, 2011)

Go somewhere else? His entire organization is named "National Association of Photoshop Professionals." He can't just switch everything over to "National Association of GIMP Professionals" or something.

0 upvotes
naththo
By naththo (Nov 23, 2011)

Hi,

I am sorry. I have to disagreed with you. Adobe isn't the only one, Microsoft and Macintosh is another example all software are never come cheap at all. You get what you pay for. Photoshop quality is very outstanding and I can't complain. So far Lightroom is the most popular and is a great alternative to photoshop at a better price. Can't you think about light room instead? Normal photoshop is great for more feature to fiddle around, especially good for business and arts, etc. But remember, it takes a long time for programming to create a whole big photoshop software. So it will cost more at the result. Photoshop Element is less feature than that but cheaper than Photoshop full version. If you were a student doing full time you should be able to buy academic software instead. But I can't complain about price unfortunately cos I can see how much effort it has been made by programming to create a whole software. There is also monthly payment option as well.

0 upvotes
foto2021
By foto2021 (Nov 22, 2011)

xpda wrote: "That is good news for consumers, as it will help open the market for competing products."

WHAT competing products? There are other image editing suites but nothing that remotely competes with Adobe Creative Suite.

0 upvotes
Denis de Gannes
By Denis de Gannes (Nov 22, 2011)

It would be interesting if there would also be a change to the policy with respect Lightroom? Will LR version 1 and 2 customers be able to upgrade to version 4.

0 upvotes
bllarkin
By bllarkin (Nov 22, 2011)

Might want to fix that date. It's December 31, 2011, not 2010.

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Nov 22, 2011)

Strange, I usually get used to the year changing by the end of January. Clearly I'm running behind. Sorry about that.

0 upvotes
xpda
By xpda (Nov 22, 2011)

That is good news for consumers, as it will help open the market for competing products.

Comment edited 57 seconds after posting
1 upvote
IEBA1
By IEBA1 (Nov 22, 2011)

Two things of note here is that Adobe both accelerated the release schedule (more versions more often) and decreased the number of previous versions eligible for upgrade pricing. So, in essence, instead of upgrading 2, 3 maybe even more years apart, Adobe now wants to see new cash every year or so.

To their credit- they are making dramatic improvements in their software. So the ROI is still there IMHO.

1 upvote
martian1
By martian1 (Nov 22, 2011)

Whether any improvements in their software are 'dramatic' highly depends on each customer's need, while it is a fact that many users do not update to every new version.

I currently use CS4 and planned to upgrade to CS6, however Adobe puts me under pressure to pay for CS5 by end Dec 2011 on very short and even strangely indirect notice via a blog post - just to be able to use CS5 for the short period until CS6 is out, when I could have enjoyed CS5 for a much longer time, if I knew this earlier.

Therefore to me Adobe's way of communicating is unprofessional and to do it on such short notice is unfair business.

2 upvotes
Steve Wilson
By Steve Wilson (Nov 22, 2011)

I like the last sentence the most.

2 upvotes
IcyVeins
By IcyVeins (Nov 22, 2011)

I'll never pay for any imaging software - ever.

2 upvotes
Joe Federer
By Joe Federer (Nov 22, 2011)

Then this doesn't affect you. Those of us that buy our software, however, this causes a large hit to our pocketbooks.

I know I'll certainly be looking for some other solution -- I normally skip every other upgrade in order to keep my workflow consistent. Now that won't be an option - upgrading realy will cause additional learning curves and hurt my business more than just the added cost of the upgrade.

2 upvotes
Mr Fartleberry
By Mr Fartleberry (Nov 22, 2011)

You'd think Adobe would try to encourage more licensed seats rather than drive people away, eh Grumpy?

0 upvotes
Tom OConnor
By Tom OConnor (Nov 22, 2011)

It is funny how people reject the idea of paying for software. It takes a lot of money and effort to create these programs. We all love what they do. If you want a new car, you have to sell your old one and buy a new one. Can't just upgrade it by paying a small fee for all of the new goodies. Same thing for anything else I can think of, you have to buy a new one.

3 upvotes
AShimon
By AShimon (Nov 22, 2011)

I generally upgrade to the latest versions anyway. This news affects me little.

0 upvotes
DaveJC
By DaveJC (Nov 22, 2011)

If I stop buying new cameras, I have no real need to upgrade PS ever again. I rarely use PS any more. Most just use LR. PS is for fancy stuff. My K-5 outputs DNG for RAW, if all cameras adopted a DNG output option, Adobe would have truly shot themselves in their foot. A new camera outputting DNG does not have to wait for a new cam release and can jump right in on any version PS.

Comment edited 44 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
TX Photo Doc
By TX Photo Doc (Nov 22, 2011)

I've bought every other version since 2.5. I have v4 now and was waiting for v6 to come out. If I had known that, I would have bought v5 from the beginning and enjoyed it all this time. I don't plan on now buying 5 and shortly having to buy v6. I think I'll learn to do stuff in Photoshop Elements when they come out with the next version.

0 upvotes
Malcolm L
By Malcolm L (Nov 22, 2011)

Well, I have bought every upgrade based on merit and my needs. If CS6 warrents buying, I'll evaluate it and probably buy it. Cost really isn't a factor for me.

2 upvotes
mikewhalen5
By mikewhalen5 (Nov 22, 2011)

But 80% of the software in the upgrade is the same as the earlier version that has already been paid for and developed.

2 upvotes
xtoph
By xtoph (Nov 22, 2011)

reply to tom o'conner:
"If you want a new car, you have to sell your old one and buy a new one. Can't just upgrade it by paying a small fee..."
and there you've put your finger on the reason why upgrade prices for software are more than reasonable: you can't sell your old copy of photoshop the way you can your old car.

i have nothing against paying for software--i've even contributed to shareware and freeware when the product is good--but the amounts of money involved in adobe cs is out of control. obviously they are calibrating it to commercial production houses, but in the process they leave nonprofits, small designers, and others who might only use the unique capabilities once or three times a year out in the cold.

i've paid for my current version (and several before that), but i don't have the money for cs6 anytime soon.

Comment edited 41 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
babart
By babart (Nov 22, 2011)

This situation has a silver lining: Adobe will soon be facing stiff competition from other software companies. The graphic arts software field has needed this competition for some time. If they continue with this policy, Adobe's position as the Microsoft of imaging software is over.

BAB

1 upvote
John Ellis
By John Ellis (Nov 23, 2011)

Yes, Corel's founder almost bankrupted them years back in folly and mismanagement and this is a gift from heaven for them to seize the moment and get its presence back in a big way. I am not sure if PaintShop Pro does raw picuteres or not but either way, they need to get with it. I always liked Paintshop and would gladly return.

1 upvote
Denver Wedding Photographers

Perhaps its time for another RSP style company to compete and lead us to another competitive system that is priced to make it worth the upgrade.

I have ID, PS, LR and DW. I may just have to stop using Adobe.

0 upvotes
Riprap
By Riprap (Nov 23, 2011)

After starting out with PS4 I stopped purchasing anymore at CS3, I recommend Photoline to anyone now, it's compatible, less bloated, and does all of what I need.

0 upvotes
snapperZ
By snapperZ (Nov 23, 2011)

I agree that If Adobe is to retain its hobbyist user base its pricing structure is going to have to change. I've tended to upgrade everytime since CS2 but I'm not sure I'd have bought Photoshop at all if I'd been buying in to the proposed upgrade system.
The main stimulus for me to upgrade has been RAW compatability for new cameras but I think LR makes this a lot less of an issue for me and I'm not sure I'll bother upgrading PS in future.
If You use PS all day every day it's a must but I can cope pretty well with LR and an older version of PS (or for that matter GIMP or Paintshop Pro). Plenty of other places to spend my money.

1 upvote
Dennishh
By Dennishh (Nov 23, 2011)

Adobe's Netflix moment!! Don't they ever learn?

0 upvotes
Dennishh
By Dennishh (Nov 23, 2011)

Just downloaded PaintShop Pro X4 will try it again. Adobe might have done us a favor by encouraging the competition! Adobe must not of heard there is a recession in the photo business. Sorry to hear there having a hard time making enough money, maybe if the lower the price they will sell more copies than ever.

0 upvotes
philfennessy
By philfennessy (Nov 25, 2011)

Again Ive bought every version from v2.5. Personally as a mac user I think Adobe really dropped the ball with CS5. Photoshop has always been the photographer professional tool but they added silly features like the puppet warp and all the 3d options that are far better addressed in purpose built 3d packages and removed the variations tool from the mac version because they didn't have time to code a 64bit version. Plus they added a third party shareware program to handle the check for upgrades. It just felt thrown together to meet the deadline. No better than CS4. CS4 to CS5 was a retrograde step on the mac platform.

0 upvotes
martin chappell
By martin chappell (Nov 28, 2011)

Adobe just shut me down today i had to search the net to find a number to call them they told me i need to deactivate before i upgrade mac osx then reactivate, fortunately i was reactivated but it is alarming how easy they can deactivate your software, i am using CS 4 extended and am planning to upgrade to CS6 but if i need CS 5 then i will be staying on CS 4 and just upgrading aperture. I will never go to a monthly subscription.

0 upvotes
Alan Granger
By Alan Granger (Nov 28, 2011)

I mostly use LR now, and only use CS5 for content aware fill. I have a photo restoration business and that was worth the upgrade cost. However, if there is not something similar for CS6. I'm out. I am not going to upgrade again unless they offer something significant. Actually, appears to me that there is less and less new for photographers in Photoshop. Mostly for graphics people.

0 upvotes
Jennings Ford
By Jennings Ford (Nov 30, 2011)

I have used Photoshop Elements for years (5 versions). I bought PS5 and LR3 on greatly reduced price special about 6 months ago. I am truly impressed with what LightRoom can do by itself and use it 90 percenty of the time. PS5 has masks and can mould shapes, etc which I use rarely, but still need. If you have a choice - I recommend LightRoom for most non-commercial users.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 398
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