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Adobe faces criticism for change of upgrade policy

By dpreview staff on Nov 22, 2011 at 21:53 GMT

Photoshop trainer and author Scott Kelby has published an ‘open letter’ to Adobe requesting it re-thinks its product upgrade policy. The company, in a recent blog post about its ‘Creative Cloud’ online computing service, revealed that it will only allow owners of the most recent versions of Photoshop and Creative Suite to upgrade to the CS6 versions, when they become available. This moves away from its traditional position of allowing owners of the previous three versions a discounted upgrade. The company is offering a 20% discount for these owners to bring themselves up-to-date in time for the policy change.

The move, seemingly aimed at encouraging users to move to the monthly license for the cloud service, rather than buying a ‘perpetual license,’ will mean owners of Photoshop CS3 who might have expected to have the option of upgrading to CS6 will now have to first pay $159/£127/€199 (ex. tax) to move to version CS5. Users of the comprehensive ‘Creative Suite Master Collection CS3’ will face a rather more daunting $1,119/£985/€1279 (ex. tax) bill to put themselves in the position to receive a discounted upgrade to the CS6 version. Kelby’s letter acknowledges there may be a business case for the change in policy but asks Adobe to delay the policy change until CS7, so that users have more time to make an informed decision about their upgrade options. The 20% discount on upgrade prices is valid until December 31st 2011.

Comments

Total comments: 398
1234
paul simon king
By paul simon king (Jan 30, 2012)

Rang Adobe to double check that I would UNEQUIVOCALLY be able to upgrade to Photoshop CS6 boxed or downloadable version, when it came out, at an upgrade price.
-the lady I spoke to only could refer me to the info on their own website which she agreed was ambiguous ; in that it did not specify whether users of INDIVIDUAL CS products would be able to take advantage of the upgrade offer, nor whether the upgrade to CS6 (from CS4) would be for a boxed/downloadable version or whether it would be only for the cloud version.In other words it is still not clear whether users of Photoshop (as opposed to the full CS suites) CS3/CS4 will have an upgrade path to CS6 Photoshop which can be installed on their computer- it is not clear whether the upgrade path (CS4-CS6) will be for boxed/downloadable versions or for cloud only versions ( I asked very specifically about this).Nor is it clear whether the upgrade price will be within the usual upgrade price parameters.

0 upvotes
keepreal
By keepreal (Jan 14, 2012)

What proportion of readers who use Photoshop share my view that upgrades for most people are a waste of money. I was the lucky winner of CS2 for my prowess with Elements 2 where the judge Martin Evening said he could not see any signs of the heavy retouching I had done to remove distracting elements even though I supplied him with a copy of the original. I would not dream of paying the hike for the full software. Of course if you are into graphics rather than photography, it might be a different story.

I have dabbled with trial versions of CS3 and CS4 but did not like them. CS2 has a lean uncluttered interface and I like it that way. Moreover if you are interested in pictures rather than photo technology, does it really matter having the latest version or is it Adobe merely cashing in on acquisitive users? I cannot imagine Claude Monet arguing over which kinds of brush or pigments to use with Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Frédéric Bazilleor, Alfred Sisley or having to keep trying new ones.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
andrew turner
By andrew turner (Dec 19, 2011)

What a mess.

I first caught wind of Adobe's move toward subscription-based pricing when trying out Adobe Muse; then, when investigating the seeming hole in Apple's iPad, being lack of integration through Apple TV and iPhoto - and found Carousel, which is also subscription-based.

I use the professional CS suite at work and at home, though at home I'm at CS3. However - based on what I've been reading - while I may continue using Adobe products at work, I will likely end my relationship with them on an independent level and actively seek and use alternatives. The only piece of the puzzle I am truly uncertain about is InDesign - any suggestions?

cheers
Andrew

1 upvote
jefflins
By jefflins (Dec 19, 2011)

Here we go...I'll tell you now, this won't fly. Just like BOA trying to charge you $5 a month to use your debit card. The people that make these decisions are disconnected from reality. The result will probably be flat revenue/profit change with a bonus of lost goodwill. People will do the full upgrade even less often...will seek competitive solutions..move to Elements...procure the software illegally, etc.

Fortunately, the solution is simple: Charge more to upgrade from older versions, and do so in a logical manner. Current version upgrades $150 (nice! and reasonable enough to incent peeople to regularly upgrade) one version older, $199. 2 versions older, 250. 3 versions older? Out of luck, no upgrade available.

If they MUST stick with their new policy, then at least make it $150 vs 199.

BTW, this pricing model screams "we can't inovate enough to make you WANT to upgrade on your own..."

Almsot as annoying as Apple charging $100 for 16GB of storage...and 200 for 48gb

1 upvote
bish_o
By bish_o (Dec 11, 2011)

One man show and using cs4 master collection here, so an upgrade to cs5 master collection then an upgrade to cs6 is looking pretty nuts to me. I guess I'll just go from upgrading every two iterations to upgrading every three iterations. I suspect that a good lot of other users will be considering the same.

I've been thinking for a while now that Adobe is the new Microsoft, will this latest move be akin to the Vista fiasco in it's effect on Adobe's thinking? Frankly I feel that Adobe needs a wake up call and this may be it hopefully. As much as I like some of their software (flash is dying - please don't bother bundling it in any more or at least give me the option leave it out of the master collection), it's often bloated, certainly overly expensive, usually with crappy installation experiences (and then you have to do a 1gig update) and don't even get me started on their so called support. Sounds like Microsoft all over again, arrogant-tick, out of date-tick, overly expensive-tick.

0 upvotes
Reactive
By Reactive (Dec 6, 2011)

I have to use CS5 and TS3 at work, and I am distinctly unimpressed with each so-called 'upgrade'. They contain just a few headline 'features' for the marketing team to shout about, but still contain plenty of old, slow, and very crude tools (compared with Corel programs). If the immense prices meant slick applications and fast responses by Adobe, the prices might be acceptable - but that's not the Adobe way is it? Installation takes forever, uninstallation still worse, requiring cleanup programs to remove the mess. The suite's applications don't store their data in a consistent format, so if you need to use another workstation it's virtually impossible to take your customizations across with you. And my pet hate is Acrobat, which gets more bloated, badly laid out, and inconsistent on each 'upgrade' - but still has lots of basic bugs.

It's astounding Adobe manage to hold its market position when the open source alternatives and user experience are so much more rewarding.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
J Parker
By J Parker (Dec 6, 2011)

FastStone Image Viewer (a Lightroom-like program) and Gimp are outstanding free alternatives once you get used to their interfaces -- not every interface needs to look like Photoshop's to be effective. There's also significant third party open source support such as a plug in that will allow Gimp to run many of Photoshop's plugins. Photoshop is a great program -- but putting that money towards a nice collection of fast primes will do far more for your images. I know that this may not be the best solution for many professional Photoshop users, but it's an alternative worth considering for some.

1 upvote
cononfodder
By cononfodder (Dec 2, 2011)

I can appreciate everyone's frustration. Isn't it nice that we have an advocate like Scott Kelby on our side. I was told in the 2008 Photpshop World that my G5 would have to be replaced to use some of the really great plugins (eg Topaz) and that Adobe was greaing up for 64 bit which would require an Intel chipset. I purchased CS 5 extended and its great, however with my plugins I end up using Lightroom 2 and CS5 only for heavy duty processing. The new MAC was a big ouch, however it was worth it. I would recommend some sort of graduated scale for entry to the next level of CS or an amnisty program . At this point, CS5ext does the job and CS6 will have to be super for me to upgrade as I have been with them since CS. That's a grand right there. Finally, I agree with Scott's recommendation postpone till CS7 for all of us to make the decision. Perhaps they could implement a tiered system to make the initial purchase less of a sting especially for non pro's. Whatever obtain it legally.

0 upvotes
frank200
By frank200 (Dec 4, 2011)

Scott Kelby is NOT advocating for us he is doing it for himself he make money from Adobe Users if more people move away from adobe that is going to hurt him

0 upvotes
cononfodder
By cononfodder (Dec 6, 2011)

Your point well taken , however name a group that can be addressed as readily as NAPP. Otherwise it is doubtful we would have any say if at all. I will have to consider my image style regarding any further upgrades. Adobe might want to consider selling upgrades by the feature, ie like plugins. I also wonder if the arcitechture of CS6 is dependent on changes made to CS5?

0 upvotes
Lensjoy
By Lensjoy (Dec 1, 2011)

I've always upgraded on every other Photoshop release, all the way back to Photoshop 3.0. Adobe never seemed to offer enough improvements to make it worthwhile on their release schedule, but I've found value by waiting an extra release cycle. I suspect many others will agree. I don't think I'm cheating Adobe for paying for six releases of their software over that time.

Hey Adobe, how about this: Deliver a new version of Photoshop half as frequently with twice the improvements and maybe everyone will decide the upgrade is worth it. Today's product planning simply extracts money from customers without delivering real benefit for what we pay. Adobe also needs to do a better job communicating with their customers so we get the features we need rather than what the developers think is cool.

2 upvotes
Fellowpedestrian
By Fellowpedestrian (Dec 1, 2011)

I had been an Adobe photoshop follower since PS4 up until CS3. I then realized that every other year, they'd bring a so-called upgrade and ask for more money. I think in all, that software caused me a lot of money. I now work mostly with Corel. I've had all their photo apps up to the latest and it works fine and it's a lot cheaper. All the fancy Mac users will have you believe that you're not a real photographer if you don't use Adobe. My clients could not care less!

1 upvote
Danny
By Danny (Dec 1, 2011)

I would be interested in Corel, and as I make a living working in PS I think am a professional PS user. Unfortunately Corel is not for Mac users... (anymore?)

My main concern is that Adobe does not deliver anything new to Photoshop in their upgrades. It are minor adjustments and functions I can live without. I upgraded to CS5. Was it worth it? As for now I still do 99% the same things I already did 10 years ago in Photoshop... I have some favorite and essential functions (Liquify/CMYK) as we all have our own way of working. Why upgrading then? I had too... what if I would have stayed with CS3 and in the near future no PS alternative is offering CMYK support? You can't stick around forever in the same version. Computers change, system versions change. The only thing that hardly seems to change is Photoshop! They can ask me double the upgrade price every year if they really have something new to offer in their upgrades. They don't give you the whole pie, just very tiny slices.

1 upvote
NigelMoore
By NigelMoore (Dec 2, 2011)

> All the fancy Mac users will have you believe that you're not a real photographer if you don't use Adobe.

Hey, I'm a 'fancy Mac user', and I lament the fact that PSP isn't available for Mac (I used to use it years ago on Windoze, but that was when is was still JASC).

0 upvotes
Ohnostudio
By Ohnostudio (Dec 2, 2011)

@danny I totally agree with you here. I did a recent rant post about the issue on my blog. I am at CS2. A few months ago I got the Corel PSP X4 or whatever it is just to run some plugins for fun as they would not run on my old CS2. Being a Photoshop user since about 1997, I find the Corel product clunky to say the least. But as I only use it on a limited basis, I can live with the shortcomings.

0 upvotes
somename
By somename (Dec 1, 2011)

Adobe puts down real money in developing their software, and while it can be debated how much they're actually spending... if you did not update to the previous version, then you did not support the development of the next version... and hence, you're rather freeloading your way with the reduced upgrade price.

To try and simplify it further:
You buy CS3 when it is released, and this helps pay for the development costs for CS4 and recover costs from CS3's development.
Adobe goes and makes 3 more iterations of the software, during which time you do not offer any financial support to Adobe.

Now WHAT do they owe you?
Adobe is doing nothing wrong... the reduced update costs are a REWARD, not a right. For supporting adobe by updating before, they reduce the price to update again.

Try "Upgrading at a reduced price" your DSLR next time, say that you bought a P&S 5 years ago so you deserve a reduced price. If this sounds absurd, why doesn't Adobe's practices sound sane?

0 upvotes
frank200
By frank200 (Dec 1, 2011)

upgrading is a choice and choosing other application it is to so F... .adobe

1 upvote
NigelMoore
By NigelMoore (Dec 1, 2011)

>Try "Upgrading at a reduced price" your DSLR next time, say that you bought a P&S 5 years ago so you deserve a reduced price. If this sounds absurd, why doesn't Adobe's practices sound sane?

That's a fallacious argument, though. Both Adobe and the camera producers have to cover R&D/marketing costs and make a profit, but the hardware producers also have to maufacture/distribute the product. Adobe's distribution costs are reduced by software download, for example.

To directly compare software and hardware producers' practices is irrelevant.

5 upvotes
DigitalShutter
By DigitalShutter (Dec 2, 2011)

That is not a fair comparison at all!! They already have all the ground work laid out and they add a few sprinkles of innovation each year. Camera makers Physically change the designes and layouts of cameras each year. They also offer higher pixel counts, faster iso's, improved response times, etc. So as far as development goes, I would agree with you if they redesigned it each year....But they dont. They add a new feature and want to charge you full price. Why not go modular and let people pay for the new features they want. Instead of forced upgrades. On a different note....It will be a cold day in hell that I give adobe $50/month to use there program...Hmmm Pay $600 once and use it for a few years or pay $600 per year for a subscription?!?! If Adobe does not watch it's strategy they may end up in the same boat as Netflix!!

0 upvotes
bm bradley
By bm bradley (Dec 5, 2011)

I've upgraded since ps 3.5, now I'm at cs4 and I don't really see any reason to upgrade to cs5 or cs6 or cs7... what has adobe done to improve the software? nothing that I can see... bmb

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
panman55
By panman55 (Dec 1, 2011)

I've always upgraded every other version over the years from PS2, got as far as CS4, and then realised there was no point in going any further as my dear old trusty dual-core fast-ish PC (cutting-edge in its time, about 5 years ago) simply wouldn't work with CS5 - so no need for it.
So the decision's made: Adobe, I am NOT going to buy an entirely new computer just to run your expensive software on, and by the way I think you've behaved appallingly to all the many loyal users of your products over the years with horribly cynical 'upgrade paths', especially the dollar-for-pound ripoff prices that we've had to endure here in the UK for way too long.
Actually I'm very happy with what my PS CS4 does, and I'll not be giving Adobe any more cash from here on in - so stuff it, boys, this time you've gone too far and I will not be purchasing anything with your name on it in the future: So long, and thanks for what was once a great product!

1 upvote
frank200
By frank200 (Nov 30, 2011)

I would recommend to everyone to take advantage of the rebates and upgrade to CS5 and then lets boycott Adobe buy stop buying there products we need to let them know what we think and the best way is through their wallet

2 upvotes
globethrottle
By globethrottle (Nov 30, 2011)

O boy Im glad Im not and has never been a PS user. There are so many alternatives that I almost feel sorry for those willingly pay almost ridiculous sums of money for a program.

0 upvotes
frank200
By frank200 (Nov 30, 2011)

could you please list some of the alternatives that you use, i'm looking for one in the future. thank you

Comment edited 21 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
globethrottle
By globethrottle (Nov 30, 2011)

Just google alternatives to ps. ........PSP, gimp, krita, pixia, IrfanView, chocoflop, LR.......etc.

Comment edited 4 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Danny
By Danny (Nov 30, 2011)

And none of your alternatives allows you to work in the CMYK color space.... There is NO alternative for Photoshop for professional users who have to work in CMYK.

0 upvotes
sevo_stille
By sevo_stille (Dec 1, 2011)

Well, Photoline for example does CMYK.

1 upvote
Rule 34
By Rule 34 (Nov 30, 2011)

Photoshop is $699 new, no CS crap included. If you're charging standard rates for graphics design, that's about one day's worth of work. I'm kind of failing to see the problem here.

1 upvote
ChrisKramer1
By ChrisKramer1 (Nov 29, 2011)

Reading about this I looked on the Adobe website and saw the special 30% reduction on the upgrade. I did think about it but 230 Euros is a lot of mulah (which could go towards a tamron 60mm f.2) and my CS4 seems more than enough. But then I thought about Gimp - sometimes you mention Photoshop to people and they reply "Nah, I use Gimp". So I'm trying it out - and I'm hooked! Seems powerful enough and there are los of tutorials and plug-ins available for free! I can use my Nikon raws too. So thanks Adobe - now I know I don't need you anymore!

0 upvotes
frank200
By frank200 (Nov 29, 2011)

I to love Gimp it is very powerful And you can use Topaz plugins with Gimp. and many other Photoshop brushes and other stuff.
I have CS5 but I will not be able to afford this Adobe Black mail so I rather donate money to Gimp

0 upvotes
Danny
By Danny (Nov 30, 2011)

Yep, let GIMP add CMYK and we are talking.

0 upvotes
frank200
By frank200 (Nov 30, 2011)

here is how:
http://www.digital-photography-school.com/adding-icc-profiles-in-gimp
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hANzyYHGIT8
http://www.registry.gimp.org/node/471
http://www.blackfiveservices.co.uk/photoprint.shtml

0 upvotes
Patco
By Patco (Dec 6, 2011)

Danny said, "Yep, let GIMP add CMYK and we are talking".
Ive not tried it but:
"CMYK support in The GIMP"
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/CMYK_support_in_The_GIMP

0 upvotes
Shorty88
By Shorty88 (Nov 29, 2011)

I lost interest in Adobe when I bought my last camera and found out I would have to upgrade to be able to open my raw files????? They can charge what they want because I'm out and don't plan on getting back in!

1 upvote
Danny
By Danny (Nov 29, 2011)

I don't mind paying for Photoshop each year IF the upgrades are really worth it. The problem is, they are not by far.. You can simply miss a couple of versions, and still you can do 99% of the stuff you want to do anyway. Hey, so now I have 'Puppet warp' in CS5, cool. Can I live without it? Of course, the essential ingredients are already inside Photoshop, no matter if you work with CS1 or CS5. Adobe knows this, and because they own the market they are getting lazy. Lazy to add options that really make a difference, lazy to update their filters; all are ancient with little clumsy windows, nothing new. But the alternative software makers are not lazy, and soon someone, somewhere starts adding CMYK and RAW workflow. We can all predict how things will work out for Adobe when this is starting to happen. Because as soon as someone is offering a serious alternative that don't force people to pay for each upgrade, I know what I will do.

3 upvotes
Thanks4thefish42
By Thanks4thefish42 (Nov 29, 2011)

It was do nothing and stay with CS3 or pay up now as to not have to shell out huge bucks later on. After the switch to Aperture 2 I use CS3 about 1% of everything I do commercially. But that 1% in CS3 is worth the price of admission. The blackmail of having to go to CS5 first is indeed blackmail but they are trying to stay in business and I just have to add it to my cost of doing business. In the long run your CS2 or CS3 may not work on Operating system-(whatever creature Apple comes up with) Tortoise v1.02. Then your really screwed. Everytime an upgrade comes out I say, No Way. Then about a few days and a Kelby book later I say-how did I ever live with out this.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
jaygeephoto
By jaygeephoto (Nov 29, 2011)

I like it! It's very American; Apple's been making stuff in China, Banks now charge customers exorbitant fees for their mistakes, so why is Adobe so late in the game? With any luck, CS6 won't run on the new computer I bought a month ago. Gotta love corporate tyranny.

3 upvotes
frank200
By frank200 (Nov 29, 2011)

what improvements CS6 is offering compare to CS5?

0 upvotes
rkgitto
By rkgitto (Nov 29, 2011)

I'm glad I'm a member of NAPP, and support Scott Kelby speaking out about Adobe's suggested new policy. I love the Adobe products, and have invested a lot of money (at least a lot for me) in them. Beginning forced to upgrade for each new release would be a real hardship for me. and many others as well.
As a leader in the industry Adobe does have a responsibility to it's users. I'm loyal, but technology is constantly changing, and new products are being developed. So I'll support Adobe as long as I fell Adobe is supporting me.
I know there's no such thing as a 'free lunch', but I don't want to be forced to also pay for dinner.

0 upvotes
frank200
By frank200 (Nov 29, 2011)

Thank God there are so many alternatives Some are FREE or very cheap like Gimp serif photo, core. for the future that would be my choice for now i will jut use CS5 which is great No need to upgrade

0 upvotes
spoli58
By spoli58 (Nov 29, 2011)

See Netflix backlash after they change the rules of the game. Adobe follows the same path. While it is understandable the need for financing the R&D, the fact is that Adobe (like other big players in this market) are tempted to become bullies and make the profit their main goal. They better be learning from Netflix on how to treat their customers.

Lately I became more appreciative towards the Open Source products: despite of not being perfect and having less predictive support, with patience and dedication you can get pretty good results. Not to mention that more and more competitors come with innovative tools that are usually priced aggressively against the Goliaths of the business (I guess they all dream of becoming Goliaths one day).

There are always other options!

0 upvotes
Jim Hayward
By Jim Hayward (Nov 29, 2011)

This is good. It will open up the market to others who have produced a good but not feature rich excellent photo suite. I have CS4. I am not getting 5 so I can get 6 so it will work on my April (Hopefully) arrival of my 1DX.

0 upvotes
davidkachel
By davidkachel (Nov 29, 2011)

C'mon guys. Don't be so hard on Adobe. What else could they do? They don't have a Steve Jobs they can fire or a New Coke they can try to peddle. They have to do something monumentally stupid!

0 upvotes
Deerev
By Deerev (Nov 29, 2011)

For my income, Photoshop is very expensive, and yet through the years I have purchased two different versions. I guess I missed a few too many upgrades, and changed platforms, thus was told I would have to once again purchase for my new computer.

Sorry I just don't have enough respect to once again be asked to purchase for a third time.

2 upvotes
Bryan Costin
By Bryan Costin (Nov 28, 2011)

I'm not surprised. Companies which have a large market to themselves usually do stupid and self-destructive stuff. Adobe is in dire need of a serious commercial competitor.

I image that Adobe figures corporate customers and professionals either already reflexively upgrade, or can afford to pay more when they decide to do so. And if those guys violate the byzantine licensing agreements then they're big targets with deep pockets. Everyone else doesn't really count, since they're already assumed to be using unlicensed copies, anyway, because they wouldn't put out the cash for the previous rounds of upgrades.

0 upvotes
cpmavrick
By cpmavrick (Nov 28, 2011)

A bad move by Adobe in an attempt to suck customers dry. I'm liking Nik products a lot better these days and I use CS5 even less.

0 upvotes
rdc13
By rdc13 (Nov 28, 2011)

I'm on Photoshop all day at work - where I don't have to pay for it. Just upgraded to 5 at home. Unless it starts making me money again (went from freelance to working for in-house for an agency), I won't be upgrading soon. Most of the newer 'improvements' aren't worth the price of admission. Bye Photoshop - trying to be like Quark, huh? Remember them?

2 upvotes
Hauer
By Hauer (Nov 28, 2011)

Will Adobe be victim of their own success?!

0 upvotes
Danny
By Danny (Nov 28, 2011)

I have CS5 for a couple of days now, upgraded from CS3. I haven't found any serious changes yet. The interface is a bit different, some navigation is a bit smoother (loop) and an interesting option called 'puppet warp' seems very nice, kind of like 'Liquify' which is use a lot. Filters are the same, as always, little clumsy micro-windows, nothing new. And to think this is a 2 versions upgrade from CS3, I really have to search for new stuff.. It is an upgrade, but c'mon Adobe.
A couple of years ago I bought a 3D program called 'ZBrush', very professional piece of software. So far, every upgrade is free for registered users, and this program has changed A LOT since I bought it. That's what I call good support, and they won't make me feel bad when they decide to charge for a new version as they have done so much for free so far. And as said, when there is an upgrade, it is really worth it.......

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
1 upvote
Charlene_S
By Charlene_S (Nov 28, 2011)

A couple of issues come to mind for me (in addition to a company trying to get more money out of its customers). 1) if they were to go to an all cloud based product , how would this effect people whose ISP put monthly limits on data usage? 2) What happens to people like myself who use Topaz Labs plug ins with a cloud based product.
Topaz Labs take your plug ins and turn them into a stand alone product! BTW Topaz does not charge current subscribers for updates. Here that Adobe????

4 upvotes
CollBaxter
By CollBaxter (Nov 28, 2011)

I agree Charlene. We have Capped DSL accounts out in the boon docks , connection is unreliable and slow . What about some people like nature shooters , architects and others that live and work out of the 'Global Village" where there is NO internet connection. One day MBA students will be doing theses’ on what went wrong at Adobe or “ one of the worst marketing decisions that parallel the Cherry Coke thing. “

3 upvotes
stanginit
By stanginit (Nov 27, 2011)

Then they wonder why people use their software illegally. Why not try making it affordable.

6 upvotes
NigelMoore
By NigelMoore (Nov 28, 2011)

As a photographer, what is it that PS does that PSE/LR do not? PS is expensive because it's a pro app with a lot of power. Probably too much for most people. Affordability is driven by the market, and tight-fistedness (or otherwise lack of money) is no excuse for piracy. There are legal alternative options out there.

4 upvotes
BC in NS
By BC in NS (Nov 30, 2011)

NIgel- You are absolutely correct. LR and PSE would do what 95% of photographers might need. As a pro, I use Photoshop - but don't then need LR (using Bridge and Camera RAW to import and make minor adjustments to my photos). I am thinking my way to save money is to simply purchase the PS upgrades as they come, but drop LR (which I have but seldom use any more) altogether. In the end, people will find legal ways to purchase what they need within their budget, whether that's a consumer or a professional. To do otherwise (use the software illegally) is just theft.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
Brian Hedrick
By Brian Hedrick (Nov 27, 2011)

I'll second that an open source alternative needs to be found. Open Office, while not unseating Microsoft, has done quite well and is a respectable program.

0 upvotes
jcmainman48
By jcmainman48 (Nov 27, 2011)

A Netfilix like death spiral?

1 upvote
iGirl
By iGirl (Nov 27, 2011)

This is the perfect time for another brand to come in and take all Adobe's business away. Most of their software is incredibly bloated anyway.

I'll use my licensed and paid for CS5 software for as long as I can before "upgrading" - but when I do - it won't be to Adobe as long as this "subscription" scheme in is effect.

3 upvotes
buda1065
By buda1065 (Nov 27, 2011)

A common sense approach would be to sell the full version for $250. More people would buy it and I think revenues would increase. Frequent and free upgrades would limit pirating. Instead they choose monopoly rent and high pricing. A good time for an open source alternative to come along, something like PT GUI.

2 upvotes
Dario D
By Dario D (Nov 27, 2011)

Much good on Scott Kelby for doing this.
(btw, his books/stuff helped get me going in photography.)

2 upvotes
PhotoKhan
By PhotoKhan (Nov 28, 2011)

His books/stuff also helped Adobe a lot...

0 upvotes
DaveBowman
By DaveBowman (Nov 26, 2011)

Adobe has gone right down in my estimation over this. Stinks of greed and milking their soon-not-to-be-so-loyal customer base if they continue down this route. Cloud computing and subscription based - the only loser here is the customer, during a time of recession to boot. I have no interest in it.

0 upvotes
Martin_Kay
By Martin_Kay (Nov 25, 2011)

I'm not totally sure of the necessity to even keep upgrading. I have the CS5 creative suite, but I actually prefer to still use my old CS2 version especially Illustrator. There are many changes made to these latest versions I don't like- I don't actually feel at home with the new interfaces. I don't like having to go to the bother of learning some new and unecessary interface change.
I never upgraded to CS3 or CS4, but went from CS2 to CS5, but really for most work a photographer would do its just not necessary to keep upgrading and Adobe know this.

Comment edited 6 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
nachos
By nachos (Nov 25, 2011)

I've been a long time adobe customer and their monopolistic behavior has led to terrible customer service and absurd pricing schemes. It was a fiasco updating to 5.5, for which I paid considerably more for the upgrade than the one previously. Their CS also ignores complaints, or takes days to send pithy responses.

Frankly, the best way to hit Adobe in the wallet is the pirates. It takes an extra 5 minutes to install a well-tested trusted-source pirate version with easy step-by-step directions (and even youtube demonstration videos). And the pirates have better 'customer service' to boot!

I'd gladly keep paying Adobe, but only if the gouging ceased. And I was a customer of theirs for over a decade. But for now, I'll take the friendly pirate who likes sticking it to Adobe.

2 upvotes
Renaylor
By Renaylor (Nov 25, 2011)

I am not a professional photographer by any means. I am a serious amateur who has been using Adobe Photoshop for over10 years. I start with version 5 and was hooked and used that version for years until I had to upgrade. Fortunately for me I could get an educational discount. I just upgraded to CS4 extended to CS5 Extended. The Content Fill and other features were worth the upgrade to me especially at 30%(Black Friday Sale). However that being said-in this economy-I cannot and will not feed this business or any other who insists on making a profit by picking the pockets of its customers. However the only way to stop this madness is not with our mouths but with our wallets. Just like with Bank Of America. If enough people open their mouths-close their wallets. I don't just mean amateurs but professionals in the industry like Scott Kelby and others and we all stand together and do not upgrade anything they will eventually throw in the towel.

5 upvotes
Gary Kirkpatrick
By Gary Kirkpatrick (Nov 25, 2011)

Look at it this way. Adobe, Microsoft and probably Apple and the rest have learned a great lesson from Drug Dealers. They brought us in, got us hooked and now after they will tighten the screws. The idea is monthly payments, miss a monthly and you will be cut off, fined to reconnect, who knows how much that will be. I shoot a lot in remote areas where internet is sporadic. I am currently at a beach on the California coast, using Verizon wireless broadband. The connection goes in and out. Sometimes I cannot connect for hours, sometimes days. If I have to connect to use PS or possibly Microsoft it will put me and a lot of others back in the stone age of Photography. It may very well be that the last few remaining years of my life will be spent using Windows 7, CS5 and Lion.
Just wait until the Automotive industry catches up. OnStar can do it now. Miss a payment on your car, DMV or insurance, maybe even Income Tax and a Satellite will shut down your car or cars.......It's coming!

2 upvotes
edfo4
By edfo4 (Nov 25, 2011)

Here's what I think. Adobe isn't going to change their new upgrade policy until they see if it is making them more money than their current policy. If it does, it will stay, if it dosen't, well, we'll get an announcement about how Adobe listens to its customers and it'll be back to the old way. Forum comments, as much as they might relieve stress, are unlikely to have much effect. And as for Kelby's "open letter"..baloney! Kelby's business depends on Adobe and he'll do nothing to tick them off. If he really wanted to make a point, he could have told them not to change. What he did was just get a little free publicity in places like dpreview.com. I know that's cynical, but I'll bet a free up-grade, it's accurate!

1 upvote
ZM1
By ZM1 (Nov 25, 2011)

I am putting this in because it didn't fit below. I was excited about Adobe's new template based web design software, it would have been a good replacement for iWeb. When I went to their site to download the BETA of Muse I found out that it would be a subscription based service. Adobe lost me right there. They lost a future customer before they even brought the product to market, stupid.
I hope someone comes out with reasonably priced versions of everything Adobe makes, I really don't think adobe really knows how much of a consumer product company they are (they are not Auto Desk they don't make products that only a hand full of people use in a professional setting). Adobe Cut the sh#t charge your academic price for the regular product and don't even think about selling subscriptions to your wares.

1 upvote
escaladieu
By escaladieu (Nov 29, 2011)

Try Serif Webplus

0 upvotes
ZM1
By ZM1 (Nov 25, 2011)

The people on this forum defending Adobe's new upgrade and pricing schemes, by saying that Adobe has to do allot of R&D, miss one crucial point. Adobe is a software company and at the end of the R&D phase when they bring out their product they do not have to produce anything the customer downloads the product no shipping no warehousing no physical product (I know they still sell allot on DVD now, but how much of an investment is that even?).
A company engaged in making tangible products for instance a cars or cameras, has to do at least as much R&D, and then actually manufacture a physical working product to sell, they then have to ship and warehouse that product. When they come out with a new model they have to take a loss on the unsold old ones.
I learned PS on a cracked copy and then moved on to an academic version (only because I thought the academic price was fair), I will never upgrade to a new version unless it has something I need. If it goes subscription I'm gone.

0 upvotes
Hawaii-geek
By Hawaii-geek (Nov 25, 2011)

Even as a CS5 and LR3 user and upgrader ... I do NOT see the "good" in this.
With LR I am using PS less and less. Which for me is a good thing. So, I want to upgrade , but the upgrade cost must stay low. (and run faster, for everyday stuff).

0 upvotes
Stefan Carey
By Stefan Carey (Nov 25, 2011)

I have seen this trend to the monthly fee, and will avoid if at all possible buying products like these. Corel Paint Shop Pro & Silkypix offer excellent alternatives at a much lower price.

We also still need to hear why Adobe prices for downloads in Australia are much higher than the US prices.

I think we should boycott companies if we think they are trying to take advantage of us unfairly.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
escaladieu
By escaladieu (Nov 29, 2011)

Can Paint Shop pro read NEF's ? I just tried it with no luck. Must say I'd like an alternative to PS, its just too expensive !

0 upvotes
sh10453
By sh10453 (Nov 25, 2011)

Part 2

There are plenty of others that are totally free, such as Paint.NET, with lots of user-contributed plug-ins.

Also, digiKam, is another, which is an open-source program, with tons of plug-ins.

The Gimp is another free alternative, a powerful, open-source program also.

Of course there will be a learning curve, but that's the case with almost every software, and it may very well be worth it.

I will not whine. I'll just find alternatives, and let a vendor rethink.

Just my 2-cents

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0 upvotes
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