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Kodak sells Image Sensor Solutions business

By dpreview staff on Nov 8, 2011 at 10:57 GMT

Kodak has sold its Image Sensor Solutions business to Platinum Equity in a bid to strengthen its financial position. The company, which has struggled to manage the shift in the consumer photographic market from film to digital, also recently revealed that it may have to raise cash by the sale of more than 1100 patents to survive the coming year. Image Sensor Solutions provides sensors for the Leica M9 and S2 and a number of medium format backs, as well as a wide range of specialist imaging applications.

Click here for more on Kodak's proposed patent sale (Reuters)

Press release:

Kodak Sells Image Sensor Business to Platinum Equity

ROCHESTER, N.Y., November 07 - Eastman Kodak Company (NYSE:EK) announced today that it has completed the sale of its Image Sensor Solutions (ISS) business to Platinum Equity in a move that will sharpen Kodak’s operational focus and strengthen its financial position.

While the financial details were not disclosed, Kodak will have continuing access to the image sensor technology involved in this transaction for use in its own products. Kodak has previously communicated that it would sell assets that are not central to its transformation to a profitable, sustainable digital company. This sale is aligned with that strategy to generate cash to complete the transformation.

Included in the sale is a 263,000 square foot facility in Eastman Business Park in Rochester, N.Y., that houses manufacturing and research facilities.

The ISS business develops, manufactures, and markets the world’s highest performance solid state image sensor devices. Over the past 30 years, Kodak’s image sensors have delivered unrivaled image quality and innovative features for use in a broad range of demanding imaging applications. From precision manufacturing inspection to digital radiography, from earth imaging satellites to traffic monitoring, from the world’s highest performing studio photography cameras to DNA sequencing systems, customers around the world rely on high-performance products from ISS in the most mission-critical applications.

Platinum Equity is a global M&A&O® firm specializing in the merger, acquisition and operation of companies that provide services and solutions to customers in a broad range of business markets.

“Image Sensor Solutions is a business that is well-positioned in the high-performance imaging markets in which it participates,” said Pradeep Jotwani, President, Consumer Digital Imaging Group, and Senior Vice President, Eastman Kodak Company. “This sale maximizes shareholder value by obtaining a full and fair valuation for this business, and allows Kodak to increase its financial flexibility.”

Jotwani noted that Platinum Equity brings significant financial and operational resources to the ISS business and a comprehensive plan to ensure its continued success.

“Platinum Equity is an ideal acquirer of Kodak’s ISS business because they are committed to the success of the business for the benefit of customers and employees,” Jotwani said. “I’m very pleased that we have such a favorable outcome for all of our constituents.”

Platinum Equity focuses on acquiring businesses that can benefit from the firm’s extensive in-house capability and expertise in transition, integration and operations.

“This is a great opportunity to acquire a business with an impressive record for delivering innovative solutions to customers around the world,” said Brian Wall, the partner at Platinum Equity who led the team pursuing the acquisition. “The ISS business has a strong management team with the right vision for leading the company into the future. We share their commitment to product development and customer service and are committed to helping the business realize its full potential.”

Wall said Platinum Equity’s experience managing complex transitions from corporate parent companies will benefit employees, customers and other partners. 

“Our operations group will work hand-in-hand with the management team to ensure a seamless transition while allowing the organization to stay focused on delivering world class imaging products and solutions,” said Wall. “We are proud to have forged a unique divestiture solution in partnership with Kodak that serves the best interests of everyone involved.”

Comments

Total comments: 69
marianco
By marianco (Nov 10, 2011)

IDIOTS at Kodak.

Kodak just sold its only viable digital photography unit, where it is a world leader.

Everything else is dependent on other companies.

I foresee Kodak dying at an accelerated pace.

2 upvotes
AlanG
By AlanG (Nov 12, 2011)

This is a desperate situation. What were they supposed to do since they were running out of money to operate? They are trying to sell 10% of their patents too. And who knows what else?... if anyone will buy them. They had few options and are simply trying to buy some time to try to turn a profit with their remaining other divisions.

0 upvotes
Digital Tips
By Digital Tips (Nov 9, 2011)

Alan makes a good point.

In fact I don't think Kodak has really bothered too much with making slr's or even cameras since the early eighties, to the best of my recollection any way.

To be fair though, they did try to establish themselves after creating the first digital camera with a 13mega pixel CCD sensor, a Nikon. They tried for the services related to that, such as printing and the software for storing the photos on a pc (they teamed up with IBM).

It's just not much came of it.

It's a real shame.. I have a real soft spot for Kodak, as the first picture I ever took was with a Kodak automatic camera (I think it was 110 film...if you can remember that).

0 upvotes
AlanG
By AlanG (Nov 9, 2011)

Well I'm the first one to say Kodak has made a lot of mistakes. But most of the posts here don't seem to realize that Kodak is trying to establish itself in the commercial printing, consumer printing, packaging, laser projection and some other businesses. They really are not trying to rely on competing in the digital photography market and certainly not in the pro camera business. Most of what they are doing will not cross the radar of many readers here. And they are dealing with the fact that their traditional markets for still and motion picture film and chemicals are going away.

Now I'm not saying this is a wise well executed plan or not. And I don't know if they will succeed. But they do have their products and what they think is a plan. And if you look at their 3rd qtr results, some of these divisions have improved a lot even if they have a way to go before they can be profitable. So there may be a chance for them. But I'm not ready to bet on it either.

Comment edited 5 times, last edit 6 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Klipsen
By Klipsen (Nov 10, 2011)

Looks like there's a lot more money in printers these days.
Konica and Minolta found out years ago, but I'm surprised that Kodak would throw the towel in the ring.

0 upvotes
Tom Stone
By Tom Stone (Nov 9, 2011)

Kodak management is stuck in a downward spiral. They have never known how to deal with competition in a tough marketplace. They should be getting rid of their old business structure at firesale prices in order to invest and innovate as a digital leader.

1 upvote
Keith
By Keith (Nov 9, 2011)

What will this mean for the production of Leica M9s?

0 upvotes
DanCart
By DanCart (Nov 9, 2011)

this Kodak situation is quite strange because at the beginning of digital over a decade ago they were the company which was making the best quality professional digital SLRs and licensing them to the likes of Canon,so its quite amazing how the company is said to have faied to adapt to the transition to digital.......

0 upvotes
chn_andy
By chn_andy (Nov 8, 2011)

Kodak may not be a success in the commercial market, yet it provided numerous solutions for scientific instrument.
If you know astronomy, almost all affordable CCD cameras for amateurs and professionals use Kodak chip. Apogee, FLI, SBIG, some models from QHY and ATIK all use kodak CCD. Even the Illumina Sequencing Analyzer in my lab use the kodak CCD.
Though inferior in terms of read noise, and dark current compared to Sony, they provide all kinds of Black and White sensors in various format and pixel density. Sony only put its newest technology into high density sensor for cellphone and Point and shoot, instead of large pixel low light sensor. With the diffraction limited in place, the 24MP A77 is just another bad example.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
halfaman
By halfaman (Nov 13, 2011)

Sony puts money where the money is. CCD sensors represent only a 10% of the global imaging market, while CMOS takes the remaining 90% and growing. It is very curious that Kodak judges film as a better asset than CCD sensors division. Tri-X is still the best selling film in the world...

0 upvotes
onlooker
By onlooker (Nov 8, 2011)

When have Boards of Directors become holy cows of American industry? Is it the apathy of the shareholders? The way Kodak has been mismanaged, the directors should have been tarred and feathered years ago. They couldn't manage a lemonade stand, fer crying out loud.

3 upvotes
AbrasiveReducer
By AbrasiveReducer (Nov 8, 2011)

All this talk of Kodak not having the latest digital SLR. At the risk of stating the obvious, Kodak's photography business was doomed from the start of digital. Why? Because the money isn't in the hardware; it's in the consumables. So instead buying film and processing for a lifetime, the customer bought memory card and they were done.

For most people the only remaining consumables, if any, are ink and paper and Kodak, in their wisdom tried to lowball ink. Crappy Lexmark printers didn't help but again, the money--the built-in repeat business, is in the consumables.

So, at the end of the day, they failed to make the transistion from a high profit business to a low profit business fast enough.

0 upvotes
Steinerphoto
By Steinerphoto (Nov 8, 2011)

Kodak had the world by its tail when they came out with the Kodak SLR 14mp pro camera. Then, they blew it when there was a system-wide problem. Kodak refused to repair the problem under warranty (…a normal customer service situation) and instead chose to try and charge pro photogs $700-$1000 to make the alteration. The majority of pros sold their cameras and the value of these camera dropped on the used market. Canon should be thankful, as the majority of the Kodak pros fled to Canon.
Subsequently, Kodak came out with the ‘new’ improved 14mp Kodak SLR-N which actually was a great camera. I still own mine.
Kodak’s next fatal error was to de-value their new SLR_N camera by stating that in 2 years, there would be no further upgrades to the software. Kodak bailed on their promise. The rest of the pros took off for greener pastures.
Like the Greeks of today, Kodak ended up carefully lining up both feet and both hands before shooting them all at the same time, metaphorically speaking.

5 upvotes
kenscott
By kenscott (Nov 9, 2011)

I owned a SLR-N, great camera at the time for the money.

0 upvotes
Doug Frost
By Doug Frost (Nov 8, 2011)

Kodak dragged their heels getting into the digital market and when they finally did they released one lousy camera after another. But their sensor division managed to make some decent products. So now they've sold off the crown jewel of the company, arguably their most viable division.

So much for Kodak.

4 upvotes
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Nov 8, 2011)

That's melancholic news. I can remember the old DCS digital SLRs - I still have a couple, and DPReview's very first SLR review was a Kodak DCS 520 - and they were super for the time. But the company seemed to hang onto its sensor designs too long, and never worked out how to survive once Nikon and Canon raised their own game, and so their professional range died like a stone.

Check out DPReview's coverage of the 2001 PMA - with its huge Kodak stand:
http://www.dpreview.com/news/0102/01021406pma02.asp#kodak

In the compact market the only camera they seemed to put any effort into was the V705, the twin-lens design. The rest was just a bust. It's as if the professional sensor business and the camera department never spoke to each other after 2001.

0 upvotes
Lupti
By Lupti (Nov 8, 2011)

I agree that the V705 was a fine camera(I have it and it is still ok). Unfortunately beside these ones Kodak and their older P models with RAW and wideangle like the P880 Kodak failed to impress and their low-budget cameras weren´t such a big success.
And their Pocket camcorder line is just a joke. What a waste of the good name.

0 upvotes
RonHendriks
By RonHendriks (Nov 8, 2011)

Good that the sensor's made for Pentax 645D are safe for now.

0 upvotes
GMack
By GMack (Nov 8, 2011)

I thought the USA patents ran out in 15 years? If so, the Kodak patents may be lapsing very soon anyway so they would seemingly be worthless to a buyer - or Platinum Equity in this case.

I smell some money flowing to the wrong pockets someplace. Too bad for the MF buyers like Hassi, Leica, and Phase One who, if the imaging sensor manufacturing part remains, will have to raise their prices even more to cover the buyout. This might be their demise in the digital MF camera arena unless some other sensor manufacturer steps in. With the 36MP Nikon D800 supposedly on the horizon, the FF 35mm sensor may be the new MF sensor of the future and kill off the MF line entirely. If some 100MP FF sensor appears in another 10 years, bye-bye medium format.

0 upvotes
Dirk67
By Dirk67 (Nov 8, 2011)

That is unlikely. Many MF manufacturers have already switched to Dalsa sensors. Some are still using Kodak. The question if 35mm will replace MF has been around for decades. With film people argued about it and with digital as well. People will always strive for higher quality and MF has a size advantage. A 100MP file from MF will always look better than a 100MP file from 35mm. People will pay for that difference.

0 upvotes
Maxfield_photo
By Maxfield_photo (Nov 8, 2011)

Holy hell, have you seen the new sensor that they just announced!? I think Kodak sold off the wrong division.

1 upvote
Faintandfuzzy
By Faintandfuzzy (Nov 8, 2011)

It's a sahme to see such a fine company with a long history fall apart under inept management with no vision.

2 upvotes
snake_b
By snake_b (Nov 8, 2011)

It's not a shame. It's the reality when short term profits in a quarterly fashion take precedence over long-term longevity because board members and shareholders only care about profits NOW. The company doesn't answer to its employees, consumers, nor anyone else. They answer ONLY to board members and shareholders.

5 upvotes
iae aa eia
By iae aa eia (Nov 8, 2011)

The first camera I used and disassembled and broke was an Instamatic 177X from my mom and I remember most people in my country had Kodaks until my teenager years. I remember buying a Portra film to shoot some social events gave me confidence and made me anxious to see the results. I remember looking closer at movie strips and seeing the Kodak brand marked at the laterals. I remember handling Kodak chemicals and Royal papers in a minilab,...

Kodak had everything to be successful in the digital market, but didn't know what area of itself to concentrate on, letting unprofitable departments to draw money from the profitable. I really hope they have a plan. To end like Vivitar (I still remember how Series 1 lenses represented something good), oh gosh, no please.

1 upvote
CopCarSS
By CopCarSS (Nov 8, 2011)

"Kodak has previously communicated that it would sell assets that are not central to its transformation to a profitable, sustainable digital company."

How exactly does the sale of the imaging sensor division not relate to the "transformation to a profitable, sustainable digital company?" Aren't sensors kind of, you know, a necessary part of digital photography?

Comment edited 46 seconds after posting
17 upvotes
Ed Gaillard
By Ed Gaillard (Nov 8, 2011)

Smells like a bust-out--stripping all the valuable assets prior to bankruptcy. Watch the money disappear.

7 upvotes
steveh0607
By steveh0607 (Nov 8, 2011)

Kodak should have gone all out in DSLR production early last decade. They could have developed a range of good cameras from medium format to professional.

Now they are selling off the only thing that makes money! And they're going to sell 1,100 patents. The Japanese companies must be straining at the bit to buy those.

1 upvote
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Nov 8, 2011)

Hind sight is always 20/20. I remember hearing that their executive board was told by its shareholders to give more concentration on film than their other endeavors. Note how they've reformulated a few of their films over the past 3 years: TMX, TMY, Porta, new Ektar in 35mm, 120, and 8x10 sheet film sizing.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Nov 8, 2011)

since DSLRs have the entrenched players, it would have been as fruitless as Oly. now, if they had come out with a mirrorless system, maybe 5 yrs ago.. that would have saved them

1 upvote
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Nov 8, 2011)

Thing is, they *did* go all-out in DSLR production, about the time of the DCS 760 / 720X - they dominated the market for several years up until then - and they even had a couple of medium format backs. As I understand it they never made any money from the pro market, and there was no way to broaden the appeal of the cameras (the relatively cheap DCS 330 and 315 went nowhere) because they were expensive to make, and then Canon and Nikon launched their own SLRs and that was that.

0 upvotes
graybalanced
By graybalanced (Nov 8, 2011)

Maybe...except that they had no company DNA for developing film SLRs. An SLR is a heck of a lot more than just a nice sensor.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Nov 8, 2011)

http://image-sensors-world.blogspot.com/2011/11/kodak-announces-new-ccds-seeks-patents.html

0 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Nov 8, 2011)

Hmm, Kodak producing a 35mm image sensor and an aps-h image sensor? Interesting, wonder where they will go? Security and high end business devices/cameras?

0 upvotes
ethz
By ethz (Nov 8, 2011)

It's pleasantly surprising.
Not only Kodak announce new sensors, but KAI sensors (that means liveview enabled).
Moreover those sensors are APS-H and FF, just like the ones in M8 and M9. What a coincidence!

In fact, I can't stop thinking of a feasible correlation with the Blackstone's investment in Leica. It would give a serious purpose for the money...

0 upvotes
Ashley Pomeroy
By Ashley Pomeroy (Nov 8, 2011)

I think Kodak invented the APS-H format - the old DCS 460 introduced it, back in 1995, and their subsequent six megapixels models stuck with APS-H (in fact they continued with the same basic sensor, upgraded over time).

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Nov 8, 2011)

BUT.....Kodak has announced new CCD sensors, a 16mp 35mm full frame sensor (8 fps) with 7.4um pixels and a 16mp APS-H sensor (8 fps) with 5.5um pixels on November, 7. 2 days after selling

0 upvotes
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Nov 8, 2011)

Yea noticed that.. would kill for camera with 16 mpix CCD (and no AA). Unfortunately I remember only one company willing to use it.. Leica. :D

0 upvotes
Franka T.L.
By Franka T.L. (Nov 8, 2011)

Simply do not see anything positive with this one. The money they raised is just so they can have the coffer to go for what another year doing the same. Still no viable product, no viable product plan and market plan. Not to mention really they really do not have much of a business anyway.

4 upvotes
Midnite1
By Midnite1 (Nov 8, 2011)

I have to agree.
While they dominated the film business, they lost a lot when that industry died and they attempted whatever with their Mickey Mouse Digital cameras and their Terrible printers!

Time for them to close shop!

0 upvotes
sh10453
By sh10453 (Nov 8, 2011)

Exactly ... No viable product, no viable product plan.

I do not think they lack the engineering talents, but that's what happens when a tech company becomes controlled by bean-counters who pinch pennies when it comes to making a product, but reward themselves generously for destroying a great icon!

Without products to compete head-on with their top competitors, and for the various levels of photographers & hobbyists, they have no chance to survive.

In the past 10 years, they produced a lot of cameras that my great grandmother is happy with (although she never held a camera in her hands before).

I do have some of their products, including the Z1285, which is totally manual, or totally automatic, etc., and with a larger than average sensor, instead of the commonly used 1/2.33", and I do like its pictures (for the most part), but the performance is sluggish (like the rest of the Kodak's), and the zoom is only 5X.
....
Make a GOOD product quickly, Kodak, or prepare your coffin!!

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 3 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Romaine
By Romaine (Nov 8, 2011)

This company is hopeless. I will stock up some HC-110 developer concentrate liquid while it's still available.

1 upvote
Prognathous
By Prognathous (Nov 8, 2011)

Other than the P880 and a few FF DSLRs, they didn't release any digital camera worth mentioning in the last 10 years. They had it coming.

0 upvotes
Midnite1
By Midnite1 (Nov 8, 2011)

Their Z series Digital cameras weren't all that bad. They take decent pictures, but everything else., the C and M series were total garbage!
As for their printers....I've already posted my thoughts on them!

0 upvotes
Yomama
By Yomama (Nov 8, 2011)

Will Leica keep the sensor from Kodak?? Interesting to know in 2 years time when M10 is released.

0 upvotes
Rick Knepper
By Rick Knepper (Nov 8, 2011)

Too bad Leica, Phase One (and whoever else is left in MF), Canon, Nikon & Sony Pentax, Olympus, et al didn't form a consortium and buy this critical asset of the photographic community and keep it out of the hands of the vultures. Oh yeah, all of these guys are vultures too.

1 upvote
Romaine
By Romaine (Nov 8, 2011)

Olympus? Did you read today's other news?

1 upvote
deletedGregR1
By deletedGregR1 (Nov 8, 2011)

anyone else notice these conflicting messages?

1 - Kodak has sold its Image Sensor Solutions business to Platinum Equity in a bid to strengthen its financial position. >> which means Kodak is ditching ISS to improve Kodak's finances

2 - “This is a great opportunity to acquire a business with an impressive record for delivering innovative solutions to customers around the world,” said Brian Wall, the partner at Platinum Equity who led the team pursuing the acquisition. “The ISS business has a strong management team with the right vision for leading the company into the future... >> which means that this is a well-managed and profitable business segment.

so, which is it? is it causing Kodak to show too many failures, or is it well managed & profitable?

i'm surprised Kodak is still around. figured they'd be totally dead at least five years ago. their last memorable effort was APS / Advantix film. ugh.

0 upvotes
Romaine
By Romaine (Nov 8, 2011)

My understanding of the strengthening of Kodak's financial position is that Kodak is short of cash, so it sells its profitable and vauable ISS business at a good price to solve its cash flow problem, while they still can. This is not to say they're sthrengthening their long-term financial proposect, as they're just shooting themselves in the foot. What's left of Kodak now?

2 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Nov 8, 2011)

Wasn't APS film more a Minolta gamble than Kodak? Or maybe it's just that APS film did more harm to Minolta than it did to Kodak?

0 upvotes
Midnite1
By Midnite1 (Nov 8, 2011)

I was under the impression, based on what I read, that Kodak was going Bankrupt!

They messed up bad with their Digital cameras and their printers are nothing to call home about!
Look nice, but print jobs are awful!

What's left for them?

2 upvotes
BBnose
By BBnose (Nov 8, 2011)

What the hell is the firm Platinum Equity?

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Nov 8, 2011)

Bring back Kodachrome!!!!!!

2 upvotes
Midnite1
By Midnite1 (Nov 8, 2011)

On SD format! :)

1 upvote
mr645
By mr645 (Nov 8, 2011)

My guess is Kodak will soon be a name, like vivitar and Polaroid

4 upvotes
Carlos Echenique
By Carlos Echenique (Nov 8, 2011)

Oh yeah, this makes perfect sense. NOT. Goodbye Kodak, photography shall miss you.

2 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Nov 8, 2011)

most likely the mao firm is gonna dice up the sensor business and sell to the highest bidder. that is really the only way to maximise THEIR shareholder value.

1 upvote
Tom Bird
By Tom Bird (Nov 8, 2011)

should they maximise OTHER people's shareholder value?

0 upvotes
Rolo King
By Rolo King (Nov 8, 2011)

I think he meant to emphasize "shareholder." It's all about shareholders and short term profits now anyway.

0 upvotes
Card
By Card (Nov 8, 2011)

Struggled to manage the shift from film to digital?
-snork-
How about "utterly and completely failed" to manage the shift to digital?

2 upvotes
Paulo Ferreira
By Paulo Ferreira (Nov 8, 2011)

They sold their sensor's business? What´s left then? A couple of expired Kodachrome 25 on their chilling cabinet?

3 upvotes
Paulo Ferreira
By Paulo Ferreira (Nov 8, 2011)

There's a "step-sister" company in Japan called FujiFILM. Read the writing on the wall please...

1 upvote
Mescalamba
By Mescalamba (Nov 8, 2011)

IMHO, they should join together..

0 upvotes
Robert Hoy
By Robert Hoy (Nov 8, 2011)

Fuji's latest and upcoming efforts are far better than Kodak has done, i.e. x100, x10, and future EVIL camera. Plus I've heard that Fuji has vowed to be the last player standing in film. Maybe Kodak is/was too diversified and Fujifilm is more dedicated to the things they do best. Kodak was all about sueing people over their patents, like online displaying of digial photos, seriously.

5 upvotes
ScottieC
By ScottieC (Nov 8, 2011)

Nibble, Nibble, and Nibble away... perhaps they should seek a merger with another company...

0 upvotes
Dirk67
By Dirk67 (Nov 8, 2011)

I wonder what will be left for Kodak to actually run a valuable business? Film going away, digital being sold, patents sold, etc. Maybe picture frames and printed booklets will save them. Sad story on how to ruin a company and I bet that all those who made the business decisions of the recent past are all well off. D!RK

1 upvote
love_them_all
By love_them_all (Nov 8, 2011)

I knew sooner or later they will have to liquidate. Anybody knows if they supply the sensors for the hassy as well?

0 upvotes
ravduc
By ravduc (Nov 8, 2011)

It would be a shame to see this company go under. They have had such an impact on photography for over a century. They did actually democratize photography by bringing it to the masses. Before Kodak, photography remained in the hands of just a few.

0 upvotes
Tom Bird
By Tom Bird (Nov 8, 2011)

Kodak KAF-50100 is in Hasselblad H3DII-50 and H4D-40, KAF-37500 in Leica S2

0 upvotes
Melbourne Park
By Melbourne Park (Nov 10, 2011)

I am bemused by many of the comments here.

The facts about Kodak's core business are obscured by their R&D with sensors. And their core business has always been manufacturing high quality papers. The cameras have been an end to allow their paper (& film) operations to succeed.

The sensor involvement attempted to aid their customers, but their strategy was not clear. The copy / print house business was core, but it too has perhaps not been a winner. Meanwhile, printers have gotten cheap, and they can use any old paper. Rather than lovely Kodak high tech papers.

So Kodak is off loading its sensor business. A good thing in actuality. A bit like IBM off loaded their PCs, to Lenovo. Although I think Lenovo is mostly owned by IBM. The reality though is that Kodak haven't won the big users of sensors over. They seem to have become a niche provider. And that's understandable, because sensors never were core to their business.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 69