T3

T3

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Joined on Jul 1, 2003

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On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1669 comments in total)

All the ideas people have suggested seem to ignore the fact that whatever Canon is announcing, it has to be something that has been considered "impossible" by everyone else. Basically, the teaser is saying, "You guys all thought this [whatever it is] was impossible, but we don't see it that way. We've made it possible. We've made this product that everyone else has been saying *can't be done*."

Either this product is truly extraordinary and ground-breaking, or they are setting themselves up for major disappointment. It kind of reminds me of Nikon's Df teasers. So much mystery, so much hype, so much anticipation. But it all ended up being a bit anti-climactic when the Df was finally introduced. Canon has set the bar even higher, by essentially claiming that they are going to introduce a product once considered "impossible" and "can't be done." We'll see if they can live up to that claim.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 20:19 UTC as 653rd comment | 2 replies
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1669 comments in total)
In reply to:

sproketholes: I want a mirrorless camera that has a bundled adapter for EF and FD lenses, in an insane flange distance which would allow anything to adapt to it. A high quality EVF, weather-proofing and hot-sht audio and video capability with all amazing port access, with the ability to connect to an SSD to record 4K output, a solid sensor that sucks in low light and be full frame, and about the size of the A6000.

All of this is really actually possible..

All of this coming from a company that didn't put wifi into the 7D MKII because they couldn't figure out how to put wifi into a metal device? Masaya Maede: "We considered adding this feature to the EOS 7D II but the body material presented challenges." Apparently, plenty of other companies have licked that challenge. But not Canon. For them, it's still "not possible". So, apparently, what might seem "actually possible" for one company doesn't mean it's possible for another company.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 20:06 UTC
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1669 comments in total)
In reply to:

creisti86: New EOS M with EVF and the sensor from the 70D

If that's what Canon considers "See Impossible", then it shows just how far behind Canon really is. A mirrorless camera with an EVF! Wow, we sure didn't see that coming, Canon! Canon sure does see the impossible.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 19:34 UTC
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1669 comments in total)
In reply to:

T3: The fact that this is a double page ad in the New York Times makes it unlikely that it'll be a camera product. We photographers tend to think Canon are all about cameras, but they aren't. They do a lot of other stuff too. It's more likely that it has something to do with their business machines division (office copiers, office automation, etc.). If they had something photo-related to tease, they would have done it at Photokina. But my guess is that since this thing isn't photo related, they are teasing it in the NYT.

Or it could be a white 7D MKII with a matching Stella McCartney handbag.

Well, the rest of the world outside of DPreview probably can't think of a photo camera that would be worthy of that level of hype either! A new camera is just not that important to the rest of the world, and certainly not worthy of a two page NYT ad (IMHO). Business machines and business products, on the other hand, are something that businesses rely on, on a daily basis. And it's a big part of Canon's business.

Look up "Canon ImageRUNNER logo", and you'll see that this logo is very similar to the logo they are using for their line of digital copier business products. They all use a similar box logo:

http://mitracopierindo.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/image-runner2.jpeg

Coincidence? Seems unlikely.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 15:45 UTC
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1669 comments in total)
In reply to:

falconeyes: With this comes a new "Canon See Impossible" box logo not seen before. That's not about a camera. Rather a new line of business products. IMHO.

If it is about a camera, then not a single specific new model. But rather a new technology incorporated in cameras. Or just a new logo art ...

Look up "Canon ImageRUNNER logo", and you'll see that this logo is very similar to the logo they are using for this line of digital copier business products. They all use a similar box logo:

http://mitracopierindo.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/image-runner2.jpeg

Coincidence? Seems unlikely.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 15:40 UTC
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1669 comments in total)

The fact that this is a double page ad in the New York Times makes it unlikely that it'll be a camera product. We photographers tend to think Canon are all about cameras, but they aren't. They do a lot of other stuff too. It's more likely that it has something to do with their business machines division (office copiers, office automation, etc.). If they had something photo-related to tease, they would have done it at Photokina. But my guess is that since this thing isn't photo related, they are teasing it in the NYT.

Or it could be a white 7D MKII with a matching Stella McCartney handbag.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 15:29 UTC as 707th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

lacikuss: I was thinking about all these companies fighting in the mirrorless arena for a tiny marketshare while Canon is just sitting on the side like as if not caring at all. In the meantime there is a very portable small (almost pocketable) and very cheap mirrorless camera ($250) with and APS-C sensor and with access to one of the largest lens catalogs in the world.

So.. why don't buy and EOS-M instead? At this price range there is no match!

So maybe Canon is not sitting on the sides after all but only having fun while the other panaolymfujisonyniketc are eating each other alive?

I have the EOS M. But I'd rather have the LX100. Why? It has better ergonomics, better controls, an EVF, a body with a zoom lens that is as compact as the EOS M with just the 22mm, a small add-on flash (yes, EOS M even with 22mm pancake still benefits from having flash), panorama sweep, 4K video, WiFI, etc. Yes it costs more. But my point is that you get more. Things like EVF, camera controls, a comfortable grip, etc. are really important once you best past the "my sensor is bigger than your sensor" silliness.

BTW, lets not forget that Canon originally tried to sell the EOS M + 22mm as a $799 kit when it was released in November 2012! Talk about a rip-off! Thankfully, they didn't get away with it because the market roundly rejected that attempt at highway robbery. Its current price more accurately reflects its value, IMO.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2014 at 15:29 UTC
In reply to:

lacikuss: I was thinking about all these companies fighting in the mirrorless arena for a tiny marketshare while Canon is just sitting on the side like as if not caring at all. In the meantime there is a very portable small (almost pocketable) and very cheap mirrorless camera ($250) with and APS-C sensor and with access to one of the largest lens catalogs in the world.

So.. why don't buy and EOS-M instead? At this price range there is no match!

So maybe Canon is not sitting on the sides after all but only having fun while the other panaolymfujisonyniketc are eating each other alive?

@nerd2 - Unfortunately, you don't seem to know what you're talking about. No external controls? The Leica T has twin top-plate control dials. No built-in flash? It has a built-in pop-up flash. No EVF? The T has electronic contacts in the hotshoe for Leica's accessory EVF. And the EVF tilts. Poor ergonomics? The Leica T has a wide right-side grip area with a deep scallop for your fingers to hook into. And it has those twin top-plate dials that are in easy reach of your thumb. Also, if you prefer a grippier body, Leica offers form-fitting snap-on rubberized body skins for the T. As for lens selection, in addition to T lenses, Leica also offers a slim-profile adapter with full electronic contacts so you can use Leica's compact M lenses. The EOS M's adapter for EF lenses is huge, totally negating the slim profile of the EOS M's body, not to mention the fact that EF lenses are also large.

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/leica-t-typ701/4

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2014 at 08:28 UTC
In reply to:

lacikuss: I was thinking about all these companies fighting in the mirrorless arena for a tiny marketshare while Canon is just sitting on the side like as if not caring at all. In the meantime there is a very portable small (almost pocketable) and very cheap mirrorless camera ($250) with and APS-C sensor and with access to one of the largest lens catalogs in the world.

So.. why don't buy and EOS-M instead? At this price range there is no match!

So maybe Canon is not sitting on the sides after all but only having fun while the other panaolymfujisonyniketc are eating each other alive?

Yeah, well, with the EOS M you get what you pay for, which is not much. No EVF, no tilt screen, no external controls, poor ergonomics, no built-in flash (and no small clip on flash either), no panorama sweep, slow AF, hardly any lenses, etc. I tried liking mine, but it's just not as enjoyable to use or own as I was hoping. Canon didn't put much effort into it, and it shows. I wish the EOS M had the LX100's design, controls and ergonomics. Instead, your just get a soap bar of a camera.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2014 at 04:47 UTC
In reply to:

captura: Panasonic fanboys rejoice! This article completely ignores the 'other' competition; the Sony RX100 trio, and the best-value Fuji X-30.

@captura - You can compare DXO points all you want, but a lot of people just don't like Sony controls. I just like the LX100's control layout much more. Dedicated exposure comp dial, dedicated shutter speed dial, dedicated aperture ring on the lens. People get so caught up in lab numbers that ultimately make very little practical difference out in the real world, but completely ignore how a camera handles and how well the controls are laid out. These days, just about any camera can produce great images if it's in the hands of a capable photographer. So I think a big differentiator that people should start taking into consideration is the design and layout of the camera. How a camera handles is important.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 07:54 UTC
In reply to:

RedDog Steve: The lack of a built-in flash will be missed by the vast majority of users who will use the LX100 as a compact (high end or otherwise) was originally intended ...
Quick, ready and capable - no muss, no fuss.
No flash puts a serious damper on that.

The fiddly enthusiast oriented manual control layout will further slow many non-pro users who are better served by the now traditional PASM modes.

To my view the LX100 is aimed at a very narrow user base (possibly to test waters).

Thank goodness there are still cameras made for people who like "enthusiast oriented manual control" layouts. Thank goodness the LX100 isn't just another dumb-down PASM Mode Dial camera.

Not every camera needs to be made for the widest audience or the lowest common denominator.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 07:37 UTC
In reply to:

misolo: I'll repost my comment here for replies in case anyone has thoughts on this: if there truly is a demand for optical zooms in phone cameras, why doesn't anyone do a module with three different lenses selectable from an internally rotating disk? The camera module would still be very compact (with no outside 'hump'), certainly not a problem to fit inside today's oversized phones and in tablets. It seems that 70mm is still amenable to 'pancake' designs, so something like 24/40/70 should work and would be a vast improvement over the usual fixed 27 or 28 designs. If such a simple solution is readily available with existing technology and nobody's doing it, is there really demand to justify the development of new technologies like the one described in this article?

I believe the "module with different lenses selectable from an internally rotating disk" strategy has been tried from time to time on compact cameras, but it just never caught on. I think it's because people would rather have zoom instead. If someone could develop a zoom lens small enough to fit inside a smartphone, I think it would be very popular and be a major selling point for any smartphone that has this zoom feature! Consumers like zoom.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2014 at 14:51 UTC
In reply to:

T3: Well, it's good to see that Canon is FINALLY getting serious about purses! Forget about all the other things me might wish Canon to do...at least they are really getting serious about purses now!

I don't think I'm the only one with a "snark" comment :)

Lighten up. Do you understand how humor works?

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 15:12 UTC
In reply to:

boogieboogie: So that's £400 for the camera that cost £200 to make and £800 for the purse that cost £10 to make. Go figure.

@Combat By Design - well, relative to the expense and quality of the bag, it's definitely an odd pairing. In the world of high end fashion, luxury goods, and expensive designer handbags, you don't see a lot of plastic being used. That material is not a good fit for that market. That's why the plastic iPhone 5C flopped. The plastic material was inconsistent with the "premium" image of what people expected from Apple. Likewise, with this Stella McCartney bag, the plastic build of the SL1 is inconsistent with the "premium" image, and clientelle, of a high-end designer like Stella McCartney. We're not talking about Walmart shoppers here! LOL. The SL1's plastic body is certainly good enough for the average consumer. But this bag isn't geared towards the average consumer. It's a luxury product made with premium materials.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 15:10 UTC
In reply to:

boogieboogie: So that's £400 for the camera that cost £200 to make and £800 for the purse that cost £10 to make. Go figure.

It's a total mis-match: expensive designer bag on the outside, cheap plastic camera on the inside. A better fit for a designer camera bag would have been one of the new Leicas (Leica X, Leica X-E, Leica T). Making the SL1 white still doesn't hide the fact that it's made of plastic. And the SL1 is not nearly as stylish as a Leica, which might be quite important if you're trying to sell to the style crowd.

If I were a fashionista woman who liked quality things, I would find the plastic Canon camera inside the Stella McCartney bag to be a bit of a let down. It's like dressing up in expensive designer clothes, then strapping on a plastic wrist watch.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 01:29 UTC
In reply to:

tkbslc: My mid-30's aged wife says it's really cool. Obviously the market wasn't a bunch of male photo gear nerds.

@Rob - I think your average fashion-conscious pop-star/celebrity would be more attracted to one of the new Leicas (Leica T, Leica X, Leica X-E), rather than a white plastic SL1 with a cheap white plastic kit lens. So I think this Stella McCartney bag is a total mis-match for the cheap toy-like SL1. It's a weird pairing. Sure, in pictures it might look ok, but in person you quickly realize how light and cheap the SL1 feels. I would find it a bit odd to open up this high quality designer bag and find a cheap plastic camera inside. One of the new Leicas would be a much better fit for this bag. And since they are so much more compact than a DSLR, the bag could be made more compact, too.
I wonder if potential customers will ask if they can buy the bag without the SL1.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 29, 2014 at 01:20 UTC

Well, it's good to see that Canon is FINALLY getting serious about purses! Forget about all the other things me might wish Canon to do...at least they are really getting serious about purses now!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 28, 2014 at 07:55 UTC as 20th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

xrokx: Fuji should make a special limited run of fixed lens (about 35 mm) FF cameras. It doesnt matter if they are a little on the big side. It could be a collectors item; it wouldnt hurt their sales of aps-c if they price it high enough. Half the price of a LEICA maybe . As long as it is fast and sharp.

I wouldn't doubt that that's something Fuji could do in a few years. But right now, I think they're just trying to build their base in APS-C. One step at a time. Companies have limited resources.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 27, 2014 at 04:07 UTC
In reply to:

samhain: Great questions!
Unfortunently not so great answers, especially the one about not bringing out a full frame x100. That, in a word- SUCKS. That completley sucks.

Sony flopped on the RX1 by leaving off the viewfinder(evf or ovf).
If fuji brought out a full frame x100 it would sell through the roof.
I honestly dont know what they're thinking.

Not happy about the answer reguarding different focal lengths either.
The adapters dont cut it.

I like that they are improving usabillity. But this camera is getting long in thw tooth and the little tweaks to the x100t are no where near enough to warrant an upgrade from x100s. I wouldnt even upgrade from the first gen x100.

"If fuji brought out a full frame x100 it would sell through the roof.
I honestly dont know what they're thinking."

There's certainly no guarantee that a FF X100 would "sell through the roof."

One reason why the RX1 flopped might have been the fact that it costs $2800. A full frame Fuji X100 with a viewfinder would probably be similarly priced. No fixed, single focal length camera is going to sell "through the roof" at that price. I think you're being a bit overly optimistic in your sales predictions.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 05:19 UTC
In reply to:

utomo99: I will wait for your next products. I hope the mirrorles is really good.

@armandino - there are plenty of people who are justifiably disappointed with EOS M. That's why Canon had to slash its price so drastically. I own the EOS M. But I only bought it because I was taking advantage of its fire sale pricing. The original EOS M pricing was an insulting joke. And even with the near-giveaway pricing, it's a rather disappointing experience. Canon clearly put in the bare minimum of effort with the EOS M. And Canon certainly isn't helping the EOS M by their lack of support of it (they refuse to bring the 11-22 and 55-200 to the US). All in all, the EOS M has been a disappointing experience. And yet, Maeda seems to mock us by saying that they've been "serious" about it all along.

Are you a Canon salesperson? If so, go back and tell your bosses that they they've made the EOS M a very disappointing experience. It's making many of us look elsewhere. They need to completely redo the EOS M body. Because right now, there are Canon Powershot P&S's that handle better.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 26, 2014 at 04:37 UTC
Total: 1994, showing: 61 – 80
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