ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 510, showing: 81 – 100
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On Rain shot in the I'm shooting in the rain challenge (1 comment in total)

This appears to be a duplicate entry. Beyond that, neither one seems compliant with the rules: "shots taken in heavy rain or spray that caused VISIBLE DROPLETS on your lens."

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2014 at 12:24 UTC as 1st comment
On Kodak 760H in the Carousel challenge (3 comments in total)

Voting again reveals that clever isn't appreciated by most DPReviewers....

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2014 at 12:08 UTC as 1st comment
On I'm shooting in the rain challenge (2 comments in total)

Many of the entries here do not show obvious signs of "VISIBLE DROPLETS on your lens," which is what this challenge is supposed to be about. Admittedly, there may be a fine line between droplets visible in the photo and droplets on your lens. Thus, I will not disqualify entries that appear to have been made in good faith.

Voting should strongly favor entries that clearly have droplets visibly present in the optical path, degrading the optical quality by blurring, obstructing, or distorting portions of the image. Just having droplets in a scene captured with an optically unimpaired lens isn't what this challenge is about.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 19:18 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

Juraj Lacko: It would be so much more appealing to me if it was made in m42 mount since that is easy to adapt with cheap adapter almost to any system.

What auto exposure feature? It's an unchipped manual lens, right? You enable the poorly-named "shoot without lens" option on your body, and maybe use a chipped adapter (e.g., to enable IBIS in Sony A-mount bodies), and it works fine... pretty much no matter what mount it natively was. Sony E/FE bodies even allow the fancy multi-shot modes to work with fully manual unchipped lenses. The only problem: no EXIF data.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2014 at 15:20 UTC
In reply to:

Juraj Lacko: It would be so much more appealing to me if it was made in m42 mount since that is easy to adapt with cheap adapter almost to any system.

I'm a Sony E/FE mount user too (with a fleet of commercial adapters + ones I've designed and 3D printed myself), but I still have A-mount bodies and sometimes use a wide range of different cameras in my research. As such, I usually get this kind of thing in A mount, but it would be much more useful in M42 or T.... After all, the fact that there's a Nikon version says the glass has a large enough distance to the sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2014 at 13:30 UTC
In reply to:

Juraj Lacko: It would be so much more appealing to me if it was made in m42 mount since that is easy to adapt with cheap adapter almost to any system.

Yes! I don't know why manufacturers keep insisting on making fully manual lenses in fixed mounts. M42 would work for everything but Nikon; a T thread would be even better because it would work on everything and T adapters allow rotational adjustment. There isn't some stupid old patent preventing Ts, is there?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2014 at 10:34 UTC
On Fujifilm X30 First Impressions Review preview (453 comments in total)

Hmm. 4 articles to announce one X30 camera. That's a DPReview record. Is the Fuji mark-up at GearShop that high? ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 16:40 UTC as 79th comment | 6 replies
On Fujifilm X30 First Impressions Review preview (453 comments in total)
In reply to:

veroman: I have yet to find any reason to go beyond my X10. The X10 gives me exceptional IQ in a wide range of environments and conditions and provides the best JPEGs of any camera I've owned so far, including my bigger Olympus E-bodies.

The X30 is almost certainly for newcomers and not X10/X20 owners like myself.

As the latest model in the series, I guess it fills the bill. But I don't see it as a worthwhile improvement over the older versions. I'm not even sure a 1" sensor would have made all that much difference. The X10 really does produce some remarkable imagery.

The X10 is a very appealing package, but, having studied it a lot (I'm the author of DeOrbIt), IQ never was a great reason to buy an X10 over competing cameras. The innovative sensor design and processing were both alpha-test quality rather than tuned products.

Hopefully, the X30 will deliver somewhat better IQ without alienating fans of the X10 look and feel. I have doubts about how many new buyers Fuji will pick up with the X30, but the EVF should draw some....

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 14:16 UTC
On Hasselblad unveils pixel-shifting 200MP H5D-200c MS article (248 comments in total)
In reply to:

marcio_napoli: For those saying the price is absurd:

I'm a really, really small fish as a fashion photographer, I can't charge not even a fraction of what this camera cost.

But I've once heard that a big name, national level fashion photographer, charged 60 K for a fashion catalog.

There's another big name I can think of, that shoot bedding and product photography.

His average price is around 30, 40 k per job! I've once heard he charged 95 grand for a larger job.

See? That's where these cameras are finding homes.

For big name photographers, who have their huge reputation tested job after job, nothing makes more sense than a Hasselblad and Phase One.

3 k DSLRs like the D800 only complement their kit for specific needs (higher ISO, more flexibility, need for weather sealing on a beach shooting), and are not their main camera.

Phase and Hassel are their average DSLR.

I know of quite a few research, museum archive, and industrial projects where $50K for a camera would be a non-issue. In fact, it would be expected and easily within budget. PS: don't ask what some people are willing to spend on lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 24, 2014 at 18:45 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Http://raw.pics.io looks like a pretty vanilla raw converter, but it did match the camera JPEG colors for a test Sony A7 raw better than most raw converters... not that the camera JPEG colors were right. ;-)

I also didn't see any adjustments, which are the main reason to use raw....

What? Go to http://www.cybercom.net/~dcoffin/dcraw/ -- Dave Coffin's code for nearly all raw formats is open source (not the latest Foveon support) and is how most raw converters extract the raw image data.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2014 at 20:00 UTC
On At the Corner of the Field in the APS-C lens on FF body challenge (2 comments in total)

This isn't the full 3:2 aspect ratio of the A7 sensor, so it technically violates the rules that you are not supposed to crop. However, the A7 does have a 16:9 aspect mode that still uses the full sensor width and isn't phrased as a crop, so I can see arguing that it is still in the spirit of the challenge and will not disqualify it.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2014 at 16:49 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Http://raw.pics.io looks like a pretty vanilla raw converter, but it did match the camera JPEG colors for a test Sony A7 raw better than most raw converters... not that the camera JPEG colors were right. ;-)

I also didn't see any adjustments, which are the main reason to use raw....

Wow, that would explain it and be deplorable. I've often used JPEGs as color balance references for raw conversion, but just extracting a JPEG preview would be very slimey indeed.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2014 at 16:05 UTC

Http://raw.pics.io looks like a pretty vanilla raw converter, but it did match the camera JPEG colors for a test Sony A7 raw better than most raw converters... not that the camera JPEG colors were right. ;-)

I also didn't see any adjustments, which are the main reason to use raw....

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2014 at 12:37 UTC as 13th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Ceus: One problem is that the images can not be converted and saved as TIFF files, neither does the software recognize this format. I always save my images as TIFF after processing my RAW files.

TIFF is a tagged file format spec, not an image encoding. Usually, people mean uncompressed 24BPP RGB encoding when they say TIFF, but TIFF can wrap a JPEG and even DNG images are in a TIFF wrapper. I think the preferred encoding for 24BPP RGB would be PNG, which has lossless compression and is understood by most image handling software. Lossless JPEG 2000 and various cinema-oriented formats would be even better, but few software packages support them.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2014 at 12:13 UTC
On Hasselblad unveils pixel-shifting 200MP H5D-200c MS article (248 comments in total)

Ok, this theoretically makes perfect sense... BUT how hard is it to hold the camera so still that the image isn't shifted between shots by amounts that are very significant compared to 5.3/2 microns? With a fully electronic shutter, maybe... and a leaf shutter should be better than focal plane... but from experience I know it is darn hard to get a camera and lens assembly bolted to a block of concrete to have that little motion between shots....

I would think a better approach would be to treat this by computationally aligning a bunch of images, assuming unknown movement, for standard superresolution processing. No?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2014 at 22:11 UTC as 40th comment | 2 replies
On Kodak 760H in the Carousel challenge (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

Buzz Lightyear: Clever. Thanks for the chuckle.

I've been digitizing old slides for a few weeks now, so guess what my first thought was when I read "Carousel?" ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2014 at 21:04 UTC
On Sony a7S used to shoot Chevrolet commercial article (278 comments in total)

When I first saw this (which was last week) my immediate reaction was "how do I get to the camera controls?" Notice there isn't even any way to look at the camera's EVF or LCD, so you'd be viewing on an external monitor not shown in the above.... This is pretty much how DSLRs are packaged as capture backs for movie industry users, although the A7S isn't exactly a DSLR.

Cinoflex was pretty clear that use of the A7S here is about the sensor size (for lens effects), DR, and high ISOs -- 2/3 of which are currently unique properties of the A7S for video capture....

Direct link | Posted on Aug 21, 2014 at 11:16 UTC as 46th comment
On Accessory Review: Drobo Mini RAID article (149 comments in total)

I assume the Drobo is using RAID 6 encoding of the data; that's how my home Synology is configured (five 4TB drives able to withstand any 2 failing). It is a standard encoding, so even if the housing failed, I can recover all data by simply mounting the remaining drives on a PC under Linux. All good.

The $419 cost of the Drobo without drives would easily buy three 2TB external laptop drives that you could use with simple software mirroring to give similar fault tolerance -- but the ability to put the separate drives and controllers in different bags when traveling greatly decreases the probability of PHYSICAL damage or loss.

I'm reminded of a research presentation I gave to a General many years ago about a fault-tolerant computer system. At the end, he said I hadn't discussed relevant fault tolerance at all and asked "if I take my gun and shoot it, is there any path through it that will make it fail?" He was right.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 11:11 UTC as 58th comment

Nice bit of tech from MSR (research, not a product group). Over the last decade, there's been a lot of work reconstructing 3D models from video, and lots of work computationally stabilizing video, but this creation of timelapse videos puts the two together in a way I haven't seen before.

Usually, one crops to an image portion for which there is complete data for stabilized video. This sequence instead seems to fill-in with low-quality portions of the 3D model, which seems to work much better for the huge viewpoint changes that happen in timelapse....

Direct link | Posted on Aug 12, 2014 at 10:44 UTC as 35th comment
On Apple expands OS X Mavericks Raw compatibility article (86 comments in total)
In reply to:

xpanded: Sigma DP1 Merrill
Sigma DP2 Merrill
Sigma DP3 Merrill
Sigma SD1 Merrill
Sigma DP2 Quattro

Now that is strange. Why have they omitted them?!

I agree that camera makers should make more details public, but Dave Coffin has been on a one-man-mission to make the world safe for raw shooters, and basic support is simply a matter of looking at dcraw. Incidentally, although dcraw source code has long been free for all uses, the latest Foveon support isn't, so perhaps Apple simply refuses to deal with Dave?

I still think the general problem here is that companies like Apple are not really worried about being compatible with everybody -- in fact, they have often been deliberately incompatible and used that for leverage of various kinds. As I mentioned above, the Foveon sensors and Fuji X10 also both have IQ issues that could bring Apple more complaints (and bad press) than simply leaving them unsupported.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 10, 2014 at 12:25 UTC
Total: 510, showing: 81 – 100
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