Damian D

Damian D

Lives in United Kingdom Surrey, United Kingdom
Works as a Nokia Imaging
Has a website at www.twitter.com/phonedaz
Joined on Apr 4, 2003
About me:

I'm responsible for imaging experience at Nokia

Comments

Total: 20, showing: 1 – 20
On DxOMark Mobile will help power Connect reviews post (4 comments in total)
In reply to:

vlad0: So how did they manage to give the iphone 5 a higher score than the 808 in video recording ? It doesn't make any sense, I have both.. and overall, there is really no contest. The 808 has zooming, amazing stereo recording, and more control..

Were they looking just at the quality ? Because even then, I don't see how the 5 is any better.

Otherwise, great job :)

That seems very surprising given the benefit of pixel over sampling in video. Would love to hear more details as this doesn't correlate with our own benchmarking.

Best regards

Damian Dinning

Direct link | Posted on Oct 13, 2012 at 19:50 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

There is a 3mp setting in 4:3.

Re icons, in Windows Phone it's even simpler, that a design direction so the focus is on the content rather than the interface.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2012 at 22:12 UTC
On Nokia 808 Review: Damian Dinning of Nokia Responds article (214 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulRivers: Still just disappointed that there's no shutter priority mode.

That's the biggest thing that keeps this from possibly replacing my Canon s100 - I don't care about aperture priority, but in indoor lighting shutter priority is my most used mode - people moving at 1/15 just doesn't work, at all.

Got it.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2012 at 09:59 UTC
On Nokia 808 Review: Damian Dinning of Nokia Responds article (214 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biggs23: If the ISO is not set to automatic the letter 'M' appears, correct? Why doesn't the actual ISO value get displayed? That seems like an easy code correction to me.

As said, in some languages due to the characters, 1600 doesn't fit inside the icon. Similarly exposure compensation, so we remind you that you've set it. But this is good feedback, thanks.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2012 at 07:28 UTC
On Nokia 808 Review: Damian Dinning of Nokia Responds article (214 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: I am also impressed, by both the way the response was communicated and also by the throughful design details as explained when trade-offs have to be made. For example, the display brightness not reliable as a visual way to determine the photo's brightness in very dark or bright conditions. I think the design choice was a good one for a phone camera.

While I am happy to read such details in addendum, it appears that clarification such as these should be been sought before a review is published, to give the maker a chance to explain so that anomalies do not just look like faults, and, also to give the reviewer a chance to eliminate misunderstanding, factual errors or wrong implications in their review report and adjust them. It does not mean giving away any review independence and their right to report anything as they see fit, as the reviewer can still stand firm on any issues found and as reported, but it could make the review better, and more professional. Thanks.

However, we are careful to keep our replies as factual as possible, the review still needs to be a reflection of dpreview's view rather than ours of course, as much as we’d like it to be ours ;)

Personally, I read a LOT of reviews and forums to gain additional insight in to what people like/dislike. However, EVERY product always has its trade-offs, you simply can't design one product to be perfect for everyone. We use such insight to where possible improve (if necessary) the current product or sometimes take that into account for the next...

Nokia encourages such direct discussion – personally I belive it’s the best way to learn more about your customers and the web provides us the capability to have such direct conversations.

Thanks again for all your feedback - keep it coming!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2012 at 07:23 UTC
On Nokia 808 Review: Damian Dinning of Nokia Responds article (214 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: I am also impressed, by both the way the response was communicated and also by the throughful design details as explained when trade-offs have to be made. For example, the display brightness not reliable as a visual way to determine the photo's brightness in very dark or bright conditions. I think the design choice was a good one for a phone camera.

While I am happy to read such details in addendum, it appears that clarification such as these should be been sought before a review is published, to give the maker a chance to explain so that anomalies do not just look like faults, and, also to give the reviewer a chance to eliminate misunderstanding, factual errors or wrong implications in their review report and adjust them. It does not mean giving away any review independence and their right to report anything as they see fit, as the reviewer can still stand firm on any issues found and as reported, but it could make the review better, and more professional. Thanks.

From a manufacturer point of view I think one of the great things about the web and forums such as these it that it allows a response from the manufacturer. I do agree with however Barney, that the reviewers are entitled to their views, where they are presented along with supporting rationale. That’s helpful for you to understand the context of such points and whether they are valid in your own personal view. After all what I believe or Barney believes on behalf of dpreview may not represent your own preferences for example. That’s after all why we have industries with multiple manufactures producing multiple products. The world would be a boring place without such choice.

Sometimes, as in this case, dpreview were in contact with us to clarify a few points before publication. I commend and thank dpreview for checking information before publication.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2012 at 07:23 UTC
On Nokia 808 Review: Damian Dinning of Nokia Responds article (214 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: The "exposure" response doesn't really explain why there's no manual exposure.

Copy and pasted from similar question above...

We agonised a lot over this area during development. The main limitation is the lack of variable aperture control (a size constraint). If you set a specific shutter speed you're either going to get over/under expsoure or the system needs to play with the gain (ISO) which may leave you with results you were not expecting. This time round we've provided user control over the ND filter so you can force faster or slower shutter speeds, dropped the longest shutter speed to 2.7 seconds (when using manual ISO) and a greater degree of exposure compensation and ISO settings. Whilst we recognise this is not ideal, this should provide sufficent control over every available variable (given the limitation of no variable aperture ) to force shutter speeds that would still result in correct expsoure.

For the future, we continue to seek ways of providing more direct control over settings applicable to such usage.

Thanks for your feedback.

Damian

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2012 at 07:08 UTC
On Nokia 808 Review: Damian Dinning of Nokia Responds article (214 comments in total)
In reply to:

PaulRivers: Still just disappointed that there's no shutter priority mode.

That's the biggest thing that keeps this from possibly replacing my Canon s100 - I don't care about aperture priority, but in indoor lighting shutter priority is my most used mode - people moving at 1/15 just doesn't work, at all.

We agonised a lot over this area during development. The main limitation is the lack of variable aperture control (a size constraint). If you set a specific shutter speed you're either going to get over/under expsoure or the system needs to play with the gain (ISO) which may leave you with results you were not expecting. This time round we've provided user control over the ND filter so you can force faster or slower shutter speeds, dropped the longest shutter speed to 2.7 seconds (when using manual ISO) and a greater degree of exposure compensation and ISO settings. Whilst we recognise this is not ideal, this should provide sufficent control over every available variable (given the limitation of no variable aperture ) to force shutter speeds that would still result in correct expsoure.

For the future, we continue to seek ways of providing more direct control over settings applicable to such usage.

Thanks for your feedback.

Damian

Direct link | Posted on Aug 2, 2012 at 07:05 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

Hi, thanks for the comments. The 2mp setting was specifically selected for the purpose you outlined but also the current limit of certain social sharing sites. It's available in the 16:9 aspect ratio setting and does in deed provide greater zoom as a result.

I personally worked with the team on the icon design. However the design direction is away from 'chrome' and over fussy detailing as it just distracts from the content in our view. So whilst I can relate to your comment here, this was a deliberate design decision. Your other suggestion is an excellent one. We will consider that for the future - thanks.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 17:04 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

Viewfinder: Given there is no optical viewfinder of course we do prioritise the brightness of the viewfinder in very bright and very dark conditions to increase usability. In bright conditions we increase the brightness of the display accordingly to make it as visible as possible and in very low light conditions we increase the read time (reduce the viewfinder refresh rate) to increase the effective brightness of an otherwise dark scene. Unfortunately this results in a trade-off in such situations in the accuracy of the image as a preview which may explain some of the challenges you experienced with exposure compensation.

Best regards

Damian Dinning - Nokia

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 15:19 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

Exposure: The 808 PureView uses a system which is more heavily influenced (unless faces are detected) by objects in the centre. Half press of the HW capture button (assuming touch to focus has not been set) locks both focus and exposure which for most situations should provide the desired results. However, this is an area I think with some small amount of innovation can improve the experience for the future.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 15:19 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

ISO setting: we found the optimal number of touch controls along the side of the viewfinder in a screen of this size to be 5. This dictated the size of the touch targets. No doubt people will chime in and comment on this point but this was the recommendation from our usability experts to achieve good usability in the camera. This in turn dictated the area for text, which in some languages the characters used require more space than the often used English versions. However, as with all the icons we prioritised at least indicating that a function was set to a setting different to the default. Increasing the size of the buttons would have impacted more on the viewfinder which we were keen to avoid.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 15:19 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

Again based on trials we found once people had used it for a while it becomes very intuitive fast and easy. As I think you pointed to in your own conclusion. Our own user testing showed that after this period everyone preferred it to conventional zoom methods.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 15:18 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

Often with these methods you end up under/over shooting and/or moving the device during the operation. Furthermore, in the case of motorised controls, you’re often having to wait for the zoom to travel from one point to another. With slide zoom it allows you to frame the shot similarly to cropping in photo editing applications and then when happy with the framing, simply releasing your ginger from the display it either quickly zooms to that setting in the case of stills or in video smoothly and more slowly to the pre-set framing. We use an acceleration/deceleration curve at the start/stop phases of zoom too, impossible with other methods and then aim to handle all those pixels as smoothly as possible. Ideally I would have liked it to be even smoother. Zooming out is more conventional. We did prototype the same method of zooming for zoom out but in trials we found it to be counter intuitive.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 15:18 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Damian D: Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

This principle led us to a number of decisions we felt all things considered where the right ones:

Specifically…

Histogram: We believe not everyone uses it or knows how to use it and even fewer need/use it all the time. Our solution was therefore to provide one click access from the EV adjustment button. You can either just check it or check and adjust, it’s up to you. But then you can easily hide it too. As aid we wanted to retain as much viewfinder real estate as possible.

Slide zoom: We felt the conventional method of 'assisted' zoom is too slow and lacks sufficient control and precision. What I mean by assisted zoom is basically anything other than manual zoom as on most SLR’s. Whilst manual zoom is fast and precise it’s almost impossible to zoom smoothly, important for video of course. The slide zoom capability we're introducing for the first time with the 808 PureView provides a level of precision and speed pinch to zoom and motorised zooms are unable to provide.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 15:17 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)

Hi Barney/everyone.

Great to see the 808 PureView receiving your Gold Award – thank you. Our team are both delighted and extremely proud of their collective achievement. :D

Wanted to just take some time out to share some insights/background behind some of the decisions/trade-offs we made given some of the points you noted in the review.

Whilst we wanted to provide a rich set of controls which cover key elements such as focus, exposure, brightness/colour and composition especially for those who take a more involved role in the capture phase, we also wanted to keep as clean and as uncluttered viewfinder as possible. As you might imagine however, it’s very hard to get this balance just right. Personally speaking I find most of not all digital camera viewfinder/info screens are either all or nothing. We continue to seek the best balance in this regard, but equally, recognise we can never get this right for everyone.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2012 at 15:15 UTC as 59th comment | 14 replies
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

Peiasdf: "Not only does it feature the highest-resolution sensor of any mobile phone camera, but at the time of writing, the 808 PureView features the highest-resolution sensor of any current camera outside of highly specialist (and very costly) medium format equipment"

Someone got a 3D or 1Ds X in office. :D

Not that it's about the input resolution of the sensor (7728 x 5368 btw) but out of curiosity did you check the specs? :)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2012 at 15:19 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

anthony mazzeri: 'pixel oversampling combines many pixels to create a single (super) pixel'.

What if it actually were a real super single pixel instead of combining 5 smaller ones, so the sensor itself would be 8MP. Would a straight 8MP image from that size sensor be better?

Barney is right you wouln't have the capability to zoom. Adding to that the performance would otherwise be virtually the same. So this way you get the best of both worlds. :)

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2012 at 08:10 UTC
On Review: Nokia 808 PureView article (354 comments in total)
In reply to:

kff: What a pity! Nokia PureView 808 is so sophisticated technology, but it doesn't have thread for tripod ...

Hence the Nokia accessory as shown in the picture.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 31, 2012 at 08:05 UTC

Thanks everyone for some excellent comments and feedback.

I just wanted to clarify that the images we [Nokia] have captured thus far and any that you find on the net, were taken using prototype hardware with software which is not yet finalised. This is especially relevant with regards to low light which has not been optimised at all...yet. We are working actively on that area right now. It's extremely interesting to read the opinions relating to noise filtering and detail retention. Thank you.

best regards

Damian Dinning - Lead Program Manager, Imaging Experience - Nokia

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2012 at 08:12 UTC as 18th comment | 11 replies
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