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Canon EOS-1D X professional DSLR announcement and overview

By dpreview staff on Oct 18, 2011 at 05:00 GMT
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Canon has announced the launch of the EOS-1D X, its latest flagship professional DSLR. The 18MP camera is built around a full-frame sensor capable of shooting at up to 14 frames per second (12fps with AF), allowing it to replace both the 1D Mark IV and 1DS Mark III in Canon's lineup. Despite looking like previous 1D cameras, it's been extensively reworked (it includes more professional video features than any other Canon DSLR), so we took the opportunity to talk to Canon USA's Technical Advisor, Chuck Westfall about the camera and its features.

The 1D X won't be available until March 2012, so examples are not widely available yet. We've been extensively briefed on the camera and, in combination with an exclusive interview with Westfall, have prepared an overview of the camera.

Click here to read our overview of the Canon EOS-1D X

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Press Release:

CANON U.S.A. INTRODUCES THE NEW CANON EOS-1D X DIGITAL SLR CAMERA, RE-DESIGNED FROM THE INSIDE OUT


Featuring a Completely New 61-Point Autofocus, Fast Shooting up to 12 fps, 18-Megapixel Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, Full HD Video Recording and Much More

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., October 18, 2011 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, is proud to introduce a completely revolutionized EOS-1D series camera, the Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera.* As the new leader in Canon’s arsenal of professional DSLRs, the EOS-1D X will be a high-speed multimedia juggernaut replacing both the EOS-1Ds Mark III and EOS-1D Mark IV models in Canon’s lineup. Enhancing the revolutionary image quality of the EOS-1Ds and speed capabilities of the EOS-1D series, the EOS-1D X DSLR features an 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ Imaging Processors, 14-bit A/D data conversion and capable of shooting an incredible 12 frames-per-second (fps).  Canon’s EOS DSLR cameras and accessories have a long-standing legacy of providing high-quality results to professionals in a wide range of markets, including sports, nature, cinematography, wedding and commercial studios. The addition of this new model will help take this tradition to a whole new level.

The EOS-1D X announcement comes on the heels of Canon’s recent manufacturing milestone with the production of the Company’s 50-millionth EOS-series SLR camera in September of 2011. Furthermore, Canon will achieve yet another milestone at the end of this month producing the 70-millionth EF lens.

“The EOS-1D X represents the re-invention of the EOS-1Ds and EOS-1D series, combining new proprietary Canon technologies with the culmination of customer feedback and requests from the field. We are proud to introduce this camera to the worldwide community of professional photographers and cinematographers with the features and capabilities they need to capture the great moments that display their talent,” stated Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies and Communications Group, Canon U.S.A.

The Camera With Three Brains
The EOS-1D X features three DIGIC processors, including Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors capable of delivering approximately 17 times more processing speed than DIGIC 4, and a dedicated DIGIC 4 for metering and AF control. In conjunction with the newly developed high-performance 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS image sensor, the Dual DIGIC 5+ processors provide high-speed continuous shooting, lower noise, and a significant increase in data processing speed than previous EOS-1D models. This new level of data processing speed allows the EOS-1D X to perform many functions including chromatic aberration correction for various Canon EF lenses in-camera instead of through post-production software. The DIGIC 4 processor utilizes a new 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor for enhanced exposure accuracy with color and face detection, and works together with the camera’s new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF.

The EOS-1D X employs a completely new imaging sensor, producing the lowest noise of any EOS digital camera to date for stunning portraiture and studio work.  The new 18-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor utilizes large pixels – 1.25 microns larger than those in the EOS-1D Mark IV sensor and .55 microns larger than those in the EOS 5D Mark II sensor  – together with gapless microlenses to achieve enhanced light gathering efficiency, higher sensitivity and less noise at the pixel level.  The new sensor has improved on the already very high signal-to-noise ratio of sensor output of earlier EOS models for outstanding image quality, even in extremely low light.  When combined with the Dual DIGIC 5+ imaging processors the results are stunning.  The images produced with the EOS-1D X camera’s new sensor are so clean that files can easily be up-sized if necessary for even the most demanding high-resolution commercial applications. The EOS-1D X will also feature new Ultrasonic Wave Motion Cleaning (UWMC), Canon’s second generation self-cleaning sensor unit, which utilizes carrier wave technology to remove smaller dust particles from the sensor and it includes a new fluorine coating on the infrared absorption glass to help repel dust. 

The low-light capability of the EOS-1D X is evident in its incredible ISO range and ability to photograph in extremely low-light conditions. Adjustable from ISO 100 to 51,200 within its standard range, the new model offers a low ISO 50 setting for studio and landscape photography and two high settings of 102,400 at H1 and 204,800 at H2, ideal for law enforcement, government or forensic field applications.

New 61-Point High Density Reticular AF
The EOS-1D X includes a brand new 61-Point High Density Reticular AF, the most sophisticated DSLR AF system Canon has ever released.  The 21 focusing points in the central area are standard precision cross-type and effective with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6, depending on the lens in use. The center five points are also high-precision diagonal cross-type points for maximum apertures as small as f/2.8.  All 61 points are sensitive to horizontal contrast with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6 and 20 of the outer focusing points function as cross-type points with maximum apertures as small as f/4.0. Other innovations of the new 61-point High Density Reticular AF include expanded AF coverage area, superior focusing precision and low light sensitivity, and greater low-contrast subject detection capability compared to earlier EOS AF systems. (See image below for AF point configuration)

All AF functions now have their own menu tab for quick and easy access (formerly AF custom functions in previous EOS models).  A new AF Configuration Tool allows for customized setting of tracking sensitivity, the acceleration and deceleration of tracking subjects, and AF point auto switching, all of which are easily accessed and adjusted via the new AF menu tab. A built-in Feature Guide advises photographers on which settings to use according to subject matter.

Similar to the AF point selection options offered in the EOS 7D Digital SLR camera, the EOS-1D X offers six AF point selection modes: Spot, Single Point, Single Point with surrounding four points, Single Point with surrounding eight points, Zone selection and Automatic AF point selection. (See image below AF point selection options.)

EOS iTR AF: Intelligent Tracking and Recognition Enhances AF Performance
The Canon EOS-1D X features incredible new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF options ideal for wedding and event photography as well as sports and photojournalism. The default AF mode for the EOS-1D X uses phase detection AF information, while a new second option uses Face Detection technology to track recognized faces in addition to color information, ideal when shooting events such as tennis or dancing where facial recognition of the original subject will help keep that person in focus throughout the scene.

Exposure Control
For the first time in a Canon DSLR camera, a DIGIC processor is used exclusively with the metering sensor for fast, accurate exposure control. The Canon DIGIC 4 processor takes advantage of the EOS-1D X’s 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor and utilizes 252 zones for general metering or 35 zones for low-light metering to help ensure accurate evaluative ambient or flash exposure.  The new subject recognition capabilities enhance nearly all of the camera’s automatic functions, helping to adjust exposure, autofocus, Auto Lighting Optimizer and Automatic Picture Style to the scene being captured for enhanced image quality. 

Multiple Exposure Modes
The EOS-1D X is the first EOS Digital SLR to feature Multiple Exposure capability. The camera can combine up to nine individual images into a single composite image, with no need for post-processing in a computer. Four different compositing methods are provided for maximum creative control, including Additive, Average, Bright and Dark. Compositing results can be viewed in real time on the camera’s LCD monitor, and there is a one-step Undo command that allows photographers to delete an image and try again if desired. The EOS-1D X’s Multiple Exposure mode even allows photographers to specify a previously captured RAW image as the starting point for a new Multiple Exposure composite image. 

Super High Speed Mode
The Canon EOS-1D X camera breaks new ground in the world of digital SLRs, offering a Super High Speed Mode which increases shooting speeds up to 14 fps at full 18-megapixel resolution in JPEG mode*1. The new camera is also capable of shooting RAW, JPEG, or RAW+JPEG at speeds up to 12 fps in One Shot AF or AI Servo AF for enhanced performance in sports photography and other applications requiring high-speed digital capture. This new level of performance is made possible by the combination of the EOS-1D X’s 16-channel readout CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors, and a completely new reflex mirror mechanism that has been engineered by Canon to combine high-performance with exceptional precision and reliability.

Enhanced EOS HD Video – New Compressions, Longer Recording
Centered around an all-new full-frame CMOS sensor with larger pixels than those found on the EOS 5D Mark II image sensor, the EOS-1D X utilizes new HD video formats to simplify and speed up post-production work.  The two new compression formats offered on the EOS-1D X include intraframe (ALL-i ) compression for an editing-friendly format and interframe (IPB) compression for superior data compression, giving professionals the options they need for their ideal workflow. Answering the requests of cinematographers and filmmakers, the EOS-1D X includes two methods of SMPTE-compliant timecode embedding, Rec Run and Free Run, allowing multiple cameras or separate sound recording to be synced together in post production. 

Canon’s all new full-frame CMOS sensor ensures that video footage captured on the EOS-1D X will exhibit less moiré than any previous Canon model, resulting in a significant improvement in HD video quality. A desired feature for many documentary filmmakers using Canon DSLRs was to enable recording beyond the four gigabyte (GB) file capacity and the EOS-1D X is the answer. The new camera features automatic splitting of movie files when a single file exceeds 4GB.  The new file splitting function allows for continuous video recording up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files; no frames are dropped and the multiple files can be seamlessly connected in post production, providing filmmakers the recording time they want in the same convenient DSLR form factor. The camera records Full HD at 1920 x 1080 in selectable frame rates of 24p (23.976), 25p, or 30p (29.97); and 720p HD or SD video recording at either 50p or 60p (59.94). SD video can be recorded in either NTSC or PAL standards.

The Canon EOS-1D X also includes manual audio level control, adjustable both before and during movie recording, an automatic setting, or it can be turned off entirely. A wind filter is also included. Sound can be recorded either through the internal monaural microphone or via an optional external microphone through the stereo mic input. 

Enhanced Ergonomics & Optimized Design
Photographers familiar with Canon’s EOS 1D-series of cameras will notice the control configuration of the EOS-1D X takes a different approach to button placement.  The re-designed exterior and ergonomic button configuration feels comfortable in your right hand, allowing seamless navigation through menu options. 

The Live View Button has been conveniently placed near the user’s thumb for one-touch switching between Live View and Viewfinder shooting. The Quick Control Button and menu navigation controls will allow users to change camera settings using only their right hand, for fast, simple one-handed control using their thumb on the scroll wheel. The new multi-controller is positioned by the right hand thumb when the camera is held for vertical shooting and enables the same level of control to camera operators when shooting vertically as they have when shooting horizontally.  On the front of the camera are four user assignable function buttons, two for vertical shooting and two for horizontal shooting, allowing customizable button control when shooting in either position.  The camera also features a level of weather resistance equivalent to earlier professional models such as the EOS-1D Mark IV.

Canon has answered the request of many professional EOS photographers and incorporated Dual Card Slots into the new EOS-1D X DSLR camera. The dual CF card slots will allow photographers to carry only one memory card format and still achieve instant image back-ups and enhanced storage capacity.

This camera also features a new shutter design with even greater durability and precision. Rated to 400,000 cycles, the new carbon fiber shutter blades are more lightweight and durable, allowing the EOS-1D X to achieve over 100,000 cycles more than the shutter of the EOS-1D Mark IV.  A new shutter motion and new motor help further reduce vibration in the camera. The EOS-1D X also features an electronic first curtain, new to the EOS-1D series DSLRs, for minimal in-camera vibration during image capture.

Connectivity
For professional photographers who prefer a wired workflow and transfer system, Canon has included a built-in LAN connection in the EOS-1D X DSLR. The built-in LAN connection features a gigabit Ethernet Jack capable of 1000BASE-T transmission speeds, offering photographers a stable wired connection for ultra-fast data transmission.  If the network were to go down, the camera will attempt to resend images until the files are sent.  The EOS-1D X also features a direct image transfer function whereby images can be selected for transfer, and only sent once a LAN or USB connection is established.

Accessories
Designed exclusively for the EOS-1D X, the new Canon WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter* features wireless LAN support for 802.11n network transfer rates providing users with increased communication speed when compared to previous models.  With this new dust and weather resistant model, professionals can synchronize clocks on multiple cameras and use the unit to support linked shooting when utilizing multiple cameras.  In addition, Bluetooth-compatible equipment can be easily linked to the device as well.

The EOS-1D X also offers an optional Canon GP-E1 GPS Receiver*, which can be easily integrated into the camera’s body.  Powered by the camera, this GPS receiver provides the same weatherproof resistance as the EOS-1D X, even at the connector. With an electronic compass on-board, the GP-E1 will log movement – latitude, longitude, elevation, and the Universal Time Code – and allow viewing of camera movement on a PC after shooting.  The receiver will also record camera direction when shooting, even when shooting vertically.

Pricing and Availability
The Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera is scheduled for March 2012 availability and will be sold in a body-only configuration at an estimated retail price of $6,800.00. The compact, lightweight WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter is scheduled to be available in March 2012 and have an estimated retail price of $600. Availability for the GP-E1 GPS receiver is expected in April 2012 with an estimated retail price of $300.

*1 Super High Speed Continuous shooting at 14 fps requires mirror lock and JPEG mode at ISO speeds less than 32000.

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Comments

Total comments: 524
1234
aimannassar
By aimannassar (Oct 18, 2011)

I don't know why Canon didn't integrate the wireless radio flash control inside the body!

5 upvotes
Haelstrom
By Haelstrom (Oct 18, 2011)

I'm going to assume that it was a space issue. Its already a pretty substantial camera. They might not have been able to cram it in. Or may have been a battery life issue. By putting it off camera they could spout a better battery life on the box and have the wireless camera flash controller supply its own battery. And by making a off camera version they could design it once then sell to people with older cameras.

But like you. I would have liked to seen it internal.

1 upvote
aimannassar
By aimannassar (Oct 18, 2011)

I think I'm getting this camera "along" with my 1Ds III. Not yet a replacement IMPV. May be better ISO, MultiExposures, and few more improvement. But, still way far from what I was expecting after owning 1Ds III since day one of release.

I feel like I'm going down instead of up!... same happened after introducing the 5D for the third of the price and almost two thirds of the quality.

1 upvote
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

In their aps-c cameras, I believe it is the pop-up flash that works as the trigger. It might not be possible through Canon's design to include it in a camera without an integrated flash unit.

0 upvotes
BitFarmer
By BitFarmer (Oct 18, 2011)

As a nikon user -excuse my intromision on a canon talk- I never undertood it about external flashesh on canon: my 6 years old D70 (rebel like) did have it on cheap nikon flashes (SB600 in my case), so does my actual D300s, and almost all nikon DSLR do, except 1 or 2 of the cheapest ones, even models without internal flash. And it is VERY handy in many occasions.

If can say, lowering pixles to 18MP looks excelent to me, i do prefer high iso than big files.

2 upvotes
Derek Clarke
By Derek Clarke (Oct 18, 2011)

As RedFox88 says, the Canon wireless flash system actually uses modulation of the on-camera flash to control the external units

So if there's no on-camera flash there's no external flash control.

However an Sp-E2 transmitter or a suitable Speedlite in the flash shoe can be used.The SP-E2 is basically a very low power flash with an infra-red filter on.

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
aimannassar
By aimannassar (Oct 19, 2011)

I agree with @BitFarmer, on the Nikon way. It is way easier, and less hassle. @Derek, I own the ST-E2 along with all the PW lineup. Hensel triggers and so on. But it is way easier to control the flashes without any external accessory.
This applies also to the "internal" GPS unit, and WiFi accessory. Why do we need to add more size to the camera.

0 upvotes
Paul D TV
By Paul D TV (Oct 18, 2011)

As a filmmaker, here's my take on this camera:

http://paul-d.tv/blog/2011/10/18/canon-eos-1d-x/

0 upvotes
jackpro
By jackpro (Oct 18, 2011)

don't bother there is nothing on the 1Dx worth reading

0 upvotes
Karsten42
By Karsten42 (Oct 18, 2011)

Very nice camera. Multi Exposure sounds nice. Improved video sounds nice. Many other features taken from the 7D either unchanged or improved were a must have. Resolution - hmm. I don't know.

But the external GPS-unit is a downside. Canon managed it to put one into the tiny Powershot S100. I would rather continue to use an external device and render GPS-information afterwards into the photos.

0 upvotes
Juraj Lacko
By Juraj Lacko (Oct 18, 2011)

I like the fact that MP race is slowing down however I have feeling the new 5d or its replacement will have even more pixels that 21.
Af points and continuous shoting its great improovement. I like super hight ISO capabilities. Surely in the future will be good software to battle noise back and save lots of pictures.
What I would like to see in next one would be better AF performance with tracking in live view and lcd panel that could flip and rotate. But thats only me. Lets wait for real image samples out of this gem. Perhaps I will start to save up for it and trade my 5d2.

2 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Oct 18, 2011)

An LCD panel that could articulate is both larger and more fragile. As this camera is known for its robust, weather sealed structure I can see why they left it off.
As for the AF performance, we have no idea until we have a population out there being tested. Canon will always be judged harshly in this area.

0 upvotes
Carsten Saager
By Carsten Saager (Oct 18, 2011)

It looks the market becomes now a bit more segmented: Speed machines for journalism, wildlife (1Dx & D4) and high resolution bodies (D800, 5DmkIII) for the rest where you can live with slower focus and shooting speed: Landscape, architecture, studio.

0 upvotes
Derek Clarke
By Derek Clarke (Oct 18, 2011)

My feeling is that the resolution race went a little too far, and now all the manufacturers are putting more emphasis on low sensor noise and hence higher ISO capability. Don't be surprised if the next 5D also has a lower resolution sensor.

0 upvotes
Donglei
By Donglei (Oct 18, 2011)

It's an speed machine for olympics. There will be another pixel machine over 32 megapix probably.

0 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Oct 18, 2011)

Fast face detection Contrast AF for movie would be nice, but, still, Canon is the best among digital!

0 upvotes
Robin Chittenden
By Robin Chittenden (Oct 18, 2011)

I have had problems with 'mirror slap' with Canon EOS1D Mk4 , especially on rapid fire. I see this one has a larger mirror. Be interested to see how users get on with this one.

0 upvotes
ScottieC
By ScottieC (Oct 18, 2011)

Wow, it's finally time to replace my 1DMark II, it's everything I wanted in a camera...

1 upvote
Mr Fartleberry
By Mr Fartleberry (Oct 18, 2011)

Obviously another sports camera not intended for landscape photographers.

3 upvotes
Superka
By Superka (Oct 18, 2011)

There are film Medium and Large format cameras for Landscapes, with over 150 Mpx, not interpolated. There are no 24x36 landscape cameras.

0 upvotes
Juraj Lacko
By Juraj Lacko (Oct 18, 2011)

what is wrong with 5dmk2 to be used as landscape camera?

7 upvotes
Ivanaker
By Ivanaker (Oct 18, 2011)

nothing, but there are better and often cheaper solutions, like the ones Superka said. Mamiya 6 or 7 MF with Fujifilm Velvia 50 produce much finer images, with better DR.

0 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Oct 18, 2011)

As the others have said there are a ton of alternatives. Moreover, if you actually print an image you can make amazing 8x10s from P&S. As it seems most never even get printed who cares what camera is used?

0 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Oct 18, 2011)

Well Velvia will not get you any better DR, probably worse, although it does not suddenly chop the tonal range when it runs out of headroom.
Now shoot some Portra 160 and DR goes off the scale. Oh if only I still had a 10x8 camera. Load that with Portra and it would be something very special.

0 upvotes
M Jesper
By M Jesper (Oct 18, 2011)

Mamiya 6 or 7 cheaper ? Does that include film & developing ?

0 upvotes
Ivanaker
By Ivanaker (Oct 18, 2011)

Yes it is cheaper.
Put it this way:
You bought 1ds mk1 for 6000$, sold it for 3000 and bought 1ds mk3 and lost another 3000. now you are buying 5dmk3 for 3000$.

thats 9000 you spent for cameras in 10 years. Buy used mamiya and you have 8000 for film and developing, and that mamiya will last for years.

film and MF is still the way to go for landscapes

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Oct 18, 2011)

Mate, you're dreaming if you think Velvia has more dynamic range than a 5d2 - ever shot Velvia or a 5D2?

Besides, Nikon and Sony are the dynamic range kings.

0 upvotes
MaikeruN
By MaikeruN (Oct 19, 2011)

shoot transparencies

0 upvotes
Marco 2k7
By Marco 2k7 (Oct 18, 2011)

I say they got it great!

It's fast, high fps, just right amount of mpx and looks nice to handle.

Let's wait for a high res 5D MkIII, it seems they found more convenient making a high speed top model and a full frame "small body" with high res instead of 1D and 1Ds

And I bet nikon will be on the same line too with D4 and D800.

1 upvote
SeQuenCe
By SeQuenCe (Oct 18, 2011)

WooooOoOooW
I Just Want One To Play With For A While....:-)

I Cannot W8 For 4 Months Until It Will Be Available....

0 upvotes
adhemar
By adhemar (Oct 18, 2011)

Exquisite example of late 20th century technology. Keep trucking, Canon.

9 upvotes
Mr Fartleberry
By Mr Fartleberry (Oct 18, 2011)

Like living Ground Hog day over and over isn't it?

1 upvote
yuyucheu
By yuyucheu (Oct 18, 2011)

What is the 1Dx only 18MP? I was thing the new canon camera should be over 24MP.

3 upvotes
Photomonkey
By Photomonkey (Oct 18, 2011)

You can get a Sony now. Be Happy.

0 upvotes
Chaitanya S
By Chaitanya S (Oct 18, 2011)

tempting proposition. Will definitely wait for 7D replacement.

0 upvotes
Knocker221
By Knocker221 (Oct 18, 2011)

Yep me too, Waited to see what the spec was, no way can I afford this bad boy but it gives me a clue as to what the 7D ii might be like

0 upvotes
Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik
By Drazen Stojcic Buntovnik (Oct 18, 2011)

Makes you wonder what the 5d mk3 is going to be like, especially since it obviously needs to replace both the old 5d mk2 and in part 1Ds mk3 - resolution wise. 1Ds line is obviously gone for good. I wouldn't be surprised at all to see 5D2 replaced with same size body, higher resolution and low fps with same video features as in 1Dx. Maybe even 2k RAW video, depending on what the upcoming camcorder announcement is about...

4 upvotes
Jan Privat
By Jan Privat (Oct 18, 2011)

Yep, I am also waiting for a new "small & affordable" FF.
Maybe the 5D mk3. Maybe with the same sensor. ISO & Video specs sounds promising.

0 upvotes
Nuno Souto
By Nuno Souto (Oct 18, 2011)

High time someone got it: it's not about the Mpixels! It's about IQ.
Looks like Canon finally woke up and admitted lenses cannot provide better resolution than the lightwaves going through them. Kudos to them!

18 upvotes
Andrew Booth
By Andrew Booth (Oct 18, 2011)

Nonesense. You can get fantastic quality from Canon's 18Mpix cropped sensors - and that pixel pitch is the equivalent of 36Mpix on full frame. There's still enormous scope for worthwhile resolution increase on full frame cameras.
For studio photography low-light performance isn't a big deal either (you always have plenty of light). So more, smaller pixels makes sense.

5 upvotes
DarkShift
By DarkShift (Oct 18, 2011)

High MP gives always better IQ if noise isn't worse. And even the best medium format lenses can out play current sensors. My 24 TS-E II would be wonderfull with high MP.

There's obviously 36MP Nikon D800 coming which seems even more tempting, if Canon is not willing to upgrade 5d2 soon.

The X is not obviously meant for high quality studio camera. Its for video, sports and press. The best studio cameras can shoot over 50MP with single shot with superior IQ.

7 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Oct 18, 2011)

So what exactly have they added to get an increase in picture quality then? 12 fps, no that wont be it, high iso no that can't do it either, ah 16 bit that would do it, but they left that out.

1 upvote
T3
By T3 (Oct 18, 2011)

"So what exactly have they added to get an increase in picture quality then?... high iso no that can't do it." Really? You think high ISO performance has nothing to do with image quality? Also, we still don't know how those bigger pixels will help DR. But more importantly, by sticking to 18mp rather than adding /more/ megapixels, it prevents /degradation/ of image quality due to the use of smaller and smaller pixels contributing to less light sensitivity, diffraction, etc.

1 upvote
Nuno Souto
By Nuno Souto (Oct 21, 2011)

"Nonesense."
Really? Let me see: because you say so?
"You can get fantastic quality from Canon's 18Mpix cropped sensors - and that pixel pitch is the equivalent of 36Mpix on full frame. "
No, I cannot. Even a Pana GH2 has better IQ.
"There's still enormous scope for worthwhile resolution increase on full frame cameras."
No, there isn't. Read on diffraction limits.

0 upvotes
CameraLabTester
By CameraLabTester (Oct 18, 2011)

Goes to show who's doing their homework... on the R&D department.

Announced 5 months in advance to allow for saving up on the budget...

6 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 18, 2011)

ah nikon will beat this specs soon... the specs are good but it's still ugly

35
2

2 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 18, 2011)

well nikon users must get used to uglyness... V1 anyone?

ROTFL....

13 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 18, 2011)

just like you ugly and so boring cam!

0 upvotes
rich in tx
By rich in tx (Oct 18, 2011)

Henry M. Hertz, how many times are you going to keep bringing up the V1? yes it's ugly and a major FAIL, but it's a gimmick. It's not their flagship DSLR. The full size D=series Nikons are stunning. At least Nikon's dont have a gay wheel on the back...

But my real concern with this new D1-X is the use of CF cards... am I the only one who has had one of the pins get bent by a bad card or by foreign objects falling in before you shove a cf card in? Wouldn't it make more sense to go to a card such as the SD cards... that have no pins to bend? just my opinion..

As far as the other specs, I love it. I am all for lower MP in favor of higher IQ. I am looking for better video quality than the nikons have; I know the canons (even down to the 60D) have better video than the nikon DSLR's. I am sure this one will be fantastic.
Being a Nikon guy, I hope the D800 (my price range) will raise the video bar. Image quality wise, I am not worried. I prefer nikon's still image over C.

2 upvotes
Boiler_Jack
By Boiler_Jack (Oct 18, 2011)

HOW MUCH!! I Want 2!

0 upvotes
Dave Peters
By Dave Peters (Oct 18, 2011)

No AF point for f8 lenses ?
Who needs 12 fps if you have to use mirror lockup to use it ?
Nice to see 2 x CF slots and option for GPS
Need to wait and see how AF tracking is improved
Is the battery the same as mk III and IV ?

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 18, 2011)

so you buy cheap beroflex lenses with a maximum of f8 for this camera?
you must be the only one..... no wonder canon don´t care.

read again... 14 FPS needs mirror lock up....

3 upvotes
blofelder
By blofelder (Oct 18, 2011)

I assume he means f4 super teles with 2x extender. There's your f8 aperture. Not so cheap.

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 18, 2011)

well i complain about that when nikon has f11 AF sensors...
500mm F5.6 + 2x telekonverter. ;-)

come one you must be realistic.

0 upvotes
Dave Peters
By Dave Peters (Oct 18, 2011)

You are right it was 14 fps that needs mirror lockup - sorry.
I have the Canon 800mm f5.6 which becomes f8 with 1.4x extender. The 1Ds mk III will AF with it so if this doesn't its a serious limitation for me.

0 upvotes
Martinka
By Martinka (Oct 18, 2011)

Battery is new due to some new safety stuff in Japan, although is compatible (back and forward) with 1D IV battery

0 upvotes
MirkoK
By MirkoK (Oct 18, 2011)

Great camera....BUT ...to say this is a merger of the 1D and 1Ds line is wrong.
i think its safer to say that the 1Ds line is "dead" and will be substitued by the 5D/ maybe 3D line.

i think we will be seeing another camera announcement this year in the 1 digit segment

and please canon....35mm 1.4L II? :)

4 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (Oct 18, 2011)

Any idea why Canon choses to announce it so long in advance?
Is this traditional Canon way with the Pro series or are they tryin to prevent ppl from jumping ship?

1 upvote
nathantw
By nathantw (Oct 18, 2011)

Most likely since Nikon will (or will not, who knows?) announce their cameras soon enough.

0 upvotes
WilliWieberg
By WilliWieberg (Oct 18, 2011)

why are the AF-points are not designed across the frame?

7 upvotes
Eleson
By Eleson (Oct 18, 2011)

I guess they want to reuse the AF module on an APS-C model.
I think all FF's are this way.

1 upvote
WilliWieberg
By WilliWieberg (Oct 18, 2011)

I thought so too. like what they did with the D3 of D700, they reused the old AF modules. but since FF is on the marked for years no, I hoped the would modify this...
at least it is the chance that the new Nikon D4 will go this way, as Nikon's AF system has always been a little bit ahead of Canon's

2 upvotes
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Oct 18, 2011)

its not just the AF modules

The flash AF assist light need to cover that area too
and the outer beams are coming in at an acute angle
for them to work.

Somewhere it was discussed in white paper, I think.
BUT its time to move out of this restriction !

0 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Oct 18, 2011)

Nikon's AF always ahead of Canon???

Check out 1D/1Ds vs D1X/D1h, 1D2/1Ds2 vs D2X/D2h. The disparity is even greater than 1D4 vs D3s

Comment edited 15 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Martinka
By Martinka (Oct 18, 2011)

There are some technical difficulties - size of the secondary mirror etc. You can see similar AF coverage in Nikon and Sony FF cameras...

4 upvotes
MysticX
By MysticX (Oct 18, 2011)

Great tool .... not for the normal average photographer.
We, the amateurs and enthusiasts, were waiting for them to release their mirrorless. Hope it'll be FF & small !

However, this camera would be very useful if used by the police here in Romania where many idiots break the rules and race with their expensive cars trough the cities. Connected to the wireless system it should provide great evidence for the police.

And of course, movie makers will love it.

0 upvotes
SidePod
By SidePod (Oct 18, 2011)

lets wait for the first samples ...
Looks like Canon just tweaked their old sensor design instead of moving forward to onchip column adc a la Sony. Did they finally got rid of low iso noise, banding, and so on?

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 18, 2011)

have you read it before making your stupid comment?

they wrote it a few times in the press release that this is a completely new sensor.

7 upvotes
SidePod
By SidePod (Oct 18, 2011)

of course its a new sensor since its their first 18mp FF. I was talking of its architecture ....

0 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 18, 2011)

it´s still a cmos sensor with a bayern pattern.
but im sure they have reworked everything from readout to AD circuits.

0 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Oct 18, 2011)

I sure hope Canon has improved on their sensor readout cos their low ISO dynamic range is some ways behind the competition

2 upvotes
vpts
By vpts (Oct 18, 2011)

Congratulations Canon!
The camera showed the brutal technology. I can not imagine how it work and how photo quality are. OMG! 2 digic V and another one digic IV for metering and AF control!

2 upvotes
role_of_72
By role_of_72 (Oct 18, 2011)

This is brutal! I can't see any weak points (obviously it's not for high MP studio work).
Congrats Canon!

1 upvote
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul
By Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul (Oct 18, 2011)

Funny you just read specification, you not have it. :)

0 upvotes
role_of_72
By role_of_72 (Oct 18, 2011)

Oh, you're right, from the specs of course. :)

0 upvotes
mario toni
By mario toni (Oct 18, 2011)

Final Cut Pro X - Eos 1D X .... hmmmmmm.....;)

0 upvotes
tommy leong
By tommy leong (Oct 18, 2011)

good one Mario

I wonder did anyone else notice they skip a whole bunch
of numbers
but the technology didn't jump that much

0 upvotes
Shootingbox
By Shootingbox (Oct 18, 2011)

Canon put the X, because it's the 10th generation for the EOS camera.

0 upvotes
Tiler65
By Tiler65 (Oct 18, 2011)

For the speed freaks..... have a listen to this
http://www.flickr.com/photos/inrsoul/6256207783/

5 upvotes
RawDogg
By RawDogg (Oct 18, 2011)

Now that's cool. I'm a speed freak alright.

0 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Oct 18, 2011)

An upgrade for 1D users, nothing much for 1Ds users to get excited about, unless of course the AF actually works well and there really is an increase in picture quality. Picture quality needs to be more than just less noise, I would of thought 16bit would of been here by now. All I see at the moment is just a speed increase, with maybe less noise, no big DR increase.
The 1DsmkIII was supposed to be a competitor for MF, it looks like Canon have abandoned that path.
I see Nikon jumping over this with both feet.
Every new top end digi 35mm looks to add more reason for me to go the MF route. I will reserve judgement until we see some real world results, as it stands the usual hype over content is all it says to me, just polishing the bells and whistles.

7 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Oct 18, 2011)

No one knows anything about DR performance yet. When Nikon announced their D3X, D3s, D7000 etc, they never made any claim about improved DR performance either.

Time will show if Nikon can jump over this bar set by the 1DX with both feet. Remember the current D7000 vs 2 year old 7D vs 2 year old D300s? Up to now, Nikon has yet to jump over the 2 year old 7D.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
HowaboutRAW
By HowaboutRAW (Oct 18, 2011)

photo nuts:

Do you mean to imply that the Nikon D7000 and the Canon 7D beat the Nikon D3/D3s and D700 for image quality?

0 upvotes
KAllen
By KAllen (Oct 18, 2011)

If it had a significant DR advantage they would be shouting about that from the roof tops. It will be for all practical purposes the same as their other FF cameras, if we are lucky a 1/2 stop increase.

0 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Oct 18, 2011)

HowAboutRAW:
I am comparing one APS-C camera against another. I am stating the fact that when it comes to performance specs (pixel count and fps), Nikon has yet to respond to a 2 year old 7D.

By extension, it is not immediately obvious if it's easy to clear the bar set by the 1DX (assuming the latter lives up to its hype...). That's why I said only time will show.

0 upvotes
Marksphoto
By Marksphoto (Oct 18, 2011)

It's a shame that Canon keeps making so called "better cameras" and yet there is no professional software to process RAW files. Photoshop's conversion creates dull images compared to DPP but DPP does nothing more than ajust white balance and density. SHAME ON YOU CANON THAT PROS CAN'T USE YOUR EXCELLENT CAMERAS TO THEIR FULL POTENTIAL!!!! I wouldn't even mind paying for a good RAW software from Canon, I guess they are too busy making money on insognificant upgrades that they forgotten about the end result :(

0 upvotes
ciumexan
By ciumexan (Oct 18, 2011)

yes. Finally my dream DSLR ...

The camera is covered with all info i found online on http://www.canon1dx.org ... please feel free to visit ... I will gather all the info online there. At the end... PURCHASE! :)

1 upvote
Zoomstein
By Zoomstein (Oct 18, 2011)

woo-hoo! looks like a very impressive upgrade!

3 upvotes
HetFotoAtelier
By HetFotoAtelier (Oct 18, 2011)

That's a great camera ;-) and now waiting for the Nikon D4 :-)
it should be better and earlier in the shops :-)

3 upvotes
lacroute
By lacroute (Oct 18, 2011)

No 1080/60, stratospheric price for a 18MP camera, still the same useless 1/250 flash sync... And as good at 51200 than 1DMkIV at 12800... Did they ever use their MkIV at 12800 ?

0 upvotes
Alxy
By Alxy (Oct 18, 2011)

The flash can be used in high speed mode at anz speed. The statement that 1Dx at 51200 is as good as 12800 must confirmed first. It could be that the new processor makes better noise reduction. At suche high ISO the noise is really bad. It is more itneresting if the new camera has same noice on 6400 as 1Dm4 at 1600.

0 upvotes
lacroute
By lacroute (Oct 18, 2011)

We do not use cobra flashes in our activity. Only Elinchrom, Profoto, quantum... That's why we keep on asking for higher flash speed sync, instead of cheating it with pocket wizards.... And believe me, it was the same story about noise between IV and III. Still no adverse brand, I suspect.

0 upvotes
Gerardjan
By Gerardjan (Oct 18, 2011)

Great machine! Great specs! ME too! Great!
That's why i love my K5 so much for less than 6x the price

1 upvote
TomLarsen
By TomLarsen (Oct 18, 2011)

It looks very impressive...

But the main delight for me is that it will soon be a lot cheaper to pick up a second hand 1Ds MkIII ;)

2 upvotes
rodibest
By rodibest (Oct 18, 2011)

OMG! I was waiting for ages for it!

1 upvote
joshdphoto
By joshdphoto (Oct 18, 2011)

Oh gosh, I really hope this is a joke. How is this a replacement to the 1Ds MK3?

I've owned all the 1 series cameras but will definitely not be buying this one. Hmmm... something wrong when you can buy a higher spec Sony with higher MP under $1000 USD. Perhaps an "s" version is in the works - I hope so! High FPS not of much use to studio shooters. I don't even care about DR!

Very doubtful of the claims of files that can be "up-sized". Sure, low noise is great, but if the detail is not there, the detail is not there. I've used a Fuji S2...

Maybe time to switch (back) to Nikon or Mamiya (with Phase One)? Wow! I never thought I would be writing that sentence!

For other photographers who use Canon in a studio environment, I think this will be a big disappointment.

4 upvotes
joshdphoto
By joshdphoto (Oct 18, 2011)

Wow, for someone who doesn't know anything about me, you've made some assumptions.

I wouldn't call myself a MP junkie, but I do consider it my professional responsibility to (within reason) use the best equipment available for the job. When I first started working professionally over 2 decades ago it was Sinars, Velvia, and Mamiya RZ's. When I switched to digital, the clear leader (in 35mm) was Canon. I can't say this camera would be the best for my particular needs, and I can imagine others thinking the same. I am not sure what type of photography you do, but I imagine that for professional studio photographers this camera is a disappointment. It is for me.

BTW - while I am normally not one to broadcast it, my IQ is above Mensa requirement and slightly below "genius". I find when you suggest that people are stupid simply because they do not share your opinion - it just makes you look bad.

4 upvotes
Alxy
By Alxy (Oct 18, 2011)

So, 1DX is not a big step down in turms of resolution. But everyone was expecting a step up, not down. 15Mpx ist not much less than 18Mpx. May be the next one...

0 upvotes
joshdphoto
By joshdphoto (Oct 18, 2011)

Let's hope there is another one. It's enlightening to realise that not all are as concerned with resolution, but for me it is vital.

Some would say that if 21 MP was enough a few years ago, why is 18MP so paltry now? The fact is that industry expectations change. Subtly client expectations do grow over time. There are things I could get away with 5 years ago (quality wise) that wouldn't be up to standard these days. It doesn't help that digital backs have gained so much resolution over the past few years.

For a Canon based studio, like my own, competing against a Phase One, Leaf or Hasselblad based studio, this means that longer term I will probably need to dump the Canons as my workhorses and invest $60K+ in medium format gear, which (frankly) sucks.

2 upvotes
Andrew Booth
By Andrew Booth (Oct 18, 2011)

Josh, like you I used to shoot an RZ as my main camera - and this is a disappointment. For studio use, there's plenty of light available, so you can have both resolution and low noise - no reason to give up resolution.
Canon have shown that they can produce great cropped sensors with 18Mpixels - scaled up to FF, this would be a 38Mpix sensor. So there's plenty of scope for much higher quality resolution from a FF imager.
I'm hoping for a 5DIII studio camera with 28+Mpix, or maybe even the return of the '3' series.

2 upvotes
rinkos
By rinkos (Oct 18, 2011)

you reffer to the A65...and i would read Sony's forums ..people are livid that instead of creating a higher ISO able camera using the great 16mp sensor ..Sony put out the 24mp sensor just so it would appeal all the idiots running around MP for no reasons...the 24mp sensor has slightly less IQ then the 16mp ..so instead of upping the ISO they upped the MP count..

i for one for all my previous bashing on Canon am glad they put "just" a 18mp sensor..this is the way all companies should go ..less then 20mp sensor with ultra high ISO ability ..200K is impressive..and also 14fps ..nice.

0 upvotes
Tom Bird
By Tom Bird (Oct 18, 2011)

obviousley you are not the main target group for this body.

one can assume, that canon knows how many sports- and weddingshooters are there in town and how this compares to the hi-res-should-be-MF-photogs.

the 1dx will be THE cam for photojournalists, that's for sure.

not so much for sportsshooters. they will lose the 1.3 crop of the former 1D and gain not much in pixels. bold move by canon, hopefully they know what they are doing...

0 upvotes
Mattoid
By Mattoid (Oct 18, 2011)

"BTW - while I am normally not one to broadcast it, my IQ is above Mensa requirement and slightly below "genius"."

I'd stick to not broadcasting it if I were you. Even if it's true it makes you sound like a douche. But surely you're smart enough to already know that.

1 upvote
joshdphoto
By joshdphoto (Oct 18, 2011)

Yes, totally aware that it might make me appear the douche. My point is that one shouldn't assume stupidity simply because of a difference of opinion. I'll take douche above stupid. Plenty of intelligent, successful people with valid viewpoints are called douches by others.

1 upvote
sfseng
By sfseng (Oct 18, 2011)

not so bad, at least it has a Live View. :) (despite the swivel LCD screen)

0 upvotes
NINJA1200
By NINJA1200 (Oct 18, 2011)

I can't wait to buy this camera piece of art and take a thousand videos of my cat and niece!!

12 upvotes
Kris Bell
By Kris Bell (Oct 18, 2011)

Can somebody PLEASE explain to me the point of all these 61 AF points?! I've never understood ever having more than one point - I dont want to be second-guessing where the camera is going to choose to focus, I need to know EXACTLY where it is going to focus and if necessary once focused I can re-compose the shot.

That small rant aside, I agree with bigdaddaves comment below about being between sports and studio. I'm personally holding out for a new 5D but this is slightly worrying, underwhelming news to me. 61 point AF and improvements to movie mode are largely irrelevant to me as a photographer.

0 upvotes
grubybartek
By grubybartek (Oct 18, 2011)

Kris,
ie if you shoot BIF - every one helps.No time to recompose.

0 upvotes
The A-Team
By The A-Team (Oct 18, 2011)

the problem with re-composing with fast lenses at close distances brings your original focus point out of focus (but only just...©dpreview :) there was a test demonstrating this recently somewhere on the net.

0 upvotes
Lea5
By Lea5 (Oct 18, 2011)

CONGRATULATIONS from the Nikon camp. I use a D3X and a D3. The 1DX looks like an amazing camera. I'm sure this camera will make many Canon shooters very happy, especially the Sportshooters and Videoguys. It makes me jealous! :D

6 upvotes
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Oct 18, 2011)

A technological marvel as one would expect but....

Who is it for?

Give this camera a crop mode and the sports guys will be delirious, give it more meg and the studio guys will be delighted, but this falls right between two stools to me.

There is nothing here to make me sell my 1Ds3 and all the sports guys will have to get lenses a third longer to take the same shots.

Nearly but not quite I think

2 upvotes
Mario72
By Mario72 (Oct 18, 2011)

I wonder why some people use their time and energy to lash out at a camera which is not even on the market.
It would be better if people would hold their peace and be still.

10 upvotes
nflanders2
By nflanders2 (Oct 18, 2011)

... or take some pictures.

8 upvotes
RawDogg
By RawDogg (Oct 18, 2011)

I knew the haters would come one. No matter what anon does there are always hater just sitting there waiting to lash out on one thing or another. I would love to get my hands on this when it is released. Canon knows exactly what they're doing.

1 upvote
echelon2004
By echelon2004 (Oct 18, 2011)

If the AF works it might be a really good camera =)

The name is a bit of a flirt with the mac crowd I suppose, strange, I've always seen the Canon as the cheeper mainstream alternative with enough muscles of their own to not having to be bothered with games.

0 upvotes
olyflyer
By olyflyer (Oct 18, 2011)

Wow. Congratulations to Canon.

0 upvotes
Elson
By Elson (Oct 18, 2011)

Wow!!! Finally Full Frame :) but as good as Nikon D3s??? In low light???

0 upvotes
RawDogg
By RawDogg (Oct 18, 2011)

What do you mean "Finally Full Frame"? Canon had the full frame before Nikon. Lets wait and see about the low light performance...I believe it will be better than Nikons D3s..

1 upvote
Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul
By Thanatham Piriyakarnjanakul (Oct 18, 2011)

Low light is just ok, not really good...

http://cweb.canon.jp/camera/eosd/1dx/samples/index.html

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

You get that impression from one very small web sized image that seems to have "alternative" (cross processing) processsing? Foolish on your part.

0 upvotes
amir_np
By amir_np (Oct 18, 2011)

Not so impressing,
This is not an special camera after this delay.
Your users are not silly to be satisfied with these childish futures that every compact camera have.
Technology is growing so fast and with present technology these futures are junk.
Your users are not kids Canon! Don't forget this!

3 upvotes
SidePod
By SidePod (Oct 18, 2011)

wow, looks like Canon finally has a competitor for the D3 ... too bad its 4 years late ...

Comment edited 22 seconds after posting
5 upvotes
photo nuts
By photo nuts (Oct 18, 2011)

Not the D3, but the 2 year old D3s. The D3 was good but not spectacular. The D3s, OTOH, sets the standard by which all high ISO images are compared. :)

0 upvotes
RawDogg
By RawDogg (Oct 18, 2011)

How long did it take Nikon to come out with w Full Frame DSLR after Canon produced one?

1 upvote
ARTASHES
By ARTASHES (Oct 18, 2011)

D3 was much more revolutionary for Nikon than D3s and with D3 the high ISO battle started for real (the priorities has changes) and until now no Canon FF camera couldn't compete with so it's is pretty truth to say that it's the first Canon camera that can compete with D3 (with D3s to thought)

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

No, it sounds like a d4 competitor, a d3 competitor would have been 12 or 13 MP with the sam 45 point AF and none of the extras the 1DX has. Canon must know some of what Nikon is cooking up. My guess is the D4 will also be in the 16 to 18 MP range and not the 24 to 32 MP range some users on here are "wishing" for.

0 upvotes
sfseng
By sfseng (Oct 18, 2011)

With that kind of conservative specs, I believe it won't stand long for its competitors to beat up in next new Sonikon FF launch.

0 upvotes
RedFox88
By RedFox88 (Oct 18, 2011)

The 1D and d3 cameras are not competitors for the 5D and d700 camera lines.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 524
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