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Canon EOS-1D X professional DSLR announcement and overview

By dpreview staff on Oct 18, 2011 at 05:00 GMT
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Canon has announced the launch of the EOS-1D X, its latest flagship professional DSLR. The 18MP camera is built around a full-frame sensor capable of shooting at up to 14 frames per second (12fps with AF), allowing it to replace both the 1D Mark IV and 1DS Mark III in Canon's lineup. Despite looking like previous 1D cameras, it's been extensively reworked (it includes more professional video features than any other Canon DSLR), so we took the opportunity to talk to Canon USA's Technical Advisor, Chuck Westfall about the camera and its features.

The 1D X won't be available until March 2012, so examples are not widely available yet. We've been extensively briefed on the camera and, in combination with an exclusive interview with Westfall, have prepared an overview of the camera.

Click here to read our overview of the Canon EOS-1D X

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Press Release:

CANON U.S.A. INTRODUCES THE NEW CANON EOS-1D X DIGITAL SLR CAMERA, RE-DESIGNED FROM THE INSIDE OUT


Featuring a Completely New 61-Point Autofocus, Fast Shooting up to 12 fps, 18-Megapixel Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, Full HD Video Recording and Much More

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., October 18, 2011 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, is proud to introduce a completely revolutionized EOS-1D series camera, the Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera.* As the new leader in Canon’s arsenal of professional DSLRs, the EOS-1D X will be a high-speed multimedia juggernaut replacing both the EOS-1Ds Mark III and EOS-1D Mark IV models in Canon’s lineup. Enhancing the revolutionary image quality of the EOS-1Ds and speed capabilities of the EOS-1D series, the EOS-1D X DSLR features an 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ Imaging Processors, 14-bit A/D data conversion and capable of shooting an incredible 12 frames-per-second (fps).  Canon’s EOS DSLR cameras and accessories have a long-standing legacy of providing high-quality results to professionals in a wide range of markets, including sports, nature, cinematography, wedding and commercial studios. The addition of this new model will help take this tradition to a whole new level.

The EOS-1D X announcement comes on the heels of Canon’s recent manufacturing milestone with the production of the Company’s 50-millionth EOS-series SLR camera in September of 2011. Furthermore, Canon will achieve yet another milestone at the end of this month producing the 70-millionth EF lens.

“The EOS-1D X represents the re-invention of the EOS-1Ds and EOS-1D series, combining new proprietary Canon technologies with the culmination of customer feedback and requests from the field. We are proud to introduce this camera to the worldwide community of professional photographers and cinematographers with the features and capabilities they need to capture the great moments that display their talent,” stated Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies and Communications Group, Canon U.S.A.

The Camera With Three Brains
The EOS-1D X features three DIGIC processors, including Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors capable of delivering approximately 17 times more processing speed than DIGIC 4, and a dedicated DIGIC 4 for metering and AF control. In conjunction with the newly developed high-performance 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS image sensor, the Dual DIGIC 5+ processors provide high-speed continuous shooting, lower noise, and a significant increase in data processing speed than previous EOS-1D models. This new level of data processing speed allows the EOS-1D X to perform many functions including chromatic aberration correction for various Canon EF lenses in-camera instead of through post-production software. The DIGIC 4 processor utilizes a new 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor for enhanced exposure accuracy with color and face detection, and works together with the camera’s new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF.

The EOS-1D X employs a completely new imaging sensor, producing the lowest noise of any EOS digital camera to date for stunning portraiture and studio work.  The new 18-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor utilizes large pixels – 1.25 microns larger than those in the EOS-1D Mark IV sensor and .55 microns larger than those in the EOS 5D Mark II sensor  – together with gapless microlenses to achieve enhanced light gathering efficiency, higher sensitivity and less noise at the pixel level.  The new sensor has improved on the already very high signal-to-noise ratio of sensor output of earlier EOS models for outstanding image quality, even in extremely low light.  When combined with the Dual DIGIC 5+ imaging processors the results are stunning.  The images produced with the EOS-1D X camera’s new sensor are so clean that files can easily be up-sized if necessary for even the most demanding high-resolution commercial applications. The EOS-1D X will also feature new Ultrasonic Wave Motion Cleaning (UWMC), Canon’s second generation self-cleaning sensor unit, which utilizes carrier wave technology to remove smaller dust particles from the sensor and it includes a new fluorine coating on the infrared absorption glass to help repel dust. 

The low-light capability of the EOS-1D X is evident in its incredible ISO range and ability to photograph in extremely low-light conditions. Adjustable from ISO 100 to 51,200 within its standard range, the new model offers a low ISO 50 setting for studio and landscape photography and two high settings of 102,400 at H1 and 204,800 at H2, ideal for law enforcement, government or forensic field applications.

New 61-Point High Density Reticular AF
The EOS-1D X includes a brand new 61-Point High Density Reticular AF, the most sophisticated DSLR AF system Canon has ever released.  The 21 focusing points in the central area are standard precision cross-type and effective with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6, depending on the lens in use. The center five points are also high-precision diagonal cross-type points for maximum apertures as small as f/2.8.  All 61 points are sensitive to horizontal contrast with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6 and 20 of the outer focusing points function as cross-type points with maximum apertures as small as f/4.0. Other innovations of the new 61-point High Density Reticular AF include expanded AF coverage area, superior focusing precision and low light sensitivity, and greater low-contrast subject detection capability compared to earlier EOS AF systems. (See image below for AF point configuration)

All AF functions now have their own menu tab for quick and easy access (formerly AF custom functions in previous EOS models).  A new AF Configuration Tool allows for customized setting of tracking sensitivity, the acceleration and deceleration of tracking subjects, and AF point auto switching, all of which are easily accessed and adjusted via the new AF menu tab. A built-in Feature Guide advises photographers on which settings to use according to subject matter.

Similar to the AF point selection options offered in the EOS 7D Digital SLR camera, the EOS-1D X offers six AF point selection modes: Spot, Single Point, Single Point with surrounding four points, Single Point with surrounding eight points, Zone selection and Automatic AF point selection. (See image below AF point selection options.)

EOS iTR AF: Intelligent Tracking and Recognition Enhances AF Performance
The Canon EOS-1D X features incredible new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF options ideal for wedding and event photography as well as sports and photojournalism. The default AF mode for the EOS-1D X uses phase detection AF information, while a new second option uses Face Detection technology to track recognized faces in addition to color information, ideal when shooting events such as tennis or dancing where facial recognition of the original subject will help keep that person in focus throughout the scene.

Exposure Control
For the first time in a Canon DSLR camera, a DIGIC processor is used exclusively with the metering sensor for fast, accurate exposure control. The Canon DIGIC 4 processor takes advantage of the EOS-1D X’s 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor and utilizes 252 zones for general metering or 35 zones for low-light metering to help ensure accurate evaluative ambient or flash exposure.  The new subject recognition capabilities enhance nearly all of the camera’s automatic functions, helping to adjust exposure, autofocus, Auto Lighting Optimizer and Automatic Picture Style to the scene being captured for enhanced image quality. 

Multiple Exposure Modes
The EOS-1D X is the first EOS Digital SLR to feature Multiple Exposure capability. The camera can combine up to nine individual images into a single composite image, with no need for post-processing in a computer. Four different compositing methods are provided for maximum creative control, including Additive, Average, Bright and Dark. Compositing results can be viewed in real time on the camera’s LCD monitor, and there is a one-step Undo command that allows photographers to delete an image and try again if desired. The EOS-1D X’s Multiple Exposure mode even allows photographers to specify a previously captured RAW image as the starting point for a new Multiple Exposure composite image. 

Super High Speed Mode
The Canon EOS-1D X camera breaks new ground in the world of digital SLRs, offering a Super High Speed Mode which increases shooting speeds up to 14 fps at full 18-megapixel resolution in JPEG mode*1. The new camera is also capable of shooting RAW, JPEG, or RAW+JPEG at speeds up to 12 fps in One Shot AF or AI Servo AF for enhanced performance in sports photography and other applications requiring high-speed digital capture. This new level of performance is made possible by the combination of the EOS-1D X’s 16-channel readout CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors, and a completely new reflex mirror mechanism that has been engineered by Canon to combine high-performance with exceptional precision and reliability.

Enhanced EOS HD Video – New Compressions, Longer Recording
Centered around an all-new full-frame CMOS sensor with larger pixels than those found on the EOS 5D Mark II image sensor, the EOS-1D X utilizes new HD video formats to simplify and speed up post-production work.  The two new compression formats offered on the EOS-1D X include intraframe (ALL-i ) compression for an editing-friendly format and interframe (IPB) compression for superior data compression, giving professionals the options they need for their ideal workflow. Answering the requests of cinematographers and filmmakers, the EOS-1D X includes two methods of SMPTE-compliant timecode embedding, Rec Run and Free Run, allowing multiple cameras or separate sound recording to be synced together in post production. 

Canon’s all new full-frame CMOS sensor ensures that video footage captured on the EOS-1D X will exhibit less moiré than any previous Canon model, resulting in a significant improvement in HD video quality. A desired feature for many documentary filmmakers using Canon DSLRs was to enable recording beyond the four gigabyte (GB) file capacity and the EOS-1D X is the answer. The new camera features automatic splitting of movie files when a single file exceeds 4GB.  The new file splitting function allows for continuous video recording up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files; no frames are dropped and the multiple files can be seamlessly connected in post production, providing filmmakers the recording time they want in the same convenient DSLR form factor. The camera records Full HD at 1920 x 1080 in selectable frame rates of 24p (23.976), 25p, or 30p (29.97); and 720p HD or SD video recording at either 50p or 60p (59.94). SD video can be recorded in either NTSC or PAL standards.

The Canon EOS-1D X also includes manual audio level control, adjustable both before and during movie recording, an automatic setting, or it can be turned off entirely. A wind filter is also included. Sound can be recorded either through the internal monaural microphone or via an optional external microphone through the stereo mic input. 

Enhanced Ergonomics & Optimized Design
Photographers familiar with Canon’s EOS 1D-series of cameras will notice the control configuration of the EOS-1D X takes a different approach to button placement.  The re-designed exterior and ergonomic button configuration feels comfortable in your right hand, allowing seamless navigation through menu options. 

The Live View Button has been conveniently placed near the user’s thumb for one-touch switching between Live View and Viewfinder shooting. The Quick Control Button and menu navigation controls will allow users to change camera settings using only their right hand, for fast, simple one-handed control using their thumb on the scroll wheel. The new multi-controller is positioned by the right hand thumb when the camera is held for vertical shooting and enables the same level of control to camera operators when shooting vertically as they have when shooting horizontally.  On the front of the camera are four user assignable function buttons, two for vertical shooting and two for horizontal shooting, allowing customizable button control when shooting in either position.  The camera also features a level of weather resistance equivalent to earlier professional models such as the EOS-1D Mark IV.

Canon has answered the request of many professional EOS photographers and incorporated Dual Card Slots into the new EOS-1D X DSLR camera. The dual CF card slots will allow photographers to carry only one memory card format and still achieve instant image back-ups and enhanced storage capacity.

This camera also features a new shutter design with even greater durability and precision. Rated to 400,000 cycles, the new carbon fiber shutter blades are more lightweight and durable, allowing the EOS-1D X to achieve over 100,000 cycles more than the shutter of the EOS-1D Mark IV.  A new shutter motion and new motor help further reduce vibration in the camera. The EOS-1D X also features an electronic first curtain, new to the EOS-1D series DSLRs, for minimal in-camera vibration during image capture.

Connectivity
For professional photographers who prefer a wired workflow and transfer system, Canon has included a built-in LAN connection in the EOS-1D X DSLR. The built-in LAN connection features a gigabit Ethernet Jack capable of 1000BASE-T transmission speeds, offering photographers a stable wired connection for ultra-fast data transmission.  If the network were to go down, the camera will attempt to resend images until the files are sent.  The EOS-1D X also features a direct image transfer function whereby images can be selected for transfer, and only sent once a LAN or USB connection is established.

Accessories
Designed exclusively for the EOS-1D X, the new Canon WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter* features wireless LAN support for 802.11n network transfer rates providing users with increased communication speed when compared to previous models.  With this new dust and weather resistant model, professionals can synchronize clocks on multiple cameras and use the unit to support linked shooting when utilizing multiple cameras.  In addition, Bluetooth-compatible equipment can be easily linked to the device as well.

The EOS-1D X also offers an optional Canon GP-E1 GPS Receiver*, which can be easily integrated into the camera’s body.  Powered by the camera, this GPS receiver provides the same weatherproof resistance as the EOS-1D X, even at the connector. With an electronic compass on-board, the GP-E1 will log movement – latitude, longitude, elevation, and the Universal Time Code – and allow viewing of camera movement on a PC after shooting.  The receiver will also record camera direction when shooting, even when shooting vertically.

Pricing and Availability
The Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera is scheduled for March 2012 availability and will be sold in a body-only configuration at an estimated retail price of $6,800.00. The compact, lightweight WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter is scheduled to be available in March 2012 and have an estimated retail price of $600. Availability for the GP-E1 GPS receiver is expected in April 2012 with an estimated retail price of $300.

*1 Super High Speed Continuous shooting at 14 fps requires mirror lock and JPEG mode at ISO speeds less than 32000.

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Comments

Total comments: 524
1234
Iskra
By Iskra (Nov 29, 2012)

Still no review of this camera. How old will it have to be before you give it an unbiased proper review?
Is it some kind of politics behind your lack of interest in this Canon body, or is it a lack of ability?

1 upvote
flatech
By flatech (Mar 17, 2012)

The Canon 1Dx is finally available for preorder from Amazon. It should be released around the end of April.
I looking forward to see what it's capable of compared to the D4.

http://amzn.to/AlePwD

0 upvotes
AK PHOTO
By AK PHOTO (Mar 7, 2012)

The `1d-x will be very tempting to purchase as an upgrade to my 1D Mark IV, but I'm not sure it's worth it. The images from the 1D Mark IV are amazing. I've enlarged my outdoor images to 40X60 on canvas and they're very high quality. I also prefer the results over the 5D Mark II for portraiture at ISO 100-200. The high ISO is okay, but that is the only improvement that the newer model could offer that could make me get one. I do shoot a fair amount of high ISO events. Waiting long periods of time for the new model released makes it less likely for me to want to update however. I find this rather annoying.

0 upvotes
Eosman01
By Eosman01 (Feb 12, 2012)

Well just to put my two cents in, GPS uses power it's good to have the option- if u want it then buy it!
18mp FF RAW file, well if you can't use that for a bigger enough picture and enough picture quality - Then you don't know what you are doing!
I had a Eos1N back in the day and this is the equiv Digital version!
I know people who HAVE USED THIS ALREADY- And they LOVE IT!
"yes all pro users and people in the trade".
You want a built in multiplier? Buy a Bigger lens! if you can buy this camera then you can buy a nice 400mm f2.8L IS & a 2x, to go with it oh- 800mm isn't close enough- well get closer even if you are shooting lions feeding in africa, Than again with 18mp FF you could crop it, You know we used to" blow up" negs in the old film days with a enlarger to make something bigger, but people forget "a perfect picture can't be cropped"
I'm lucky enough to be getting to try out this puppy really soon and my expectations are it's going to be Everything I could ever want!!!!

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

A switch to turn GPS on or off would be better than buying separate, expensive, awkward ugly lumps to add two features, both of which can be found in cheap Canon compacts.

Leaving these features out of the body was a marketing decision, and frankly a deplorable one.

I have a 1D IV - if the 1D X had GPS and wireless built-in, then it would tip the scales in favour of an upgrade for sure. As it is, I'll wait and see what comes in the next model.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
AaronRome
By AaronRome (Jan 12, 2012)

I really look forward in getting this camera; upgrading from the 1D Mark II.

0 upvotes
JVWy
By JVWy (Dec 17, 2011)

I think Canon missed the boat too by not adding a built in multiplier similar to the Nikon D3s with a crop factor of 1.5X or 1.6X. I would have also liked to have seen an adjustable drive rate instead of the 2 choices of 3fps or 12fps. With all the electronic gizmos would it be that hard to have a choice between 2 and 12fps?
Look forward to the GPS Unit!

0 upvotes
proteinpowder
By proteinpowder (Dec 30, 2011)

The D3s has a full frame sensor and does not have a focal multiplier. Using a crop sensor on the 1DX would be a step backward as you would have reduced image quality, especially at high ISO's.

3 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

Canon's crop lens are EF-S which is not compatible with full frame Ef mount (struck mirror)

0 upvotes
derekdphoto
By derekdphoto (Feb 5, 2012)

I think if you're looking for the x1.6 FOV for your style, such as gaining a little boost to your zoom lenses for distance shots, look at the Canon EOS 7D, which is 18MP, 8 fps and has the crop FOV sensor at a 1.6 multiplier.

Anyone wanting their lenses to behave like they would on a 35mm camera or wanting to shoot higher ISOs with less grain will use a full frame sensor, which both Canon and Nikon make for the professional market.

0 upvotes
elau
By elau (Dec 12, 2011)

I don't know what a lot of you people are talking about. I mainly shoot sports, and the specs of this camera seem to be the perfect camera. It's as if Canon took everyone's advice about the 1D Mark IV and put it all in one camera. To name a few, there were complaints about the 1.3x crop in the mkIV. Well, now it's full-frame. 16.1MP not enough? Now it's 18MP. I feel that that's plenty considering a higher pixel density really won't help the camera out much. The ISO boosts up to 204,800. Of course I'd probably never use that much, but this type of capability just hints that maybe even the ISO 25,600 will be usable in normal usage. The 14FPS will be amazing in capturing shots as well. This is basically a 1DsMkII put into a 1DMkIV. All of these improvements for less than what the 1DsMkIII is selling for now ($7000). I'd say this is quite a bargain. (if they do sell for $6,800)

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Khizer
By Khizer (Jan 25, 2012)

Great camera, but I am eagerly awaiting the Review. If anything is left to be desired, it is for price to come down by about $1k to help me decide between 1D X and Nikon D4. Right now, I am in a quandary.

0 upvotes
Jussi K
By Jussi K (Dec 5, 2011)

Compained video & stills

Haven't found info to this: Can EOS 1D X shoot simultaneously video and also take stills? As a all around journalist, this is exacty what I am looking after. I have old nice & heavy Mark II N plus a videocam, which I typically need to use on same asignment. To do even a video interview, a turnable liveview screen is a must. We also do a lot of fast sportshooting, so a top notch still performance is a must. So even 1DX seems not to be able to deliver all this, but compained video & still would be nice. I am not willing to change to other make, because is would be too much investments again.

0 upvotes
Davidefoto
By Davidefoto (Nov 16, 2011)

Canon knows how many photographers chosen Canon in alternative to MF? It understands this choice will make them change? I would have changed my DSMIII for a better 21 mp or a 30 mp. Instead I will continue to use mine until I could afford Hasselblad. I'm disappointed: Canon sensor is my favorite. They really think that those now use D Mark IV will spend $ 7000 for less Mp of the 5D Mark II ( which costs 1/3 )? Reporter ( those who need high frame rate and sensitivity ) are today the lowest paid photographers in the world; do you think can afford these investments? This camera will be inaccessible to those now use the D Mark 4, and inadequate to those now uses the DS Mark III. I hope a close release of a 30-32-36 mp, otherwise Canon will lose many professionals; therefore, will lose many amateur photographers, because amateur they want to have the camera they see in the hands of professionals. Unfortunately seems that photographic industry does not understand this concept

1 upvote
Petka
By Petka (Jan 8, 2012)

Real photographers understand that there is no sense making much over 20 MPix 35mm sensors as the lenses do not resolve well enough (diffraction and real life price/quality/weight limitations) to use them. Camera companies catering to real photographers have also realized this basic fact, and that low light sensitivity is a bigger factor in getting pay shots than useless pixels.

4 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

I remember when 'real photographers' were telling us that 5 MP was more than enough, and there was no point in getting a camera with higher resolution because blah, blah, bs, blah.

Even if the lens can't resolve higher resolutions, higher resolution sensors could produce better images. In the same way that a 300dpi image printed at 300dpi looks pretty unimpressive, but the same 300dpi image printed at 1400dpi looks smooth and delicious on a quality printer.

Nikon and Hasselblad both make cameras with much higher resolution sensors - perhaps you feel they don't make cameras for 'real photographers'.

But I'm assuming you consider yourself a 'real photographer' - what kit do you use?

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

Davidefoto:

I'm a 1D IV user, and I won't be buying a 1D X. I see there are lots of changes for the better with this model, but it's not enough for me to justify changing - for my photography, I'm happy with the IQ and features from my 1D IV.

However, I find that 1D IV images are way nicer than the substantially higher resolution images from the 5D II - no comparison - whether this is due to improved sensor or processing technology I couldn't say, but both appear to have improved again on the 1D X, along with some extra resolution.

I certainly found the 1D IV kicked the pants of the 1D III in every department, but didn't have the opportunity to compare with the 1Ds III model, and it's a very different beast.

Perhaps compare IQ and handling between your 1Ds III and the 1D X - you may find that the 1D X could be a worthwhile purchase for you with the extra generation gap.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
bohoops
By bohoops (Nov 13, 2011)

Does this camera have the 'Lens Calibration' feature built into it? Or is that standard on all new 'D' series cameras and they don't even list it in specifications anymore?

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

I can't imagine it would be missing.

I found that none of my lenses required any calibration on my 1D IV, but it's nice to know it's available if I need it rather than have to send body and lens to Canon for six weeks.

0 upvotes
unknown member
By (unknown member) (Nov 9, 2011)

Olympus has been hip to the whole "lower" megapixel thing before it was ever cool... Nice to see that Canon is learning a thing or two.

That ISO 200,000 will really come in handy too... if you want to take a natural light picture of bat dung in a pitch black cave.

0 upvotes
eozdural
By eozdural (Dec 27, 2011)

about taking pictures in almost complete darkness... the problem will be focusing on any subject, I mean if you intend not to use a flash to take the picture, then you will also not use a flash for focus assistance. I was thinking about this earlier, for focusing in near dark, I think a kind of 'sonar' would be useful. Interesting how you wrote about the bat cave. All the lenses would have to be calibrated of course. I have never heard of such a thing, i wonder if it actually exists in any form.

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

Olympus did that because Panasonic refused to let them use their 16mp sensor and neither m43 sensors can do ISO200000 so I assume no one will ever need such high iso

anyway Olympus's Jpeg engine are too superior that nothing really matters :-)

0 upvotes
Montana500
By Montana500 (Nov 5, 2011)

Nice to see Canon admitting that too many pixels hurts IQ. The 40D had better IQ from ISO 100-800 than the 50D and 7D. The images were "smoother" and cleaner, which is why I bought a DSLR to begin with. The 7D is like those Panasonic consumer cameras (The FZ line) or my old venerable Canon s2 superzoom. If Canon came out with an 8D with 12mp I'd trade my 7D for it. It's all about IQ.

0 upvotes
drif8r
By drif8r (Nov 6, 2011)

A 7D 18MP downsized to 10MP as 40D will have more resolution and less noise . You can't compare 100% crops of a sensor that 80% more resolution.

3 upvotes
Jon Rista
By Jon Rista (Nov 21, 2011)

Scale the nearly 2x larger image of the 7D down to the same resolution of the 40D, and see if you can still complain about IQ. Its ludicrous to compare 100% crops of sensors designed almost 5 years apart!! You can never lose image quality as you increase resolution, although you might end up out-resolving the lens (which still wouldn't result in *worse* IQ.)

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

Montana you should try the Sigma SLRS (or even DP series), at 100% they care just clean, why brother with a 40D?

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

Jon Rista:

Overpacking a sensor with pixels certainly can hurt IQ. It's only worth having the extra pixels if the sensor technology is sufficiently improved to manage the pixel density.

Whether this is why Canon haven't gone for a higher pixel count here, or whether they found that the upgraded triple processors meant that it simply wasn't necessary to do it to improve IQ, who knows? Let's see the results when it's released.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Nov 4, 2011)

People who think they understand how camera technology actually works are going to be left behind. The sensor race has changed and having too many pixels will degrade image quality. Get up to speed people. I worried allot of good photographers are missing a trick on sensors moving forward

1 upvote
carljw316
By carljw316 (Nov 1, 2011)

I don't see why so many people are whining about low megapixels! You're ignoring the ISO performance. This is Canon's answer to the D3s, and it's a slam dunk! This is a low light sports camera at it's finest, and I'm hoping to own it! Consider the market for indoor youth sports...volleyball, gymnastics, and cheerleading, or even outdoor sports in early morning, overcast conditions. This camera is gold for these situations. You'll get noise-free images with high shutter speeds in the worst lighting conditions. That's where the value of this camera is found. If you want shoot at 100 ISO in your studio, then obviously this is not what you need.

8 upvotes
amir_np
By amir_np (Nov 1, 2011)

After 7D and 5DMKII, This camera doesn't come better with this tiny improved features. This is a huge piece of Junk.

1 upvote
BeanyPic
By BeanyPic (Nov 4, 2011)

Oh so you've actually tested it then. I've been lucky enough to test it at Pro solutions and have to say it blew my socks off. As for tiny improvements you have no idea. This is a BIG game changer.

8 upvotes
Canon16
By Canon16 (Nov 18, 2011)

@amir_np ... What ??? You def. are a moron? Did you even read its huge spec sheet? It blows everything and that includes D3S on the market in that price. Don't make vague statements ... be precise and tell me which other model can beat it? Its the IQ and ISO that matters. Did you even notice it can shoot @ 12/14 fps and Full HD. 3 processors. MP is not really a big deal and 18 is fairly good. Canon made a good call.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 4 minutes after posting
6 upvotes
Jon Rista
By Jon Rista (Nov 21, 2011)

@amir_np: What exactly are you basing that opinion on?? This camera hasn't even hit the shelves yet, how can you possibly call it a piece of junk?! This kind of naive crap doesn't benefit anyone, it just gives fodder for all the sheep who listen to it to propagate pointless fabrications across the net.

Wait for the damnable thing to be RELEASED before you s**t all over it!!

2 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

Yes it is huge piece of Junk for morons which I assume you were referring to yourself?

1 upvote
JoeAmateur
By JoeAmateur (Jan 10, 2012)

@Mtsuoka: Really? Wipes the floor spec-wise with the D4. Guess we'll see what's real when they're both shipping, won't we?

0 upvotes
Mike Fulton
By Mike Fulton (Oct 26, 2011)

With my 1DS Mk3, I shoot mainly at ISO 100 with studio flash.

The increased frame rate of the 1D X does nothing for me, because my lights don't recycle that fast. The improved ISO sensitivity does nothing for me, because I shoot at ISO 100. Wasn't having any focusing issues, so the improved autofocus isn't something I really need. Going from 21.7mp to 18mp is a drop of nearly 20%. Doesn't seem like a good thing to me.

The new camera sounds like an awesome step up for 1D Mk4 owners, but tell me again how this is an "upgrade" from my 1DS Mk3?

I think I'll stick with my 1DS Mk3 for now.

2 upvotes
SCY
By SCY (Jan 9, 2012)

I'm with Mike here -

What I think we'd all love to see - commercially speaking - is a higher resolution chip, better pixel size & most importantly?

Lenses specifically designed to capitalise on the new chips.

This seems like a capture product that slots right in the middle between the 1DS and 1D / EOS product groupings. It looks like Canon is trying to simplify their product line by merging 2 clearly defined groups together with comprimises to both.

0 upvotes
AaronRome
By AaronRome (Jan 19, 2012)

A slight decrease in resolution isn't good, but the size and pixel density is. I went from the Canon T2i to the 1D Mark II; in most aspects of that T2i, it beat the Mark II out of the water, 18mp, newer process (Digic 4), A/D Conversion was a tad bit faster 12/14 bit...These are all things to consider, look even what I gained; 8.5fps, all pro exclusive features. But what really got me to the Mark II was the way it handled with highlights and shadows; AND the slightly larger sensor and larger pixel density, (makes for a better high ISO/Low noise ratio. I honestly knew too much about cameras and related tech to own an entry level SLR, so I made the purchase on the Mark II; no dust on the sensor, no Error 99, no hardware flaws, crisp 8mp images.... What I'm trying to say, is that 21mp full frame might not be just as good as you think it may be if you put forward the effort to process the technology in such a matter. Look what Nikon did with the D3s, leading in Low light photos at 12mp!

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

Heh, as a 1D IV owner, I would have thought the opposite more likely.

I shoot some studio work, but mostly outdoors. I was dubious initially about the one size fits all solution of the X, but I'm coming around to it, and I think the resultant image quality on the 1D X versus your 1Ds III might surprise you - I'd compare the two if I were you. I haven't handled a 1Ds III, but the 5D II's 21MP images simply don't compare to the 1D IV images, and the 1D X has improved resolution and processors - got to be worth a look. That's assuming you feel you need to improve, since you sound pretty happy with your 1Ds III.

Personally, I'm so happy with the 1D IV (image quality, speed, AF, felxivility) that I don't feel the need to upgrade yet - though I probably would have if the X's feature list included wireless and GPS built-in. I hate the stupid lumpy add ons, and find them to be unnecessarily expensive.

0 upvotes
Zolotusca
By Zolotusca (Oct 24, 2011)

My questiona are: 1. If I take a shot with an aperture between 1,4 and 2,8 I need to spot-focus with the 5 central cross-type focus points? 2. If I take the photo with an aperture between 2,8 and 5,6 I need to use for the spot focusing the 16 points aroud the 5 central ones? 3. If I take a shot with an aperture between 4 and 5,6 I need to spot-focus with the outer 10 + 10 lateral cross-type focus points? Is this correct?

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

No. It makes no difference which aperture I choose, only the lens's *max* aperture.

This relates only to the maximum aperture of the lens in use - how much light can be drawn through the lens for focusing before the aperture closes down to the selected setting when taking the photo (or using DoF preview).

I have five lenses - one with a max. aperture of f1.2, three with f2.8, one with f4. This means that I get to use all the cross-type sensitivity with all my lenses, but I lose the additional diagonal cross type sensitivity with my f4 lens.

The cross-type focus points still work outside these aperture ranges, but then they only function as horizontal focus points, not cross-type. You can choose any point you like for your spot focussing, but some will be better than others if your lens is bright.

It seems likely that most people buying this camera will own mostly fast glass, and get to use all these good things, regardless of what aperture they choose to use for a given shot.

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

The centre focus points with diagonal crosses in addition to vertical/horizontal crosses should be fantastic with fast glass.

0 upvotes
Yukihyo
By Yukihyo (Oct 23, 2011)

Price confirmed here in Japan today at 583,000 Yen (US7,640) for the EOS-1 DX.
That makes it close to half-way between the Mark 1V and Mark 111 Ds. Two major stores (plus Amazon Japan) have confirmed this price.

0 upvotes
wutsurstyle
By wutsurstyle (Oct 21, 2011)

Not to change the subject of debate, but I noticed there is no Mode Dial on the upper left corner. Seems interesting to me. Anyone know whats going on there?

0 upvotes
mickcivic
By mickcivic (Oct 21, 2011)

Mode is changed by a combination of a button press and control dial in the 1-series. Check out the top view and you'll see a "Mode" button. You press and hold that and change the setting with the dial near the shutter button.

Very confusing for first-time 1-series users, but when you get used to it, it's a really sweet system.

1 upvote
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

I notice that even the film EOS 3 and EOS 1 don't have mode dail

0 upvotes
paul johe
By paul johe (Oct 20, 2011)

I bet Canon considered the less MP factor before launching this. It sounds like a big 7D sensor. Have you tried 7D's highest ISO with Adobe LR3? It just was amazing. DPP failed to remove the noise at the highest expanded iso. With the noise removal of LR3, 7D can produce much better bigger size prints (up to 20x30 with no problem). I almost get rid of 7D due to noise before I used LR3. Normally I use 1dsm3 and 5dm2. When playing with 1000+ test shots with 7D and LR3, I can feel its potential of a bigger version of 7D sensor which makes the same 18MP with much better high iso performance and resolving power. I think it is a balance move by Canon considering how many want more MPs. With much better softwares for stitching and HDR with computer processing power, 20ish MP can be the max for 35mm DSLRs. It will be interesting to see how Nikon responds with D800 and D4 in terms of MPs.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 21, 2011)

a perfect lens at f/4 will need 500MP to resolve. there is still improvement when pixel pitch goes down to a fraction of CoC. 30-50MP will become standard in several years (after that for videos shooting from APS-C cameras) and that's only a fraction of our goal (I'm thinking of 300-500MP, 1.5 um pitch for 35mm FF).

p.s., there will be 47MP if we can stitch 7D sensors into 35mm FF, what I want for 5D3.

Comment edited 14 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Picturenaut
By Picturenaut (Oct 25, 2011)

@ paul johe: I read your comment with great excitement as I use a 7D and currently consider an upgrade to LR3. Still use Canon's DPP raw converter because when the 7D was fresh on the market early tests revealed that it was the best raw converter for the 7D then. Thanks for this valuable info!

0 upvotes
bohoops
By bohoops (Nov 13, 2011)

It's not the same 18MP sensor. The pixels are bigger on the new camera. The sensors both are 18MP, but the 1-DX is full-frame and the 7D is not.

2 upvotes
Jon Rista
By Jon Rista (Nov 21, 2011)

@bohoops has it nailed. No way you could compare the APS-C 18mp sensor of the 7D with the FF 18mp sensor of the 1D X. Worlds different, the 1D X has a far larger pixel, not to mention it being a completely redesigned new sensor with an entirely different low-noise readout system.

0 upvotes
marike6
By marike6 (Jan 7, 2012)

The 7D sensor is not a benchmark that Nikon needs to "resond to".

The 7D is a fast camera, good video, but it does not have a particularly impressive sensor. Compared to other APS-C cameras, like D7000, K5, the 7D has worse high ISO performance, and dynamic range by a lot.

0 upvotes
LensmanSA
By LensmanSA (Oct 20, 2011)

Yes I want one

0 upvotes
jesse2
By jesse2 (Oct 20, 2011)

Still no full-time AF for video shooting?

0 upvotes
skrulm8
By skrulm8 (Oct 20, 2011)

Manual focus is working just fine for Hollywood.

4 upvotes
jesse2
By jesse2 (Oct 21, 2011)

So there really isn't full-time AF for video shooting for the upcoming EOS-1D X. For the sake of enthusiastic (not pro) SLR users, it would be a must-have. I have been waiting on Canon for a couple years now.

This is a major bummer that Canon hasn't had any camera to match what Nikon, Sony, Panasonic, Olympus have now.

0 upvotes
openskyline
By openskyline (Oct 21, 2011)

it's not for you if you don't know how to manual focus in Video.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 23, 2011)

it's okay 1DX not made for many people looking for a good camera. and people should not be blamed for not working for Hollywood when they buy a camera.

0 upvotes
SurfnWally
By SurfnWally (Oct 23, 2011)

Hollywood or not, the constant blurry, seeking in and out of auto-focus, or "amateur focus" is what makes amateur videos look amateur. If you already have auto-focus, turn it off. If you are looking to buy a new video camera, buy a dedicated video camera without auto-focus. Your videos will look so much more professional. If you're looking for a professional still camera, the 1D line is tops, but not for video.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 24, 2011)

SurfnWally may talk about contrast AF, but I think the topic is phase-diff AF? which is standard for professional video cameras.

0 upvotes
Canon16
By Canon16 (Nov 18, 2011)

@jesse2 ... pls go buy a dedicated video camera. Canon is NOT here to satify just you. This cam has a purpose and theres nothing in Nikon lineup to match its potential. Panasonic and other likes are NOT even a competition. They are for ameteur photographers. Get off the line.

0 upvotes
kadosh32000
By kadosh32000 (Nov 20, 2011)

There's no serious cinematographer that would ask for full-time AF on video. Simply, nobody has a use for that, since creative focus is what you aim for anytime you are shooting video.

1 upvote
Alfonso Bresciani
By Alfonso Bresciani (Dec 28, 2011)

Manual focusing works fine for Hollywwod because:

1) They have a person called "focus puller"

2) Scene on the sets are pre arranged therefore they prefocus or follow focus remotely

3) focu puller has a large monitor to focus with

1 upvote
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

'There's no serious cinematographer that would ask for full-time AF on video' True. They're also less likely to choose a stills camera...

Much as Alfonsi Bresciani points out, most of us don't have the leisure to spend days setting up a scene, don't have a full crew to assist on the day, and are not shooting professional actors who are moving through the scene in a predicted manner, and just like they did in the previous X takes. We're talking about video facility on a stills camera that will probably be hand held most of the time, and used to capture unrehearsed moments as they occur, using lenses that are actually designed for stills not video. I think fast, accurate AF would be most helpful here.

Are there any pro news videographers here that could weigh in? I suspect that's a more realistic usage comparison.

@Canon16 - Canon wants to satisfy users of all levels, so supply a range of cameras. Why would you imagine your opinion more valid to them than jesse2's?

Comment edited 45 seconds after posting
0 upvotes
Almoster
By Almoster (Oct 20, 2011)

Hi! Do you know if Epson P-7000 will read the raw files from the new canon eos 1d x?

0 upvotes
GKC
By GKC (Oct 24, 2011)

I doubt it will right out of the box, but I would be surprised if there wasn't a firmware update for the P7000 almost as soon as the 1DX is released.

0 upvotes
Photodog7
By Photodog7 (Oct 20, 2011)

To make a unbiased comment due to the fact I like both systems, it just seems like a long wait only for this. It does not seem like canon really made a good move. On one note, they seemed to address a lot of improvements photographers were looking for, but It seems like the camera is only a small step in front of nikons d3s which will be replaced soon. Then canon is bragging about the pixel size of 7 microns, and about the fact that it is 1.3 microns bigger than the 1d mark 4 and .5 bigger than the 5d mark 2. Sad to say that even though it is a few less megapixels, the D3s has 8.5 micron size, which is much larger. I also feel they just abandon their sports shooters by making only a full frame model. It is really important to have the reach that a 1.3 sensor can provide. Sorry, don't want to upset anyone unless there is something I don't know, Trying to evaluate why this was worth the wait, Despite the fact yes there is SOME nice new features with the camera.

3 upvotes
amir_np
By amir_np (Oct 20, 2011)

If they put improvement of this camera to a blind man, after this long time he could make much better movement. It seems Canon was aslept most of this time and said to himself: "May be next time"

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 20, 2011)

D3S has twice as large (area) pixels as D3X while it can provide little, if any, improvement of image quality. D3S cooks its so called "RAW" files with noise reduction (a good one, provided by an American company) but the same job can be done better with more pixels (expect at extremely high ISOs).

0 upvotes
Almoster
By Almoster (Oct 20, 2011)

Hi! Do you know if Epson P-7000 will read the raw files from the new canon eos 1d x?

0 upvotes
Almoster
By Almoster (Oct 20, 2011)

Hi! Do you know if Epson P-7000 will read the raw files from the new canon eos 1d x?

0 upvotes
jam9
By jam9 (Oct 20, 2011)

A 1.3x sensor does not provide extra reach. It's just cropping the image.

2 upvotes
Photodog7
By Photodog7 (Oct 21, 2011)

understood, but professional sports shooters like the extra lens range provided by the cropped sensor.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 21, 2011)

jam9, you are right, it's not cropping but small pixel pitch that really counts.

0 upvotes
Canon16
By Canon16 (Nov 18, 2011)

Obviously D3S has 8.5 b/c of 12MP. We will see when they will come up with 18MP+. 1DS has much higher ISO (Nikon is not even comparable), much faster (9 vs 12/14), Not a little more MP but significant... you seem to ignore 6MP (1/3). Full HD. List goes on. Everything in this cam except pixel pitch (as a consequence) is better than D3S.

0 upvotes
JoeAmateur
By JoeAmateur (Jan 10, 2012)

Umm, the Nikon has a larger pixel site only because it's got less pixels. The D4 is only 16mp,and that 8.5 site dropped down to 7.3. Do the math, Canon DOES have a lot to brag about its size 7 on a 18mp sensor. If you extrapolate the size reduction on the Nikon, its size would be about 6.7 on an 18mp sensor.

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
0 upvotes
amir_np
By amir_np (Oct 20, 2011)

I think 7D and 5Dmk2 was much better in their time. But this new one is a dirty cheating.

0 upvotes
Unhappy with Canon
By Unhappy with Canon (Oct 20, 2011)

Canon has really let us down. We've waited years for an upgrade from the 1DS Mark III. So Canon tells us that the 'upgrade' will be a super expensive camera that has less resolution than the 1DS mark III. And we have to wait six (more) months- pushing the delay for the upgrade from the Mark III to 3.5 years.

I will not spend the money on this camera.

Canon is trying to dictate what we want, rather than listening to our concerns. Did serious photographers really want a combination video camera? Really?

What a massive disappointment.

And having tried the 1D Mark 4 this summer- that camera really did not prove its worth. The camera blew the whites (even after adjusting the CF settings) and rendered terrible colors.

Who would pay so much for such poor quality?

But hey, I have to produce the best images. Canon can no longer deliver.

And I hate being kept in the dark about new releases. It makes it harder to make good business decisions.

12 upvotes
Boiler_Jack
By Boiler_Jack (Oct 20, 2011)

So jump ship who cares.

7 upvotes
Michael Thompson
By Michael Thompson (Oct 20, 2011)

Well when the 1Dxs arrives in Spring 2012 with its 32MP FF sensor and all the new tech from the 1Dx you will be a happy man!
of course the 6k price may put you off a little - unless you are a working pro where the 6k price will soon pay for itself.
btw, 18MP if the files are super clean regards ISO will easily uprez for 18x24 prints no problem at all.

1 upvote
KAllen
By KAllen (Oct 20, 2011)

How does spending £6k because you are a pro pay for itself? I would like to know.
If I spend 6k on new technology for it to be an investment and not an indulgence it would need to generate more than 6k worth of work more than I would of earned with the old technology. I can't see how this camera would earn a pro more than they are earning with the cameras in the range now.

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 5 minutes after posting
3 upvotes
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Oct 22, 2011)

I think the video function makes sense, many Hollywood productions started using the firmware updated 5D Mk II in their shootings, mostly action shots where the camera can be mounted inside a car w/o being seen by other cameras. And it didn't increase the cost of the camera by much. The proof is the 50D running the Magic Lantern firmware, enabling it to record video. Agreed there are many people that will never use the video function, but what does it hurt to have this function included?

0 upvotes
GKC
By GKC (Oct 24, 2011)

Less resolution means lower pixel density and cleaner high-ISO images. The way I see it, is if you're doing work that requires 25+MP you should probably be shooting digital medium format. The combination video camera is an excellent idea. Many photographers, including myself are now doing an increasing amount of video work as well, and this camera is addressing our demands. If you don't need the video feature, don't use it. I've been able to produce fantastic images with the 1DmkIV and the 5DmkII with no issues with blown highlights or colours... Do you have some examples of the problems you were having?

1 upvote
bohoops
By bohoops (Nov 13, 2011)

There a few ways it could pay for it self. You can recoup some cost by selling the old camera and you can depreciate (tax purposes) the camera over a couple of years.

If you can take 14fps you may get shots that other pro photogs may miss (if that is your type of shooting). Depending on the your current model, you can save on cleaning. If you get better exposures with less noise, you will spend less time post processing the images - huge labor cost savings. With that being siad, I can still take shots with my old 20D and produce fabulous images with no grain on an 11x14. So it all depends on what type of professional photographer you are and the conditions in which you shoot. I don't think it would help much in my wedding photography, but if I was a sports photographer I can definitely see the advantage.

1 upvote
Canon16
By Canon16 (Nov 18, 2011)

I never heard anybody saying 1D line as poor quality IQ. It seems like you do not know how to shoot. Don't blame the cam for your poor skills.

1 upvote
Felipe Rodríguez
By Felipe Rodríguez (Oct 20, 2011)

I've sold my 1Ds Mark III...

1 upvote
Tom Bird
By Tom Bird (Oct 20, 2011)

you don't need it for the next 6 months? then you neither need a 1Dx

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 20, 2011)

5D2 has a poor AF and low frame rate otherwise it's good enough to replace 1Ds3 for most of applications.

2 upvotes
Felipe Rodríguez
By Felipe Rodríguez (Oct 21, 2011)

I have a 5D2, so I can get rid of the 1Ds without much trouble... I don't even need the 1DX, since I'm not going to cover sports for a while, but I wanted to sale the 1Ds before the 1DX would make the prices drop...
Anyway, I think I'll get a 1DX. According to the specifications, it's a superb tool. But I want to wait until I can see real pictures taken with a production unit...

Comment edited 1 minute after posting
1 upvote
putomax
By putomax (Oct 20, 2011)

may i burn in hell but i think is incredible how we are "feed" with "tiny" improvements (that skilled photographers make very good use of) in these zega tecnological tools-toys-computer-gadjets-retina-whatever...
and the worst part is that we follow smilling. don't get me wrong, we bound to go forward AND if i had the money ( sadly, almost all is about the money) i would buy one of this mermaids... oh! i can hear them singing...

that's what i like the most in issa's haiku

in this world
we walk on the roof of hell
gazing at flowers

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 2 minutes after posting
4 upvotes
Jon Rista
By Jon Rista (Nov 21, 2011)

How exactly is a native ISO of 52,100 a "tiny" improvement over the previous...what, 12,800 ISO (or the fact that no other camera on the market today from an brand even comes close to a NATIVE ISO of 52,100)? How exactly is a 14fps rate a "tiny" improvement over 10fps? Thats a 40% improvement!! How exactly is a 61-point adaptive, predictive, intelligent AF system with a dedicated Digic processor a "tiny" improvement over the 45-point system that had to share processing power? Counting the points alone, its a 35% improvement, but the differences are far greater than that!

Sorry @putomax, but your comment is incredibly naive...

2 upvotes
backfire hurts
By backfire hurts (Oct 20, 2011)

Hey Nikon!!! Are you going to continue sleeping.....

1 upvote
sfseng
By sfseng (Oct 20, 2011)

When Sony announced 12 fps, 24mp, HD Autofocus video mode camera ppl said nah~we don't need that! but when Canon announced 12 fps 18mp camera, handofocus (manual focus) HD video mode camera with 5x price of Sony ppl said wow that's the monster! what a brand bias......

Comment edited 2 minutes after posting
5 upvotes
harrisoncac
By harrisoncac (Oct 20, 2011)

Because they have no brain.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 20, 2011)

obviuously Canon failed to develop column readout for their flagship camera. Sony had it 4 years ago for alpha-700 (IMX021 image sensor capable of 10+ fps) and Samsung had it sometime earlier for mobile phones.

Canon needed 32 channel readout for a high resolution camera but they decided to go with only 16. that should be one of the limiting factors behind the 18MP.

for storage, I think a 9-SDXC-RAID unit should be awesome.

0 upvotes
tongki
By tongki (Dec 11, 2011)

sony doesn't have good body yet,
A900 is totally failure for journalists, slow AF from Zeiss and G lenses, stupid WB, unreliable flash mounts,
I don't think sony are in the same league with canon and nikon, sony had to learn a lot how to make good bodies, we don't need toy features like smile shutter on A550

1 upvote
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

because you are a fanboy

0 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 20, 2011)

and now here comes lytro which is inspired by apple's simplicity

1 upvote
GKC
By GKC (Oct 24, 2011)

Lytro is cool, but it's no pro DSLR.. Not by a longshot.

0 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 20, 2011)

I hope the rest of the team at Apple continues to drive simplicity. Simplicity is everything. Simplicity is why I can find everything and do everything I need on my iPod Touch, while a lack of appreciation of the power of simplicity is why no one can figure out how to get their DSLR to take the darn picture half the time when we press the shutter. Oriental camera makers cram too much in to try to make them sell more. If they were artists, they'd understand simplicity, but they aren't artists.

2 upvotes
TurboSled
By TurboSled (Oct 20, 2011)

Ken Rockwell? Is that you?

6 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 20, 2011)

i'm he's secretary lol. iCamera please

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

@pacogwapo
don't try to mimic his style please, one Ken Rockwell is silly enough for most of us

are you trying to beg for donation in your post to support your growing family?

1 upvote
newcameraguy2821
By newcameraguy2821 (Oct 19, 2011)

Several preview videos of the Canon EOS 1D X:

Canon EOS 1D X Preview
http://shrt.fm/rbBgZp

Canon unlocks new possibilities for professional photographers with the EOS-1D X
http://shrt.fm/r5eUQg

Canon EOS 1D X Press release preview
http://shrt.fm/rteoR8

Canon 1D X Introduction
http://shrt.fm/qesh9C

0 upvotes
panchoskywalker
By panchoskywalker (Oct 19, 2011)

I don't get why it's only 18MP. I understand it's enough for a lot of people and it's enough for me (I own a 5D). But I don't get the comercial move. Why?

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 19, 2011)

there may be several reasons. one may be the technical difficulty to readout 12-14 fps while keeping high image quality.

another may be for sports, it's difficult to get sharp image that needs 50MP etc because of blur and focus error (I believe 1DX only replaces 1D4. 1Ds3 is killed by Canon's own 5D2 already).

Canon only make products to please customers. if many don't have a clue what image quality is and want less pixels, then Canon could make cameras for them and don't mind if that's against their own interests.

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 19, 2011)

there is very little gain of IQ to have larger pixels. there is, however linear (or sqrt) gain of PQ (pixel quality) that many mistake for IQ.

1 upvote
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Oct 19, 2011)

yabokkie
you dont obviously know what the "circle of confusion" is, go and look it up.

Canon just doesnt aim to people like you

as simple as that.

5 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 20, 2011)

DioCanon,
sorry I cannot agree with you that Canon lenses have poor resolution.

1 upvote
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Oct 21, 2011)

??? who said that???

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

you should go to MF
by they way, do you know how different is 21mp and 18mp?

0 upvotes
Mr Fartleberry
By Mr Fartleberry (Oct 19, 2011)

It's beginning to look like this is a great replacement for the sports model but won't go far in generating lust from the fanboys accustomed to 21MP. I know I wouldn't ever give up MP at this point. Unless it was an offer I couldn't refuse. Things are looking better for Sony every day.

2 upvotes
PhotoPhoolish
By PhotoPhoolish (Oct 19, 2011)

If the camera lives up to its specs, it will be the perfect camera for almost every type of shooter; with the exception of studio shooters whose clients require billboard sized shots.

All you people disappointed by the "lack" of sufficient pixels, perhaps medium format is the way to go. If you search the web and seek out famous studio shooters with high end clients, you will find that an overwhelming majority use medium format cameras and not full fame DSLR's.

This camera can be used by sports photographers, who then get bored and switch to sports journalism, then make a switch to the paparazzi, then make friends with a famous musician and take shots in poorly lit concert venues and finally get sick of people and make the switch to landscapes.

The D3S is the closest competitor, but it comes up short in pixel count.

As I stated in the beginning, if it lives up to its reported specs, this will be the most versatile camera on the planet until Nikon counters with something similar.

Comment edited 3 times, last edit 10 minutes after posting
9 upvotes
Teila Day
By Teila Day (Oct 20, 2011)

I agree 100% with you; this camera seems like a very smart move for Canon, especially for ditching the smaller sensor, and booting the res. to 18mp., coupled with speed and better high iso capabilities.

One thing you mentioned was that "all the people" disappointed by the small MP count should, perhaps, check out MF cameras. Most people needing more resolution already know that MF is a better option for their work (fine portraiture, etc.). The problem is cost. After paying $20k for the MF body/sensor, they must also pay around $4k per lens (Hasselblad). If you need a wide lens (about the cost of the newest Canon) and long lens ($4k), macro lens, portrait lens, and ... well, you get the point; the cost is over $30k. USD.

Many people would like Canon or Nikon to offer 30+mp so they can use their existing lenses, and the money saved over MF for lights, packs, spares, insurance and other much needed business stuff.

2 upvotes
PhotoPhoolish
By PhotoPhoolish (Oct 24, 2011)

I agree with you about the cost of MF and how a less expensive high MP camera would appeal to those that require high res. files for whatever reason. However, if I may attempt to get inside the mind of Canon, I would imagine - based on the cameras specs - that they were more interested in appealing to a broad audience and buyer.

If they went the high MP way, they would lose the ability to shoot at anything resembling high ISO's and fps. You can see this clearly in Nikon's D3X which to date is the top-of-the-line full frame camera out there, but only able to produce really clean files up to ISO 1600 topping out at 6400. While great for studio and landscape photographers, it loses people looking for high ISO and fps capability.

Since the technology doesn't exist for a 30mp, ISO 100,000+, 10 fps beast, I feel Canon has attempted to produce the next best thing with this camera....if the specs are accurate.

Question: Since when did 18 MP become not enough??? :)

2 upvotes
kubrik111
By kubrik111 (Oct 19, 2011)

I stand my 1Ds III and I will buy 1Dx.

Amazing DSLR :-)

2 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 19, 2011)

don't know if everyone have already seen it, some high ISO samples (small only): http://dc.watch.impress.co.jp/docs/news/20111020_484856.html the light should be about a dozen lux or so, about the same as a standard car park in the US. crazy to shoot 1/5000s.

1 upvote
ogl
By ogl (Oct 19, 2011)

The best FF camera ever made. 100%.

1 upvote
Steve1307
By Steve1307 (Oct 19, 2011)

Wow, Ogl do you have one already? I thought they weren't available until Mar2012.

I'm really impressied if you've actually managed to get your hands on one. I'd be really interested to read your report and see some sample images.

Come on Ogl.. how 'bout it. ;)

Comment edited 58 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Oct 20, 2011)

I'm amateur, it's too expensive for me. But I have ability to analyze the information...It's outstanding camera. 18 MP FF with outstanding stuff inside.

1 upvote
RDMPhotos
By RDMPhotos (Oct 19, 2011)

So does this mean that APS-H sensors are out?
Would be a shame if that were true.

0 upvotes
ogl
By ogl (Oct 19, 2011)

APS-H must die. The same cost as FF. Rather strange focal range.

0 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 19, 2011)

Canon has to go FF to compete with D3S and expected D4, though we do need small pixel pitch for outdoor sports.

0 upvotes
mjbehnke
By mjbehnke (Oct 19, 2011)

The APS-H sensor was made to be as close to FF as possible and get an awesome FPS result. Now that Canon has a FF that can push 12-14fps, the APS-H is no longer needed. I think they are smart to get it out of the line-up, even though it was a big seller. JMHO

0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

I will buy your APS-H lens if you have one :-)

0 upvotes
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Oct 19, 2011)

EvlBert,

It is understandable why Canon did not include GPS devices in their cameras. Main reason is that there are several countries that do not allow you to bring any electronic with GPS capabilities, starting with phones, gps maps, and cameras. Having GPS included would men Canon could not sell this model to those markets, they would have to create a second series w/o the gps, what would result in higher prices. Also journalists and photographers working on those countries would have to get a different camera too. And on top of that, several government agencies where a camera like this is needed do not allow GPS, especially the military. There are several reasons not to include a GPS device. And on top of that it would increase the size of the camera, even if it's only a little, it would increase the costs, not only for the parts but also for GPS license/usage. There is still a fair amount of photographers working in a studio or fixed location who just don't need GPS.

6 upvotes
yabokkie
By yabokkie (Oct 19, 2011)

one important place a GPS can help is studio, because you have virtually no way to tell which studio from the photo itself.

0 upvotes
amir_np
By amir_np (Oct 19, 2011)

The understandable matter is why Canon made this poor camera with poor new features that older and cheaper cameras have many of them??????
I think GPS is the last matter instead of this Canon quizing people.. lol

0 upvotes
mjbehnke
By mjbehnke (Oct 19, 2011)

@Amir_NP...
Really? What camera's currently have the AF system in this camera, can shoot 12-14fps FF, and has the ISO? Multi-Exposure Mode? Just wondering, as maybe I can buy that camera instead of waiting for this one.

0 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Oct 19, 2011)

that's a news! which countrys dont allow gps?
really I am curious

1 upvote
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Oct 20, 2011)

Okay, if some needs a gps to locate a studio later on, how hard is it to take a note or name a folder?
DioCanon. Let's start with the the once I had to deal with: Russia (depending on what you're photographing), same in China where you need a permit that takes about three month to get and costs quiet some money, Cuba, Syria, North Korea, Tunisia, Egypt. Some countries like Tunisia and Egypt change their laws spontaneously often and some countries now allow GPS if they are turned off, we can thank the international popularity of the iphone for that. But in general GPS, especially in countries of the middle east, socialist countries, and unstable countries can become a problem real quick. And being a journalist asked to cover a conflict that just happened in the middle east, and then not being able to go there with your equipment, a risk I can't take. I was lucky enough to take a photo series of Cuba in 2010 and will be going to China and Russia early next year, no way to go with GPS.

1 upvote
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Oct 20, 2011)

You need to know that GPS is American, any country that is not America could for whatever reason ban GPS. Especially countries that don't stand good with the US - as said - for whatever reason.

0 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Oct 20, 2011)

I know people who travel all over the places especially in Arab countries, some of them mentioned and I ve never heard once they had problems with theirs smartphones, Nokia, BB, etc. all with GPS.
Cuba I m not surprised with all the prohibited items, but again I have friends that goes there every year and never had a problem simply because these objects are prohibited only to Cubans.

0 upvotes
Almoster
By Almoster (Oct 20, 2011)

Hi! Does any body knows if Epson P-7000 will read the raw files from the new canon eos 1d x?

0 upvotes
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Oct 21, 2011)

Off course, you might be lucky an no one checks your phone etc, especially if you're a tourist, but once you're there for business and especially as a journalist you don't want to risk having your equipment and images sized. The mentality is like that, they let you enter the country with your gps, they let you take pictures etc. and as long as you're staying on the tourist path, behave the way they want they might not even say a word. But if there is anything they don't like on what you're doing they will be quick enforcing any law that you have broken, thinking they don't mind/ don't know. I spend already several nights in control stations, police stations, hotel rooms paid by the local police waiting to be interrogated by the authorities the next day. In Cuba for example they picked me up in a area where there is no tourism, they put m in a hotel for the night.

0 upvotes
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Oct 21, 2011)

The next day I spend all day waiting for officials from the areas capital. As they finally arrived they took my passport and looked up information on their laptop. Then they went through very picture I've taken. I was lucky enough that I took a shot of a Che wall drawing what certainly lightened the mood of the officials. But my experience, the rural police who picked me up had no glue about gps, cameras, etc. the border control neither, but the officials from the capital with their laptops and all their questions, they certainly did! It's really a question if you want to give them anything they could use against you, meaning to take your photographs, seize your equipment, deport you, or if you really made them mad to put you in jail.

0 upvotes
kadosh32000
By kadosh32000 (Nov 20, 2011)

Okay, let me clarify this. 1- I am cuban. 2- I am visiting Cuba in 15 days 3- I live in US. 4- GPS are NOT banned in Cuba. 5- Police forces are (most of the time) comprised of low education individuals even in US; not to mention rural police in Cuba! From Rick Sammons to Alexey Titarenko, just to mention two of them, have been in Cuba with no problems. It happens that all those countries you mentioned Marco are the only ones worthy of street photography along with India and some other eastern countries. So my question is: Is it really that important for photography to have a camera equipped with a GPS? Is that what you are looking for? Well, if that is the case, you can go/come to NY and have people looking at you with a WTF attitude, but hey! you can use a camera with a GPS!

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
0 upvotes
Mtsuoka
By Mtsuoka (Jan 1, 2012)

@Amir_NP I agree with you that nowadays even shitty P&S have 16 mp already! what a shame for Canon trying to sell us a 6k camera with just 18mp! Those Canon people must be cheating POS people!!

and I think 16mp is really enough for self portrait for morons like you

0 upvotes
EvlBert
By EvlBert (Oct 19, 2011)

I have never posted on this forum but I feel compelled to post about this camera.

1. The lack of built in GPS is stupid. It is very easy to have built in GPS, very easy to shut it off from a menu, very easy fire it up and get a signal. At this point the ONLY reason to not have it built in is so they can retro sell it back to fit the other cameras 1D series.

2. In using the camera and the GPS, the GPS gets right in the way of the built in Ethernet (having built in Ethernet is nice) They are side by side and the Ethernet cable constantly gets caught on the GPS stalk when rotating landscape and portrait.

3. I am not sure if the production version will have an interval timer but the demos do not. Again a stupid thing.

4. Those that think a separate menu for auto-focus is an amazing feat have never used the custom menu on a Canon. I have all my most needed features on a custom menu, try it some time.

5. I look at the 1D X as a testbed for the next camera and a bit of marketing

0 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Oct 19, 2011)

Practically every camera is in some way a "testbed for the next camera" and is certainly "a bit of marketing", so your statement is as insightful as declaring that the sky is blue. As for GPS, a removeable GPS unit is better for the working, traveling photographer due to restrictions on GPS usage restrictions in some places. You can always leave your GPS unit at home, but you can't do that will your camera. Keep in mind that a lot of thought goes into building these cameras, using the input of *lots* of professional photographers. Armchair camera designers like yourself love to think they know it all, and know better than Canon, but you're just being delusional.

3 upvotes
THSolutions
By THSolutions (Oct 19, 2011)

Re-Post from another board:

I can not wait, 4 months after this baby hits the market, there are going to be plenty of USED 1d and 1ds's available!!! Oh the Joy!! LOL

YES!

Comment edited 16 seconds after posting
7 upvotes
amir_np
By amir_np (Oct 19, 2011)

A large amount of money for these poor features in this monster body.... not worth at all

5 upvotes
Henry Schobin
By Henry Schobin (Oct 19, 2011)

Are you kidding? This is the best and LEAST EXPENSIVE top of the line 1D EVER. The original 4mp 1D listed for $5499 and the original 11mp 1Ds listed for $8000. NEITHER had even one 10th the features of this camera.

7 upvotes
Henry M. Hertz
By Henry M. Hertz (Oct 19, 2011)

lol.. another troll.

0 upvotes
randellROWE photography
By randellROWE photography (Oct 19, 2011)

I totally agree with Henry S. they have given the best of both worlds and for a fair price. If this had been a 1Ds4 it would have cost more. Sure the MP may have been higher for the studio shooter, but the ISO performance and fps would not have been this good. I sold my Nikon D3s and picked up the 1D4 for the video and MP gains, but hate the 1.3 crop. I just can't get used to it. With the 1Dx you get the best blend. FF sensor, 12fps and 18MP. Very excited indeed! Very curious to see what the 5D3 will offer?

1 upvote
amir_np
By amir_np (Oct 19, 2011)

It's Funny,
Technology is growing very fast. It's not difficult for Canon to make a higher MP cam with focus system that nikon use many years ago. I'm a canon fan, but these foolish features in this size is a dirty financial dial that canon do with their fans. Next time (after 2-3 years ) make a new camera with a little beat improvements but with "21 MP" that 5D MKII have years ago and then you will say WWOOWWW THIS IS A GREAT CAMERA, A MIRACLE etc.. (because it's a new cam anyway) But you don't know what a unfair dial they do with you...

Comment edited 7 minutes after posting
2 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 20, 2011)

henry troll hertz

0 upvotes
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

@amir_np It's a shame you don't make any useful or valid comments, anywhere.

@Henry Schobin and randellROWE photography - I'm not so sure about the fair price. It must seem like a good deal to someone expecting a typical 1Ds price, but for a 1D user like myself, it seems kinda expensive. Near double what I paid for my 1D IV, in fact. The more I look at it, the better this camera seems to me, but is it worth double the price of a 1D IV?

Also, saying it's less than previous 1Ds cameras is not really an expression of value - they've always been monstrously over-priced on release.

If someone offers me one as a gift, I'll be only too thrilled, but with this generation and for this money, I expected more. Key omissions for me are GPS and wireless as built-in functionality, and video AF, faster data transfer, a file management facility for a directly connected hard disk, and yes, more megapixels, would all have been pleasing additions, IMHO.

0 upvotes
dbo
By dbo (Oct 19, 2011)

Canon needed to update their flagship.
The tech specs are looking amazing, and the camera will surely reach the top end when reviewed. Nothing else to be expected.

The clientele being interested in this upcoming masterpiece mostly don't care about this MP bean counting. The want to get that what Canon developped with the 1X - a very fast shooting, very fast processing camera with excellent quality including very low light capabilities.

The guys demanding most possible details probably will be served with an upcoming 5MK2 successor of the main stream segment being anticipated coming with 24-36MP.

And regarding the guys claiming GPS not being integrated:
A lot of potential 1X Users will travel aroung the planet, and probably visit countries where it is restricted to use. So from a professional pov it's wise to have it as an optional device.

7 upvotes
EvlBert
By EvlBert (Oct 19, 2011)

I do. I care very much about the MP size as before I could print larger prints for commercial work without having to go to my Hasselblad.
With this change Canon has conceded the studio market to Nikon (and I guess Sony in a way). And is really focusing on news and sports and to some extent wildlife (although that last one could be debated).
For studio work I will rely more on the Hasselblad and less on Canon, the design of the 5D MK n and the various proposed layout changes are not to my taste.

0 upvotes
Boky
By Boky (Oct 19, 2011)

canon camera that may focus accurately? no way....

Boky

1 upvote
milwman
By milwman (Oct 19, 2011)

Nikon came back after 3 or 4 bad AFing cameras

1 upvote
Anastigmat
By Anastigmat (Oct 19, 2011)

That is funny. The body is so big, but Canon cannot find any space inside to build in the GPS unit. I think it is more likely that they just want to charge the customer for this gadget. Nevertheless, it is huge improvement on the previous cameras, which require the purchase of a wireless transfer unit and a GPS unit before a GPS data can be integrated into the camera.

4 upvotes
MaikeruN
By MaikeruN (Oct 19, 2011)

1) Because GPS chews up battery extremely fast.
2) Most people don't need it, and most pros don't have time to wait for it to find a signal.
3) Most of the body is used for the FF mirror box and penta-prism, card slots and the vertical grip is mostly all battery. There really isn't that much extra space to fit unnecessary things. Not to mention the extra cost to fit it in every unit when less than half the owners will actually use it.

4 upvotes
ageha
By ageha (Oct 19, 2011)

You can simply turn off an in-body GPS if you don't want it to chew up battery juice.

1 upvote
Henry Schobin
By Henry Schobin (Oct 19, 2011)

Why don't you show Cannon how it's done - send them YOUR working prototype.

1 upvote
Marco Boerner
By Marco Boerner (Oct 19, 2011)

GPS is not allowed in some countries, as a journalist this would rule any camera with GPS out.

2 upvotes
T3
By T3 (Oct 19, 2011)

A removable GPS unit is better for the working, traveling photographer than one that can't be removed, due to restrictions on GPS use in certain countries.

3 upvotes
DrAjao
By DrAjao (Nov 18, 2011)

In this age of the iPhone, I don't believe a company of Canon's caliber should be having difficulty incorporating wireless connectivity into something as big as an SLR. I won't talk about GPS but as far as WiFi is concerned, I shouldn't need to attach an extra device in order to wirelessly upload my images...not in this age. I take pictures with my phone camera and they appear in my online account almost immediately. I should be able to do the same with an SLR and I don't think it gimmicky. It's a need we didn't know we had because the technology was not available then. I know it would be hell to upload RAW files...but that shouldn't stop us from trying...the internet is getting faster...it will eventually catch up.

0 upvotes
Tee1up
By Tee1up (Oct 19, 2011)

I am having trouble figuring out if this is best used as a studio, road warrior/sports or all of the above. I guess the kicker will be a few formal, in-depth reviews.

0 upvotes
THSolutions
By THSolutions (Oct 19, 2011)

I personally think its all marketing. You can use any camera you want for the studio. In my own PERSONAL OPINION, it's not that demanding (ON THE CAMERA I MEAN).

This camera will do it all. Am I saying it will please everybody? No. But we're fickle like that, you know?

Comment edited 29 seconds after posting
1 upvote
frenchmonkeys
By frenchmonkeys (Feb 26, 2012)

Yes, you can use any camera in a studio. But if you're shooting an image for a bill board, clearer, more detailed images are kinda nice to have. The studio version dropped features that weren't necessary in the studio, concentrated on features that were.

Initially I didn't like the idea of bringing them together, but the more I look at the product, the more impressive it seems.I'm still not completely sold on it. For a 1D user, prices have just soared for a camera that includes facilities they'll never need. For a 1Ds user, the price is more agreeable, but they are still paying for some features they'll never need, and some features have dropped. I think there may still be an argument in favour of two cameras from a user perspective - obviously it's better for Canon to do it this way - there are way more 1D owners than 1Ds owners, and they all now have to pay a lot more for their next camera. And I find that annoying.

0 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 19, 2011)

if only apple makes pro camera this would be rubbish in comparison.

1 upvote
RaptorUK
By RaptorUK (Oct 19, 2011)

No, it would look twice as good, cost twice as much and work half as well . . . but it would have an Apple logo on so the not working so well would be ignored.

12 upvotes
eos-mk2-craig
By eos-mk2-craig (Oct 19, 2011)

it'd be brushed silver - have an apple logo - cost twice as much AND require specialised software to download the images and would not be compatible with photoshop LOL

10 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 19, 2011)

too many buttons, too many BS, ugly ergonomics!

1 upvote
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Oct 19, 2011)

Ehy DP review, can we cancel all this BS comments that include the Apple products?
Now this cancer of Apple boys is spreading into this website, there is not a single new with USELESS references to apple products...
If Canon is such a crap,
and Apple is so good,
go to that goddammed Steve Jobs and pray to come back to make a iCamera and stop writing BS here!

5 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Oct 19, 2011)

Besides if the iphone is a phone and as a phone is rubbish, but has heaps of cool apps,
what would an iCamera be, a crappy camera but with cool apps???

2 upvotes
THSolutions
By THSolutions (Oct 19, 2011)

Yeah right, you would need all apple software, computers, flash, and strap, and... Aw forget it. You'll pay thousands for all the accessories!

LOL

Comment edited 2 times, last edit 35 seconds after posting
2 upvotes
Henry Schobin
By Henry Schobin (Oct 19, 2011)

"too many buttons, too many BS, ugly ergonomics!"

Amen to that - Why can't Canon make a one button point&shoot 1D camera with a fixed lens that can fit in my shirt pocket?

3 upvotes
costinul_ala
By costinul_ala (Oct 19, 2011)

and you could use voice shooting - iShoot.
imagine a Sunday afternoon in the park everybody speaking to their phones an camera and the rush home to charge them .... beautiful

2 upvotes
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 20, 2011)

look what happened to other cellphones when iphones was introduced. they all became second rate.

Why do Apple products look better than anything else? Because they are sculpture. Their industrial design has been driven by Steve Job's appreciation that simplicity is power. His absolutely maniacal drive to rid everything of buttons, wires and fugly logos and stickers is what keeps Apple products simple, and therefore so powerfully attractive. Well, Steve has driven the simple, but Jonathan Ive is the sculptor (industrial designer) at Apple who has been doing the actual design, and he's still with us, too.

1 upvote
pacogwapo
By pacogwapo (Oct 20, 2011)

second rate trying hard copy cats

1 upvote
TurboSled
By TurboSled (Oct 20, 2011)

What's with all the apple comments? This comments section is in regards to a professional photographic tool. Not a computer, mp3 player, phone, or TV box. Canon isn't in any of those markets, and apple isn't in this one.

1 upvote
Kelly B
By Kelly B (Oct 19, 2011)

If 18 mp is good for 35mm Shhh! Don't tell Hasselblad that there H4D-200ms is way toooo many pixels for medium format.

0 upvotes
Total comments: 524
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