ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 405, showing: 81 – 100
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On Sony Australia releases a3500 with new kit lens article (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

peevee1: Wait, wasn't A3000+18-55/3.5-5.6 going for like $279? How low are they aiming this thing?

"How low are they aiming this thing?"

That is the correct question. My guess is that the A3000 was close to being a loss and that this is more sustainably hitting the same or a slightly lower price point. I also suspect that the new lens (after in-camera corrections) might be a bit more suitable for the 20MP sensor. Not exciting overall, but a very good entry-level camera....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 25, 2014 at 13:12 UTC
On Kodak reborn: A look at JK Imaging's 2014 lineup article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Nothing wrong. These could be sold at Walmart level retailer. Obviously, the modern digital cameras share internal components making 3rd party "break-throughs" possible.

Agreed: these are destined to be in plastic bubbles in *mart stores... and there is nothing wrong with that. They're a big step up from the usual cheapies, and the Kodak name will get them a second look even if they are a little pricier than the usual bubble-packed cameras. Of course, this means that there will be yet another player in the shrinking "midrange camera" market, and profit margins will probably drop for all.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 21, 2014 at 22:23 UTC
On 900MP portraits show human face in extreme detail article (289 comments in total)

The only catch is that 900MP isn't much of a trick anymore. There are gigapixel cameras using arrays and I'm working on a 500MP sensor (which is 4x5 format).

Incidentally, a robot arm is overkill for this. Higher accuracy at a much lower cost could have been had using either a simple 2-axis motion control mounted vertically (for perpendicular stitching, which appears to be what was done here) or a pan/tilt mount (I've used cheap Meade telescope mounts for single point of view stitches).

That said, I am impressed at the relative lack of stitch artifacts. I would have thought there would be more from subject motion (especially given that he seems to have used a raster scan order), but I guess skin texture and out-of-focus areas hide minor stitch errors pretty well....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2014 at 10:50 UTC as 73rd comment | 1 reply
On Hungarian law bans photos taken without consent article (325 comments in total)

Clearly, this is a political ploy, not actually about photography.

In addition to bothering photographers, I assume this essentially constitutes a total ban on dash and outdoor-facing surveillance cameras....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 19:10 UTC as 121st comment

Exciting? Manual input is more of a pain for this sort of thing....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 14:01 UTC as 16th comment
On Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary article (597 comments in total)

I think every camera maker has decided that a $1200 price point for a mid-size-sensor camera is high enough to be taken seriously, but not high enough to drive buyers away. I think they're wrong, especially without the EVF. I think any price between $1K and $2K gets about the same consumer reaction (too expensive to get on a whim), and full-frame cameras in that range will look like a better deal.

That said, this is a very neat little feature set Nikon's developing, and bringing that to lower-priced models in the future has real potential to get the Nikon 1 line some serious respect. Hopefully, the pricing is high now to cover development cost and will come down fast.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 14:11 UTC as 137th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

whtchocla7e: "... the first camera to break the 100-point barrier isn't a full frame model from Nikon or Sony ..."

Subtle Canon diss, haha.

It has been a long time since Canon made a sensor that earned DxO's respect. Of course, the most DxO-praise-worthy Nikon cameras have sensors made by Sony. I wonder who made the sensor in this Red?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 3, 2014 at 20:19 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I have some sympathy for Nikon in that this problem may well trace to a quality control problem with a part they didn't make (e.g., the shutter mechanism) -- it's probably a supplier problem. However, they're still dancing around it, not admitting there is anything in particular wrong in an advisory that seems to have been worded by their legal department... and even this didn't happen until well after Nikon had a follow-on product on the market (the D610).

No, I'm not saying Nikon is behaving appropriately at all. What I'm saying is I don't necessarily blame Nikon for having such a fault in the D600 in the first place, but their handling of it has been very disappointing (and disturbingly typical of many companies these days). Truth is, this is a potentially very expensive problem for Nikon to fix, and the odds are that failure to fix it will not result in as much expense via lawsuits (which is incidentally different for cars, and explains why car companies are usually better about recalls).

Nikon probably will lose some customers, but brand loyalty runs deep in photography -- especially with folks who have other Nikon bodies and a bunch of lenses. Ironically, I wouldn't be surprised if Nikon made as much money from loyal customers upgrading away from D600 problems early as they lost by people moving to other brands. :-(

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 17:29 UTC

I have some sympathy for Nikon in that this problem may well trace to a quality control problem with a part they didn't make (e.g., the shutter mechanism) -- it's probably a supplier problem. However, they're still dancing around it, not admitting there is anything in particular wrong in an advisory that seems to have been worded by their legal department... and even this didn't happen until well after Nikon had a follow-on product on the market (the D610).

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 12:49 UTC as 108th comment | 2 replies
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (1047 comments in total)
In reply to:

Henry M. Hertz: i say that´s a disappointment.

this camera does not not beat the "old" 1D X.
or do you really think ISO 400k is usable for anything than 100 pixel facebook images? LOL

but it´s good to see that nikon now has gigabit ethernet.
studio shooter will love it.

overall sure a nice camera but nothing impressing on this update.
it´s like a new rebel from canon. marginal improvements......

ps: the smallish viewfinder (compared to the 1DX) is something i would hate.
VF can´t be big enough.

Quantum efficiency of sensors is already quite good. The problem with ISO 400K is photon shot noise -- there is simply too much statistical variation in photon emission rate to accurately sample the scene with so few photons. You need more photons. It's time to focus on methods for in-camera stacking to combine many noisy high-ISO captures with intelligent compensation for motion, thereby computationally reconstructing the scene.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 12:15 UTC
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (1047 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stan Krute: > the pointless ISO race

LOLOLOLOL

Anyone who pooh-poohs the ISO increase has not shot prep sports, indoor wedding ceremonies, or misc. performances in their typically terrible low levels of lighting.

For my own work, I await a non-HI ISO getting up to 102,400

Thanks Nikon for continuing to push the envelope.

Normally, one wants to photograph scenes as sampled by light; unfortunately, at such high ISOs most of what you're capturing is photon shot noise -- statistical variations in the rate of photon emission by the light sources. The sad truth is that you need more photons to accurately sample a scene. Computational methods that sample over a longer period (e.g., computationally combining multiple shots while compensating for motion) are what you really want.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 12:03 UTC
On Nikon D4s First Impressions Review preview (1047 comments in total)
In reply to:

Aaron801: I know this is a really ignorant question, but I know nothing about this class of cameras... I'm wondering why a camera so bulky and so expensive is only 16mp?

ISO 409,600 is not sane. All you'll be capturing is photon shot noise. It seems that the MP race has been replaced by the even more pointless ISO race....

However, I will admit that 16MP is plenty of resolution for most uses -- and more significantly, it's closer to what most lenses can comfortably deliver across a FF sensor.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 05:59 UTC
On Shooting Raw with the Nokia Lumia 1020 post (72 comments in total)

Did the raw DNG files have distortion info in them? If distortion isn't being fixed in processing, the lens is way better than I'd have expected....

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2014 at 12:08 UTC as 21st comment
On Eye-Fi Mobi Wi-Fi SD card review article (100 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I know Eye-Fi was the first, but isn't comparing between their nearly identical products a rather soft review when there are now various other wifi cards being produced under other brands?

Not exactly -- I'm not talking about a collective comparison article. DPReview reviews of individual cameras still compare specific attributes across brands, this one doesn't. Aside from the second sentence, this article makes it sound like it's entirely a choice between Eye-Fi products.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 23, 2014 at 03:28 UTC
On Eye-Fi Mobi Wi-Fi SD card review article (100 comments in total)

I know Eye-Fi was the first, but isn't comparing between their nearly identical products a rather soft review when there are now various other wifi cards being produced under other brands?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 21, 2014 at 11:14 UTC as 36th comment | 1 reply
On Hands-on with the GoPro Hero 3+ Black Edition article (209 comments in total)

GoPro has been doing a really nice job on these and I think the key interesting feature is that these are now really top performers in terms of wireless tethered control. For example, my Sony A7, which DPReview praised for its wireless performance, still frequently drops & remakes the wireless connection when shooting as commanded by my cell phone from 10 feet away... not cool. Let's hope that makers of cameras with bigger sensors notice that the bar for wireless control has been raised.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 20, 2014 at 09:57 UTC as 72nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

pancromat: going to their website i don't see spotting scopes and binoculars. i see a manufacturer of high precision industrial and CCTV lenses. so they chose a few lenses off their portfolio which are capable of 4/3" and affordable, put on a MFT mount - thats it. no big invention, no "joining the MFT waggon".

Kowa is a huge name in lenses for industrial uses (along with companies like Rodenstock and Melles Griot). For example, I have Kowa 42mm f/0.75 and 55mm f/1.0 lenses that were designed for photographing X-Ray phosphor displays.

Kowa has occasionally dabbled in consumer lenses and even made a few cameras, but I suspect this announcement recognizes that folks are now buying micro4/3 cameras for industrial uses. It is shocking how far behind a lot of the sensors in "cheap" industrial cameras are... until you realize that they have a limited market, so it is hard to recover development costs and thus those cameras often have what were good (and expensive) sensors 5+ years ago.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2014 at 09:41 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Smart move for SLR Magic. Anamorphic lenses are selling for scary prices on eBay. Mostly, I think it's because people like the movie-like bokeh distortion when the captured image is stretched for playback.

However, you can save some money if that's your goal. Simply use an ellipse-shaped Waterhouse stop for your aperture appropriately positioned in front of most lenses. ;-)

No need to open the lens in most cases -- simply put an appropriately-shaped aperture cut in a piece of opaque material in front of the lens. Sizing is critical; too large a hole will vignette rather than act as a stop. This also will not work for lenses that have the entry pupil in an awkward spot, such as most ultra-wides. The change in f/number is real, although it isn't that dramatic for common anamorphic ratios.

A good anamorphic adapter really shouldn't induce flare or distortion, but both can be faked. Flare streaks can be induced by taking a cheap UV filter and lightly scratching it in the right orientation. Distortion is easy to recreate in postprocessing (distortion removal with the wrong parameters).

Using a real anamorphic adapter does allow you to use all the pixels, whereas what I'm talking about would involving cropping to get the aspect ratio. It also avoids some annoying video postprocessing.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 15, 2014 at 03:08 UTC

Smart move for SLR Magic. Anamorphic lenses are selling for scary prices on eBay. Mostly, I think it's because people like the movie-like bokeh distortion when the captured image is stretched for playback.

However, you can save some money if that's your goal. Simply use an ellipse-shaped Waterhouse stop for your aperture appropriately positioned in front of most lenses. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 23:01 UTC as 9th comment | 3 replies
On CP+ 2014: Hands-on with Sony a6000 article (99 comments in total)

Just for the record: us manual lens users don't care about PDAF. The main attraction of the A6000 to me is the ability to remote control, which is sorely missing from the NEX-7. I also expect a minor bump in dynamic range of the sensor... and my NEX-7 is only 1 stop behind my A7.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 12:03 UTC as 25th comment
Total: 405, showing: 81 – 100
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