NotSteve

NotSteve

Lives in Canada Toronto, Canada
Joined on Dec 6, 2011

Comments

Total: 52, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

vladimir vanek: Someone should stop google from their spy activities. It's/will be really dangerous that a private company has so much data in possession... And excavates more everaday from your emails, searches, tracking, calling etc.

Chlamchowder google IS violating your privacy at the request of governments. It is not an either/or hypothetical situation. See the huge scandal re: Prism/Five Eyes/project Echelon.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 22:11 UTC
On Very flashy: Ricoh unveils Pentax K-S1 DSLR article (206 comments in total)
In reply to:

KL Matt: Looks like a poor unsuspecting K5 got some bizarre disco mirrorless rammed down its throat and unfortunately lived to tell about it.

Speaking of having things rammed down your throat, weren't you the one who called this out as a fake on Photorumors and committed to buying and eating a K-SI if proven wrong?

"So incredibly fake, it is bursting with fakeness. Simply breathtaking fakeitude. Did I mention this is really really obviously a poorly photoshopped fake? If Pentax releases this camera, I will purchase and eat one. Whole."

http://photorumors.com/2014/08/18/this-is-the-upcoming-pentax-k-s1-dslr-camera/#comment-1549098526

Direct link | Posted on Aug 28, 2014 at 00:16 UTC
On Ricoh expands Q series with Pentax Q-S1 article (362 comments in total)
In reply to:

waxwaine: As Q is a "she camera", now have 2 propper nipples.

Newsflash Waxwaine, dudes have two proper nipples as well.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 7, 2014 at 23:22 UTC
On ThinkTank Streetwalker HardDrive Backpack Review article (69 comments in total)

StreetWalker? Really? Like maybe the name "Photo Ho" was already taken? (Lowe Pro Photo Ho?)

"But does it provide enough bang to justify its $229.75 price tag?" Discriminating comparison shoppers want to know: What IS the going rate to get banged by a streetwalker these days? Please update the article accordingly.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 25, 2014 at 20:59 UTC as 28th comment | 3 replies
On Nikon to offer D600 replacements if 'spots' continue article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

PixelMover: With all due respect to dpreview readers who genuinely had dust/oil/spot issues witht heir D600...
Bear in mind the source. China utterly hates and despises Japan (My wife is Chinese..) and will do ANYTHING and EVRYTHING to discredit/blame/smudge.insult/demean Japan at any opportunity.

The D600 fiasco is just a god-given present to China.

Put it this way. I have spent 4 month is China now and most of the time, they eat Japanese food buy Japanese brands, use Japanese electronics. But every now and then, a government-induced Japan-hate is instilled, where people who ate Sushi yesterday throw bricks throug the sushi bar's windows tomorrow...

Steve, these disputed islands are hardly a recent issue -- it's been going on for the last half century, at least.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 30, 2014 at 17:50 UTC
On Nikon to offer D600 replacements if 'spots' continue article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

PixelMover: With all due respect to dpreview readers who genuinely had dust/oil/spot issues witht heir D600...
Bear in mind the source. China utterly hates and despises Japan (My wife is Chinese..) and will do ANYTHING and EVRYTHING to discredit/blame/smudge.insult/demean Japan at any opportunity.

The D600 fiasco is just a god-given present to China.

Put it this way. I have spent 4 month is China now and most of the time, they eat Japanese food buy Japanese brands, use Japanese electronics. But every now and then, a government-induced Japan-hate is instilled, where people who ate Sushi yesterday throw bricks throug the sushi bar's windows tomorrow...

I think you miss the point PixelMover. The question is why hasn't any the government of any other country stepped up to do the same and defend consumers' interests, when they really should have? Isn't the role of government to defend the public interest? Secondly, you don't provide any context for Chinese animosity towards Japan. It is, by the way, not animosity toward Japan or its people per se, nor is it limited to just China, it is animosity towards Japanese imperialism which committed terrible atrocities throughout Asia, and for which the Japanese establishment, especially the hawks, are unrepentant.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2014 at 20:12 UTC
On Apple patents remote control for iPhone camera post (50 comments in total)

Great Apple. Is this your latest collaboration with the NSA? Really, really bad idea. It will make it that much easier for someone to engineer a bluetooth or other hack to take over your phone and surreptitiously turn on the camera without you knowing.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 19, 2014 at 19:30 UTC as 18th comment
In reply to:

Marty4650: I don't think Nikon gets it.

Small MILC cameras exist because they are tiny, and perfect for street shooters and travelers. They are great for a large pocket or purse and are perfect for social events, or any time you want to travel light or be discreet.

They work best with fast primes and pancake zoom lenses.

Birders and wildlife photographers don't need tiny cameras. They need image quality and reach. Do you really need a tiny camera if you are already hauling an eight pound tripod around with you?

So... along comes Nikon with a camera twice as big and twice as expensive as a Panasonic GM1. And it has a sensor half as large. But they saved you a whopping 1 gram of weight by using a memory card designed for a cell phone!

Exactly what is the point?

Nikon has created yet another overpriced MILC camera that will sit on the shelves and end up being sold at clearance prices six months from now. And this will validate their decision to keep making DSLRs for another 50 years.

Actually Marty, if I was a birder/wildlife enthusiast operating on a budget, I'd get a bridge camera. Some of them do remarkably well. So I don't agree that this demographic won't use small cameras. To me, that demographic has more in common with someone who might use the 1 system than someone who's got a few grand to drop on big, heavy glass.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 15:41 UTC
In reply to:

Richard Franiec: "When we launch certain products we’re aware of where on the globe that camera might be popular, but we don’t specifically target products in that way. But we might offer certain color variations or styles exclusively in some territories, such as flowery motifs in Europe and India for example."

How ingenious...
A hint: Military look-like bodies should sell well in North Korea.

Seriously Richard, this is very lame. One would think that as someone who makes aftermarket grips for cameras, you might actually have something useful to say. E.g., "I corroborate this based on the number of grips I sell in XYX countries for XYZ cameras..."

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2014 at 19:15 UTC
On Tamrac launches rugged-looking photo messenger bags article (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daedbird: Unfortunately, this is just a series of camera messenger bags that continue to look like camera bags to me. Its a nice effort, but it looks like a camera bag with a flap....

I feel my only option is to buy a laptop messenger bag, and install some collapsable padded pockets inside to hold the camera.

Absolutic, I would say it does look like a purse, if only because most guys, at least in North America, don't carry around a bag of that size and design. It's too small to be a laptop bag, a messenger bag or school bag...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2014 at 00:58 UTC
On Tamrac launches rugged-looking photo messenger bags article (105 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rocky Mtn Old Boy: It would be an interesting statistic to see which gets stolen more... photography or laptop bags, lol.

My guess it's laptops.

Better design one that looks like a picnic basket, imho.

You're missing the point I think. Laptops are cheap and very common nowadays and many are carried in an inconspicuous messenger-style shoulder bags. Most typical PC laptops are under $1000, and that would be what most people have (as opposed to pricier macbooks). Camera equipment that you'd need a bag like this for is probably on the order of $1500-2000 -- a decent DSLR body and a couple lenses. If you were a thief, would you go after the a laptop or the camera equipment?

In terms of absolute numbers, more people have laptops than DSLRs, so yes, in all likelihood more laptops get stolen than photography bags, but I don't think that makes the point you are hoping to make. You'd need to look at percentages for each and even then, I don't think this point has any merit.

It's not much to make an inconspicuous design without in-your-face branding to make equipment more secure, so why not do it? Why advertise to potential thieves?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2014 at 00:52 UTC
In reply to:

JustDavid: Surprised that you mention color options of K-50 rather than the fact that it has Shake Reduction built in. Also framerate is not mentioned while it is one of the best...

Don't forget the dual control wheels.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2013 at 14:22 UTC
On Another Hasselblad rebadge or Photoshopped hoax? article (187 comments in total)

Well, this is news flash -- not the camera, but the fact that I didn't realize DPR is now a rumour site. Pretty lame stuff. Is this a change in editorial policy or just the absence thereof?

I know -- how about we replace the news section with a twitter feed from photorumors.

Weird that a lot of your readers have higher expectations of this site than some of the staff.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 18, 2013 at 02:53 UTC as 64th comment | 1 reply
On 8 months with the Vanguard Up-Rise 33 camera bag article (47 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daxs: I don't like black and simple bags! Nothing about style! They can make really good tripods but bags without style!
I'm choosing Crumpler, Style and Safety!

To the contrary, I find that this bags very plain and unassuming appearance is a safety feature. It doesn't have an obtrusive logo and doesn't advertise that you've got a bunch of camera equipment like some other bags do.

But, if you want to stand out in the crowd, Crumpler bags do seem quite stylish.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2013 at 21:56 UTC
On 8 months with the Vanguard Up-Rise 33 camera bag article (47 comments in total)

Shawn, thanks for a pretty good review. I've used this bag almost everyday for about 2 years. A couple of points I would like to add.

The rain cover is attached to the bag by piece of webbing with a clip at the end, located to the right of the pocket where the rain cover is stored. Since you're not going to use the rain cover, voila, you've got your key clip.

I find the rain cover useful and in a torrential downpour it kept the contents more or less dry. It goes on pretty quick, like putting a fitted sheet on a mattress.

The main compartment can hold my K-5, 3 zooms, 3 primes, including the one on the camera, a flash, plus a computer.

Velcro still works just fine. Wish it had a bottle holder (I clip one on the side if needed), and also a place to clip a rear bike light.

A major plus is that it looks like a regular shoulder bag. Also, if you paid $170 for yours, that's too much -- I paid $130, $168 after tx & shipping from the US to Canada and that was 2 yrs ago. It's less now.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 16, 2013 at 21:52 UTC as 12th comment

So, this is basically the X-mount version of the K-01, if it's for real. More conservative in design, but the shape of the hand grip, non-black colour options and textures are very reminiscent of the K-01. The K-02 -- by Fuji.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2013 at 20:57 UTC as 56th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

NotSteve: What is the point of photojournalism, or journalism for that matter? I just don't get the point of this photo essay. At best, it is vacuous and states a very silly truism -- gaining trust of one's subject matter as a photographer is important.

What news is Karen trying to bring out? The existence of the Klan is not a news flash. What burning social questions is he trying to address?

In Canada, activists did serious to make sure the Klan could not come north. Their politics are truly reactionary and retrograde, and the Slate article portrays them as some quaint, obscure, secret society. The fact that he (and Slate and DPR) seems to have to little to say about an organization that has as history of seriously criminal activities, seems to be an indictment of photojournalism/journalism, more than anything else.

marike6, yeah, I don't get the indifference or that this is somehow just any old photographic subject. There are people alive today who lived through a period in the U.S. when lynching was not uncommon.

If someone started dropping the n-word on the forums, how long would that last? Why do Karen/Slate/DPR want to promote the Klan, which does far worse?

Maybe the best thing is to check out of this thread and not contribute any more undue attention to it.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2013 at 20:58 UTC
In reply to:

NotSteve: What is the point of photojournalism, or journalism for that matter? I just don't get the point of this photo essay. At best, it is vacuous and states a very silly truism -- gaining trust of one's subject matter as a photographer is important.

What news is Karen trying to bring out? The existence of the Klan is not a news flash. What burning social questions is he trying to address?

In Canada, activists did serious to make sure the Klan could not come north. Their politics are truly reactionary and retrograde, and the Slate article portrays them as some quaint, obscure, secret society. The fact that he (and Slate and DPR) seems to have to little to say about an organization that has as history of seriously criminal activities, seems to be an indictment of photojournalism/journalism, more than anything else.

theswede, your rationalizations/justifications for this why this item about the Klan is journalistically/socially relevant are quite a stretch.

You suggest that people look down on them from a comfortable existence. Their social conditions have dehumanized/marginalized them but instead of rising above it, they've been incited to take up as their burning cross to bear to inflict the same on others.

People actively oppose racism in the U.S. and elsewhere by fighting for their rights. What's comfortable about that? People even do it with photography/photojournalism. I can't see that this is what Karen/Slate/DPR are doing. They present Karen's work as a peculiar kind of voyeurism. None of them say what you claim, that promoting this work has an aim to reach out to the Klan and sort them out.

Are you saying that now you feel compelled to get out of your armchair engage with your local Klansmen and show them the error of their ways? Let us know how that works out for you.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2013 at 20:46 UTC
In reply to:

NotSteve: What is the point of photojournalism, or journalism for that matter? I just don't get the point of this photo essay. At best, it is vacuous and states a very silly truism -- gaining trust of one's subject matter as a photographer is important.

What news is Karen trying to bring out? The existence of the Klan is not a news flash. What burning social questions is he trying to address?

In Canada, activists did serious to make sure the Klan could not come north. Their politics are truly reactionary and retrograde, and the Slate article portrays them as some quaint, obscure, secret society. The fact that he (and Slate and DPR) seems to have to little to say about an organization that has as history of seriously criminal activities, seems to be an indictment of photojournalism/journalism, more than anything else.

What would anyone of your say if someone posted this series on one of the forums? Nice captures? Good lighting?

Isn't this what people talk about when they refer to the banality of evil?

I don't get his indifference to such a serious subject matter. I'm reminded of the lyrics to a song by Rage Against the Machine -- "Some of those that work forces are the same that burn crosses." Is that where he is coming from as a former Marine?

What's next, one wonders? A photo essay or book on child molesters, people into bestiality? Surely that will give Mr. Karen a nice challenge in gaining people's trust.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2013 at 17:58 UTC

What is the point of photojournalism, or journalism for that matter? I just don't get the point of this photo essay. At best, it is vacuous and states a very silly truism -- gaining trust of one's subject matter as a photographer is important.

What news is Karen trying to bring out? The existence of the Klan is not a news flash. What burning social questions is he trying to address?

In Canada, activists did serious to make sure the Klan could not come north. Their politics are truly reactionary and retrograde, and the Slate article portrays them as some quaint, obscure, secret society. The fact that he (and Slate and DPR) seems to have to little to say about an organization that has as history of seriously criminal activities, seems to be an indictment of photojournalism/journalism, more than anything else.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2013 at 17:54 UTC as 23rd comment | 8 replies
Total: 52, showing: 1 – 20
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