Rishi Sanyal

Rishi Sanyal

Lives in United States Seattle, WA, United States
Works as a Scientific Editor | Photographer
Has a website at www.rishi.photography
Joined on Feb 25, 2014
About me:

Although I'm a scientist by training, having recently completed my Ph.D in biophysics, photography has always been a huge passion of mine. When I saw an opportunity to meld the two at DPReview, I jumped at it... and now here I am!

Comments

Total: 808, showing: 1 – 20
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On Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review preview (1173 comments in total)
In reply to:

JMDean: 84%? That’s a little high IMO. This camera should rank down in the mid 70’s. Image Quality seems a little high on your scale. The only thing good about this camera is its build quality and performance. You couple in the poor image quality and the Value should go way down.
I purchased this camera and after shooting around 2000 images I can honestly say this is the worse Canon I have ever bought as far as image quality. That includes the Rebels I own. The quality of the images are so bad for the price range, that this will be the first camera I have ever returned. I hope Canon does better on its next release because this one sure left a bad taste in my mouth.
All the poor reviews about image quality are pretty spot on.

Worse image quality than your Rebels? In what respect?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2014 at 06:15 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review preview (1173 comments in total)
In reply to:

xval: Well, it's obvious that Canon is not the "King of the Hill" anymore. DR is disappointing. But how important is it? In some cases it's critical, in most cases it's nice to have. In any case there is no way to reproduce it on monitor or paper. So people use phoshopping to emphasis shadow details which results in "pictures". Far from realistic photo. Nevertheless most are happy with HDR-looking something. ;) And even call it photography.

When DR doesn't matter much everything else becomes more important. That's where 7d2 excels. For me video with autofocus + uncompressed video out actually was one of the main reasons to upgrade. I need it. 7d + 7d2 + 2x (dirt cheap EFS 24mm lens) make a good setup for stereo photography, something I need too.

Exactly right. People who simply say 'shadows shouldn't be pushed' are forgetting that whether or not something is a 'shadow' is itself determined by your exposure, the brightness/DR of your monitor, etc.

Our eyes often see much more than the default JPEG rendering, or even the default Raw rendering, compressed down to the limited brightness and dynamic range of your dim monitor. All made much worse if you exposed to preserve highlight tones in a wide dynamic range scene.

There's a valid argument to be made when one says that compressing that dynamic range of a scene into the low DR/brightness of a monitor or print sacrifices contrast/pop, but it comes down to personal taste - it's hard to argue that it's any more realistic to clip shadows to black or highlights to white if your eyes didn't see it like that in the real-world (& most likely, it didn't).

In other words, it all boils down to optimizing for global contrast, or pop (local contrast?). Not really fair to judge either way.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 27, 2014 at 06:14 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Kaye: The description of the one-direction AF sensors as "horizontally sensitive" is a bit misleading. With the camera in landscape mode (as in the video posted in the review showing low-light focusing), a peripheral sensor fails to focus on a vertical line. Isn't this because it is actually "vertically sensitive" (meaning that it detects contrast along a vertical line)? Since a vertical white line on a black background doesn't present much contrast in this direction, the sensor doesn't see it. There is lots of horizontal contrast, though (black on the left of the vertical line, then the white line itself, then black again to the right of the line). By "horizontally sensitive" I imagine the reviewer means that the sensor "sees" horizontal (but not vertical) lines. But the sensor itself must be oriented vertically with the camera in this orientation, so I would call it "vertically sensitive." Or am I missing something?

Thanks. And if we're going to be really technically accurate and nit-picky, I believe the correct wording should be something like 'sensitive to detail that has some projection along a horizontal vector', since it doesn't have to be perfectly straight horizontal detail. Think of how you can still align slanted edges w/ a rangefinder split prism... but not when they have absolutely no projection along a vector orthogonal to the split, if that makes sense.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 04:19 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

Eleson: As expected, a great camera! And worth it for the buyers.

A side note to reviewing:
"... This is quite stressful to the AF system, as we're shooting with the Nikkor 35mm lens at f/1.8, where depth-of-field is measured in centimeters for the subject distances chosen. Further complicating things is the fact that the camera is in 6.5fps continuous shooting mode, with the mirror flapping upward 6.5 times a second, essentially 'blacking out' the AF system between each shot. Still, the camera is able to stay on the subject in three dimensions."

It is a bit like saying "Sony a77II have extremely low noise, given that it has a semi transparent mirror stealing some light."

Should a review give extra credit because the solution have some limitations?

No critisism at all, more like something to contemplate on ...

Meh, I don't know. I get your point, but I don't really think so. Because in the end what matters to the photographer is the ultimate outcome - does it work, or doesn't it, and how well?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 04:16 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

Shotcents: The D750 is now Nikon's best overall body, assuming speed and reasonable size/weight factor in to your needs. It's less to carry than my D800 and has more resolution than my Df.
My Df and D800 (and certainly the D810) still have areas where they're better, but the D750 is the most complete package of features in a small body to date.

Unless you need crazy resolution or crazy speed, a D750 is likely the best camera you can buy at any price.

Robert

Wait, the D810 is $1k more than the D750, & not that that much bigger, w/ access to the same lens family/accessories. The 645Z is thousands thousands more, much much bigger/heavier, & comes with a completely different lens family and set of restrictions.

There's very good reason for me to mention the D810, but not the 645Z (oh, and wait till you see our real-world dynamic range comparisons between the two).

Are you just trying to be argumentative?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 04:14 UTC
On Lytro software update introduces Focus Spread feature article (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Everlast66: The biggest Lytro problem is that they are trying to solve a problem that does not exist!

A lot of the fun when taking photos is to decide what do you want in focus and how much separation (or no separation at all). It would be much less exciting to just snap photos around and then spend most time on the computer fiddling with sliders.

If it was giving you quality (resolution, DR and ISO) comparable to APSC or FF cameras and in addition give you some limited focus adjustment to correct slight back/front focus issues it would have much more success.

The light field actually has all the information needed to accurately focus at the time of capture. It's like PDAF on steroids, if implemented correctly.

Say what you will about the current implementation(s), the technology is incredibly exciting.

Yes, it'll be interesting to see if it scales, and it's great to approach these things with a healthy dose of skepticism. But man, let's keep some optimism alive here too, yeah? :)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 04:11 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ramjager: The 5Dmk3 AF system is "behind the times"!
Talk about garbage hyperbole writing.
41 cross sensors? Seriously.
Maybe rather than writing hyperbole the author should spend some time taking photos that require AF rather than making up utter garbage on a keyboard.
The 1DX focus module is still THE BEST action AF system period and the 5Dmk3 uses that very system.
Typical of DPR these days authors with little if any knowledge of the subjects they discuss is a norm
Wakey wakey DPR stop writing hyperbole based off zero experience.
Given how dated the Canon AF module is 90% of the worlds sports photogs should be upgrading from there 1Dx's that dominate sidelines because it's AF is behind the times!
Yea right.

While BarnET's comments are spot on, Horshack's remarks are fair. Rest assured we're not just re-quoting manufacturer specs, we've been subjecting these cameras to many, many AF tests. We'll be publishing the 5D3, 7D Mark II, 1D X, D810, and more results in upcoming reviews/pieces. You should never just have to take our word for it.

I've also shot many weddings with the 5D Mark III (which was a huge step up from the 5D Mark II), which was my pro-camera, but having put the recent Nikons through similar paces (in actual real-world photography) over months & months now, the advantages of tracking became quite clear. I use a D810 now, w/ the AF grid of a SU-800 and/or SB-910 on the dance floor (low light). You'll fare better w/ a D750 in such low light situations.

As for the cross-type deficiencies - which we clearly showed in a video, mentioned many times, & listed as a con - we've profusely communicated our desire for Nikon to work on this. Let's see.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 04:01 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

=VALOR=: I own a D800 and a catalogue of Nikon glass. Having played with the D750 briefly, i was shocked to learn that there is no real live-view implementation. Anyone considering purchasing this camera should know that just like the D600, there is NO real-time live view. I have not seen this fatal flaw mentioned anywhere. Nikon has crippled the D750 to yesteryears technology and yet it receives a GOLD award from dpreview? Giving the user live-view has been proven over and over to be beneficial for getting the exposure right before hitting the shutter. Entry level mirror-less cameras all have proper-real time live view but not Nikon. Not unless you buy the D800 and up.

With the announcement of the Sony A7II and now this glaring omission, it is one more nail in the coffin for Nikon.

=VALOR= is wrong, everyone else is right. =VALOR= it's OK to be wrong, but please be careful who you call a troll when your entire post was predicated on a completely incorrect assumption.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 03:33 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

nizar ghosn: how could you justify the better iso performance in the d610 in your comparison line on this page, despite the comparison chart shows that the d750 is better .. and why you have the handling of the d610 is better than the d750 in this page ??? is it ???

Yup Antony John & HFLM - couldn't agree with you guys more. That's the importance of controlled tests.

Out of curiosity - would you guys find it useful/valuable if we ever started including dcraw Raw conversions, to get around any ACR noise / black normalization issues?

Thanks.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 03:26 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

ChrisH37: I played around with LiveView on my D750 this evening, and you know what I was actually pleasently surprised. I've owned mirrorless cameras before (OMD EM5, A7) and obviously shooting with the rear LCD is nowhere near as quick as those, but it's also not that bad and much, much quicker than earlier DSLR implementations of LiveView. I can certainly see myself using it quite a bit with the tilting LCD.

Also, the 3D tracking really is staggering, I tried and quickly stopped using it on a D7000, but after reading this review I figured I may as well move away from Single Point AF for once and try it out, it's next level stuff and genuinely usable.

StanRogers: Great perspective - thanks!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 03:22 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

TORN: Cutting minimum shutter to 1/4000s and lowest ISO to 100 is making pretty sure I don't buy it. I do not use zooms and I do not intend to run a selection of ND filters because of marketing caused camara restrictions.

Well I do have enough cameras but hey Nikon listen: You want to sell something, right?

Yes, correct, but TORN appeared to be implying in his posts that ISO 50 just 'isn't there'...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 03:16 UTC
In reply to:

EduPortas: To everyone saying that DR is only average on the 7D Mark II is ask you this: what good is picture taken with 13 or even 14 stops of DR if it is not in focus? This is a camera for people who need a large AF area on their sensor, mainly journalists who actually use their lateral AF points when composing with a subject on either the extreme left of right of the frame. As a pro, I can appreciate Canon making AF much easier for us. I will gladly sacrifice a bit of DR for this. (Not a Canon fanboy here. I've owned Nikon, Canon, Sony and Fuji gear, BTW).

Also, as I think I mentioned earlier, the # of people who are even aware of 3D tracking is staggeringly low. An international award-winning wedding photographer I recently interviewed said they gave up on 3D tracking years ago b/c when they'd tested it back then, it wasn't reliable enough to trust. Turns out, they were using a system w/ 2,016-pixel RGB meter, & things have gotten much better w/ the 50x improvement in the resolution of that sensor, refined algorithms, & more processing power. When they revisited it on newer bodies, they were blown away, & now 'never turn it off'.

Also, the other day, I read a pro sports photographer's blog where he wrote something along the lines of: 'my friend told me turn off 3D tracking, not really sure what it is, but I turned it on, & I could really tell the difference, so I turned it back off since my friend told me not to use it'.

So yeah, I think this gets to your point Dr_Jon. There's a reason for technical analysis & controlled comparison.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 03:01 UTC
In reply to:

EduPortas: To everyone saying that DR is only average on the 7D Mark II is ask you this: what good is picture taken with 13 or even 14 stops of DR if it is not in focus? This is a camera for people who need a large AF area on their sensor, mainly journalists who actually use their lateral AF points when composing with a subject on either the extreme left of right of the frame. As a pro, I can appreciate Canon making AF much easier for us. I will gladly sacrifice a bit of DR for this. (Not a Canon fanboy here. I've owned Nikon, Canon, Sony and Fuji gear, BTW).

Dr_Jon nailed it. The other guy didn't. We just run a quick check? We're dedicated to test the heck out of these things, even shoot in the real-world with them (I myself am a wedding & landscape photographer). If you don't think we add any unique value by trying to rigorously test equipment under controlled conditions to *actually find real* differences, while trying to keep our tests photographically relevant, then I'm not sure why you're here.

Dr_Jon- thanks for remaining very open & receptive throughout this conversation; it's very refreshing.

We realize this isn't common opinion. But here's something else that still seems to be common opinion amongst some: that Sony sensors get more DR via processing, or that the 3EV differences in DR still don't allow anyone to shoot any real-world scene better without bracketing. All demonstrably untrue.

1DX almost catches up to recent Nikons in lateral tracking & is far better than any other Canon at this. Including the 7D2, surprisingly.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 02:56 UTC
On Lytro software update introduces Focus Spread feature article (102 comments in total)
In reply to:

Everlast66: The biggest Lytro problem is that they are trying to solve a problem that does not exist!

A lot of the fun when taking photos is to decide what do you want in focus and how much separation (or no separation at all). It would be much less exciting to just snap photos around and then spend most time on the computer fiddling with sliders.

If it was giving you quality (resolution, DR and ISO) comparable to APSC or FF cameras and in addition give you some limited focus adjustment to correct slight back/front focus issues it would have much more success.

If any technology is introduced that allows you to fix focus on a misfocused shot, without coming at any other *cost*, you'd have to be incredibly short-sighted to not welcome that technology.

Unless focus is a solved problem. Which it's not (who knows, it might be by then). And no one's saying you have to focus every shot. It's the option to fix a shot *if* focus is off. And the point is one day this tech might come *without* the costs it's associated with now. It might, it might not.

Let's wait & see. Instead of just sitting around being armchair critics. *I'm* a wedding photographer & *I* will readily say that I would welcome such tech - without too much of a cost - with open arms. Man, I mean, you ever tried to shoot a moving kid/baby with a fast prime? Yes, 3D tracking is great, but to think it gives me anywhere near 100% hit rate, or even 50% hit rate under certain lighting conditions, apertures, subjects, would just be delusional.

And none of this gets at the other benefits.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 02:42 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

JackM: 5D3's AF is behind the times? LOL. I guess the 1DX's is too then.

Yet somehow pretty much every photo on my website was shot on a Canon, I've shot many weddings professionally on my 5D3 & delivered results that made my clients very happy, and yet I still have the ability to objectively approach equipment reviews and say it like it is.

There's actually a very subtle reason for why sports situations don't typically benefit from subject tracking *as much as*, say, wedding or baby or kid or photojournalistic photography might - in sports, you can actually often get away with subject tracking off of a depth map of the scene alone (which the 5D3 does), especially as subjects don't fall out of the DOF very easily. Not the case at wider angles.

And at long subject distances, the plane of the face & body are virtually the same, as far as focus is concerned.

But hey, if you think that actual subject recognition & tracking using an image sensor - something all cameras are evolving to do - is useless, then there's no point in continuing this conversation.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 01:48 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

James Bligh: I cannot find a word about internal reflection and shutter shock issues of D750 in this review. Please point me to it if I missed it. When dpreview never even mentions (not to say evaluate) the issues, you can no longer say dpreview review is a comprehensive review which I think is a shame. Once renowned for its objective reviews and a comprehensive source of information about camera gears I am afraid dpreview has fallen into the realm of mediocrity many review sites share. The present generation of dpreview staffs may have wasted their talent and ruined the reputation of dpreview. Phil Askey will lament over it seeing the prestige he has built up tainted.

James Bligh: I said we've never seen it in the thousands of shots we took, but that we'll keep looking for it; in the meantime, keep any solid references coming, and that was seen as insulting?

Really have to wonder if we should offer free reading comprehension classes for some of our very special audience members.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 01:31 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review preview (1173 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: It is remarkable that despite all of the valid issues that Dpreview and its readers have pointed out the owners of Canon cameras continue to produce impressive results.

Does this mean that Canon camera owners have to work harder to get great images? Does it mean they have to avoid difficult situations more than other camera owners would have to? Or does it simply mean that they don’t find themselves in situations that often where the disadvantages of their camera are relevant?

"Rishi - While technically you're correct, the big problem you run into with that argument is that 90% of photography these days is not displayed in a medium where the differences in DR between Canon sensors and Sony sensors are going to be fully appreciated."

Point noted, but this also ignores the use-case where one tone-maps their Raws in post-processing to fit onto the limited DR / brightness of modern display / output devices.

Many use this technique effectively.

It also opens up new ways of shooting - such as the one I've been alluding to that allows one to effectively increase capture DR under conditions that require higher ISOs. And I see a sizable chunk of people clamoring for more DR (read: fewer blown highlights) at higher ISOs... that's exactly what 'ISO-invariant' or 'ISO-less' cameras allow.

You just have to change your thinking of exposure to take advantage of it. And, ultimately, isn't that something we should be doing: showing you how to use your gear in cool ways?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 01:19 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review preview (1173 comments in total)
In reply to:

shutterbud: The last gasp from a once-great manufacturer. This model admits that Canon is so far behind the times that they have to give you everything they have to make the purchase of their latest APS-C camera even worthwile.
Compare a D700 to an A7R.
Then compare a 7D to this.
It really is quite sad.

"I'm pretty sure he meant on the cameras he owned the primary concern wasn't having the best focus system money could buy. Today that's basically the 7DII and 1D X."

And you know this from actual testing? Though *specs* indicate similar AF performance between the 7D Mark II and 1D X, reality is that in practice, the subject tracking performance is substantially different - which we were surprised by in our own tests.

You might not understand the implications and uses of accurate subject tracking (which, for whatever reason, the 1D X does substantially better than the 7D Mark II), but many pros do. And those of us that actually use cameras for photography (where's your gallery, again?) Not that that stops armchair critics from sitting there on their computers pontificating...

Pretty ironic, then, that *we're* the ones accused of simply spewing marketing specs and bias.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 24, 2014 at 21:30 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

igor_s: Looks like a perfect camera in its price range. But I noticed one thing in its AF test video: the shots were taken after a small delay during which the model remained steady. How does the AF system cope with truly moving objects?

There are a number of tests on that page. A low light test. A video with said bearded man (Sam). And a rollover that was a completely different test where we never waited for the camera to catch up but instead kept shooting at 6.5fps while moving the camera. Which, I believe, is exactly what you were interested in.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 24, 2014 at 21:18 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1135 comments in total)
In reply to:

JackM: 5D3's AF is behind the times? LOL. I guess the 1DX's is too then.

"Face recognition is only relevant for the very few potential customers that primarily shoot portraiture."

Absolutely untrue. Face detection is actually more important for fast-paced shooting scenarios where you literally don't have the time to manually move the AF point. And proper subject tracking is important for anything that moves.

Both of those sound pretty important to us.

Furthermore, we pointed out exactly where the D750 AF system fails (lack of outer cross-type points), demonstrated it, called it out, communicated it to Nikon, & made a judgement call on how relevant it is for most photographic situations. Having actually shot many weddings with a 5D3, & placing the D750 under similar situations, we assessed the # of shots lost due to absence of proper, accurate subject detection & tracking (many) vs. the number of shots missed simply b/c of the non-cross-type points (not many).

We're not being biased, we're making calls off of actual photographic/technical experience.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 24, 2014 at 21:17 UTC
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