ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 680, showing: 141 – 160
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In reply to:

jtan163: I've seen a lot of people say that the 5ds used the 7d2 sensor tech.
However Chuck Westfall did not say that.
He said it used the same pixel size as and the same processor (i.e. DIGIC version).

He also said the same DR as the 5d3 and noise about the same as the 7d2.
To me that does not imply the same sensor tech as the 7d2.

If the exact same sensel design and fab are used, yield on the FF sensor will be pretty terrible, bumping sensor cost an order of magnitude. My guess would be that Canon is in fact doing that, but increasing yield by setting a lower threshold for acceptable performance... which would explain the lower max ISO. It wouldn't shock me if max ISO went up as they got more experience tweaking the fab line.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 20:44 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: Whilst Samsung's NX1 is the first affordable consumer 4k APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) mirrorless digital camera (great for budding 4k Cinematographers) ... with fast AF

This new Canon EOS 760D serves as the first affordable consumer HDR APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) touch-screen capable AF for budding Cinematographers wanting easy-access (minimal or no post processing) for Dual-Level Exposure for HDR CINE = like a beginners version of pro industry ARRI ALEXA CINE cams minus the expense, weight, heat, bulk, and conventional MF lens methods ... brings to the everyday shooter 'normalized' HDR CINE! (@ 720p = managable filesizes for global online sharing)

nice!

it's a preview of what's to come in higher models, like EOS 80D? (HDR 1080p) 5DMkIV? (HDR 4K, HDR 1080p), etc
EOS C-series: 1D or C#00
and likely Powershots, too

and no need to resort to ML (Magic Lantern hack), although I'm sure there will be plenty of new features buried yet to unlock

+lots o' lenses!

Honestly, I'd be getting a 5DS too... except I'm pretty sure there will be a better option from Sony by the time the 5DS is really shipping. I do like the fact that 50MP FF is above Nyquist for just about every lens, including on APS-C crops.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 14:58 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: Whilst Samsung's NX1 is the first affordable consumer 4k APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) mirrorless digital camera (great for budding 4k Cinematographers) ... with fast AF

This new Canon EOS 760D serves as the first affordable consumer HDR APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) touch-screen capable AF for budding Cinematographers wanting easy-access (minimal or no post processing) for Dual-Level Exposure for HDR CINE = like a beginners version of pro industry ARRI ALEXA CINE cams minus the expense, weight, heat, bulk, and conventional MF lens methods ... brings to the everyday shooter 'normalized' HDR CINE! (@ 720p = managable filesizes for global online sharing)

nice!

it's a preview of what's to come in higher models, like EOS 80D? (HDR 1080p) 5DMkIV? (HDR 4K, HDR 1080p), etc
EOS C-series: 1D or C#00
and likely Powershots, too

and no need to resort to ML (Magic Lantern hack), although I'm sure there will be plenty of new features buried yet to unlock

+lots o' lenses!

Dr_Jon, the Canon EOS sensors basically have about 1EV less total DR available than the Sonys, but the analog processing in the Canons flattens out DR at low ISOs, clipping where you'd see Sony-like high DR. DxO has the full resolution DR measures posted as graphs, and if you hover over a point, it will tell you the precise value (how I got the numbers I posted above). Unfortunately, when you go through calibrated combining of everything, it really does come out to only ~3EV gain possible by combining different ISOs even using every ISO the camera supports.That's still great... but Sony has been making APS-C sensors that directly output such great DR for several years.

My guess is that Canon is still using an ancient pipeline to process sensor samples. Actually, I kind of know they are, because CHDK and ML expose some of it. Anyway, Canon needs to stop doing that. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 14:21 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: Whilst Samsung's NX1 is the first affordable consumer 4k APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) mirrorless digital camera (great for budding 4k Cinematographers) ... with fast AF

This new Canon EOS 760D serves as the first affordable consumer HDR APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) touch-screen capable AF for budding Cinematographers wanting easy-access (minimal or no post processing) for Dual-Level Exposure for HDR CINE = like a beginners version of pro industry ARRI ALEXA CINE cams minus the expense, weight, heat, bulk, and conventional MF lens methods ... brings to the everyday shooter 'normalized' HDR CINE! (@ 720p = managable filesizes for global online sharing)

nice!

it's a preview of what's to come in higher models, like EOS 80D? (HDR 1080p) 5DMkIV? (HDR 4K, HDR 1080p), etc
EOS C-series: 1D or C#00
and likely Powershots, too

and no need to resort to ML (Magic Lantern hack), although I'm sure there will be plenty of new features buried yet to unlock

+lots o' lenses!

PS: Video is even worse than stills. Although you might think the lower resolution would help, and it does, electronic shuttering reduces SNR enough to essentially cancel that advantage, and then there are the lossy video encoding issues. The extra processing of video makes it difficult to get as precise measurements of DR, but it clearly is never much better than stills and is often far worse. In fact, DR unexpectedly goes down on most cameras in the continuous shooting modes vs. one frame/shutter button press mode... perhaps due to more electromagnetic noise from digital processing overlapping analog processing?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 12:07 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: Whilst Samsung's NX1 is the first affordable consumer 4k APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) mirrorless digital camera (great for budding 4k Cinematographers) ... with fast AF

This new Canon EOS 760D serves as the first affordable consumer HDR APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) touch-screen capable AF for budding Cinematographers wanting easy-access (minimal or no post processing) for Dual-Level Exposure for HDR CINE = like a beginners version of pro industry ARRI ALEXA CINE cams minus the expense, weight, heat, bulk, and conventional MF lens methods ... brings to the everyday shooter 'normalized' HDR CINE! (@ 720p = managable filesizes for global online sharing)

nice!

it's a preview of what's to come in higher models, like EOS 80D? (HDR 1080p) 5DMkIV? (HDR 4K, HDR 1080p), etc
EOS C-series: 1D or C#00
and likely Powershots, too

and no need to resort to ML (Magic Lantern hack), although I'm sure there will be plenty of new features buried yet to unlock

+lots o' lenses!

Sdaniella, you're totally wrong. On Tuesday I'm presenting a research paper at the SPIE/IS&T Electronic Imaging conference titled "ISO-less" in which I discuss the measured changes in IQ (including DR) as the analog and digital components of ISO are varied. Basically, changing ISO of an image sensor doesn't change the QE, but only read-out properties, and hence you need to change things like aperture or shutter speed too to get a really big DR. My paper will be online after the conference.

In any case, DxO measured the 5DIII DR as 11.7EV "landscape" and 10.97EV at native resolution. Even the dual ISO hack can't give it 14.5EV; DR decays at higher ISO settings such that you can never gain more than about 3EV by multi-ISO exposures with the same shutter speed and aperture on the 5DIII. In comparison, the A7 gets 14.2 "landscape" and 13.21EV at native resolution. Actually, all those numbers are even a bit inflated because they're measured against a low SNR black reference....

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 11:38 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: Whilst Samsung's NX1 is the first affordable consumer 4k APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) mirrorless digital camera (great for budding 4k Cinematographers) ... with fast AF

This new Canon EOS 760D serves as the first affordable consumer HDR APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) touch-screen capable AF for budding Cinematographers wanting easy-access (minimal or no post processing) for Dual-Level Exposure for HDR CINE = like a beginners version of pro industry ARRI ALEXA CINE cams minus the expense, weight, heat, bulk, and conventional MF lens methods ... brings to the everyday shooter 'normalized' HDR CINE! (@ 720p = managable filesizes for global online sharing)

nice!

it's a preview of what's to come in higher models, like EOS 80D? (HDR 1080p) 5DMkIV? (HDR 4K, HDR 1080p), etc
EOS C-series: 1D or C#00
and likely Powershots, too

and no need to resort to ML (Magic Lantern hack), although I'm sure there will be plenty of new features buried yet to unlock

+lots o' lenses!

Yes, that's what HDR stands for. Pat, you do know what the ML dual-ISO hack is, don't you? It's the obvious way to get HDR video from an EOS sensor. Basically, there are two readout channels with independent controls, so the ML folks realized you could set them to different ISOs, and came up with an algorithm for the HDR merge of the interleaved channels. The dual ISO hack gets something over 13EV out of a Canon sensor... of course, Sony sensors without any such tricks get at least that.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 05:07 UTC
On Go wide! Hands-on with Canon's 11-24mm F4 L article (228 comments in total)

For the record, I hate this... because it might finally be something wider than what I use now, but it's way more expensive and even a little more awkward than what I use now. I absolutely adore ultrawide zoom lenses (and Sigma is the one to beat for that with their 8-16mm APS-C and 12-24mm FF), and I know they are hard to use simply because of their ultrawide view, but can't they be a bit more user friendly?

If anyone is listening, I think there's a huge market for an ultrawide that starts around 12mm (on FF, or 8mm on APS-C), is cheaper but still high IQ, and is small enough to carry around normally -- even if it's f/5.6 or f/8 wide open. I've happily used little fisheyes that started at f/8. As long as the aperture isn't past the diffraction limit, a slow aperture really isn't much of a penalty in such a lens.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 17:00 UTC as 28th comment | 1 reply
On Go wide! Hands-on with Canon's 11-24mm F4 L article (228 comments in total)
In reply to:

Karen Casebeer: My question is why this new lens doesn't have image stabilization?

It does when used on a Sony A7II. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 16:48 UTC
In reply to:

Sdaniella: Whilst Samsung's NX1 is the first affordable consumer 4k APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) mirrorless digital camera (great for budding 4k Cinematographers) ... with fast AF

This new Canon EOS 760D serves as the first affordable consumer HDR APS-C (near Super35mm Cine sized sensor) touch-screen capable AF for budding Cinematographers wanting easy-access (minimal or no post processing) for Dual-Level Exposure for HDR CINE = like a beginners version of pro industry ARRI ALEXA CINE cams minus the expense, weight, heat, bulk, and conventional MF lens methods ... brings to the everyday shooter 'normalized' HDR CINE! (@ 720p = managable filesizes for global online sharing)

nice!

it's a preview of what's to come in higher models, like EOS 80D? (HDR 1080p) 5DMkIV? (HDR 4K, HDR 1080p), etc
EOS C-series: 1D or C#00
and likely Powershots, too

and no need to resort to ML (Magic Lantern hack), although I'm sure there will be plenty of new features buried yet to unlock

+lots o' lenses!

The "HDR video" mode sounds a lot like they've re-used the ML dual-ISO code, which would be good-ish (better if Canon would ever be nice to the CHDK and ML developers who were the sources for many of the best "Canon" features). However, at least on the Canons tested so far, dual-ISO barely brings DR up to the level of many Sony sensors shooting 1080. In fact, Canon claims 1080 at 60FPS, in which case simply merging alternating ISO on frames would trivially get an acceptable 1080 at 30FPS, whereas their HDR mode is getting just 720 at that FPS? We'll have to see what they've really done, but I'm not impressed so far....

I do like the way the rear LCD moves... I liked that innovation on my G1 back in 2000. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 16:39 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (3377 comments in total)

I fully applaud 50ish MP because it will be at or above Nyquist sampling on nearly every lens it can mount, delivering pretty much all the resolution the optics can offer, even in APS-C crop mode. However, I bet a lot of folks will be looking at images and wondering what the big deal is, because even 24MP FF is past Nyquist for many FF lenses away from the center of the frame, so the improvement often will be truly negligible. Clearly-inferior-to-Sony DR is also a problem, although the Magic Lantern guys might be able to fix that with the dual ISO hack.

In any case, it's nice to see Canon back in the game and I hope people realize what this really is: a FF camera that can get the best out of even your APS-C lenses in crop mode without the need to carry a second APS-C body.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 18:11 UTC as 604th comment
On Hands-on with Canon's 'not-coming-to-USA' EOS M3 article (553 comments in total)

Major progress, but I agree with Canon that they're not ready to send this to the US. Here, it would only hurt their DSLR sales by "blessing" the approach taken further by Sony, Samyang, etc.

Personally, if it was available here there's a good chance I'd get one to use with Magic Lantern -- which would allow me to reprogram it with my own compiled C code. Oh well. I have the EOS-M for that reason, and in truth it's sufficiently behind the Sonys in IQ that even ML doesn't endear it that much....

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 12:34 UTC as 128th comment
On Still Image Captured In A Video Mode challenge (4 comments in total)
In reply to:

minzaw: May be increased to 5 per person uploads?? to increase numbers?

Too late now, but no anyway. We need more variety, not more entries from a very few folks....

I'm really surprised by how few entries there were. I guess people haven't really gotten into using video as high-framerate stills yet?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 05:46 UTC

A little late to be getting into the FF DSLR business, isn't it? Sure does look a lot like their medium-format bodies.The interesting question is what sensor?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2015 at 04:32 UTC as 85th comment | 1 reply
On Readers' Choice Awards 2014: The Winners article (141 comments in total)

And the winner is: a Sony sensor or a Sony sensor.

(PS: Ironic that the Nikon D750 is in the middle of a recall issue.)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 4, 2015 at 05:13 UTC as 15th comment
On Samsung NX1 First Impressions Review preview (1444 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: Canon and Nikon were idle as Sony got a respectable foothold in the DSLR and mirrorless markets. Canon and Nikon have nothing comparable to this revolutionary Samsung. Once Samsung gets its lens inventory going, it will be a force to be reckoned with. Canon and Nikon still dominate by virtue of their names, but this will not last.

BSI in an APS-C sensor is quite a technological leap (probably a more expensive sensor than Sony FF), and so is the 4K IQ thanks to that somewhat early to market encoding. Sony has been leveraging their consumer electronics and VLSI tech to be a market leader, and Samsung is much bigger and comparably capable. As I've said before, these are the two companies most actively defining what high-end cameras are evolving into.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2015 at 00:39 UTC
On Canon 7D mirror box filmed at 10,000fps article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Canon 7D: 10 fps
Phantom Flex: 10,000 fps

It's clear to me that the mechanical parts of a camera are with their days numbered. In a few years the cameras will be fully electronic, and will take hundreds or thousands of high-resolution pictures per second.

ISO 1000 images are chock full of noise in the shadows -- because light itself is noisy (photon shot noise: the statistical variation in photon emission rate). I'm working on a new type of camera sensor that can sustain the equivalent of better than 1000 FPS, but it does that by having a different integration time for each pixel, so each pixel integrates photons as long as is needed to get a specified accuracy and darker pixels update much slower than bright ones. The real trick is that you're trying to image the scene, not the light used to sample it, so you need enough photons to build a scene model and can then temporally interpolate between samples at the pixel level.

Conventional high-speed camera sensors need very bright lighting to get past photon shot noise within a 1/10000s integration time. In fact, I'd be hesitant to expose the 7D's sensor to the level of lighting their 10K FPS camera needed... but they aren't too careful with that 7D. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2015 at 13:35 UTC
On Canon 7D mirror box filmed at 10,000fps article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Nice video! I think most DSLR users are not aware of the moving slit, which is a cloth curtain that moves left-right in many old SLRs (and why we still call them curtains). The temporal artifacting, nearly identical to electronic rolling shutter, is also something I think many people don't know about. It's also worth mentioning that there is a very different artifacting for leaf shutters used in compact cameras: the iris goes from open to closed and then open again, effectively varying the aperture diameter through the exposure interval (which actually can improve bokeh, but causes strange temporal artifacts within the bokeh for fast-moving objects).

BTW, a high-speed video looking at the other end of the camera is interesting too: the lens in a DSLR typically has to stop down to the desired aperture as the mirror is being lifted. In fact, in some cameras that's what's still in progress in the short interval between the mirror being up and the shutter curtain starting the exposure.

Leaf shutters can be anywhere, but they are usually near the aperture (rarely, even double as the aperture) to keep the artifacts to the bokeh issues I mentioned as opposed to vignetting.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2015 at 17:11 UTC
On Canon 7D mirror box filmed at 10,000fps article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

Anastigmat: The reason Canon and Nikon have dominated the professional SLRand DSLR market is their ability to manufacture high speed shutters and mirrors. In contrast, companies like Minolta/Sony, Pentax and Olympus simply could not and cannot equal Canon and Nikon in this area.

Actually, focal-plane shutters are commonly made by companies like Copal (e.g., http://www.nidec-copal.com/02/02.html ) and purchased as modules by Canon, Nikon, Sony, etc.: they're often the exact same mechanisms across many camera brands.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2015 at 15:58 UTC
On Canon 7D mirror box filmed at 10,000fps article (175 comments in total)

Nice video! I think most DSLR users are not aware of the moving slit, which is a cloth curtain that moves left-right in many old SLRs (and why we still call them curtains). The temporal artifacting, nearly identical to electronic rolling shutter, is also something I think many people don't know about. It's also worth mentioning that there is a very different artifacting for leaf shutters used in compact cameras: the iris goes from open to closed and then open again, effectively varying the aperture diameter through the exposure interval (which actually can improve bokeh, but causes strange temporal artifacts within the bokeh for fast-moving objects).

BTW, a high-speed video looking at the other end of the camera is interesting too: the lens in a DSLR typically has to stop down to the desired aperture as the mirror is being lifted. In fact, in some cameras that's what's still in progress in the short interval between the mirror being up and the shutter curtain starting the exposure.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 31, 2015 at 15:39 UTC as 23rd comment | 4 replies
On Still Image Captured In A Video Mode challenge (4 comments in total)

Not so many folks using video as high-framerate still capture... at least not yet?

I'm really surprised. Is it because people don't consider 1080 good enough and don't yet have 4K, or is something else discouraging folks?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2015 at 12:14 UTC as 3rd comment
Total: 680, showing: 141 – 160
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