ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 417, showing: 81 – 100
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On Blood moon eclipse: Night of April 14-15 article (64 comments in total)

Be warned: AWB will make a gray thing lit by red light look gray. After all, the black sky doesn't give any other colors to reference against. Shoot raw or fix color balance to something reasonable (e.g., daylight).

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2014 at 15:32 UTC as 1st comment
On Lomography launches Russar+ for L39 and M mount cameras article (120 comments in total)
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Looking at their gallery, IQ looks disturbingly much like that of my Spiratone 18mm f/3.5 (YS/M42 mount) on a Sony A7. The Spiratone cost 1/10 as much, and I'm not sure it was worth that....

I'm aware that this is a non-retrofocus design (i.e., sits very close to the film plane) and on mirrorless may have issues with angle of incidence as well as physical obstructions. However, the sample images really do look a lot like those from my (retrofocus) Spiratone, which is the earlier Sigma-made version. A sharp center and dark, smeared, low-contrast, corners. Then again, Lomo isn't about lenses that lack "character." ;-)

I will admit that finding any old <24mm lenses at bargain prices has gotten tough, the Russar design is tiny on the camera, and both the Russar and my Spiratone were actually delivering good IQ for their view angle when stopped down... it's just that ultrawides have improved so much since then (and APS-C kit zooms are not bad at 20mm).

The Russar+ tech data PDF gives MTF charts, and basically it's as bad as my Spiratone wide open, but gets pretty good by f/11. Would I pay $650 for a compact 20mm f/11 for my A7? Nope. Perhaps enough people will...?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 13, 2014 at 12:37 UTC
On Lensbaby releases 5.8mm F3.5 circular fisheye lens article (20 comments in total)

Hooray! I love fisheyes and the world could use another circular 185-degree choice, especially one with a modest price, really close focus, and good IQ.

"Lensbaby deliberately designed the internal lens barrel of the Circular Fisheye to be reflective" -- BOOO! HISS! This is a very bad idea if the reflections can ever intrude on the active image circle... which at least one of the sample shots (skiing) seems to show.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2014 at 22:17 UTC as 12th comment | 3 replies
On Lomography launches Russar+ for L39 and M mount cameras article (120 comments in total)

Looking at their gallery, IQ looks disturbingly much like that of my Spiratone 18mm f/3.5 (YS/M42 mount) on a Sony A7. The Spiratone cost 1/10 as much, and I'm not sure it was worth that....

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2014 at 11:20 UTC as 29th comment | 3 replies

It's good to see there are now a few fast 50s (this, Otus, and the Zeiss Sony FE) that, at least by some metrics (especially MTF50), do better than the best of the old manual-focus fast 50s. However, they don't win on every metric against some of the old fast 50s that I've bought for under $50. Fast 50s were bundled with nearly every manual-focus SLR, and their well-tuned designs are simple enough to work well without aspherics and modern coatings.

In sum, it is good to see optical design of fast 50s finally advancing, and I'm sure these new lenses will sell well, but personally I spend money on new lenses only when there aren't much cheaper old competitors. For example, I bought a Sigma 8-16mm new a few years ago.... Yes, I'm one of those focus-peaking mirrorless camera users. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2014 at 11:04 UTC as 37th comment | 2 replies

"Olympus Imaging Corp. and Panasonic Corporation jointly announced" is a pretty strange way for JVC to announce new products. Ok, the proposed products are really at "NAB 2014 (JVC Booth: Central Hall #C4314)." I don't see any of this on the JVC website?

Looks like things were cooking and this press release is a somewhat rushed response to Sony's A7S announcement....

Anyway, the more folks push 4K, the sooner it will reach critical mass. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Apr 7, 2014 at 19:19 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

ProfHankD: This probably was a minimal-effort way for Sony to bring out support for serious 4K, and it gives Sony an interesting read on the market in comparing sales of A7, A7R, A7S. In addition, if this comes out around $2K, Sony is going to sell a heck of a lot of them to would-be videographers that otherwise would buy Canon DSLRs or micro4/3.

I also wonder if this is the last step before the mechanical focal plane shutter goes bye bye -- which should happen sometime soon....

To Jogger: Without seeing inside the A7S, it seems minimal effort. That is NOT the same as saying it's easy -- but I think changing the sensor and codec was the minimum Sony could do to get serious 4K. I wouldn't be surprised to see variants of this sensor pop up in other cameras from Sony, Nikon, Pentax, etc.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 7, 2014 at 14:48 UTC

This probably was a minimal-effort way for Sony to bring out support for serious 4K, and it gives Sony an interesting read on the market in comparing sales of A7, A7R, A7S. In addition, if this comes out around $2K, Sony is going to sell a heck of a lot of them to would-be videographers that otherwise would buy Canon DSLRs or micro4/3.

I also wonder if this is the last step before the mechanical focal plane shutter goes bye bye -- which should happen sometime soon....

Direct link | Posted on Apr 7, 2014 at 11:04 UTC as 42nd comment | 4 replies
On Nikon to offer D600 replacements if 'spots' continue article (175 comments in total)

"if a number of multiple granular black spots are still noticeable in images captured with a D600 upon which the above service has been performed several times, Nikon will replace it with a new D600 or an equivalent model"

Wow. That's unimpressive. Normal policy is that most companies will replace after ONE failed repair attempt....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 28, 2014 at 22:51 UTC as 42nd comment | 1 reply
On Apple applies for dual-sensor camera patent post (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

h2k: Seeing all the critical and dismissive comments here, i understand Apple is doomed and not a respectable tech company.

Apple is, and always has been, primarily driven by marketing, not technology. The best Apple thing to buy is their stock. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 19:03 UTC
On Apple applies for dual-sensor camera patent post (71 comments in total)

The patent application does not even require that there be two sensors, but just color-sensitive and luma-sensitive "sensor areas," which I think would overlap the Kodak patent for RGB+clear (white) CFAs. In any case, I'm not impressed.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 26, 2014 at 14:29 UTC as 20th comment | 3 replies

I can imagine the engineering/marketing discussion: Yeah, that's it! We'll separate the lens from the camera body like that old Minolta thingy did.... Yeah, cool, but we better not use wireless to talk to it because Sony's been doing something like that now. What's the thickest cable we can buy to tether it? ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Mar 25, 2014 at 19:21 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
On Sony Australia releases a3500 with new kit lens article (141 comments in total)
In reply to:

peevee1: Wait, wasn't A3000+18-55/3.5-5.6 going for like $279? How low are they aiming this thing?

"How low are they aiming this thing?"

That is the correct question. My guess is that the A3000 was close to being a loss and that this is more sustainably hitting the same or a slightly lower price point. I also suspect that the new lens (after in-camera corrections) might be a bit more suitable for the 20MP sensor. Not exciting overall, but a very good entry-level camera....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 25, 2014 at 13:12 UTC
On Kodak reborn: A look at JK Imaging's 2014 lineup article (195 comments in total)
In reply to:

Gesture: Nothing wrong. These could be sold at Walmart level retailer. Obviously, the modern digital cameras share internal components making 3rd party "break-throughs" possible.

Agreed: these are destined to be in plastic bubbles in *mart stores... and there is nothing wrong with that. They're a big step up from the usual cheapies, and the Kodak name will get them a second look even if they are a little pricier than the usual bubble-packed cameras. Of course, this means that there will be yet another player in the shrinking "midrange camera" market, and profit margins will probably drop for all.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 21, 2014 at 22:23 UTC
On 900MP portraits show human face in extreme detail article (289 comments in total)

The only catch is that 900MP isn't much of a trick anymore. There are gigapixel cameras using arrays and I'm working on a 500MP sensor (which is 4x5 format).

Incidentally, a robot arm is overkill for this. Higher accuracy at a much lower cost could have been had using either a simple 2-axis motion control mounted vertically (for perpendicular stitching, which appears to be what was done here) or a pan/tilt mount (I've used cheap Meade telescope mounts for single point of view stitches).

That said, I am impressed at the relative lack of stitch artifacts. I would have thought there would be more from subject motion (especially given that he seems to have used a raster scan order), but I guess skin texture and out-of-focus areas hide minor stitch errors pretty well....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 20, 2014 at 10:50 UTC as 73rd comment | 1 reply
On Hungarian law bans photos taken without consent article (325 comments in total)

Clearly, this is a political ploy, not actually about photography.

In addition to bothering photographers, I assume this essentially constitutes a total ban on dash and outdoor-facing surveillance cameras....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 19:10 UTC as 121st comment

Exciting? Manual input is more of a pain for this sort of thing....

Direct link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 14:01 UTC as 16th comment
On Nikon 1 V3: a quick summary article (597 comments in total)

I think every camera maker has decided that a $1200 price point for a mid-size-sensor camera is high enough to be taken seriously, but not high enough to drive buyers away. I think they're wrong, especially without the EVF. I think any price between $1K and $2K gets about the same consumer reaction (too expensive to get on a whim), and full-frame cameras in that range will look like a better deal.

That said, this is a very neat little feature set Nikon's developing, and bringing that to lower-priced models in the future has real potential to get the Nikon 1 line some serious respect. Hopefully, the pricing is high now to cover development cost and will come down fast.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 13, 2014 at 14:11 UTC as 137th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

whtchocla7e: "... the first camera to break the 100-point barrier isn't a full frame model from Nikon or Sony ..."

Subtle Canon diss, haha.

It has been a long time since Canon made a sensor that earned DxO's respect. Of course, the most DxO-praise-worthy Nikon cameras have sensors made by Sony. I wonder who made the sensor in this Red?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 3, 2014 at 20:19 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: I have some sympathy for Nikon in that this problem may well trace to a quality control problem with a part they didn't make (e.g., the shutter mechanism) -- it's probably a supplier problem. However, they're still dancing around it, not admitting there is anything in particular wrong in an advisory that seems to have been worded by their legal department... and even this didn't happen until well after Nikon had a follow-on product on the market (the D610).

No, I'm not saying Nikon is behaving appropriately at all. What I'm saying is I don't necessarily blame Nikon for having such a fault in the D600 in the first place, but their handling of it has been very disappointing (and disturbingly typical of many companies these days). Truth is, this is a potentially very expensive problem for Nikon to fix, and the odds are that failure to fix it will not result in as much expense via lawsuits (which is incidentally different for cars, and explains why car companies are usually better about recalls).

Nikon probably will lose some customers, but brand loyalty runs deep in photography -- especially with folks who have other Nikon bodies and a bunch of lenses. Ironically, I wouldn't be surprised if Nikon made as much money from loyal customers upgrading away from D600 problems early as they lost by people moving to other brands. :-(

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 17:29 UTC
Total: 417, showing: 81 – 100
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