ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 512, showing: 141 – 160
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In reply to:

ProfHankD: Slow news day? This is two film-only items in a row.... ;-)

At least the IR false color in the previous article makes the foliage red, which I suppose adds to the violent content? Here, as davidrm said below, only image 1 (and the shoes in 14) have that anachronistic flair. In fact, the wet plate processing seems a little sloppy; a newly-processed wet plate shouldn't have yellow splotches -- insufficient fixing? At least I didn't have that problem when I tried homemade emulsions back in the 1970s....

I guess my overall impression of both these stories is sadness that using film, and not using it particularly well, is apparently in itself newsworthy now.

Superior? My darkroom technique was never sloppy, but I was far from the most sophisticated about photochemistry. My dad introduced me to custom emulsions for making plates for offset printing, making nameplates (photos on metal), and circuit-board etching. There were lots of folks doing custom emulsions in the 1970s, and even more who made their own "soups" for processing.

Looking at Keys web site, I will say that DPReview didn't pick the most interesting shots. He has some portraits that have more of an anachronistic feel. Still, there are a lot of photographers doing "old timey" things and this just doesn't feel that newsworthy -- especially for a web site about digital photography.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 1, 2014 at 15:02 UTC

Slow news day? This is two film-only items in a row.... ;-)

At least the IR false color in the previous article makes the foliage red, which I suppose adds to the violent content? Here, as davidrm said below, only image 1 (and the shoes in 14) have that anachronistic flair. In fact, the wet plate processing seems a little sloppy; a newly-processed wet plate shouldn't have yellow splotches -- insufficient fixing? At least I didn't have that problem when I tried homemade emulsions back in the 1970s....

I guess my overall impression of both these stories is sadness that using film, and not using it particularly well, is apparently in itself newsworthy now.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 1, 2014 at 12:21 UTC as 37th comment | 3 replies
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III First Impressions Review preview (2962 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, the IQ for the studio test scene at lower ISOs is virtually identical to the APS-C Sony A3000, but by ISO 800 there's a clear difference favoring the A3000. Still, not bad. I'd rather go with an A6000, which is about the same price as the RX100M III....

The Canon G1 X Mark II does worse than the RX100M III on low ISO (less sharp, but with halos from oversharpening). It's about the same on higher ISOs as the RX100 III, but looks cleaner because it is a lot less "painterly" (less raw color noise, weaker JPEG smoothing).

"And at ISO 800 on the RX you'll be reaching for ISO 3200 on the a6000/a3000 etc with kit lens."

Not a problem. Using the studio test scene above, 3200 on the A3000 is marginally cleaner than 800 on the RX III.

Direct link | Posted on May 30, 2014 at 13:08 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III First Impressions Review preview (2962 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, the IQ for the studio test scene at lower ISOs is virtually identical to the APS-C Sony A3000, but by ISO 800 there's a clear difference favoring the A3000. Still, not bad. I'd rather go with an A6000, which is about the same price as the RX100M III....

The Canon G1 X Mark II does worse than the RX100M III on low ISO (less sharp, but with halos from oversharpening). It's about the same on higher ISOs as the RX100 III, but looks cleaner because it is a lot less "painterly" (less raw color noise, weaker JPEG smoothing).

Well, actually, I have a NEX-5, NEX-7, and A7 with over 130 lenses from 8mm to 500mm... so I think I've got that covered. ;-)

I don't have the 16-50mm, but I don't think it's as bad as people make it out to be. It simply was designed trading raw quality for size, but the corrected JPEGs don't look all that bad. Put another way, I've seen far worse lenses that people say good things about....

Direct link | Posted on May 30, 2014 at 12:16 UTC
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III First Impressions Review preview (2962 comments in total)

Well, the IQ for the studio test scene at lower ISOs is virtually identical to the APS-C Sony A3000, but by ISO 800 there's a clear difference favoring the A3000. Still, not bad. I'd rather go with an A6000, which is about the same price as the RX100M III....

The Canon G1 X Mark II does worse than the RX100M III on low ISO (less sharp, but with halos from oversharpening). It's about the same on higher ISOs as the RX100 III, but looks cleaner because it is a lot less "painterly" (less raw color noise, weaker JPEG smoothing).

Direct link | Posted on May 30, 2014 at 10:57 UTC as 342nd comment | 5 replies
On Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art Lab Test Review preview (566 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Nikon and Sony have higher-resolution sensors (36MP). I think that's more appropriate for testing this type of lens than a 22MP Canon, which it basically outresolves. There are quite a few lenses that do really well at 24MP FF, but this SIgma is one of the few that seems to be ready for 36MP FF and beyond.

Incidentally, undercorrected SA is the standard way to get nice bokeh; it's good to see Sigma getting nice bokeh without the SA most fast 50s deliberately have....

DPReview basically says they can't tell how good the lens is using current Canons because it's sensor limited -- it probably will not be on future Canons, or on a Sony A7R right now. It would be a better test even if nobody would use it on an A7R.

The Sony native lens may well be better than this Sigma. Your argument is essentially that there are enough Canon users suffering Canon's inferior optics so that testing this lens just for them is top priority. That is not an argument I've heard a Canon user give before.... ;-)

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2014 at 12:16 UTC
On Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art Lab Test Review preview (566 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Nikon and Sony have higher-resolution sensors (36MP). I think that's more appropriate for testing this type of lens than a 22MP Canon, which it basically outresolves. There are quite a few lenses that do really well at 24MP FF, but this SIgma is one of the few that seems to be ready for 36MP FF and beyond.

Incidentally, undercorrected SA is the standard way to get nice bokeh; it's good to see Sigma getting nice bokeh without the SA most fast 50s deliberately have....

If the product isn't yet available even as a pre-release to the press, what's the rush to review it? There are lots of worthy bits of equipment that are on the market for 6+ months before DPReview takes a first look. If DPReview didn't want to wait, they could simply have added a quick test of the Canon-mount lens on a Sony A7R (which is a combo plenty of people will care about).

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2014 at 10:31 UTC
On Sigma 50mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art Lab Test Review preview (566 comments in total)

Nikon and Sony have higher-resolution sensors (36MP). I think that's more appropriate for testing this type of lens than a 22MP Canon, which it basically outresolves. There are quite a few lenses that do really well at 24MP FF, but this SIgma is one of the few that seems to be ready for 36MP FF and beyond.

Incidentally, undercorrected SA is the standard way to get nice bokeh; it's good to see Sigma getting nice bokeh without the SA most fast 50s deliberately have....

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2014 at 04:03 UTC as 60th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, Facebook is known for enticing people to post inappropriate things... now we known they hire people who do that kind of thing. ;-)

Seriously, this doesn't speak well of Facebook nor of UC Berkeley, and I wouldn't be surprised if either or both took action against Chen. I also can see the potential for a multitude of legal actions (civil damages suits) against Chen -- he explicitly advocated and facilitated theft, and gave examples of things he stole. The shocker is I don't see anything suggesting that Chen appreciates the seriousness of this, or even openly regrets having done it.

Most photographer web preview sites require a password and that's normally issued as part of a contractual agreement. Using the site in ways not permitted by that contract I believe qualifies as theft of services (not copyright violation) resulting in a fairly obvious loss of income for the photographer. To my non-lawyer ears, that sounds like a valid basis for a civil suit. No?

Honestly, I'm particularly offended by Chen's actions because I am an engineering professor. This is not how we, ACM, and IEEE, teach and expect engineers to behave.

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2014 at 03:37 UTC

Well, Facebook is known for enticing people to post inappropriate things... now we known they hire people who do that kind of thing. ;-)

Seriously, this doesn't speak well of Facebook nor of UC Berkeley, and I wouldn't be surprised if either or both took action against Chen. I also can see the potential for a multitude of legal actions (civil damages suits) against Chen -- he explicitly advocated and facilitated theft, and gave examples of things he stole. The shocker is I don't see anything suggesting that Chen appreciates the seriousness of this, or even openly regrets having done it.

Direct link | Posted on May 29, 2014 at 00:15 UTC as 99th comment | 7 replies
On HTC One M8 Camera Review post (53 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Having a separate depth sensor means there are alignment issues, which are not helped by lower resolution. It would be interesting to see if the depth sensor could be used to stitch actual 3D models more accurately, but the simulated DoF effect looks too crude to be of much use -- at least for now. Obviously, shallow DoF "like professional cameras give" is what every tiny camera wants to fake this year....

No, I'm not talking stereo pairs or single-view depth maps -- I'm talking about stitching true 3D solid models, like we use to drive 3D printers. There's a lot of tech for this, but I suspect there would be a healthy niche market for a phone directly spitting-out a printable model.

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2014 at 21:24 UTC
On HTC One M8 Camera Review post (53 comments in total)

Having a separate depth sensor means there are alignment issues, which are not helped by lower resolution. It would be interesting to see if the depth sensor could be used to stitch actual 3D models more accurately, but the simulated DoF effect looks too crude to be of much use -- at least for now. Obviously, shallow DoF "like professional cameras give" is what every tiny camera wants to fake this year....

Direct link | Posted on May 28, 2014 at 13:25 UTC as 12th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Elandreth: This is a bit confusing. As others have noted, there's subject motion between the individual shots of each scene. The description says 30,000 photographs were taken for this video. Even if each scene is composed of 50 photographs, that would still be 600 scenes, which is far more than appear in this video. So were the cameras shooting bursts at each scene?

As part of the post work done here, it says the photographs had to be slowed down and stabilized. Umm... what? How do you slow down a photograph, or stabilize one that's already been taken? Were these phones shooting images or video? There's an audio component to each scene, so perhaps they were actually shooting short video clips?

Is the twitching a timing error or a stitch error? (Normally, one interpolates between camera positions for this type of sequence.) Whatever the problem is, the video is an interesting effect, just not particularly well implemented. Much cheaper and easier to get high-precision sync using Canon PowerShots under CHDK, but then Microsoft probably wouldn't have helped. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on May 24, 2014 at 11:12 UTC
In reply to:

Kevin Sutton: I'm a chemist by training and this doesn't make much sense to me. Fluorine is a gas so do they mean that fluorine gas has been passed over the glass to make a fluoride-glass in situ? I'm assuming that the fluoride-glass is the hydrophobic material they are talking about??? Cheers Kevin

Yeah, "fluorine" obviously can't be more than a few atoms in the molecular formula of the coating, but the photographic industry has been touting fluoride glass for decades. I'm guessing this is really a heavy-metal fluoride glass, although those generally are known for their LACK of durability and resistance to water... so maybe Nikon has some secret sauce?

Impressive video anyway....

Direct link | Posted on May 23, 2014 at 11:01 UTC
In reply to:

Artistico: The Met states that the images are public domain - in fact they even point it out that that is what they believe.

As far as I can tell they therefore cannot legally prevent anyone else from making money from them. They have no copyright protection (Bridgeman Art Library v. Corel Corp), no database protection or sweat-of-brow protection (Feist Publications v. Rural Telephone Service). As long as the images are faithful reproductions, no new copyright exists.

What they could claim, though, is that by using their image database you are signatory to a contract stating that you cannot use them for commercial purposes. If this is in small print and not something you are forced to look at or acknowledge when entering the database, however, that would not really work either - and in any case, they cannot claim for more than breach of contract, not for breach of copyright. Since there is no money involved in the contract, I can't see how that would be legally feasible.

Many of the works I checked out were NOT PD... and they only have 394,253 total, not 400,000. ;-)

Seriously, this is a huge and wonderful resource for scholarly use and greatly broadens the impact of their collections. My concern is that people will now be able to "take the Met out of the loop" in dealing with key images, for example, all those WWW sites that sell big prints suddenly got some vastly superior things to print potentially without ever giving reference to the Met. The problem with that is that there is no "suggested donation" box attached to such uses as there is for access to view the PD things live, and the Met needs money to maintain and expand its collections. Perhaps the Met figures reaching a larger audience and the collection of email addresses will make up for that? I hope they're right.

BTW, most paintings are somewhat 3D and capture of a depth map along with a (sometimes multispectral) 2D image is becoming common in scholarly archiving... still not a new work.

Direct link | Posted on May 22, 2014 at 11:53 UTC
On Flickering fireflies in time-lapse article (35 comments in total)

Excellent work!

Really a great way to demo the various techniques, most of which are normally used for astrophotography. As impressive as the close-ups are, I don't think they fit-in as well... the transition is too abrupt. The write-up on the WWW site ties things together better.

Direct link | Posted on May 17, 2014 at 13:06 UTC as 18th comment
In reply to:

photoholiko: Just curious, does anybody really use f2.8 on a 300? to me that's a big price to pay for one f stop.

This is a 400mm f/2.8 (or 560mm f/4 with 1.4X converter).

If you want to get really far reach, imagine this on a little crop sensor... such as in a Nikon 1. ;-)

Just a pitty this lens has 2 more digits in its price tag than I'm likely to spend for a 400mm. Ok, it's actually 3 more digits than I spent for any of my current 400mm lenses....

Direct link | Posted on May 14, 2014 at 11:39 UTC
On Canon USA brings white EOS Rebel SL1 to America article (119 comments in total)

DPReview posts this as a separate item when even Canon's own press release just made it two sentences stuck at the end of the announcement of two lenses. Getting desperate for Canon to do something interesting in a body, are we?

PS: This also makes the claim that this is the "smallest and lightest digital SLR camera" -- to which footnote 1 adds the rather important qualifier "which use APS-C size equivalent sensors." Of course, Canon doesn't use standard-sized APS-C sensors, but slightly smaller ones. Arguably, smaller by about the same ratio as this body is. At least "Canon's research" specifying DSLR eliminates all the much smaller mirrorless cameras with actual APS-C sensors.... ;-)

Direct link | Posted on May 13, 2014 at 09:47 UTC as 54th comment
In reply to:

chiane: Why are all the 3rd party fast lenses manual focus?

A few more words: the electronics/mechanicals for AF and body control of aperture differ widely for different mounts, and most are not open specifications (i.e., must be reverse engineered with potentially undiscovered incompatabilities, as Sigma has found too late several times). Thus, fully manual is the best way to ensure usability on a wide range of mounts. Construction is also much simpler and potentially more precise, offering better optical performance as well as cost savings.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2014 at 14:19 UTC
On A travel-sized large-format 4x5 camera? article (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

steveh0607: At last, a true full frame camera! Now we don't have to suffer the poor depth of field the 35mm offers.

Yeah, they come much bigger than that. Biggest I've used was a 30x40" that had a vacuum back to hold the film really flat. Not very portable -- it weighed a couple of tons and was intended for making halftones, etc., for printing or making nameplates. Sadly, it ended-up being cut into pieces because the room it was in had been built around it, and there was no other way to get it out.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2014 at 11:33 UTC
Total: 512, showing: 141 – 160
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