ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 982, showing: 141 – 160
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On article Retro through-and-through: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review (2472 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Once again, Fuji has built a desirable, yet overpriced (and oversized), APS-C camera that could be mistaken for a Leica that somehow lost its red dot. I think the DR mode 100%, 200%, and 400% concept is very nice, and something Sony should really put into their cameras in some form -- I'm in favor of anything that gives independent control of the analog and digital components of ISO settings.

tesilab: I love DRO, but that's completely unrelated. DRO is basically localized shadow enhancement, while the DR mode on this Fuji is apparently directly allowing a deliberately underexposed (lower analog gain) raw to be mapped into a nice (higher digital gain) JPEG in camera. In fact, this is something Jim Kasson and I had a couple of forum posts about just yesterday -- the possibility of creating a Sony camera app to offer separate control of analog and digital ISO components. I have done things like this using CHDK in Canon PowerShots....

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 23:59 UTC
On article Retro through-and-through: Fujifilm X-Pro2 Review (2472 comments in total)

Once again, Fuji has built a desirable, yet overpriced (and oversized), APS-C camera that could be mistaken for a Leica that somehow lost its red dot. I think the DR mode 100%, 200%, and 400% concept is very nice, and something Sony should really put into their cameras in some form -- I'm in favor of anything that gives independent control of the analog and digital components of ISO settings.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2016 at 16:01 UTC as 326th comment | 10 replies
On article Otherworldly? Lomography introduces Jupiter 3+ lens (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

HB1969: There seem to be a few of these "new-old lenses" about. It's not just the Petzval and now Jupiter 3...there's the Helios-40 (85mm f/1.5) which is back in production and a kickstarter to get Meyer-Optik-Gorlitz Trioplan (100mm f/2.8) back. Interesting time in manual focus photography.

Samyang is definitely the closest, with a spread of cool, yet cheap, lenses. However, they're still much more conservative than Spiratone was... no really wacko toys (yet). I'd encourage Samyang to be more wild, but I certainly understand that there is risk in that because it would make some people take them less seriously. Spiratone somehow managed to be both lunatic fringe and respected by professionals at the same time....

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 15:10 UTC
On article Otherworldly? Lomography introduces Jupiter 3+ lens (163 comments in total)
In reply to:

HB1969: There seem to be a few of these "new-old lenses" about. It's not just the Petzval and now Jupiter 3...there's the Helios-40 (85mm f/1.5) which is back in production and a kickstarter to get Meyer-Optik-Gorlitz Trioplan (100mm f/2.8) back. Interesting time in manual focus photography.

I think EVF focus peaking has made manual focus arguably better than AF for most uses, and I own over 140 old lenses, but I don't think expensive modern lenses that mimic obvious optical defects from old lenses are inherently interesting. There are some interesting ultra-fast lenses now, but who is going to be broadly innovative and cheap, i.e. fun? Put another way, I really miss Spiratone....

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2016 at 05:02 UTC

It's a crappy design patent... slow news day, is it? ;-)

Link | Posted on Jan 14, 2016 at 05:11 UTC as 23rd comment
On article Kodak revives Super 8 with part-digital cine camera (367 comments in total)

$50 for 2.5 minutes... that should keep home movies limited to tolerable durations. ;-)

Honestly, the only good thing about this is that it probably means there will be more modern support for dealing with old Super 8mm movies -- like the ones so many of us have sitting around waiting to be digitized.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2016 at 05:31 UTC as 137th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Nice looking set of features... except the price! $2K for an APS-C body and $6.5K for FF? I get that these are "flagship" products, but those are prices that only make sense for folks who upgrade once every six years.

The problem is that I don't think we're at a stable-for-6-years point on the technology curve. Actually, I'm sure we're not.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 12:16 UTC

Nice looking set of features... except the price! $2K for an APS-C body and $6.5K for FF? I get that these are "flagship" products, but those are prices that only make sense for folks who upgrade once every six years.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 11:35 UTC as 52nd comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Troutguy: will I be able to use the tilt screen underwater? Ive been waiting for a cam like that.

Yes, just like on the TG-860... which is a really nice feature.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 03:12 UTC

I love the 21mm equiv. and the flip-out display is really useful for this type of camera, but the IQ of my TG-860 is a bit disappointing... and this is probably the same. They need to get a bigger sensor in there.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 03:11 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies
On article Opinion: Pour one out for Samsung cameras (324 comments in total)

Samsung isn't in the business of being #2, and Sony's response to the 28MP APS-C BSI sensor was, well, stuff that reaffirmed Sony as clearly #1. Samsung still has plenty of the camera market for cameras in other things (smart____ where you can fill the blank with just about any thing). I suspect that we'll either see Samsung quietly fade from the high-end consumer camera market or burst out within the next year with something truly awesome. It's just getting very hard to be more awesome than Sony's sensors lately....

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 02:54 UTC as 74th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Matsu: The big news items here are the sensor development partner and the sensor size. There isn't really much if any true medium format digital available in the marketplace, at any price. I believe DALSA makes a Leaf digital back sensor of the same size, 53.7 x 40.4mm. Lets call it close enough, though I was always taught that 645 film was about 56x42mm, I think perhaps there was some variation between cameras on the width, and that when the frame lines are accounted for, then a sensor of approx 54x40 may be close enough to call "full frame medium format 645.)

As with any system, the lenses matter, and having the right FOV will help the folks who use these things - and carry over an inventory of 645 lenses.

Hassleblads "double frame" is smaller than medium format, as are Pentax and Leica's 44x33 and 45x30 "medium format. These latter two are "only about 1.6X larger than 135 format.

Now if someone wants to put this into a Fuji or Mamiya rangefinder sized rig for 6-10K, hmmm...

"Do we really need "real" digital medium format?"

Yes, we do. In fact, we need large format digital. It's just that very few of us need it right now and can pay for it now. Remember that photography itself is a very young technology and digital photography is still in its infancy... larger sensors are among the things that physics makes inevitable. BTW, for some time I've been working toward a 500MP 4x5 sensor capable of HDR at the equivalent of over 1000FPS; this sort of thing WILL HAPPEN, even if the approach in my research isn't the way it happens. Don't ask me when such technology will get cheap, but this Sony sensor is a big step.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2016 at 16:30 UTC
In reply to:

Androole: RAW really is a giant advantage for any camera that is going to be used underwater. It's so critical to be able to adjust colours and WB without causing massive artifacting. Not to mention control over the (always too heavy) noise reduction.

I have a TG-850 purchased for fun and snorkelling, but RAW is a big step up.

I agree that I'd love to see a waterproof cam with a larger sensor. Even a fixed 24mm equivalent 1" would be an awesome companion for any outdoor fun.

I use a NEX-7 or A7II most often, but I have an Olympus Stylus Tough TG-860 (love the 21mm equiv. and flip-up screen), Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS2, and an Olympus Stylus 1030 SW. No raw on the ruggeds... but it honestly wouldn't help much. These cameras have built-in modes that can pretty much get what little the sensor has to offer, it's just a matter of paying a little attention to which of the myriad modes you have enabled.

Raw formats were a much bigger deal for low-end cameras when in-camera processing was compute-power-limited, but things have changed. For that matter, the DR of these sensors really isn't much beyond the 9EV or so that JPEG can easily encode (this is even true of the Canon PowerShots I use with CHDK). In sum, I think it's time for a cheap large-sensor (e.g., APS-C) compact rugged camera to really improve IQ: something with at least 12EV raw DR. It doesn't need a lot of pixels nor a very fancy lens.

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2015 at 22:45 UTC
On article Adapted Lens Talk: Readers' Showcase and new forum! (196 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I use over 140 non-native lenses with my Sonys (and an EOS-M), and I post plenty in various forums here... but there are a couple of problems with this new forum. Basically, it tends toward lens reviews, but:

1. It isn't structured (nor indexed) in a way that makes lenses easy to find.

2. There is a huge difference between using a lens on different formats (e.g., 24MP APS-C vs. 24MP FF) and there is no infrastructure for saying what evaluations are based on.

For example, Dyxum has a much more effective structure for user lens reviews (except they don't make posting sample images easy).

I'm not opposed to this new forum, and I post there myself, but I would encourage DPReview to consider making some custom infrastructure for handing user reviews of old lenses. It should be possible to modify the existing equipment review infrastructure to have the right fields and indexing and to allow review of legacy equipment.... Just something to think about. ;-)

I was referring to the USER equipment review infrastructure, not the staff-conducted reviews....

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2015 at 14:40 UTC
On article Adapted Lens Talk: Readers' Showcase and new forum! (196 comments in total)

I use over 140 non-native lenses with my Sonys (and an EOS-M), and I post plenty in various forums here... but there are a couple of problems with this new forum. Basically, it tends toward lens reviews, but:

1. It isn't structured (nor indexed) in a way that makes lenses easy to find.

2. There is a huge difference between using a lens on different formats (e.g., 24MP APS-C vs. 24MP FF) and there is no infrastructure for saying what evaluations are based on.

For example, Dyxum has a much more effective structure for user lens reviews (except they don't make posting sample images easy).

I'm not opposed to this new forum, and I post there myself, but I would encourage DPReview to consider making some custom infrastructure for handing user reviews of old lenses. It should be possible to modify the existing equipment review infrastructure to have the right fields and indexing and to allow review of legacy equipment.... Just something to think about. ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2015 at 13:49 UTC as 26th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I'm a big believer in smooth apodization (as opposed to the sink-strainer things Fuji is historically known for). It actually works to give good bokeh, as opposed to all the other tricks (like undercorrected SA). It also slightly enhances sharpness in focus (by reducing contribution from outer rays that generally suffer more aberrations and avoiding diffraction artifacts from blade edges).

However, I think the Minolta/Sony 135mm STF is still king. The annoying thing is that the 135mm STF is a manual-focus A-mount lens because A-mount does not do CDAF. I don't know why Sony hasn't made a CDAF E-mount version, but I'd think it would be worthwhile for the bragging rights alone...?

Anyway, you can make your own apodization filter for most lenses (although it is a bit trickier than one would guess) and you also can synthesize STF by varying the aperture in a multiple exposure (as Minolta did in the Maxxum 7).

The EBC Fujinon.SF 85mm 1:4 (presumably T/4) has a very similar sink strainer aperture to the Imagon, but with less open area in the center. A discussion of this, including photos of the aperture pattern and discussion of homemade ones, is at:
http://forum.mflenses.com/viewtopic.php?t=14535&sid=76ffd780d7b0a4f0eea3bf599020a03a

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2015 at 19:20 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I'm a big believer in smooth apodization (as opposed to the sink-strainer things Fuji is historically known for). It actually works to give good bokeh, as opposed to all the other tricks (like undercorrected SA). It also slightly enhances sharpness in focus (by reducing contribution from outer rays that generally suffer more aberrations and avoiding diffraction artifacts from blade edges).

However, I think the Minolta/Sony 135mm STF is still king. The annoying thing is that the 135mm STF is a manual-focus A-mount lens because A-mount does not do CDAF. I don't know why Sony hasn't made a CDAF E-mount version, but I'd think it would be worthwhile for the bragging rights alone...?

Anyway, you can make your own apodization filter for most lenses (although it is a bit trickier than one would guess) and you also can synthesize STF by varying the aperture in a multiple exposure (as Minolta did in the Maxxum 7).

A note about apodization functions:

The reason the 135mm STF does a little better, even ignoring focal length, is that it apparently has a stronger apodization filter. The STF is f/2.8 and T/4.5, while this is f/1.2 and T/1.7 -- that's less than a stop of shading. However, making bokeh appear smooth is mostly about removing the bright ring edge of the OOF PSF, which shading just the extreme edge of the aperture is sufficient to do. The STF's apodization makes the OOF PSF brightness a spherical section, whereas this Fuji seems to have a much stronger gradient at the edges with a clear center -- but I haven't found anything giving the function for the Fuji. Incidentally, supposedly a Gaussian gradient is what people would really like, but in fact such an apodization function falls off too sharply, and does not produce as pleasing bokeh.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2015 at 15:34 UTC

I'm a big believer in smooth apodization (as opposed to the sink-strainer things Fuji is historically known for). It actually works to give good bokeh, as opposed to all the other tricks (like undercorrected SA). It also slightly enhances sharpness in focus (by reducing contribution from outer rays that generally suffer more aberrations and avoiding diffraction artifacts from blade edges).

However, I think the Minolta/Sony 135mm STF is still king. The annoying thing is that the 135mm STF is a manual-focus A-mount lens because A-mount does not do CDAF. I don't know why Sony hasn't made a CDAF E-mount version, but I'd think it would be worthwhile for the bragging rights alone...?

Anyway, you can make your own apodization filter for most lenses (although it is a bit trickier than one would guess) and you also can synthesize STF by varying the aperture in a multiple exposure (as Minolta did in the Maxxum 7).

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2015 at 21:13 UTC as 20th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

T3: Good to see at least one camera company understands that we live in the smartphone age where apps are common and handy. One reason why so many people love taking photos on smartphones is because you can open up your favorite photo editing app and do all kinds of things to your photos without having to offload it to some other device first. I think more cameras should also be able to run apps.

Well, I use CHDK (and sometimes ML) -- that allows me to put my own compiled native code in (unfortunately, only) Canon cameras. The Android interface is slower and more limited, but more secure.

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2015 at 18:39 UTC
On article Merry Christmas II you: RX1R II sample gallery updated (138 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Doesn't this have the usual Sony DRO modes? The gallery seems to be chock full of slightly-to-wide-DR images rendered as blown JPEGs paired with their reprocessed raws, but in truth I suspect that the in-camera DRO could actually have done at least as well (and maybe better) producing the JPEGs with zero hassle. I get that it's nice to show what can be done with raw processing, but it is good not to forget that the camera itself also has options to automatically take advantage of the same great raw DR.

Marty4650: Was that reply to me? Don't think so.... I was simply pointing out that DPReview is going out of their way to do with raw postprocessing something the same camera can do internally.

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2015 at 18:36 UTC
Total: 982, showing: 141 – 160
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