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Bloomberg: Japanese mirrorless growth a threat to Canon and Nikon

By dpreview staff on Sep 8, 2011 at 20:57 GMT

Financial news service Bloomberg is using Japanese market data to show the extent to which Canon and Nikon are facing competition from mirrorless cameras. The report focuses on the success of mirrorless cameras in Japan, eating into the previously dominant market positions of Nikon and Canon. It goes on to quote business analysts as saying 'in the long run, Canon and Nikon will have to enter the market.' (via Rob Galbraith DPI)

Click here to read the Bloomberg report

Comments

Total comments: 184
12
bigdaddave
By bigdaddave (Sep 9, 2011)

As long as Canon continue to use their EF lens range this can only be good for us Canon users

0 upvotes
Richard Murdey
By Richard Murdey (Sep 9, 2011)

Any such system from Canon will be compatible with EF lenses through an adapter, with native lenses also available that are smaller, and, if the crop factor is different, wider.

0 upvotes
Debankur Mukherjee
By Debankur Mukherjee (Sep 9, 2011)

Now its final that Nikon is ready to release its Mirrorless model.These cameras ae good but will not replace OVF cameras.The main selling point will be its compact size and weight.

When it comes to quality and performance its the age old DSLR that will rule the market.The small sensor (1.7 / 2.33 etc ) cameras should be stopped because of its poor performace and quality.

0 upvotes
Elieser
By Elieser (Sep 9, 2011)

The portability depends more from size of lens, than from presence or absence of mirror. But producers stubborn neglect this fact.
Panasonic is one exception, producing first and unique optical stabilised compact zoom lens.
Canon nevert completes its kits with pancake lenses, and pancake for Nikon don't exist at all.

1 upvote
Drareg Ajerap
By Drareg Ajerap (Sep 9, 2011)

Yep, lenses should be part of the portability package.

I use small manual lenses on the rebel if I go for a asual stroll the smallest I have is the Industar 50mm f/3.5

The Nikon Series E primes are pancake enough for me, though they might not be as small as the new pana or pentax. I'll be happy enough if there will be a rebel smaller than the 1000D for me to mount them on.

0 upvotes
Vadimka
By Vadimka (Sep 9, 2011)

Ironically both Canon and Nikon are having a hard time due to their success in the past few years. Demand for DSLR cameras multiplied in the past few years and they had to adjust to the growing demand. Their forecast and production had to be adjusted for years to come and millions had to be invested. They did not anticipate that Mirrorless will become popular, and trend will change. They have to reorganize fast and cut the projected profits and re-invest in R&D before its too late.

0 upvotes
Drareg Ajerap
By Drareg Ajerap (Sep 9, 2011)

The issues are neither IQ nor the presence of mirrors but simple portability. Canon once bragged that that they don't need to go mirrorless to reduce the size of their DSLRs. I waited for it. But the 1100D turned out to be slightly bigger than the 1000D. I consider it a minor setback. I'm still crossing my fingers for a smaller Canon DSLR than the 1000D.

I own a 7d, 20D, 500D and 550D along with a dozen manual Nikkor lenses and handfull of M42 screwtypes. I just love the EOS system that I wouldn't mind having one more if it will come close to the mirrorless size.

0 upvotes
rocklobster
By rocklobster (Sep 9, 2011)

Perhaps they are smarter than we think in that the G12 and S95 whilst not having interchangeable lenses are often considered as an alternative to the mirrorless brigade because lenses are the big (pun intended) issue here. Take the NEX - no small lens of reasonable focal length let alone a zoom - no mean feat for APS-C sized sensors although the Samsungs are not far off target. M43 and perhaps the new Nikon mirrorless have at least a couple of options here if size is considered the most important aspect.

1 upvote
harrisoncac
By harrisoncac (Sep 9, 2011)

Canon and Nikon's reluctance to respond to the mirrorless camera market is merely a fear of their own DSLR share being eroded. Slow action only translates to the intention to succumb to competition and future failure.

Diversification of their product line is the way to go.

0 upvotes
unlearny
By unlearny (Sep 9, 2011)

I think the more people shoot with their phones, the more interest they will have in photography and growing the market. The only thing that limited the amount of people in the SLR market was intimidation, and the amount of technical know-how that was perceived to be essential to success. There seems to be too much you need to know... Phones may increase interest in P&S cameras, and even mirrorless. But one thing is certain to me, mirrorless cameras seem easier to use than DSLRs, so more people will buy them. many of those customers will move up the chain. Every new technology grows the entire market. Anyone who uses their eyes to see the world has a potential interest in photography.

0 upvotes
Camillo
By Camillo (Sep 9, 2011)

Overtime more and more people will shoot with they're phones. Mirror-less will become the new point and shooters upgrade camera and will eventually prove to derail buyers from entering the DSLR camera line up. Eventually Sony will never really catch up with Canon or Nikon in the true DSLR market because they shot themselves in the foot with the mirror-less systems.

0 upvotes
Lastpanda
By Lastpanda (Sep 9, 2011)

The article doesn't seem to state this but I get the feeling that the SLR/Mirrorless market has grown with more point&shoot users buying to both systems (more mirrorless obviously).

I notice more and more young adults that otherwise would just use their mobile phones or a point&shoot - now sporting an entry level DSLR or mirrorless.

It would be interesting to see how much sales have fallen for Canon & Nikon in compared to the growth of Mirrorless sales. Like some users here have said, its great to own both systems as they serve different purposes. I myself only own a mirrorless and am interested in adding a prosumer level DSLR in the future to my kit while expanding my interests in photography

0 upvotes
Bart Hickman
By Bart Hickman (Sep 9, 2011)

This is no threat to Nikon and Canon at all. It's a huge opportunity. They probably sit in meeting rooms trying to figure out how to get people to upgrade to new equipment. This is a dream come true. Pany and Oly will look back someday and call these the good old days because once C & N get into the game, it'll be tougher for them.

As for compatibility with existing lenses, that's pretty clear-cut as well. When you lose the moving mirror, you can shorten the registration distance which makes an adaptor easy. Telephoto lenses have to be the same size regardless, so there's no need to really even develop new tele lenses and they can focus on wide lenses.

0 upvotes
tkbslc
By tkbslc (Sep 9, 2011)

For most of the enthusiasts and hobbyists, we bought an SLR just because that was the only way to get a big sensor at semi-affordable price. As soon as some of the gaps are filled in the lenses (i.e. faster lenses in the portrait/tele range) there will be little reason for anyone buy professionals to buy big traditional SLR cameras.

That said, I am still waiting and hanging on to my 5 year old DSLR kit. It still works and the market needs to mature a bit. There still is no mirrorless mount that doesn't come with a lot of compromise.

0 upvotes
wb2trf
By wb2trf (Sep 9, 2011)

Many of the comments here falsely identify Canikon with DSLR technology. Those companies will move with the technology, and probably in time not to lose their leadership. I strongly suspect that their top end offerings will be mirrorless within 5-10 years. DSLRs will endure only as niche products. Two things will drive it: first continuous shooting speeds will get so high that stills will be selected in PP (some of which will be in-camera) and the information from adjacent frames will enhance IQ of every selected frame. There is no room for a flopping mirror in that world. EVFs will be better than OVF and CDAF will be be very fast while focus accuracy diminishes in importance in the in camera PP world. Canikon will go with this, not fight it. Physical size is not a big factor and for top end cameras space may go to batteries.

0 upvotes
javaone
By javaone (Sep 9, 2011)

I think you are making assumptions that Full frame cameras are prices artificially high. I think the prices are a function of the sensor yield (number of good sensors per wafer). I suspect the yield goes down dramatically with increase in sensor size.
For me crop sensors in SLR & lenses offer the best bang for the buck. Maybe that has a lot to do with what I like to shoot.

The SLR experience is not all about sensor size. It is also about focus response when taking pictures of action. Without fast effective focus I simply can’t get many of the shots I take.
Landscape& portrait shooters may not care but that’s not everyone.

0 upvotes
Nerkdergler
By Nerkdergler (Sep 9, 2011)

I agree with wb2trf. The 'R' in DSLR will be history in a few years. The advantages of DSLRs today have nothing to do with the mirror/prism. If manufacturers spent more time designing the best cameras they could and less time manipulating the market to maximise profits we'd be there already.

0 upvotes
Zdman
By Zdman (Sep 9, 2011)

@javaone Samsung (and proabably sony) already have patents for building phase detection into the sensor. Once it becomes commercial you'll be able to get that same superfast focus in mirrorless

0 upvotes
Anastigmat
By Anastigmat (Sep 9, 2011)

I hope mirrorless cameras will eliminate the APS-C market. It makes little sense to have a DSLR body designed for full frame and then stuff a 1.5x or 1.6x crop sensor in it. It makes or sense to use a more compact body if one is going to have a compact sensor. The APS-C format sensor has simply lived on too long, propped up by marketing strategies that price full frame cameras out of the reach of most consumers. The mirrorless models offer the same image quality as APS-C mods in a competitively priced and more compact package. In time, we will see entry level AP-C models disappear, and high end APS-C models will then follow. Currently innovation is at a stand still, because of the continued existence of APS-C models.

0 upvotes
dylanbarnhart
By dylanbarnhart (Sep 9, 2011)

I doubt your theory about APS-C DSLR's push up the price of full frame DSLR's is correct. Full frame sensors do cost more to manufacture, and it's very hard to design wide angle lenses for full frame with good resolution in the border and corners. In fact, the full frame models are taking longer and longer to be replaced because demand for them has waned.

So if mirrorless will eat into APS-C DSLR market like you said, I predict full frame DSLR will become premium niche products and will likely increase in price. Full frame lenses will have massive price jump because they lack purchase volume from APS-C crowd. Look at the price of lenses for medium format cameras.

0 upvotes
IanSeward
By IanSeward (Sep 9, 2011)

@Anastigmat
Be careful for what you wish for. Take a look at current sales figures for APS-C versus full frame. Full frame is already a niche market. If APS-C goes the size weight difference between m4/3 and full frame will be even more stark and only the well committed enthusiast will buy them driving prices even higher.

One thing to remember is that full frame used to imply medium format a number of years ago, then the tiny 35mm upstart was born and sneered at for poor image quality etc. History, with technology, has a remarkable tendency to repeat itself.

0 upvotes
Neloy Sinha
By Neloy Sinha (Sep 9, 2011)

Mirror less cameras by Nikon or Canon will obviously be very popular only if they maintain and stick to their lens mount legacy. We do nt mond to have another refined trimmed sleek body,provided if I can use my expensive prime autofocus or latest VR lenses.Because for mirror less cameras we know it very well that thre size should accommodate a hinged 3" articulated monitor cum touh screen.It translates that you cannot reduce it further. Then if too slik one is copromising with the batteries.Again a Sanghai third party will come and popularise a detachable grip and you hve to buy it addiionally. Go beyound the pancake it is no more pocketable. Show me a photographer who does not want a decent zoom in a pocketable body? So be it SLR vis a vis mirror less if you want to expand your photography horizon you cannot hide your image catcher in your pocket. Those who consider the size of heir pocket first they should be satisfied with their mobile phone.A good camera should be quality oriented

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Sep 9, 2011)

The only issue I forsee is that Canon and Nikon may view mirrorless as a product to plug a gap at the low level.

I.e. No real development or bar raising as far as enthusiast / professional compact models.

Time will tell, but its an exciting time for camera development.

In the meantime i'll keep using my D7000 but the opportunity to cut the size and weight of my kit in half without sacrificing image quality is attractive indeed.

0 upvotes
win39
By win39 (Sep 9, 2011)

I was on a tour to Japan a couple of years ago. I saw very few Japanese with cameras at the tourist spots. Lots of young people with cell phones.which stunned me at the time. Now with the cell phone revolution here I understand. The dumbing down of the mirrorless cameras is to be expected. It is an attempt to lure them away from their cell phones. By compariosn, they do not sell nearly as well here. The problem is that the camera makers pay too much attention, in my opinion, to what sells in Japan.

0 upvotes
Jabba23
By Jabba23 (Sep 9, 2011)

Go again, these cameras are popping up everywhere. Just yesterday here in Brisbane at lunch I've seen an Olympus and Panasonic mirrorless around peoples necks, obviously for the majority of people it is more convenient to carry your mobile phone around and use the camera from that.
At Osaka Aquarium in March it was me and an older man that I immediately recognised as having a Nex and some other people also had their slr's but it was difficult to see what they were. It is an emerging market and it's just going to get bigger.

0 upvotes
Jogger
By Jogger (Sep 9, 2011)

most people i know looking to upgrade from their compacts are looking for slrs. thy dont want the slr image quality in a compact by itself. they want the slr experience (and image quality of course).

0 upvotes
Jabba23
By Jabba23 (Sep 9, 2011)

Some certainly. I'm of the other school, I travel and I want to be able to take great photos (in my opinion) and not feel like I need a massage at the end of the day from carrying a dslr and its camera bag. I was in Japan and had my 2 week old Nex-5 and loved it. My girlfriend loves the camera as well coming from a compact it was easy to tell her to point it and shoot. I got the slr type quality without the slr experience of size.

1 upvote
photorad
By photorad (Sep 9, 2011)

I may be old fashioned but I the most important thing in a camera for me is an excellent image, and portability is also strongly considered.
Tons of gadgets and in camera filters etc. are secondary.
Maybe Fuji with their X 100 has the right idea with good imaging and matched fixed lens and matched sensor.
No worries about dirt on the sensor, carrying several lenses etc. Lens focal length can be limiting.
On the other hand when the NEX 7 arrives and is tested, perhaps it will "show the way".

0 upvotes
photorad
By photorad (Sep 9, 2011)

I may be old fashioned but I the most important thing in a camera for me is an excellent image, and portability is also strongly considered.
Tons of gadgets and in camera filters etc. are secondary.
Maybe Fuji with their X 100 has the right idea with good imaging and matched fixed lens and matched sensor.
No worries about dirt on the sensor, carrying several lenses etc. Lens focal length can be limiting.
On the other hand when the NEX 7 arrives and is tested, perhaps it will "show the way".

0 upvotes
photorad
By photorad (Sep 9, 2011)

I may be old fashioned but I the most important thing in a camera for me is an excellent image, and portability is also strongly considered.
Tons of gadgets and in camera filters etc. are secondary.
Maybe Fuji with their X 100 has the right idea with good imaging and matched fixed lens and matched sensor.
No worries about dirt on the sensor, carrying several lenses etc. Lens focal length can be limiting.
On the other hand when the NEX 7 arrives and is tested, perhaps it will "show the way".

0 upvotes
Pixpa
By Pixpa (Sep 9, 2011)

It doesn't take too much genius to work it out! For more arduous travel the 5DMkII is left behind in favour of a Panasonic GF1 with lenses. My shoulders, arms and legs thank me.

2 upvotes
Kirwin
By Kirwin (Sep 9, 2011)

Instead of setting the standard through creative and innovative design...

They must now yield to follow the dreams and visions of another.

0 upvotes
Darbkins
By Darbkins (Sep 9, 2011)

Panasonic and Olympus have set the standard, that's why all of my cameras are Panasonic which I use fore creating GigaPan panoramas

0 upvotes
deep7
By deep7 (Sep 9, 2011)

Well, it's clear any camera manufacturer with an eye to a long and prosperous future must look hard at producing not just a "mirrorless" camera but a wider range of options than just small sensor compacts and Digital SLRs. I have all three types of camera available and it's a no-brainer that my interchangeable lens compact camera is with me nearly all the time. That's reflects what the market changes are showing, for good reason.

I don't believe for a second Canon aren't working on something.

0 upvotes
Ross the Fidller
By Ross the Fidller (Sep 9, 2011)

I think Canon has been the reluctant follower of features introduced by Olympus, such as live view, sensor cleaning, art filters & articulating screen etc. for a DSLR & I think they will reluctantly follow with their mirrorless models too.

0 upvotes
dadsgm
By dadsgm (Sep 8, 2011)

With the technological advances and advantages of mirrorless bodies it is obvious that Canon and Nikon will be challenged in the market place. I am a Nikon person. I own a Sony a55 and consider it more of a play with camera as opposed to a serious one. Unless something is done to improve the OVF especially indoors and low light situations mirrorless will take a backseat to any camera with an OVF.

0 upvotes
Mike Ronesia
By Mike Ronesia (Sep 9, 2011)

My EVF on my GH2 brightens the scene so I can frame my shot. I think the EVF on the GH2 is wonderful and once you get used to it, it's hard to go back.

0 upvotes
Stu 5
By Stu 5 (Sep 9, 2011)

There is more to a decent viewfinder than just brightness. Like all EVF viewfinders at present, the GH2 viewfinder is appalling in low light. That will get better in the future but at present the difference between a decent OVF and a EVF in low light situations like for example in a theatre whilst taking production photos is huge. The EVF is just not up to the job. Unless there is some sort of breakthrough in technology it will be sometime before EVF's are up to the job. As some pro magazine said, at the moment it is like watching bad video. The potential for EVFs in the future is huge as long as people don't keep on saying 'the quality is good enough now' because the danger is the camera companies read that and think 'oh why should we spend any more money developing the quality when people are already happy with them'...

0 upvotes
DioCanon
By DioCanon (Sep 8, 2011)

This is great news...
2 brands with 83% of the market (DSLR) is not a healty market.
Sony, Panasonic and Olympus are pushing in the mid and entry level market with good results.
Now Canon should respond though...

1 upvote
petepictures
By petepictures (Sep 8, 2011)

By the way film is not obsolete. The last few months I am shooting only film for myself. I bought lots of film cameras. I miss it for long time and now I am enjoying it double.

0 upvotes
Zoomstein
By Zoomstein (Sep 8, 2011)

Well, while at it, I think mirrorless is a bigger threat to micro 3/4... But Canon & Nikon will certainly have to do something about it. Hopefully they're not going to follow Sony's radical decision of ditching OVFs altogether.

0 upvotes
wwwaaronegrotk
By wwwaaronegrotk (Sep 8, 2011)

Micro 4/3s is the pioneer of mirrorless. :)

All Oly/Pana are mirrorless cameras.

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Sep 9, 2011)

Does the E5 not have a mirror??

0 upvotes
Ross the Fidller
By Ross the Fidller (Sep 9, 2011)

"All Oly/Pana are mirrorless cameras." Should say, All Oly/Pana micro 4/3s are mirrorless cameras.

0 upvotes
Mike Ronesia
By Mike Ronesia (Sep 9, 2011)

Or, all new...

0 upvotes
Graystar
By Graystar (Sep 8, 2011)

In BNC Aug 2011 numbers, 7 of the top 10 spots are DSLRs. Mirrorless cameras are at #5, #9, and #10. That's actually worse than one year ago.

0 upvotes
justmeMN
By justmeMN (Sep 8, 2011)

Just because something is popular in Japan, doesn't mean that it will become popular elsewhere.

Canon estimates that they will sell 7.3 million DSLRs this year (Source:Bloomberg) and Nikon estimates that they will sell 5.4 million DSLRs this year (Souce: Reuters), so there is no need for them to panic. :-)

0 upvotes
Richard Butler
By Richard Butler (Sep 8, 2011)

But they could become popular elsewhere, so complacency isn't a good idea, either.

1 upvote
sensibill
By sensibill (Sep 8, 2011)

I find it interesting Bloomberg is taking notice, but I really could not care less what they have to say about the camera market (or anything else, but that's my politics showing). :)

0 upvotes
EvanZ
By EvanZ (Sep 8, 2011)

The rangefinder didn't replace the SLR. The Nikon FM/FE didn't replace the F3/4/5/6. There's going to be a place for the DSLR as long as people want to shoot with really great wide-angle and telephoto primes.

0 upvotes
Sosua
By Sosua (Sep 9, 2011)

Agree re: super telephotos etc. but i'm pretty sure its always been easier to design smaller, lower distortion, higher quality wides for rangefinders?

1 upvote
Patrick McMahon
By Patrick McMahon (Sep 8, 2011)

Interesting, but I have never read this as an "if not this- than that." It is simply a new format camera and I am sure in time many slr owners will carry one rather than their G11's, p7000, etc. It is not at all comparable to the shift from film to digital in my opinion.

1 upvote
Mike Ronesia
By Mike Ronesia (Sep 8, 2011)

Maybe not AS big, but it is big and after you switch you'll understand why.

0 upvotes
tonywong
By tonywong (Sep 8, 2011)

True, in some ways they are complementary...if Canon or Nikon can figure out how to successfully integrate their respective SLR lens mounts to a mirrorless format without compromise they will just suck the wind out of most of their competitors' sails.

I've got a GH-2 with a bunch of kit but I still primarily use my Canon SLR kit because the GH-2 isn't quite there as a replacement. Still for many people it can be a replacement at a smaller size and cost, so Canon and Nikon need to be wary of being left behind.

I do see the analysts trying to make their point with some lame anecdotes, like the Pentax Q system being a threat to a Canon SLR setup. I think cell phones are more of a threat to cameras of all kinds rather than just a mirrorless vs. SLR battle though.

0 upvotes
blotzphoto
By blotzphoto (Sep 8, 2011)

Pentax might be in an even better position if the pentax/ricoh combination can produce a mirror less that takes a k-mount.

0 upvotes
Patrick McMahon
By Patrick McMahon (Sep 9, 2011)

@ Mike, I just don't see it as a "you have to switch" development. Again, it is a new format camera which I believe many slr users will find as a compliment. There will certainly be people who chose one or the other, but that goes on everyday between formats.

0 upvotes
jotor
By jotor (Sep 9, 2011)

So, if a K-mount mirrorless is produced with M43 sensor, my 15mm becomes a largish and slow 30mm equivalent and the 17-70mm a 34-140mm equivalent zoom. Hmmm..., I'd have to think about that for awhile.

Joe

0 upvotes
Mike Ronesia
By Mike Ronesia (Sep 8, 2011)

I'm so glad I went with my M4/3's system. I get great pictures in a smaller easier to use and carry package. How can that be a bad thing.

2 upvotes
crisno1
By crisno1 (Sep 8, 2011)

@ Maxfield : we said the same years ago about film. Eventually, most of us swiched to digital.

0 upvotes
rocklobster
By rocklobster (Sep 8, 2011)

Easy - Canon buys Samsung's camera division and rebadges the NX200 etc to put a good name to a very good camera.
Nikon's mirrorless camera release is imminent so we will see how good that is very soon.

Cheers

0 upvotes
Tim in upstate NY
By Tim in upstate NY (Sep 8, 2011)

Samsung is bigger than Canon, a lot bigger.

1 upvote
rocklobster
By rocklobster (Sep 9, 2011)

But it's camera division is a lot smaller than Canon's.

0 upvotes
Myari
By Myari (Sep 9, 2011)

No, Samsung isn't selling it. It's the other way around. Samsung can buy both Canon and Nikon.

0 upvotes
curtisls
By curtisls (Sep 8, 2011)

If one were unknowledgeable about the subject and read this article, one would come away with the impression that Olympus had just released its first mirrorless camera, instead of being one of the pioneers of this genre with arguably the largest and most interesting collection of native lenses available. Of course, how could a small company like Olympus pose a threat to Canon and Nikon like the behemoths of Sony and Panasonic? ;-)

0 upvotes
Mike Ronesia
By Mike Ronesia (Sep 8, 2011)

I agree with the first part of your comment but not quit sure about your lens comment.

It was quit obvious that the article was very limited and the writer didn't do much research.

1 upvote
petepictures
By petepictures (Sep 8, 2011)

Its frightening for some of us with a lot of lenses dedicated to one system.
I think this is the future anyway, although I may need to change systems.

0 upvotes
olympian_dp
By olympian_dp (Sep 8, 2011)

Strange I thought Olympus had the most market share (and the lead innovator here) and they hardly get mentioned in the article.

7 upvotes
brianbxb
By brianbxb (Sep 9, 2011)

I noticed that glaring omission especially when Olympus started the 4/3 standard ( with Kodak ) whereas Sony ( relentlessly proprietary and paying the price with a poor selection of lenses ) are mentioned so very many times.
Will Nikon join the 4/3 or M43 brigade and have the confidence to take on Oly/Pana on pure camera quality of their new device ? I doubt it. Time to cast off their old SLR customers - there is no upgrade path from cave painting to the touch screen

0 upvotes
Maxfield_photo
By Maxfield_photo (Sep 8, 2011)

You can have my prism when you pry it from my cold, dead hands.

0 upvotes
hootsmon
By hootsmon (Sep 8, 2011)

The Bloomberg article struck me as somewhat nalve, and poorly researched (like the puzzling omission of Olympus for example). Yes, smartphones are surely to blame for the demise of Point & Shoot segment. That *should* be a wake-up call for CaNikon ,etc. yet surprisingly they appear to be burying their heads in the sand. My theory is that P&S upgraders will be a big slab of mirrorless buyers. And to a much lesser extent, some 'DSLR downsizers'.

2 upvotes
eenymac
By eenymac (Sep 9, 2011)

Ok, so the market for small mirrorless systems has ballooned in Asia and the west is going to be playing catch-up. Fine, but right now I prefer my dslr for the image quality, physical size and nice bight OVF.

However, what a small number of dedicated dslr users may want and what the marketing bods and shareholders might want are two very different things. Might we see those big shareholders in thoe two big manufacturers push them away from the dslr market into a more profitable mass mirrorless market? Scary I know but when money rules everything these days, the needs or wants of a particular customer sector mean nothing if it's not shifting in high enough numbers.

0 upvotes
smeebruce
By smeebruce (Sep 9, 2011)

So . . . Canon (and Nikon) make a full-frame mirroless that takes EF lenses . . . what a great opportunity to make a camera that looks different, does video brilliantly (they never use the mirror anyhow) and give the new device some amazing software for both still and video . . .its not a problem . . . wow, what an opportunity!

0 upvotes
fastprime
By fastprime (Sep 9, 2011)

Personal experience over the past year: Returning to this old hobby. First choice after research was the GF1. It turned out to be an excellent camera. I soon added a GH1 because at the time I could buy it with the 14-140 lens for the same price at B&H than I could at the stores in Canada for just the body. Turned out I actually liked the GH1 better than the GF1 because of the EVF. I did buy the VF1 for the GF1 but it sucks. I still yearned for a Nikon DSLR though, and when the D7000 came out I picked one up. I've since sold the GF1 to offset the cost of a G3 and will soon sell the GH1. I took the D7000 on holiday with its kit zoom and it was great to use. When I go hiking in the mountains, I take the G3 and a couple of lenses. That works well too. I've been buying a lot of vintage MF glass that I use on the GF1/GH1/G3 and really enjoy that. I find EVF MF assist is great for macro. IQ is excellent on both systems. I think 99% of the pop would be happy with G3 IQ. 1% pixel peeps may not.

1 upvote
robtec88
By robtec88 (Oct 1, 2011)

Well I guess that's the beauty of having so many variations of picture capturing devices available - there's something for most everyone. I think this whole argument of M43 is better than DSLRor vise versa, OVF superior to EVF (for now!) and so on, are silly arguments at best. Use what suits your needs best and don't criticize what others use. This gets as silly as car and truck brand arguments: use what you like, can afford and does the job for you - honestly people, are we still in 5th grade?

Instead, look at the pictures people have taken with their cameras and enjoy or critique those instead. After all, in the end it's all about the captured shot!!!

0 upvotes
Total comments: 184
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