Peter K Burian

Peter K Burian

Lives in Canada Toronto, Canada
Works as a Photographer, writer, editor
Has a website at www.peterkburian.com
Joined on Feb 11, 2002
About me:

Stock photographer and Contributing Editor to PHOTO LIFE, PhotoNEWS, and Australian Photography magazine.

Also, Author of Magic Lantern books about Sony and Pentax DSLRs (but I test all brands of products for the magazines.) Co-author of some David Busch Guides as well.

www.peterkburian.com

Comments

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On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 First Impressions Review preview (971 comments in total)

Nice to see that you discuss the fact that only a portion of the Four Thirds sensor is actually used. (Many Web sites ignored that.) But, the effective area is 1.6x (not 1.5x) larger than the 1-inch sensor.

Quote from Panasonic: DMC-LX100 has a large 4/3-inch High Sensitivity MOS Sensor ... approx.1.6x larger than the 1-inch sensor. ...

http://au.panasonic.com.au/News+and+views/News/2014/September/LUMIX+DMC+LX100+Designed+to+inspire+creativity

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2014 at 13:39 UTC as 76th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: Make the printer more expensive and the ink cheaper....
With all current printers on the market Ink is more expensive then gold. ;)

Kind of like razor blades. Cheap to buy a Gilette kit but the blade cartridges cost a fortune. They are in a secure area of drug stores in Canada.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 13:21 UTC
In reply to:

Apotheker: Could Epson not produce a printer with the following ink configuration:

gloss optimizer
matte black
photo black
grey
vivid magenta
orange
cyan
yellow

So 8 channels, both blacks loaded simultaneously (no flushing needed), gloss optimizer, light colors removed in favor of using small droplets up to 2 pl, grey for ABW-mode and orange combined with vivid magenta to get the same results as the magenta, red and orange combination of the R2000 and gloss optimizer to minimize gloss differential/bronzing as the R2000 does, but with grey ink like the R3000 for neutral B&W prints.

Also a user replaceable waste ink tank, like the Epson Pro 3880.

That would be winner, more than this upgrade of the R3000.

Yeah but what would a machine like that cost? And how big would it be? I assume this SC-P600 will be similar in price and size to the R3000.

Frankly, this printer format has not been selling well at all for the past few years. Making a new machine that is even more expensive and larger would not do much to boost sales.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 13:20 UTC

What the heck size is A3+?? I guess people in England know, but for the rest of us, could someone not have included that info? I had to do a google search.

A3+ paper measures 329mm × 483mm which is about 12.9 × 19.0 inches

http://www.answers.com/Q/What_size_is_A3_plus_paper

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 13:16 UTC as 9th comment | 3 replies
On DxO Optics Pro 9.5 now integrates with Adobe Lightroom article (62 comments in total)

The latest version, 9.5.2 is now available.
http://www.dxo.com/intl/news/dxo-optics-pro-v952-available

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2014 at 12:53 UTC as 2nd comment

There is now a newer DXO optics pro -- 9.5.2 (not covered by DPReview) -- that supports the D810. http://www.dxo.com/intl/news/dxo-optics-pro-v952-available

I tried DXO on some RAW files and it provided fabulous image quality, when the suitable lens module was installed; the software provides a message automatically when it detects the lens that was used. Be sure to allow it to install the lens modules.

NOTE: The lens quality setting in DXO is at -50 by default. No idea why. You get much better quality when it's set to zero AND much higher sharpness of intricate detail when you set it to +25.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2014 at 12:43 UTC as 2nd comment
On Accessory Review: Drobo Mini RAID article (149 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peter K Burian: What is the actual model number for this product? I cannot find anything on the Drobo site about a Mini Raid.

I guess it's just called Drobo Mini.

Drobo Mini protects your data without any intervention – even in the event of multiple drive failures. You can even switch from single to dual disk redundancy with a single click, ensuring enterprise-level dual parity data protection when required. Drobo’s with BeyondRAID are also self-healing and have virtual hot-spares. If a drive happens to fail, Drobo will automatically re-layout the data to return to a protected state without disruption. http://www.drobo.com/storage-products/mini/

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 13:24 UTC
On Accessory Review: Drobo Mini RAID article (149 comments in total)

What is the actual model number for this product? I cannot find anything on the Drobo site about a Mini Raid.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 13:21 UTC as 32nd comment | 2 replies
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (239 comments in total)
In reply to:

chateaulatour: Great article, Guy, and tutorial. Just wondered how less capable it would have been to take those very same shots with the D800. I guess the extra fps helped a lot, but could you have achieved the same with the 800. I can remember a couple of years back when all the pundits said the 800 was in no way a sports camera and it should be kept in the studio on a tripod. If you do sports get the Canon.... Just goes to show what a good photographer can do with almost any equipment. I remember arriving at a motor race about 20 years ago with a Mamiya Twin lens reflex. And my shot ended up as an ad in Newsweek... :-)

I own the D800 and have been testing the D810. For action, the D810 is a bit better: 1 fps faster (or 2fps faster in 1.2x crop mode.) And -- in the right situation -- the Group-Area AF mode provides greater reliability (see info below) in maintaining focus on the primary subject.

Otherwise the D800 is about the same ... although that evaluation would require extensive side-by-side testing. (RobGalbraith.com used to do that type of testing.)

Nikon quote: When Group-area AF is selected, the camera uses one focus point selected by the user and one each above, below, to the right, and to the left of the selected focus point, for a total of five focus points, for focusing. By capturing the subject within the five-point group, even if it is small and moving quickly and erratically as is often the case when photographing athletes and animals, the intended scene can be captured with greater certainty without focus shifting to the background.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 15, 2014 at 13:12 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (239 comments in total)
In reply to:

steelhead3: Guy,do you own the 80/400 or was it loaned to you...the cavalier attitude with rain does lend the belief you may not own it and maybe have to send to Nikon and its famous impact damage claims.

The old 80-400mm was terrible for sports (and bird photography) because the autofocus could never keep up. Nice to know the new one is much better.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 13:12 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (239 comments in total)
In reply to:

AutoMatters: Guy,
Thank you for a fascinating report on the Nikon D810 and the comparisons to the D4S. Based in San Diego, I've been shooting motorsports for my weekly newspaper and online automotive column. My primary body/lens combo has been a D3S with Nikon's old 80-400mm. I prefer the smaller but sufficient file size of the D3S to the D810. The images meet my needs and the D3S is rugged and very weather resistant. At races I also carry a D3 with a wider zoom (Nikon 28-300mm) .
I'd like to replace my D3 with a body that has better low light sensitivity. That new body would become my primary camera. From your report it sounds like that should be a "sports body" with a much lower pixel count than the D810, correct?
When do you think a D5 is likely? Instead, should I try to find a used D4S? I hate that Nikon replaced the two CF card capability (in D3S) with one CF card and a proprietary Sony card (in D4/D4S).
My new Tamron 150-600mm will replace Nikon's 80-400 at the IndyCar season finale.
Jan W.

We use the word Autumn in Canada too. And the Song Blue Autumn was by an American, Roy Orbison.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 13:08 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (239 comments in total)
In reply to:

frugivore: Wonderful article Guy!

You mentioned that you set ISO to auto, meaning that you use Nikon's autoexposure. You also mentioned use of the highlight weighted metering mode in one instance. Do you use that mode exclusively on the D810? If not, why not?

Yeah and I'm not sure Nikon has done a good job in really explaining the purpose and drawbacks of Highlight Weighted metering OR that it's Spot metering. Spot metering without some expertise can create terrible exposures with any camera but Highlight Weighted Spot has even more risks as you point out, Guy.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 13:05 UTC
On Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions article (239 comments in total)

I am also testing the D810 and it is a fabulous camera and performed well during BMX races and a cycle road race. The 5fps drive speed is better than 4fps, but still a tad slow.

In my view, it's the kind of camera I would want as an extra body (to the D4s) when shooting aspects at an event that do not require high speed drive. But I still wonder why 36 megapixels would be required for most sports event photography. (Why buy a 36MP camera to shoot 9MP RAW files?) Of course, it's not billed as a sports photography camera and would be ideal for wedding photography, for example. (I know several wedding pros who use the D800.)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 12:59 UTC as 19th comment | 9 replies
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1531 comments in total)
In reply to:

AnHund: "This is good news, although for D800 shooters it might leave a slightly bitter taste in the mouth (there's really no reason why the D800's JPEGs couldn't look sharper, too with tweaked firmware)."

Despite a nice and fair review the above statement is complete nonsense imho. The jpgs can be very, very sharp from the d800, but I'm not sure who would ever shoot jpegs with any of the D8xx series, well yes, I think Ken Rockwell would :-)

I am still wondering whether the new CLARITY feature in Picture Control modes is one reason that D810 images have greater apparent sharpness. Clarity increases mid tone contrast making images appear sharper. (No previous camera includes this feature).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2014 at 13:11 UTC
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1531 comments in total)

Capture NX2 supports D810 RAW files ... apparently, anyway. v.2.10.0
https://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/19104

There is an update which will provide this support but today, I could not get it to work (HELP > Update NX2) ....

I got a message when I tried that: Could not communicate with server. .... I'll need to try it next week.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2014 at 13:09 UTC as 55th comment
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1531 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: Investors in the D810 (who dumped their D800's) will be a bit annoyed in six months when a brand new D900 (or whatever) hits and you get to take another $1000 depreciation bath.

Every camera is eventually replaced but the D810 should have a life of about two years.

If we worried about the fact that our camera (or vehicle) will eventually be replaced with a new/improved model, we would all be shooting with a 1950's camera (and driving a 57 Chev.) Only then would we be able to ignore new/improved models and never worry about that aspect.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2014 at 13:46 UTC
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1531 comments in total)
In reply to:

h2k: Some interesting findings here and i enjoyed the comparisons with 2 or 3 different versions of an image. Still i would have loved to see 100 % crop comparisons of D800 vs D810 to appreciate how the "veil is lifted" from the D810's AA-filterless images.

I thought the examples for shadow retrieving (yellow plane, rusted oldtimer) looked exaggerated, slightly HDRish.

Barney: Did you test D800 vs. D810 with the CLARITY control completely disabled? I am still wondering if that control is affecting the results. It is ON, at one level or another, in most Picture Control modes.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2014 at 13:43 UTC
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1531 comments in total)
In reply to:

bigdaddave: Interesting that the 5D3 images might be a little smaller but they are consistently much sharper, especially at the higher ISO's.

I'm sure the D810 is very good but it's overkill for 90% of subjects compared to the excellent Canon

The entire Nikon vs. Canon comparo issue is mostly academic. If you own a half dozen Nikon or Canon lenses, you will probably stick to your current brand, no matter how much better one camera is than another.

And I'm sure that both EOS Mk III and Nikon D800 series owners are perfectly happy with what they own.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2014 at 13:42 UTC
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1531 comments in total)
In reply to:

NiklaiN: Use Nikon software for Nikon RAW files. You will see miracles!

I agree; I get MUCH better image quality when converting a RAW file with Nikon NX-D vs. Adobe Camera Raw. BUT ..... only the new NX-D supports the D810. **If you use CaptureNX2, you end up with a very small file after conversion from NEF to TIF.**

NX-D works perfectly and it is FREE, but it is not nearly as versatile as CaptureNX2. (I guess Nik will no longer work with Nikon on the Capture software so Nikon has gone with SilkyPix software in developing NX-D. So with the D810 and future cameras, we won't be able to use NX2).

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2014 at 13:37 UTC
On Nikon D810 Preview preview (1531 comments in total)

...........Compared to the D800, images from the D810 look like they've had a veil removed............... OK, but is this due to the elimination of the low pass filter OR the new Clarity feature in Picture Controls? (I'm surprised you do not discuss the Clarity feature)

With Clarity set fairly high (as it is in some Picture styles) the images definitely look more snappy in MY preliminary tests. The key is to compare a D800 vs. D810 image .... made with the D810 Clarity control set to OFF. (I have not done so yet)

You can set Clarity high in Adobe Camera Raw with any camera but the D810 has this feature in-camera, and it is ON by default (at various levels depending on the Picture style in use) ... while the D800 does not.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2014 at 13:31 UTC as 62nd comment
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