Andy Westlake

Andy Westlake

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Joined on Jan 28, 2008

Comments

Total: 754, showing: 241 – 260
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In reply to:

SETI: No real life photos? Charts are interesting, but I believe my own eyes more

This is only the lab test data. Real life photos will follow in our full review.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2013 at 17:21 UTC
In reply to:

Eyeglass10101: I think everyone is missing a key element (and even DPREVIEW) doesn't list the full name for this lens: It's a NOCT lens. As in nocturnal/night time lens. Yes, it's obviously great for daytime uses, but it's a killer at night. You will see almost no coma. None.

@Eyeglass10101: We're merely using Nikon's own product name for this lens, i.e. AF-S Nikkor 508mm f/1.4G. It does not contain Noct.

However, as we stated above, the MTF data certainly doesn't tell the whole story, and the 58mm does indeed have exceptionally low coma wide open.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2013 at 17:18 UTC
On Roger Cicala gives Nikon D610 a clean bill of health article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Debankur Mukherjee: Is Mr Cicala trying to prove that the D600 had no sensor dirt issue ?

No. He's showing that the D610 doesn't have the same sensor dirt issue as the D600.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2013 at 10:35 UTC
On Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df article (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

sandy b: Saw a post on Miranda about having to press the release every time you change the shutter speed, " Apparently dpreview got this wrong - the lock is only to change the shutter dial out of 1/3 stop (command dial) mode."

Looks like this is right - I've corrected the text. Sadly though, that doesn't help with the ISO and exposure compensation dials.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 6, 2013 at 16:26 UTC
On Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df article (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

effstawp: In the grand scheme of things, I highly doubt Nikon's DF can take away Fuji's thunder. Even the upcoming XE-2 is a more compelling option for most; body+lens being cheaper.

The X-E2 can focus too. Strange but true.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 6, 2013 at 13:15 UTC
In reply to:

Freddog: Sadly no one here sees the point , great free upgrade for run and gun DOP's . Vacuum .....? It really sucks that you cannot see how useful this is . Pun intended ....

It's not a free update (I've changed our news story to make this clearer).

Direct link | Posted on Nov 6, 2013 at 12:34 UTC
On Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df article (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

marike6: From the preview: "The choice of putting ISO and exposure compensation on the top left and adding locking buttons leaves me cold. In contrast I love the Fujifilm X-Pro1, because its traditional control dials are carefully-placed for ease of use."

They are? There are only two dials: Shutter speed and ISO. I can't imagine how they are more conveniently placed or well thought out.

The X-Pro1 has no ISO dial so you need the Q menu or Fn button for ISO. And using Auto ISO, you have the camera defaulting to 1/30 minimum which is barely passable for handholding.

As long as the DF has the current ISO setting display in the VF, you could theoretically change ISO without removing the camera from your eye. There is no difference. Besides with the great D4 high ISO ability, there will be a ton of Auto ISO shooters.

As far as locks on dials, all X100 users who have accidentally moved the EV compensation dial will tell you how important the locks for dials are.

I think it's entirely fair and useful for us to state our initial opinion of the camera. We're a review site - that's what we *do*.

Just because you disagree, for whatever reason, does not make us guilty of 'unwarranted bias'. It just means you have a different opinion (and you're perfectly entitled to that). One key difference, though, is that our opinion is informed by having actually handled the camera, and then having time to think hard the implications of the design (and pricing) decisions that Nikon has made.

There is certainly huge interest in this camera. But you have to be remarkably blinkered to conclude that everyone else's impression is as positive as yours seems to be.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 19:15 UTC
On Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df article (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

marike6: From the preview: "The choice of putting ISO and exposure compensation on the top left and adding locking buttons leaves me cold. In contrast I love the Fujifilm X-Pro1, because its traditional control dials are carefully-placed for ease of use."

They are? There are only two dials: Shutter speed and ISO. I can't imagine how they are more conveniently placed or well thought out.

The X-Pro1 has no ISO dial so you need the Q menu or Fn button for ISO. And using Auto ISO, you have the camera defaulting to 1/30 minimum which is barely passable for handholding.

As long as the DF has the current ISO setting display in the VF, you could theoretically change ISO without removing the camera from your eye. There is no difference. Besides with the great D4 high ISO ability, there will be a ton of Auto ISO shooters.

As far as locks on dials, all X100 users who have accidentally moved the EV compensation dial will tell you how important the locks for dials are.

You're right, the D800 method isn't great either, especially if you're shooting with a large lens. Luckily you can set it up on Auto and leave it most of the time.

Nowhere did I say the Df is a poorly implemented, pointless camera. Please stop inventing accusations.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 18:05 UTC
On Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df article (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

marike6: From the preview: "The choice of putting ISO and exposure compensation on the top left and adding locking buttons leaves me cold. In contrast I love the Fujifilm X-Pro1, because its traditional control dials are carefully-placed for ease of use."

They are? There are only two dials: Shutter speed and ISO. I can't imagine how they are more conveniently placed or well thought out.

The X-Pro1 has no ISO dial so you need the Q menu or Fn button for ISO. And using Auto ISO, you have the camera defaulting to 1/30 minimum which is barely passable for handholding.

As long as the DF has the current ISO setting display in the VF, you could theoretically change ISO without removing the camera from your eye. There is no difference. Besides with the great D4 high ISO ability, there will be a ton of Auto ISO shooters.

As far as locks on dials, all X100 users who have accidentally moved the EV compensation dial will tell you how important the locks for dials are.

If you use the Fn button for ISO on the X-Pro1, it's very easily changed with the camera to your eye. Meanwhile the exposure compensation dial is easily operated by your thumb without having to take your eye for the finder.

In contrast on the Df, you have to move your left hand from supporting the lens, locate the release button for the requisite dial, hold it down and spin the dial to change the setting. I'm not sure how much hands-on time you've had with the Df, but I found this to be very awkward.

As someone who's extensively used the X100 and X-Pro1 (and lots of old mechanical cameras too), I completely disagree about dial locks being important. What matters is getting the weight of the click-stops right - do this and you don't need locks.

Auto ISO is of course near-unusable on the X-Pro1, and semi-fixed on the X-E2, but vastly better implemented on the Df. But if you're using Auto ISO all the time, why have an ISO dial?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 17:35 UTC
On Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df article (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

Eiffel: Reminds me of the Minolta 600si Class, which was an attempt a recreating the manual focus look on a more modern camera ("Full Frame" film based, but with AF).

Designers went as far as to dress up the exposure compensation dial to look like a winding level but crippled the body in some other ways (slow fps)

http://tammesphotography.weebly.com/minolta-dynax-600si.html

At least the minolta brought back some great ergonomics and was good value (I still have one and it works well more than 15 years after purchase...). In fact it was a very coherent product, more so than the Df in my view.

I'd say it's much more like the 600si's contemporary, the Pentax MZ-5 (ZX-5 in the US), which was an AF SLR with top-plate shutter speed and exposure compensation dials. But the Pentax captured the simplicity of manual focus SLRs a bit more successfully than the Df does.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 15:38 UTC
On Hands-on with the retro Nikon Df article (230 comments in total)
In reply to:

CFynn: I'd like to see a shot of the focusing screen

The focus screen is much like any other Nikon SLR. There's no manual focus aid, but you can turn AF point illumination off when using MF lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2013 at 07:55 UTC
In reply to:

JEROME NOLAS: To DPR staff- why don't you have photo-contests too?

We do, occasionally.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 15:19 UTC
On Samyang offers lens kits for videographers article (22 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: Looks like a decent starter set if the price is cheap enough... if not, then just use a more established set like the Zeiss CP series that render teh same across lenses. I wonder if these are just their photo lenses rehoused/geared in cine bodies.

These are just the photo lenses rehoused in cine bodies. As for price, though, the most expensive of these *sets* will probably cost about half as much as a single Zeiss CP.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 14:16 UTC
On Sigma 18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Review preview (333 comments in total)
In reply to:

focusnow: Ok - I think I may have found the solution... for shooting wide open with this lens in combination with the 70D....

1) set micro adjustment to +20 far and near
2) set camera M, P or C
3) shoot in live view mode
4) press AF button on top, select Flexizone single
5) press magnifier 3x to zoom in 10x (2x = 5x zoom)
6) half press shutter to focus
7) take photo in focus

I ave tried this at 1.8, ISO 200 in dim lit room and got sharp focus in every shot...

Works for me. Curious to hear about your experience.

Thanks.

@focusnow: The improvement you're seeing is simply due to live view AF being inherently more accurate. AF microadjustment is not applied when shooting in live view on the EOS 70D.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 10:05 UTC
On Olympus Stylus 1 Preview preview (324 comments in total)
In reply to:

John McCormack: Does the camera have a "silent" mode, i.e., the ability to turn off all sounds and flash, say in a museum or theater.

It doesn't have a specific 'silent mode' like Fujifilm cameras do, but you can go into the menu and turn off operational sounds (the shutter is essentially silent). If you don't pop the the flash up, it won't fire.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2013 at 22:44 UTC
In reply to:

DWM: The chart accessed by clicking the Sigma 100-300 box above and choosing the Nikon D800 does not appear to match the lens widget comparison chart for the same lens and camera. The lens widget comparison chart shows a much better result for the Nikon D800.

I'm sorry, I really don't understand what you mean.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2013 at 16:54 UTC
In reply to:

ThSpeer: Is there a comparison with the previous Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 AF APO EX DG OS HSM , which was released just a year or two before the current 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS HSM ?

According to Sigma the two lenses have the same optics. The main difference (aside from a cosmetic redesign) is that the new lens is compatible with the USB Dock, and gains two user-customisable user setups accessed by a switch on the barrel.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2013 at 16:00 UTC
In reply to:

yabokkie: the 120-300/2.8 looks good.
interesting the T stop is 2.9 on Canon and 3.1 on Nikon.

Probably better considered as T3.0 +/- 0.1 on both

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2013 at 14:05 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M1 Review preview (2063 comments in total)
In reply to:

kingal: Can someone tell me which version of Adobe Camera raw (if any) is able to recognise and process the RAW files from the Olympus OMD EM1? I have ACR version 7 and it does not recognise them.
Many thanks!

ACR 8.2 will process the E-M1's files. One workaround may be to download the latest version of Adobe's DNG Converter and convert the ORFs to DNG, which previous versions of ACR will then recognise and convert.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 30, 2013 at 11:50 UTC
On Olympus Stylus 1 Preview preview (324 comments in total)
In reply to:

John McCormack: Are there filter threads on the lens barrel?

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/olympus-stylus-1/3

Direct link | Posted on Oct 29, 2013 at 18:26 UTC
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