Peter K Burian

Peter K Burian

Lives in Canada Toronto, Canada
Works as a Photographer, writer, editor
Has a website at www.peterkburian.com
Joined on Feb 11, 2002
About me:

Stock photographer and Contributing Editor to PHOTO LIFE, PhotoNEWS, and Australian Photography magazine.

Also, Author of Magic Lantern books about Sony and Pentax DSLRs (but I test all brands of products for the magazines.) Co-author of some David Busch Guides as well.

www.peterkburian.com

Comments

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On Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 article (386 comments in total)

I got to shoot for a half hour with this new G7 thanks to Panasonic Canada. Very impressive. Super fast autofocus even in a dark interior. AND 4K video. Also, a 30 frame per second drive (using 4K) that provides 8 megapixel still photos. AND superb image quality at low ISO, Surprisingly nice at ISO 3200.

see photos at https://picasaweb.google.com/110698711952841559844/20150520 (These JPEGs were made using preliminary software so I cannot post high res photos. These were SIGNIFICANTLY downsized.)

Direct link | Posted on May 20, 2015 at 19:39 UTC as 12th comment | 2 replies

This is supposed to compete with Lightroom????

I use a Windows PC but many of my friends loved APERTURE .... Does Apple believe there's no demand for **advanced** photo editing software??? .......... More likely, they realized that they cannot compete with Adobe. ... Lightroom 5.6 for Mac is available now http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=5822

No idea when Lighroom 6 will be available but it should be fabulous http://photorumors.com/2015/02/27/adobe-lightroom-6-hdr-merge-video-leaked-online/

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 17:40 UTC as 28th comment | 4 replies

This was the famous $2395 Stellar with a wooden grip. http://files.doobybrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/hasselblad-stellar.jpg

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 13:28 UTC as 47th comment

AND Hasselblad was making their own SONY RX 100 II, the Stellar, with a grip, made of wood or other materials. $2,395 ..... Sony's camera sells for $650 so the Hasselblad grip and H logo name added $1750 to the price. **Apparently, it has been discontinued** .... lack of sales perhaps?

Sounded like a bargain: The Hasselblad Stellar (RX100 II) features a titanium finish rather than a black one, a big "H" logo on the front, and a deep, contoured handgrip that's missing from Sony's version of the camera. The grip is available in your choice of carbon fiber or wood. http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2472739,00.asp

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 13:27 UTC as 48th comment
In reply to:

BonsaiZG1: Very expensive and unnecessary parody .....

Right on! The term "parody" is perfect. If this were April 1, I would be sure the product -- or at least the homage -- is an April Fool's joke.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2015 at 13:14 UTC
In reply to:

TLD: Richard from DPReview, you are way too intense. Please lighten up and smile now and again.

Canon, when will we see a replacement for the 1DsMK3? Mine was seven years old last November!!!

Richard did this interview at the CP+ trade show. Having attended many of those, I know that you get very, very tired. Show floor all day, industry dinners in evening. AND jet lag when traveling to another continent.

Perhaps Richard is more lively when he is back at the office, well rested.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:50 UTC
In reply to:

Richard Franiec: I liked the interview. Very well conducted and Mr. Westfall's answers stroke me as genuine and thoughtful.

Chuck Westfall is one of the most knowledgeable people in the industry that I have ever met.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 15:47 UTC

Confirmed: D810A not suitable for general photography, even in RAW capture mode.

Here's the reply I got from a Tech Specialist at Nikon: "While certain environments may induce a color cast over the whole photo, such as with fluorescent tubes, ***the increased reddish colour cast may only be on a small portion of the photo.*** For example, the red tinge could only appear on a purple flower or on black clothing with a high reflectance. If it’s on a small portion of the photo, just editing the RAW file may not fully correct the problem."

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2015 at 18:02 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Frank C.: If both mirrorless and conventional dslrs were suddenly created today, which would people flock to?

Excellent question, Frank. And how about this one: If 35mm film SLRs AND digital SLRs had been created at the same time, which would we have flocked to?

OR If excellent color films had been created at the same time as black & white films, would monochrome have been very successful?

I love my DSLRs but if mirrorless cameras had been created at the same time, perhaps I would have gone with the latter.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 15:12 UTC
In reply to:

Jetranger_Pilot: Honda Civics outsell Mercedes - doesn't make them better.

Drivel.

I would much rather have a BMW 335i (not a Mercedes) than a Honda, so for me, the BMW is better ... because I love to drive it. I love the seats, the style, the acceleration, the handling ....... But I know that in many aspects, a Honda is better. My wife loves her Honda CRV and I'm sure she will continue to love it, with few problems, and without major repairs, for 200,000+ miles.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 15:01 UTC
In reply to:

Operator: Hey Samsung builds cameras - interesting ;-)

IMHO he forgot a detail to mention - Our goal is ... Mirrorless to outsell DSLRs 'in three years' ... on the consumer market.

The question is IMHO not Mirrorless OR DSLRs (I already use both systems parallel), it's Mirrorless AND DSLRs. The customers will go small and compact where small and compact is a advantage (travel, street) and they will go big/ergonomic and fast where ergonomic and fast is a advantage (sport, wildlife).

The majority will go anyway the smartphone path ...

Yeah, smartphones and iPads are the future, unfortunately. Recently, I was shooting a snowmobile race, with machines jumping over hills. They did not allow spectators to get close, so a camera with a zoom lens would be the ideal choice, right?

Well, 90% of spectators were shooting with a cell phone or an iPad. And I will bet that nearly all of them have a camera or two sitting in a closet at home. They knew they were coming to a race and that they would not be able to get close. Would have made sense to bring the camera, but very few did.

That was the day I realized what the future of ""photography"" looks like.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 14:46 UTC
In reply to:

Charlie boots: It is probably obvious that mirrorless will eventually replace the traditional SLR with flipping mirror and prism as will electronic shutters replace traditional fp shutters. The SLR has been a workhorse for the past 50 years and is an amazing mechanical gadget. It also replaced existing well established technology. The fact that the mirror and shutter mechanism reliably lasts for 200k or more activations and that it can function at 11fps is astonishing. A mdern DSLR is mostly electronic and solid state anyway and as technology progresses it will invariably replace the clunky mechanical pieces. With the speed of development and innovation in the digital world we probably cannot imagine what will be possible in 3 to 4 years. Look at the iphone 6 and its competitors to see what has been achieved in just a few years.

Well, yes, a few DSLRs can shoot at 11 frames per second, but the vast majority can only manage 5 or 6 fps. While even affordable mirrorless cameras can shoot 10, 15 or more frames per second. I won't trade my DSLRs for this reason, but I do acknowledge this benefit of the mirrrorless cameras.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 14:41 UTC
In reply to:

Jetranger_Pilot: Honda Civics outsell Mercedes - doesn't make them better.

Drivel.

Well, according to Consumer Reports and just about every other testing publication, Hondas are far more reliable than Mercedes. What defines "better"? Features? Speed? Style? or reliability and value for the money .... I do not have the answer but it's worth thinking about.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 14:38 UTC
In reply to:

Shiranai: They want to rival $5000 DSLRs? Well thats a lot of confidence putting their small APS-C against fullframe. Especially considering their less than optimal lens-range which still lacks a 50mm 1.4 or a 300mm zoom.

And yes, there is something that DSLRs do better - its that their viewfinder has no lag at all. Because even if its 5 milliseconds it can be the moment you miss.
And talking about small sized, the NX1 isn't really small sized, they intentionally made it this big to attract DSLR owners, so thats complete marketing-bull.

The real lag in a DSLR is when you are shooting a series of photos. Between each shot, the viewfinder blacks out due to reflex mirror action. At least I know it *does* but that time is SO short, I am never aware of it. So, in practise, it is not a drawback at all.

Most (all?) mirrorless cameras have a different problem. When you're shooting a series of images -- panning with a bird flying across your line of vision, for example -- the camera shows the **previous** image that you have taken. It's NOT real time. That does make it more difficult to keep the bird in the frame. Less of a problem with a larger subject like a horse and rider.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 14:36 UTC
In reply to:

KW Phua: By the time mirrorless out sell DSLR, maybe still Canikon outsell others.

In three years? Hmm.. well, maybe in Asia where mirrorless cameras have always been more popular than in North America. But yes, until Nikon and Canon make a *major* effort at competing in the mirrorless market, DSLRs will remain the norm in most countries.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 14:32 UTC

OK, if the D810 images for comparison were made with the better f/1.4 lens, what lens was used for the D800 images?

If the latter were made with the cheap f/1.8 lens, the image comparison would no longer be valid.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 22, 2014 at 17:42 UTC as 32nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

gdfthr73: Good grief, all you posters are so pathetic. You should all find new hobbies. Or maybe if you started your own magazine and began your own "best photographs of the year" list than your taste in photography would be petter represented. The only problem of course is that no one would actually care about it.

I agree with your comment gdfthr73. Every time ANY contest posts its winning images, 75% of the comments suggest the judges are blind or idiots.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 22, 2014 at 16:43 UTC
On BPG image format aims to replace JPEGs article (205 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter K Burian: Here's a different perspective on this topic, IMHO:

For a new format to succeed, it would also need to be a capture option that cameras offer. ***Not just a format for use on Web sites.***

That would require all camera companies AND all software manufacturers get on this bandwagon. But they won't. The concept of a familiar JPEG format (especially for 90% of the population who are snap shooters, at best) is essential for the market. The fact that BPG is far superior is not relevant. It boils down to marketing and what the public will accept, as the camera manufacturers see it. Too many consumers would find a new image format to be an extra complication to deal with.

Serious shooters already have RAW capture as an alternative to JPEG. And snap shooters are happy with JPEG; they just don't know any better, and 90% do not even *want* to know.

Ok, here is another opinion ... http://www.gizmag.com/bpg-image-format-outperforms-jpeg/35232/

"""Is BPG likely to take over as a successor to JPEG? There’s a few factors running up against it. JPG is more or less doing a good enough job. Designers are comfortable with using it online, it’s well understood, it’s supported pretty much everywhere, and internet connections are becoming fast enough that image download times aren’t the issue they used to be...

Still, it's cool to watch clever people achieving clever things with software, even if the morass of patent law and commercial considerations do end up leaving BPG by the wayside."""

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 18:32 UTC
On BPG image format aims to replace JPEGs article (205 comments in total)

As I read more e-zines discussing this new format, I realize that it really is intended only for use on the Web. Not really as a capture format for digital cameras. And yes, it is preferable to JPEG2000 BUT ... until recently, ****JPEG2000 was the BEST alternative to JPEG.****
And yet, JPEG2000 was never supported by most browsers. So, why do we expect anyone to support BPG? http://www.gizmag.com/bpg-image-format-outperforms-jpeg/35232/

"""Is BPG likely to take over as a successor to JPEG? There’s a few factors running up against it. JPG is more or less doing a good enough job. Designers are comfortable with using it online, it’s well understood, it’s supported pretty much everywhere, and internet connections are becoming fast enough that image download times aren’t the issue they used to be...cool to watch clever people achieving clever things with software, even if the morass of patent law and commercial considerations do end up leaving BPG by the wayside."""

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 18:31 UTC as 16th comment | 2 replies
On BPG image format aims to replace JPEGs article (205 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter K Burian: Here's a different perspective on this topic, IMHO:

For a new format to succeed, it would also need to be a capture option that cameras offer. ***Not just a format for use on Web sites.***

That would require all camera companies AND all software manufacturers get on this bandwagon. But they won't. The concept of a familiar JPEG format (especially for 90% of the population who are snap shooters, at best) is essential for the market. The fact that BPG is far superior is not relevant. It boils down to marketing and what the public will accept, as the camera manufacturers see it. Too many consumers would find a new image format to be an extra complication to deal with.

Serious shooters already have RAW capture as an alternative to JPEG. And snap shooters are happy with JPEG; they just don't know any better, and 90% do not even *want* to know.

Starting with version 10 (released in September 2011), Adobe removed support of JPEG 2000 from its Photoshop Elements software. (The latest versions of Photoshop still support JPEG 2000.)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 18:01 UTC
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