Stu 5

Stu 5

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Works as a Photographer
Joined on Apr 11, 2005

Comments

Total: 780, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

SteB: Olympus are the most innovative of all the Camera manufacturers. Remember live view first appeared on an Olympus camera. Olympus film SLRs had TTL flash metering long before the other manufacturers. When Olympus innovates, all the others soon follow. The original Olympus OM 35mm film SLR was the first compact film SLR, soon all the others followed. They may not have the resources of the bigger manufacturers to sustain their technological leads, but they are always ahead of the curve with innovation.

But not to anywhere near the degree of Olympus. TTL metering, TTL flash metering, ESP metering, Spot metering, multi spot metering, Video on a DSLR, although they did not think there was a market for it! Flip out screen on a DSLR, dust filter for the sensor, live view etc etc.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 5, 2014 at 16:09 UTC
On Sony Alpha 7 II real-world sample gallery posted article (231 comments in total)

Noise reduction has been set too high on the Jpegs.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2014 at 21:36 UTC as 50th comment
On Real-world test: Nikon D750 at the Museum of Flight article (274 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jogger: ... but, DPR commenters keep telling me that FF DSLRs are dead.

When on earth did DPR say that?...

Direct link | Posted on Dec 3, 2014 at 16:22 UTC
In reply to:

Marcos Villaroman: Is this the same company/device that advertised Android compatibility during the Kickstarter and then backed away from Android support soon afterwards?

If so, this is not the kind of company I want to support, especially given the $150 price tag.

srados that is why there is an option to wear the Lumu around your neck. It is less difficult to use than plugging in a set of headphones.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 16:34 UTC
In reply to:

llamacide: I'm sorry but I think I'll stick to a tool designed for the job-
Minolta meter V - light meter
Iphone - phone calls and email/ messaging

The Polaris does not have as wide a metering range though and does not do video.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 16:32 UTC
In reply to:

paulbysea: Yet again this site assumes all readers use Iphones, despite the fact that more Android phones are out there. If you are going to review a product make sure it supports the dominant mobile operating system.

So that means all the pro photographers that use handheld meters still have got it all wrong and are all lousy photographers.

It's amazing Gossen and Sekonic did not go bankrupt years ago with no demand in their products... oh wait there is... all those photographers that know a cameras built in light meter is reflective readings only and that live view screens are not calibrated and are not reliable outside and would not be stupid enough to rely on a histogram and clipping indicators to do a paid job.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 16:28 UTC
In reply to:

Marcos Villaroman: Is this the same company/device that advertised Android compatibility during the Kickstarter and then backed away from Android support soon afterwards?

If so, this is not the kind of company I want to support, especially given the $150 price tag.

The Luxi uses the camera on the phone so it is only as good as the sensitivity of the camera sensor. It is also using the lower quality front facing camera at that. So it's usability varies from phone to phone. It's EV range is not as good as the Lumu which goes from -4EV to 20EV, which is better than a lot of separate handheld meters.

The Luxi has also been shown to be inaccurate. About one stop out. Where as the Lumu has been shown to be as accurate as any separate handheld meter.

The Luxi is just a piece of plastic where as the Lumu is measuring the light level and then converting that to an audio signal and sending it down the headphone jack. That is the reason it cost more money.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 16:15 UTC
In reply to:

Marcos Villaroman: Is this the same company/device that advertised Android compatibility during the Kickstarter and then backed away from Android support soon afterwards?

If so, this is not the kind of company I want to support, especially given the $150 price tag.

I suppose you are aware that a lot of Android phones do not provide sufficient power through the headphone jack. Lumu have no way of controlling that.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 16:11 UTC
In reply to:

fmian: For the same price you can get a dedicated Polaris Light Meter that does flash metering as well.
For a little bit more you can get one that does spot metering too.
So this is just a gimmick for those that want a cute toy before realising it doesn't do a bunch of other stuff which is important for most people using a light meter.
Very limited application.

Trouble is the gimmick as you put it has a much wider metering range than the Polaris. Also a wider range of ISO and shutter speeds. It can also be used for video, with FPS value, Shutter Angle or Shutter Time.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 11:29 UTC
In reply to:

Robert Newman: For $150 you have many other options including a used Minolta Flash Meter IV (roughly $60 on eBay) which, while the size of a cellphone itself, has many other features and is more robust and less likely to get broken. This is all largely academic, however, since I have never seen a cellphone photographer who bothered to meter. Even pro photographers seldom use a separate meter these days due to the sophistication of the built-in metering systems of their cameras.

Also this is not designed for cellphone photographers!

The Lumu also has a wider EV range than the Minolta IV.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 11:14 UTC
In reply to:

Robert Newman: For $150 you have many other options including a used Minolta Flash Meter IV (roughly $60 on eBay) which, while the size of a cellphone itself, has many other features and is more robust and less likely to get broken. This is all largely academic, however, since I have never seen a cellphone photographer who bothered to meter. Even pro photographers seldom use a separate meter these days due to the sophistication of the built-in metering systems of their cameras.

Rubbish. Lots of pro photographers have a separate light meter in their camera bag. A camera built in light meter only does reflective metering.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 10:54 UTC
In reply to:

fakuryu: Comparing RAWs at daylight and low light even at just ISO800 vs the K3, K50, D7100, XT1, X100T, that Canon sensor is still lagging behind especially with the chroma noise. Wished that the K5II or K5IIs was also in the comparator since the lowlight high ISO performance of that 16mp sensor is sweet.

Sorry but the reality is at 800ISO the 7DII already has the edge over the D7100 in the low light test using Raw. The gap just widens from there onwards as the ISO goes up.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 08:47 UTC
In reply to:

Boky: Out of the whole group, comparing like-for-like cameras of a similar cost, the D7100 strikes the best blend of fairly admirable results. Dynamic range looks good, details look good, dynamic range allocation to shadows and highlights also look appropriate...

Nick

You have read further down on this post where DPR state the studio test does not exceed the DR range of the Canon 7D MKII. meaning you cannot determine which camera has better DR from it?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 2, 2014 at 08:38 UTC
In reply to:

paulbysea: Yet again this site assumes all readers use Iphones, despite the fact that more Android phones are out there. If you are going to review a product make sure it supports the dominant mobile operating system.

Mister Roboto both methods have their advantages but saying you can do everything with a cameras built in light meter compared to an incident meter is simple not true to the point of being laughable.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 19:57 UTC
In reply to:

Debankur Mukherjee: How correct are the readings...........??.......should be compared to a dedicated light meter.....

Not well enough to know the advantages of an incident meter over the light meter in a camera Mister Roboto.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 19:53 UTC
In reply to:

Marcos Villaroman: Is this the same company/device that advertised Android compatibility during the Kickstarter and then backed away from Android support soon afterwards?

If so, this is not the kind of company I want to support, especially given the $150 price tag.

How on earth is it going to compromise your earphone jack?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 19:49 UTC
In reply to:

Debankur Mukherjee: How correct are the readings...........??.......should be compared to a dedicated light meter.....

It might be an idea to read up about separate light meters first of all for a few days and then make a comment on a thread like this.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 09:26 UTC
In reply to:

Debankur Mukherjee: How correct are the readings...........??.......should be compared to a dedicated light meter.....

You honestly do not know the advantages do you... oh dear...

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 09:24 UTC
In reply to:

paulbysea: Yet again this site assumes all readers use Iphones, despite the fact that more Android phones are out there. If you are going to review a product make sure it supports the dominant mobile operating system.

Well clearly you do not know the difference or you would not just have come out with that statement.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 09:22 UTC
In reply to:

Turbguy1: Ahh...why not just put a diffuser over the existing camera lens and point that in the direction of the shot...using a special app to read light values off the cam's sensor??

Incorrect PhotoKhan. None of the camera lens options on the market are as good. It's not a case of being badly implemented. It's just not as accurate no matter how well implemented.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 29, 2014 at 13:31 UTC
Total: 780, showing: 1 – 20
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