Peter K Burian

Peter K Burian

Lives in Canada Toronto, Canada
Works as a Photographer, writer, editor
Has a website at www.peterkburian.com
Joined on Feb 11, 2002
About me:

Stock photographer and Contributing Editor to PHOTO LIFE, PhotoNEWS, and Australian Photography magazine.

Also, Author of Magic Lantern books about Sony and Pentax DSLRs (but I test all brands of products for the magazines.) Co-author of some David Busch Guides as well.

www.peterkburian.com

Comments

Total: 196, showing: 1 – 20
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Another web site says this camera is ONLY official in Japan. Has it been announced for the US?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 19:58 UTC as 110th comment

I wonder when we will see another headline?

"Acme Inc. to restart manufacturing of buggy whips" (Heaven knows, there are far too few buggy whip manufacturers.)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 16, 2014 at 13:15 UTC as 5th comment

"Here we are faced with cameras that use the same sized sensor (although not all of it, in the case of the Lumix LX100), ............." That's a pretty casual mention of the fact that the LX100 does not use the entire area of the Four Thirds sensor.

In fact, the effective area of the sensor is only 1.5x larger than that of a 1-inch sensor. While some cameras, like the Fuji X100 series use a massive APS-C size sensor. (***Granted, the more important issue is pixel pitch: the size of the pixels, which would also be worth discussing. The Lumix LX100 would fare very well in this respect compared to many integral-lens cameras.***)

For what it's worth .. Four Thirds (as in the GX7) = area of 224.8mm squared.
LX100 effective sensor area = approximately 178mm squared
1-inch = area of 116mm squared
Canon G1X = area of 261.8mm squared
APS-C = area of 368mm squared

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 13:52 UTC as 75th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Rooru S: If they want professionals to take Sony seriously, they shouldn't stop R&D of A-mount lenses. There is a bunch of lenses that need an update quickly and there are serious holes in the A-mount lineup (for example, a set of constant F4 zoom lenses to complement the SAL1635Z, SAL2470Z, SAL70200G).

And if we talk about Camera bodies...where is the 1DX/D4s competitor that many professionals prefer to use? What about a proper D800 competitor with a proper AF module? Right now the a99 is only competing against the D600/6D and is losing.

Right now the Minolta Engineers are thinking what the hell they're doing with Sony after they're leaving A-mount in the dust...

Sony already has fabulous Carl Zeiss lenses. Not enough in the mirrorless category of course, but they are working to develop more. The big question is, In the mirrorless camera owner market, how many will pay big bucks for pro-grade Carl Zeiss lenses?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 13:40 UTC
In reply to:

lbpix: I think a mirrorless full frame would be great. I've really enjoyed using the Fuji XE but love the quality and dynamic range of full frame. Go for it Nikon.

The larger the sensor the larger the camera and lenses must be. A primary goal of mirrorless was to reduce camera and lens size.

Granted, the omission of the reflex mirror and pentaprism would make a full-frame mirrorless camera smaller than a full-frame DSLR. But small enough to attract any potential buyers?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 13:36 UTC
On Photokina 2014: Quiet but significant article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

Raw Jaw: How can the section "Serious mirrorless" not include Samsung's NX1?

Samsung's problem is that they are not successful in getting the photo retail channel (camera stores) to stock their products. HUGE ones like B&H do, but the more typical stores often do not.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 13:04 UTC
On Photokina 2014: Quiet but significant article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

quokka: I am surprised that there appears so little interest in Canon's 400mm II DO lens, and that few have linked the advent of this lens to the 7d II. The combination of these tools should be a BIF shooter's dream, with NO real competition. Furthermore, based on MTF charts, this lens should take the 1.4x and 2x adapter quite well, delivering lightweight, yet very functional 560mm and 800mm capability. Good time for birder's.

...of course, this is all on paper. We shall see.

Who gets excited about a $300,000 Rolls-Royce? The DO lens is $6500 and huge.

Dimensions 5.0 x 9.1" (12.70 x 23.11 cm)
Weight 4.27 lb (1.94 kg)

Granted it's $3000 less than the 500mm f/4 which is $9500. Fortunately there are many such lenses for sale in the used market. Rich guys buy them, use them once, and sell them for a lot less money.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 12:59 UTC
On Photokina 2014: Quiet but significant article (165 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Look at the modern DSLR. It has outgrown its ergonomics. Even the entry level models are ridiculously complex. One of the appeals of mirrorless is the streamlining of the body and interface.

Well the bodies are smaller (though some are not very small) but the interface is also not streamlined with some models; they are really like smaller DSLRs. Similar specs and similar controls.

AND removing external controls makes a camera very heavily menu dependent. Is that better than setting a function with a dial or knob?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 12:54 UTC
On Photokina 2014: Quiet but significant article (165 comments in total)

In a week at photokina you only got a single photo of the buildings? (at the start of this article). And that was taken before the show started.

I'm sure there were hundreds of people outside the building, not three or four. A photo like that would provide a feel for the event.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 12:49 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First Impressions Review preview (1869 comments in total)

Nice to see that you discuss the fact that only a portion of the Four Thirds sensor is actually used. (Many Web sites ignored that.) But, the effective area is 1.6x (not 1.5x) larger than the 1-inch sensor.

Quote from Panasonic: DMC-LX100 has a large 4/3-inch High Sensitivity MOS Sensor ... approx.1.6x larger than the 1-inch sensor. ...

http://au.panasonic.com.au/News+and+views/News/2014/September/LUMIX+DMC+LX100+Designed+to+inspire+creativity

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2014 at 13:39 UTC as 271st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: Make the printer more expensive and the ink cheaper....
With all current printers on the market Ink is more expensive then gold. ;)

Kind of like razor blades. Cheap to buy a Gilette kit but the blade cartridges cost a fortune. They are in a secure area of drug stores in Canada.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 13:21 UTC
In reply to:

Apotheker: Could Epson not produce a printer with the following ink configuration:

gloss optimizer
matte black
photo black
grey
vivid magenta
orange
cyan
yellow

So 8 channels, both blacks loaded simultaneously (no flushing needed), gloss optimizer, light colors removed in favor of using small droplets up to 2 pl, grey for ABW-mode and orange combined with vivid magenta to get the same results as the magenta, red and orange combination of the R2000 and gloss optimizer to minimize gloss differential/bronzing as the R2000 does, but with grey ink like the R3000 for neutral B&W prints.

Also a user replaceable waste ink tank, like the Epson Pro 3880.

That would be winner, more than this upgrade of the R3000.

Yeah but what would a machine like that cost? And how big would it be? I assume this SC-P600 will be similar in price and size to the R3000.

Frankly, this printer format has not been selling well at all for the past few years. Making a new machine that is even more expensive and larger would not do much to boost sales.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 13:20 UTC

What the heck size is A3+?? I guess people in England know, but for the rest of us, could someone not have included that info? I had to do a google search.

A3+ paper measures 329mm × 483mm which is about 12.9 × 19.0 inches

http://www.answers.com/Q/What_size_is_A3_plus_paper

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 13:16 UTC as 10th comment | 3 replies
On DxO Optics Pro 9.5 now integrates with Adobe Lightroom article (62 comments in total)

The latest version, 9.5.2 is now available.
http://www.dxo.com/intl/news/dxo-optics-pro-v952-available

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2014 at 12:53 UTC as 2nd comment

There is now a newer DXO optics pro -- 9.5.2 (not covered by DPReview) -- that supports the D810. http://www.dxo.com/intl/news/dxo-optics-pro-v952-available

I tried DXO on some RAW files and it provided fabulous image quality, when the suitable lens module was installed; the software provides a message automatically when it detects the lens that was used. Be sure to allow it to install the lens modules.

NOTE: The lens quality setting in DXO is at -50 by default. No idea why. You get much better quality when it's set to zero AND much higher sharpness of intricate detail when you set it to +25.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2014 at 12:43 UTC as 2nd comment
On Accessory Review: Drobo Mini RAID article (149 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter K Burian: What is the actual model number for this product? I cannot find anything on the Drobo site about a Mini Raid.

I guess it's just called Drobo Mini.

Drobo Mini protects your data without any intervention – even in the event of multiple drive failures. You can even switch from single to dual disk redundancy with a single click, ensuring enterprise-level dual parity data protection when required. Drobo’s with BeyondRAID are also self-healing and have virtual hot-spares. If a drive happens to fail, Drobo will automatically re-layout the data to return to a protected state without disruption. http://www.drobo.com/storage-products/mini/

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 13:24 UTC
On Accessory Review: Drobo Mini RAID article (149 comments in total)

What is the actual model number for this product? I cannot find anything on the Drobo site about a Mini Raid.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 13:21 UTC as 32nd comment | 2 replies
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

chateaulatour: Great article, Guy, and tutorial. Just wondered how less capable it would have been to take those very same shots with the D800. I guess the extra fps helped a lot, but could you have achieved the same with the 800. I can remember a couple of years back when all the pundits said the 800 was in no way a sports camera and it should be kept in the studio on a tripod. If you do sports get the Canon.... Just goes to show what a good photographer can do with almost any equipment. I remember arriving at a motor race about 20 years ago with a Mamiya Twin lens reflex. And my shot ended up as an ad in Newsweek... :-)

I own the D800 and have been testing the D810. For action, the D810 is a bit better: 1 fps faster (or 2fps faster in 1.2x crop mode.) And -- in the right situation -- the Group-Area AF mode provides greater reliability (see info below) in maintaining focus on the primary subject.

Otherwise the D800 is about the same ... although that evaluation would require extensive side-by-side testing. (RobGalbraith.com used to do that type of testing.)

Nikon quote: When Group-area AF is selected, the camera uses one focus point selected by the user and one each above, below, to the right, and to the left of the selected focus point, for a total of five focus points, for focusing. By capturing the subject within the five-point group, even if it is small and moving quickly and erratically as is often the case when photographing athletes and animals, the intended scene can be captured with greater certainty without focus shifting to the background.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 13:12 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

steelhead3: Guy,do you own the 80/400 or was it loaned to you...the cavalier attitude with rain does lend the belief you may not own it and maybe have to send to Nikon and its famous impact damage claims.

The old 80-400mm was terrible for sports (and bird photography) because the autofocus could never keep up. Nice to know the new one is much better.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 13:12 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (246 comments in total)
In reply to:

AutoMatters: Guy,
Thank you for a fascinating report on the Nikon D810 and the comparisons to the D4S. Based in San Diego, I've been shooting motorsports for my weekly newspaper and online automotive column. My primary body/lens combo has been a D3S with Nikon's old 80-400mm. I prefer the smaller but sufficient file size of the D3S to the D810. The images meet my needs and the D3S is rugged and very weather resistant. At races I also carry a D3 with a wider zoom (Nikon 28-300mm) .
I'd like to replace my D3 with a body that has better low light sensitivity. That new body would become my primary camera. From your report it sounds like that should be a "sports body" with a much lower pixel count than the D810, correct?
When do you think a D5 is likely? Instead, should I try to find a used D4S? I hate that Nikon replaced the two CF card capability (in D3S) with one CF card and a proprietary Sony card (in D4/D4S).
My new Tamron 150-600mm will replace Nikon's 80-400 at the IndyCar season finale.
Jan W.

We use the word Autumn in Canada too. And the Song Blue Autumn was by an American, Roy Orbison.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 13:08 UTC
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