ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 510, showing: 21 – 40
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On Evening Colors from the top of the Aruba Hyatt in the Up in the air challenge (2 comments in total)

This is a close call for the rules. If you shot it using the self timer or remote trigger, rather than holding the camera, it would technically meet the rules for this challenge....

Direct link | Posted on Nov 24, 2014 at 01:27 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On Top of the Rock in the Up in the air challenge (1 comment in total)

Was this really compliant with the rules?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 24, 2014 at 01:25 UTC as 1st comment
On Up in the air challenge (11 comments in total)
In reply to:

hindesite: Unbelievable. Can people not read the challenge description? The camera is supposed to be in the air, not (necessarily) the subject.

50% of the entries do not meet the challenge rules, which are quite clear.

Those would no doubt be photos taken holding the camera in one hand while tossing the cat in the air with the other. If only they would toss the camera and hold the cat, the photos might qualify. Oh well. ;-)

Direct link | Posted on Nov 22, 2014 at 10:43 UTC
On Up in the air challenge (11 comments in total)
In reply to:

hindesite: Unbelievable. Can people not read the challenge description? The camera is supposed to be in the air, not (necessarily) the subject.

50% of the entries do not meet the challenge rules, which are quite clear.

Shocking, isn't it? I just disqualified 'em.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 04:55 UTC

THE QUESTION is: does this 5-axis sensor movement work with UNCHIPPED manual lenses? For their A-mount bodies, the answer is very foolishly no. I hope that Sony has not forgotten to put menu options in that allow users to specify the focal length of the lens so the IBIS can do its job without requiring a chipped adapter. This is absolutely critical!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 13:04 UTC as 206th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

CameraLabTester: Hands up, those who will use this!

Come on!

Don't be shy!

Anybody?

Okay... A D750 or 5DIII to anyone who will buy this!

Anybody?

Anybody? (echo)

.

Well, I might... and if you'll make that a Sony A7S/A7/A7R instead of a D750 or 5DIII, I'm sold!

Honestly, it seems to be a fairly well thought-out 360-degree/stereo arrangement using compact camera class components. The physical design is quirky, but clever (and their 3D-printed prototype doesn't look too different from things I've 3D-printed to hold Canon PowerShots in my research). The problem is that this is a very niche product, and most people wanting the "systems camera" features will also be wanting really top IQ. If this was built using four copies of the Sony sensor from the A7S, it would be amazing, but it seems more likely it is just yet another quirky multi-compact-camera thing.

The biggest issue I see with the design is that the lens tubes are a bit far apart for 360 capture. The rule is closest object should be about 30X the distance of the offset from a perfect lens position, which I'd estimate in this case means around 8 feet.

Probably will not be funded....

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 12:50 UTC

Very nice research project. Actually, quite simple technology... could easily turn into a modestly-priced product. There will be some stitching issues, which I guess is why they're talking about "3D-aware stitching," but it probably will be pretty good as long as nothing is too close to the cameras....

Direct link | Posted on Nov 14, 2014 at 02:29 UTC as 14th comment
On Samsung NX1 real-world sample images article (330 comments in total)

Samsung already owns much of the camera market via cell phones. It's obvious from the specs that Samsung also is trying to be a leader in serious system cameras, and the sample images show that they haven't screwed-up very much. I look forward to a teardown, which I expect will reveal that this is almost entirely made from Samsung parts and subsystems. In the near future, how will other camera companies compete against the targeted resources of arguably the world's largest tech company?

Here's hoping this is a motivating challenge to companies like Canon, and not the big, bright, thing in the sky that causes a mass extinction when it hits.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 12, 2014 at 14:23 UTC as 29th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Not relevant to digital photography and hence not to DPReview. Yet another company trying to distinguish itself by echoing a past that never really was. The irony here is that Land and Polaroid were all about developing new technologies, from instant film to sonar sensors for autofocus. This is just sad.

Looking at the web site, I don't see this targeting artists -- although there has been a lot of art done on Polaroid film using pinholes. I've done a heck of a lot of photographic experimentation, but to me this feels more like mediocrity masquerading as an exclusive nostalgic experience.

It really bothers me to see people being encouraged to waste their money in this sort of way, and the association of it with such an innovator as Land adds significant insult to the injury. Look at their web site to fully appreciate just how heavily they are milking Land's good name (and no, this camera isn't anything like the model 95).

In the end, I suppose it's nothing more than very aggressive marketing of a decent pinhole camera that takes the now rather expensive film they make. And they do deserve credit for saving Land's film technology.... SIgh. I still think this is very sad.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 11, 2014 at 02:28 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Not relevant to digital photography and hence not to DPReview. Yet another company trying to distinguish itself by echoing a past that never really was. The irony here is that Land and Polaroid were all about developing new technologies, from instant film to sonar sensors for autofocus. This is just sad.

To me, it's very sad that Land's legacy comes down to low tech, ultra-low image quality, "hipster" junk like this... and it's even sadder that it gets reported here.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 10, 2014 at 10:46 UTC

Not relevant to digital photography and hence not to DPReview. Yet another company trying to distinguish itself by echoing a past that never really was. The irony here is that Land and Polaroid were all about developing new technologies, from instant film to sonar sensors for autofocus. This is just sad.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 10, 2014 at 06:52 UTC as 8th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Jogger: Great little camera. The only real con is the external flash, which i guess is a trade off for having the EVF.

Interesting that Oly has essentially ceded the entry level m43 market to Panasonic.

Since when are "entry level" cameras with smallish u4/3 sensors $900? The Olympus OM-D E-M1 might define the high end at around $1400, but there are u4/3 cameras starting at half the cost of a DMC-GM5.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 5, 2014 at 17:25 UTC
On Sony launches support program for pro photographers article (114 comments in total)

Very good, except for the requirement: "Has received an invitation from Sony Electronics to join the program." Presumably those who have know who they are and I'm not one of them. :-(

I wouldn't meet all the other requirements anyway... I'm a legacy glass user. :-)

Direct link | Posted on Oct 31, 2014 at 12:52 UTC as 34th comment
In reply to:

Felix E Klee: How can the videos be viewed?

With the now old Theta and my app Theta Control, I created time lapses, then remapped the frames with Hugin, to get that little-planet look. Examples: https://vine.co/feklee

Well, I found a photo of the Nikon 950 rig from our SC99 exhibit:
http://www.dpreview.com/galleries/9931446391/photos/3058621/p1010187fix

We didn't actually have it saving 360-degree files, but just streaming data from the laptops via 802.11 to our video wall software on the cluster driving the projectors. However, one of these Nikon 950s is still clicking away as it hangs from the ceiling in my current machine room (slightly zoomed in):
http://aggregate.org/SENSORS/108AMARK/bignow.jpg

Direct link | Posted on Oct 29, 2014 at 09:52 UTC
In reply to:

Felix E Klee: How can the videos be viewed?

With the now old Theta and my app Theta Control, I created time lapses, then remapped the frames with Hugin, to get that little-planet look. Examples: https://vine.co/feklee

The Nikon 950 was a 2MP camera with a nice 185-degree fisheye converter lens. Basically, we had a pair of them tethered via RS232C to a pair of laptop that were mounted on an autonomous robot platform. We had it wandering around our exhibit at SC99 (Supercomputing 1999) and sending images back to a cluster supercomputer driving a projection video wall, which then allowed folks to do interactive spherical pan/zoom. Hey, it was impressive back in 1999.... ;-)

If I can find a sample image, I'll post a link....

Direct link | Posted on Oct 28, 2014 at 21:33 UTC
In reply to:

Felix E Klee: How can the videos be viewed?

With the now old Theta and my app Theta Control, I created time lapses, then remapped the frames with Hugin, to get that little-planet look. Examples: https://vine.co/feklee

Not bad. Actually, looks a lot like what we got off a pair of Nikon 950 tethered back-to-back in 1999. What resolutions do you really get (both pixel count and true resolution)?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 28, 2014 at 11:50 UTC
In reply to:

Jones R: The government really ought to take this beyond national parks. Look at Hungary and their recent photography law. Making images (static photographs and video) of people without their knowledge or consent should be a federal offense. Right now one could mostly take pictures or video images of pedestrians without their knowledge or consent - and in my opinion, this is not only wrong, but should be made illegal.

I don't care where someone is from. Disgusting language and threats of physical violence (however exaggerated and irrational) have no place in civil discourse anywhere. I would suggest ignoring the source of any such virulence, or perhaps this one has earned being banned from DPReview? Responding in kind to such behaviors, even in a milder way, isn't productive.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 26, 2014 at 00:26 UTC
On Canon announces EOS C100 Mark II article (274 comments in total)

This is an unimpressive upgrade of a kludge of a camera. On the bright side, it does sound like perhaps we'll be seeing OLED displays on some Canons now, and better wifi tether support too. The dark side is that the C100 seems to be Canon's idea of what a serious mirrorless body looks like. The C100 was in 2012, then they added a dual pixel upgrade in 2013, and now this. That's significantly more attention than they've given the EOS-M....

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2014 at 02:58 UTC as 65th comment
On Pentax launches K-S1 Sweets Collection article (231 comments in total)

This has got to be a stocking nightmare for stores... but maybe that's the point? Pentax isn't in most stores, and these colors give people a reason to special order while providing a subset small enough for large stores to stock so people can see how pretty they are in person. Not my thing, but hope it works for them... Pentax would be missed.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 23:25 UTC as 101st comment
On Lomography adds Lomochrome Turquoise film to lineup article (90 comments in total)
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: I love film but this is not for me. Even Lomography's best efforts to sell a serious film roll are a flop. I tried Lomography Earl Grey, an ASA 100 film, and it has the grain of an ASA 400 film, no sharpness and no contrast. I won't even touch their colour films, especially this one.
However, I do sincerely admire the role Lomography and lomographers have been playing in keeping film alive. It's just that I don't share their viewpoints about how a picture should look like. Shifting colours can be nice, of course, but only occasionally. I don't dig lo-fi.

"I don't dig lo-fi." -- it's worse than that: a fixed unrealistic color rendering is no more artsy than no color shift. In fact, using "good" film, it's pretty easy to implement custom color shifts that are controllable to achieve the specific artistic effect you want (and it's very easy digitally). I look at this more like trying to sell painters on the idea that if they only use two paint colors, a "golden" yellow and "blue" (which sure looks like cyan to me), their painting will be better art. I suppose it looks "novel" the first time you see that color shift, but that doesn't make it art.

Making good art is about being able to implement your artistic vision using the medium you selected. I don't see this film as helping that process in any way; it's providing an inferior medium that offers little artistic control.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 22, 2014 at 00:32 UTC
Total: 510, showing: 21 – 40
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