ProfHankD

ProfHankD

Lives in United States Lexington, United States
Works as a Professor
Has a website at http://aggregate.org/hankd/
Joined on Mar 27, 2008
About me:

Plan: to change the way people think about and use cameras by taking advantage of cameras as computing systems; engineering camera systems to provide new abilities and improved quality.

Comments

Total: 956, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Back to the action: Nikon D500 Review (978 comments in total)

Good to see that Nikon has made so many improvements. I'm even OK with cutting Nikon some slack on shipping cameras with known bugs (as listed in the Loose Ends page). However, $2K for body-only 21MP APS-C seems a bit much to be rating this a better value than pretty much all competitors, and the review ends with praise of the "dependability" of this currently-buggy camera? To me, this is a very positive sign of Nikon things to come, but where they are right now isn't score of 91 impressive.

Link | Posted on May 26, 2016 at 01:43 UTC as 71st comment
In reply to:

photogeek: Whoever is the first to make a rectilinear action cam will own the market.

straylightrun: Obviously, I should stop using it as an action cam immediately! ;-)

Link | Posted on May 25, 2016 at 12:35 UTC
In reply to:

photogeek: Whoever is the first to make a rectilinear action cam will own the market.

> Whoever is the first to make a rectilinear action cam will own the market.

First off, it's easy to de-fish in camera... does nobody do that yet? (I've done it using CHDK with add-on lenses on PowerShots.) Second, what about the Olympus TG860? It's 21mm equiv. rectilinear... and that's why I own one. :-)

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 12:11 UTC
In reply to:

Favorable Exponynt: Basic specs look a lot like the Ricoh WG-M2 which is cheaper.
204 degree fov 8mp sensor 4k 30p....
http://www.dpreview.com/news/5160452334/ricoh-introduces-lightweight-wg-m2-rugged-action-cam-with-4k-capture

Yup, minor improvements here. That said, Olympus has done well with their "Tough" branding (I own two such models) and this looks like a fine addition to the line.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 12:08 UTC
In reply to:

ELLIOTPAULSTERN: I am not sure I get this. Digital cameras on drones have been doing this for quite some time with some very high quality images.

Is this all students at Rochester have to do?

> Is this all students at Rochester have to do?

Apparently, this hipster more-budget-than-sense thing got them a huge amount of mostly positive PR. Amazing. The volume of media coverage that is, not the project.... ;-)

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 02:19 UTC

Very nice to give them to museums... but no details of what's inside, and I would have expected open details. Is this Google's polite way of announcing they want to enter Gigapan's market?

Link | Posted on May 18, 2016 at 21:32 UTC as 24th comment
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, at least it has LEDs built in and goes to 1.2X instead of Sony's 30mm f/3.5 1X macro. Well, that certainly justifies 5 extra years of development and 20% higher price. Really? Come on, Canon. You can do better than this....

arbux: What? The first autofocus camera was the Konica C35 AF point-and-shoot and the first AF SLR was the Polaroid SX-70. The first autofocus 35mm SLR in production was the Pentax ME F. The first with "modern" integrated AF was the Minolta Maxxum 7000, with what is now known as Sony A-mount. Canon's EOS system came two years after Minolta. About that time, Honeywell famously sued Minolta for infringing on their AF tech, and said they would sue others... but the case against Minolta dragged, and I don't think they did sue others; eventually, Honeywell got a big settlement despite 2/4 patents not being infringed and the remaining infringement being judged to not be "willful infringement." Any way you look at it, Canon was a later entry and the motor-in-lens (vs. in body) is actually the older approach -- that's what the Pentax ME F did.

Well I guess there's still hope for Canon given the level of blind loyalty I'm seeing here!

Link | Posted on May 14, 2016 at 00:54 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, at least it has LEDs built in and goes to 1.2X instead of Sony's 30mm f/3.5 1X macro. Well, that certainly justifies 5 extra years of development and 20% higher price. Really? Come on, Canon. You can do better than this....

I own both Sony E and Canon EF-M bodies. I had high hopes for EOS-M because it can run Magic Lantern (and I also use fleets of Canons running CHDK).

I knew IQ would be down because of Canon's aging sensor tech (and it is), but there continues to be nothing compelling about EOS-M. Canon is supposed to be so great at making lenses, but for EOS-M it has been s-l-o-w-l-y duplicating the functionality of a SMALL SUBSET of the lenses that Sony was/is continually bashed for not having enough of. And yes, a 28mm on a 1.6X crop "Canon APS-C" sensor is precisely equivalent to 30mm on Sony's 1.5X APS-C. I also would hope you know that having more elements in a lens is not a benefit. The hacked 1:1.2 "super macro" mode (both lenses are really max 1:1) and the built-in lighting are real benefits for the Canon, but I don't think they justify a 20% price premium, and they certainly don't justify taking so long to come out with EF-M lenses.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 04:46 UTC
In reply to:

ProfHankD: Well, at least it has LEDs built in and goes to 1.2X instead of Sony's 30mm f/3.5 1X macro. Well, that certainly justifies 5 extra years of development and 20% higher price. Really? Come on, Canon. You can do better than this....

Canon's M 28mm is an obvious functional-clone of Sony's E 30mm, which is from 2011 (see http://www.dpreview.com/products/sony/lenses/sony_e_30_3p5_macro). 2016-2011=5 years later.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 23:23 UTC

Well, at least it has LEDs built in and goes to 1.2X instead of Sony's 30mm f/3.5 1X macro. Well, that certainly justifies 5 extra years of development and 20% higher price. Really? Come on, Canon. You can do better than this....

Link | Posted on May 11, 2016 at 10:06 UTC as 59th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

djemail: This multi mount is not (yet?) officially supported but sure would be a very interesting option:
http://adaptist.weebly.com/pentax-k-multi-mount-wr-version.html

Pentax, Contax/Yashica, Nikon, Olympus 4/3s etc... on one mout!
(Of course only Pentax Lenses with full automatic features)

bluevellet: Sony is a sensor maker; they should be doing everything they can to show-off their sensors, and pixel shift would help. It also is purely firmware and not very hard to do compared to all the other things you list. It should be an app... but I'm not sure that they give the app interface access to the sensor shift at the necessary level....

Link | Posted on May 10, 2016 at 10:05 UTC
In reply to:

Neodp: See when you simply click "Orton" in the Gimp and without even adjusting the optional slider for effect, then you can decide if you like that or a million other options and treatments and you're on down the road.

The point is there is no treatment or effect that you can not do with the Gimp. Plus, that's not only relevant it's just better; to know where to turn, for everything that is possible.

Then this Gimp and plug-ins (really cool) are your FREEDOM to add them to what even else you use. Not having to remove anything!

So it's like an intelligence test; at this point.

Should you explore more than the initial load-up of Gimp (latest stable version only please) and also install the MASSIVE library of your favorite, free plug-ins too? Heck yes!

Try everything.

Gimp is the one that's constantly and quickly improving. Upgrades free too. Including new plug-ins. The one with no tricks, fees, or tiered limits. Use the part you need and know the rest is there when you need them too.

Neodp: I happily use gimp for most "normal" photos and encourage others to as well. However, I also manipulate 16-bit int and 32-bit float image data (often using ImageMagick, which is a great library with terrible demo apps).

Just to be clear, I'm the author of KARWY (the free tool that repairs Sony raw artifacts) and I built my first gimp plugins well over a decade ago. I am currently working on processing of inherently float HDR TDCI (time-domain continuous imaging) streams -- support for which I fully intend to integrate with gimp, but I don't want to have to rewrite the gimp interface code multiple times (been there, done that) and I don't want it to be as isolated a subsystem as G'MIC has been. I also don't want to require people to install a pre-release gimp to use my plugins... so I'm still waiting.

BTW, ufraw is an easy, but crude, way to get raws into 8-bit gimp. I think rawtherapee or phototivo are better starting points, and both can export to gimp.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2016 at 03:12 UTC
In reply to:

djemail: This multi mount is not (yet?) officially supported but sure would be a very interesting option:
http://adaptist.weebly.com/pentax-k-multi-mount-wr-version.html

Pentax, Contax/Yashica, Nikon, Olympus 4/3s etc... on one mout!
(Of course only Pentax Lenses with full automatic features)

Interesting, but not adapting much. Sort of off topic here... but it does highlight the frustration that Sony hasn't done things like pixel shift (yet? it should be possible to do it as an app....).

Link | Posted on May 9, 2016 at 22:30 UTC
In reply to:

Neodp: See when you simply click "Orton" in the Gimp and without even adjusting the optional slider for effect, then you can decide if you like that or a million other options and treatments and you're on down the road.

The point is there is no treatment or effect that you can not do with the Gimp. Plus, that's not only relevant it's just better; to know where to turn, for everything that is possible.

Then this Gimp and plug-ins (really cool) are your FREEDOM to add them to what even else you use. Not having to remove anything!

So it's like an intelligence test; at this point.

Should you explore more than the initial load-up of Gimp (latest stable version only please) and also install the MASSIVE library of your favorite, free plug-ins too? Heck yes!

Try everything.

Gimp is the one that's constantly and quickly improving. Upgrades free too. Including new plug-ins. The one with no tricks, fees, or tiered limits. Use the part you need and know the rest is there when you need them too.

I certainly agree that the Gimp is excellent -- and there are more than a few filters in it that are prototypes from academic research, not available in any other form. However, there is a problem: 8-bit integers per color channel only.

Long ago, CinePaint/FilmGimp forked off to allow 16-bit integers and even 32-bit floats, but they've sort-of disappeared and we're still waiting for Gimp 3.0 to bring them back into the main version. Actually, gimp.org now says that will happen in 2.10... and non-destructive editing is slated for 3.2. Anyway, the current version is 2.8.16, and it's very usable, but it doesn't quite do everything. For example, I find I'm often using Gimp as the last step after things like rawtherapee.

The key point stands: this stuff is all free, and it is in many ways more capable than the commercial software -- especially if you're willing to use different pieces of free software for different things rather than trying to do everything in photoshop.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2016 at 00:56 UTC

Yet more evidence that every camera with sensor movement really should be doing a version of this... Sony?

Link | Posted on May 7, 2016 at 11:05 UTC as 22nd comment
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: Fantastic news and I say this as someone who has never owned any of its cameras. Sony deserves this. Always pushing the envelope, trying new ideas, formats, putting everything in and not holding back on technology, as well as persevering over so many years. It is finally getting it right, with the RX100, A7, and its sensors. Good to see it has a management that dare to explore and dream, and not just short-sighted beancounters. Compare that with Samsung and Canon.

Samsung actually was behaving a lot like Sony... the catch is, Samsung hates being in any market they can't quickly dominate. In contrast, Canon has spent a couple of decades replacing the word "innovate" with the word "leverage." ;-)

Link | Posted on May 3, 2016 at 10:36 UTC
In reply to:

steven gaspari: I hope to actually meet someone who owns a Sony camera someday.

Hi.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2016 at 00:22 UTC
On article Friendly Rebel: Canon EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D samples (175 comments in total)

You know, an entry-level camera now is better than many higher-end cameras from 5 years ago... but this really isn't awesome. From image #14, it looks like ISO6400 is pushing things too far. Then again, if a Canon DSLR is really what you want, here's a cheap one... and I bet I'll see it in bundles at Sam's Club.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2016 at 19:22 UTC as 42nd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Sean65: Don't get these articles. What are they? Some kind of camera geek porn?

Reposts of summaries of iFixit stuff, which is largely repair guides mixed with teardowns. Cool if you didn't know about iFixit, redundant if you did... and I did. :-)

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2016 at 19:36 UTC
In reply to:

ThePhilips: I use Google Image search regularly, and I yet to encounter the stock photos of high resolution. Largest dimension rarely exceeds 400 pixels.

Also I have never seen Getty images in the search results.

I think this is really just another round of the old content caching battle. Google massively caches local copies of content primarily for access speed reasons. However, it was not clear if caching is fair use and it is clear that it reduces traffic to the original site. In the US, this issue long ago got settled such that content caching is (mostly) allowed; I suspect that's why the EU venue...?

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2016 at 22:38 UTC
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