Jacques Cornell

Jacques Cornell

Lives in Kazakhstan Almaty, Kazakhstan
Works as a photographer
Has a website at jacquescornell.photography
Joined on Jul 13, 2002
About me:

I studied photography at the Institute for Contemporary Photography in Tokyo and the International Center of Photography in New York, have photos in the permanent collection at the Kiyosato Museum of Photography in Japan, have taught photography at the Fashion Institute of Technology and the International Center of Photography in New York, co-founded event photography company Happening Photos in New York, and serve clients around the world. I also shoot, print, exhibit and sell fine art travel & landscape photos.

Comments

Total: 254, showing: 1 – 20
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On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras around $500 (173 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: Why'd they drop the Panasonic GF7 from the lineup while carrying over the Oly and Fuji from last year's review?

Doh!
But why not the GF8, then?

Link | Posted on May 22, 2016 at 06:02 UTC
On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras around $500 (173 comments in total)

Why'd they drop the Panasonic GF7 from the lineup while carrying over the Oly and Fuji from last year's review?

Link | Posted on May 21, 2016 at 16:18 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies

Oh great, another bot for making cookie-cutter photo illustrations.

Link | Posted on May 21, 2016 at 03:37 UTC as 49th comment
On article Small but mighty: hands on with the Panasonic GX85/GX80 (313 comments in total)
In reply to:

AdamT: 16Mp .............. :(

If they`re going to use a new sensor (the 20Mp one in this case) , use it across the range like DSLR makers do instead of hanging on to old sensors . Kinda expected it in the G7 but not in this model ..

So a grown up GM5 then- nice option, probably a sweet spot but IMO needed that 20Mp sensor

"Sony makes a newer 16MP sensor of the same generation as the 20MP one, so it could be that one."

If it's true that the GX8's 20MP sensor is made by Sony, then this would be of the same line and generation, and so I wouldn't expect a 16MP version to be substantially better than the GX7's sensor, since the GX8's isn't.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2016 at 12:11 UTC
On article Small but mighty: hands on with the Panasonic GX85/GX80 (313 comments in total)
In reply to:

tkbslc: I can't believe they kept the !@#$ 16:9 EVF on another 4:3 aspect camera.

"the garbage that is the gx7's viewfinder"

Not being susceptible to the notorious but rare "rainbow artifact" phenomenon some few people suffer with it, I consider the GX7 EVF much better than the G6. I own both cameras. The G6 looks bigger, but the GX7 appears sharper and has much more accurate color, especially under artificial light where the G6 sometimes renders wildly inaccurate orange previews. I shoot low-light events professionally, and this defect of the G6 EVF is quite noticeable, although it happens infrequently.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2016 at 10:32 UTC
On article Small but mighty: hands on with the Panasonic GX85/GX80 (313 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sezano: 426g small? this is A7 territory.

"Richard I'm measuring weight in grames."

Then why are you talking about size? Or, is a "grame" some obscure measure of length? Weight is measured in grammes.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2016 at 10:28 UTC
On article Small but mighty: hands on with the Panasonic GX85/GX80 (313 comments in total)
In reply to:

AdamT: 16Mp .............. :(

If they`re going to use a new sensor (the 20Mp one in this case) , use it across the range like DSLR makers do instead of hanging on to old sensors . Kinda expected it in the G7 but not in this model ..

So a grown up GM5 then- nice option, probably a sweet spot but IMO needed that 20Mp sensor

If you'd read reviews of the GX8, you'd know that the GX8's 20MP sensor offers little advantage, yielding just a tiny bit more of both resolution and noise. It'll be interesting to see whether removal of the AA filter makes this camera out-resolve the GX8.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2016 at 10:22 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)
In reply to:

JMT64: "•Electronic shutter introduces possible rolling shutter"

You mean when you take a photography of a fast scene in a dark environnement and at a very low speed?

Timo,
Good point. I've seen online examples of round clock faces turned oval by rolling shutter. Longer focal lengths exaggerate the camera shake, and IS may not be able to correct it over the relatively long readout time of 1/10 to 1/25 of a second.
That said, I often shoot landscapes using bracketed exposures at long focal lengths with e-shutter, and I've noticed this effect only a handful of times.

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2016 at 07:09 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: With respect to the "Image Quality" page of the review...

Why do you guys compare high ISOs using the "Daylight Simulation" mode of the studio scene? I can't really imagine a scenario when I'd be shooting broad daylight at ISO 12800 (it would difficult to stop down that far, even at 1/8000s) and the image quality that comes out of a camera changes significantly depending on the total ambient light available.

It seems like it would be a lot more representative to use the "Low Light" tab for high ISO comparisons, and scroll to an area that is a bit more shadowed. It reveals the less pleasant noise characteristics of a camera in a much more useful way.

When compared that way, the Canon 70D in your example barely shows 2/3EV advantage, if that. I won't deny the D7200's superiority here, though - that sensor performs at least as well as the FF sensor in the A7 II! Really a triumph of efficiency from an APS-C sensor.

Yes, I know all that. The "low light" image is unevenly lit. So what? All that means is that more areas of the "low light" images are as dark as the darker areas of the "daylight" image. Getting back to the original point: the "daylight" image is appropriate if you're evaluating performance under full-spectrum light, regardless of required shutter speed, and the "low light" images is appropriate if you're evaluating perfromance under tungsten light. Otherwise, why would DPR have used tungsten light for the "low light" image when they could simply have stuck with full-spectrum and reduced the intensity?

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2016 at 03:31 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: With respect to the "Image Quality" page of the review...

Why do you guys compare high ISOs using the "Daylight Simulation" mode of the studio scene? I can't really imagine a scenario when I'd be shooting broad daylight at ISO 12800 (it would difficult to stop down that far, even at 1/8000s) and the image quality that comes out of a camera changes significantly depending on the total ambient light available.

It seems like it would be a lot more representative to use the "Low Light" tab for high ISO comparisons, and scroll to an area that is a bit more shadowed. It reveals the less pleasant noise characteristics of a camera in a much more useful way.

When compared that way, the Canon 70D in your example barely shows 2/3EV advantage, if that. I won't deny the D7200's superiority here, though - that sensor performs at least as well as the FF sensor in the A7 II! Really a triumph of efficiency from an APS-C sensor.

If the "low light" shot is darker than the "daylight" shot, that's a function of shutter speed. DPR has chosen to underexpose the former. If you use an appropriate shutter speed to render 18% gray at a value of 128, then both images get the same overall amount of light, and the only difference is the color temperature. It is the tungsten color temperature that poses a particular challenge for sensors, and this is why DPR has included the "low light" samples. They would be more appropriately labeled "tungsten" or "2800K".

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2016 at 18:52 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: With respect to the "Image Quality" page of the review...

Why do you guys compare high ISOs using the "Daylight Simulation" mode of the studio scene? I can't really imagine a scenario when I'd be shooting broad daylight at ISO 12800 (it would difficult to stop down that far, even at 1/8000s) and the image quality that comes out of a camera changes significantly depending on the total ambient light available.

It seems like it would be a lot more representative to use the "Low Light" tab for high ISO comparisons, and scroll to an area that is a bit more shadowed. It reveals the less pleasant noise characteristics of a camera in a much more useful way.

When compared that way, the Canon 70D in your example barely shows 2/3EV advantage, if that. I won't deny the D7200's superiority here, though - that sensor performs at least as well as the FF sensor in the A7 II! Really a triumph of efficiency from an APS-C sensor.

If you use a faster shutter speed under brighter light, the same number of photons hit the sensor. Light intensity ON THE SENSOR is the same. Tungsten/amber light yields higher noise from a Bayer-pattern sensor not because it's dimmer but because the reddish color registers mainly on the R pixels and very little on the G & B pixels.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 03:03 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)
In reply to:

JMT64: "•Electronic shutter introduces possible rolling shutter"

You mean when you take a photography of a fast scene in a dark environnement and at a very low speed?

You can get rolling shutter effects with moving subjects at fast shutter speeds in good light, too. This is because, regardless of the set shutter speed, it takes between 1/10 and 1/25 (depending on the camera) for the sensor to read out the whole image.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 02:49 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: With respect to the "Image Quality" page of the review...

Why do you guys compare high ISOs using the "Daylight Simulation" mode of the studio scene? I can't really imagine a scenario when I'd be shooting broad daylight at ISO 12800 (it would difficult to stop down that far, even at 1/8000s) and the image quality that comes out of a camera changes significantly depending on the total ambient light available.

It seems like it would be a lot more representative to use the "Low Light" tab for high ISO comparisons, and scroll to an area that is a bit more shadowed. It reveals the less pleasant noise characteristics of a camera in a much more useful way.

When compared that way, the Canon 70D in your example barely shows 2/3EV advantage, if that. I won't deny the D7200's superiority here, though - that sensor performs at least as well as the FF sensor in the A7 II! Really a triumph of efficiency from an APS-C sensor.

The difference between Daylight and Low Light has to do with color temperature, not brightness. If you're shooting under tungsten light, the Low Light sample is more representative. However, if you're shooting under dim natural light (dawn/dusk), the Daylight sample is more appropriate.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 02:45 UTC
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)

Correction:
"Using the e-Shutter solves the shake problem, though it's important to note a few 'gotchas' when using it. Rapidly moving subjects may look distorted due to 'rolling shutter' and it only works with some lenses (and it's not entirely clear which)."

E-SHUTTER works with ALL lenses. It's DUAL IS that only works with SOME lenses.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2016 at 02:42 UTC as 40th comment | 1 reply
On article Great Eight: Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 review (530 comments in total)
In reply to:

RGWR: Why do they keep ruining good cameras by letting them grow bigger over the years. GX7 was perfect in that respect. This one isn't.

You want a bigger EVF and side-hinged LCD? That takes up space.

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2016 at 17:48 UTC
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: If they're so serious, how come they didn't put a pass-through hotshoe on top of the transmitter? Honestly, I can't fathom how a radio trigger maker can do this. Have they never heard of event photography? Y'know, with on- and off-camera flashes at the same time? What they've made is a trigger for studio use only, and I'll bet event shooters outnumber studio shooters by a large margin.
Ugh. The stupidity, it burns.

Class A -
Yes, the Cactus V6 is the only one that will fire a manual off-camera flash AND pass through the TTL signal to a flash on top of an MFT camera. I'm holding out for a future Godox X1 for MFT because my off-camera flashes are Godox V850s and the Cactus won't adjust their output power.

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2016 at 03:46 UTC

This should come as no surprise, as Fuji has a long history of making highly-regarded medium-format lenses.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2016 at 17:37 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply

If they're so serious, how come they didn't put a pass-through hotshoe on top of the transmitter? Honestly, I can't fathom how a radio trigger maker can do this. Have they never heard of event photography? Y'know, with on- and off-camera flashes at the same time? What they've made is a trigger for studio use only, and I'll bet event shooters outnumber studio shooters by a large margin.
Ugh. The stupidity, it burns.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2016 at 17:14 UTC as 9th comment | 11 replies
In reply to:

acassino: Just because the GM lenses and the A6300 were announced at the same time, does not mean they go well together. The lenses are clearly intended primarily for full frame application, in size and focal length. Sony is in dire need of some high-quality, compact, and focal-length appropriate lenses for their APS-C cameras. Many of their current APS-C line-up do not qualify as high-quality. Even the Vario-Tessar T* E 16-70mm f/4 ZA OSS does not qualify (just try getting a good one that does not exhibit poor side-to-side sharpness). I am not upgrading my older NEX camera until I see some better compact lenses!

There's always Micro Four Thirds if you want a wide selection of quality compact lenses. The lenses are why I went MFT instead of APS for a compact and affordable kit.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2016 at 05:44 UTC
On article CP+ 2016: Hands-on with new Panasonic lenses and ZS100 (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rusk: "The lens is constructed from polycarbonate, but the mount is metal."

I doubt that. 208g and metal mount. I bet that mount is plastic just like almost with any other lens that others do. There are few from Canon, Zeiss etc that do have metal mounts but only a few.
The most metal mount lenses are from WW2 era where whole lens is made from metal (or like Leica has).

Who doesn't know what I talk about, should learn what are the lens parts (what a mount really is) or at least read the lensrental article about metal mounts.

Dude, have you ever owned an ILC? I mean, this assertion is utterly clueless. As a professional photographer, I've owned and used scores of cameras and lenses for 30 years, and the only one that had a plastic lens mount was my Canon 50/1.8. All of my Panasonic lenses have metal mounts, and the only Panasonic lens I'm aware of that has a plastic mount is one of the newer kit lenses. My Panasonic 20/1.7 weighs just 87 grams and has a metal mount.
You simply have no idea what you're talking about.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2016 at 05:34 UTC
Total: 254, showing: 1 – 20
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