T3

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On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

brownie314: I think this is FAR too expensive for the type of photographer this camera will appeal to. If you shoot in the studio and need a MF sensor - you probably already have pro studio equipment and can switch out digital backs to get whatever you want. If you need to shoot on-site - well the camera is not the biggest piece of equipment you will carry out into the wild (reflectors, flash systems, stands, etc.). So I think this is aimed at the VERY well healed amateur. I don't know how many of those there are that can drop $9k and just get a body with no lenses. We will see.

@brownie314 - You're the one who's getting worked up over a camera. Just because you don't understand the point of medium format, or can't afford it, doesn't mean that there's no point to this camera. Open up your mind and eyes. Hassy's H5D-50c currently sells for $14,500. It used to sell for $28,000. The X1D-50c is only $9000. That is a *significant* savings. And you're getting all worked up over the X1D-50c being "FAR too expensive"? :) Get some perspective. I think there will definitely be a market for this camera, and future subsequent models. The Hassy H#D medium format system has been very successful over the years--- at *MUCH* greater cost. This new Hassy X#D system is much more affordable, much more compact and lighter, and it even accepts Hassy's existing HC and HCD medium format lenses. Like I said, open up your mind and eyes. Broaden your perspective. I see a lot of potential in this introduction.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 20:37 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nicholalala: I used to shoot on the street with a Hasselblad, and medium format (and square) were always my preferred format. My perfect camera is probably an Alpa with a digital back. This is for all practical purposes that camera more refined. As somebody said on Luminous-Landscape, “If you don't see that as a breakthrough, then pick up a Phase XF body with an IQ350 back and three LS lenses and take a nice long hike or walk around a city for the day.” Just take the camera on a walk.

So, why would I buy a camera like this? Three things: It’s medium format and 50mp, so it has larger pixel sensors. It has 16 bit color depth. I’m sorry if color is not appreciated in photography. I look at my film images and am simply shocked by the color difference. The camera is reasonably priced for what it delivers in the package size. I paid $500 for 20x24" Cibachrome paper in 1990. Seriously, this camera will be useful for a decade.

I bet that I see a lot of these at weddings and environmental photo shoots.

@brownie314- " Who buys a $9k (body only) camera whose only advantage over a system camera from CaNikon or Sony is a marginally larger sensor"

I think you lack perspective. A Hassy H5D-50c with the same medium format sensor currently sells for $14,500. It used to sell for $28,000. With the Hassy X1D-50c priced at only $9,000, this is a significant cost savings. Plus, Hassy's HC and HCD lenses can be used on the X1D via an adapter. So compared to Hassy's previous medium format offerings, the X1D is a bargain.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 20:27 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

ogl: http://www.theverge.com/2016/6/22/12005978/hasselblad-x1d-mirrorless-medium-format-hands-on

After this preview I feel that it's modern, stylish and fashion thing. Fun gear.
But I don't feel that it's photo tool. :)

How ridiculously vain and superficial you are to judge a tool simply by its looks. There's nothing wrong with incorporating some decent style into a camera (or any product, for that matter). Would you prefer that it looked like it looked like it was a Soviet-era artifact? Ultimately, a tool is only as good as the person using it. If you can't get past its looks, and ultimately can't use it in a manner that delivers good results because you can't get past its looks, then that's on you! Don't blame the camera for you own mental/prejudicial shortcomings.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 03:12 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

jaygeephoto: This camera would almost be useful with a fast, high quality zoom. Perhaps a 40~120
F 2.8 would be nice. It would likely cost around $3,000 and weigh more than twice that of the camera.

@Marko2 - "Medium format's bread and butter is fashion and product photography with an elaborated strobe/lighting system"

I think that is mainly due to the fact that medium format cameras have historically been fairly large and bulky compared to their 35mm DSLR counterparts. But this X1D is now no larger than a FF DSLR (in fact, it's much slimmer).

Here's a comparison of a Canon 5D MKIII, the Hassy X1D, and a Pentax 645D.
http://camerasize.com/compact/#312,678,211,ha,t

As you can see, the X1D is very slim and compact compared to the other cameras. This camera is definitely a game-changer for medium format. I can definitely see this camera being used out of the studio, on location, traveling, much more than conventional medium format cameras.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 02:59 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mattersburger: Waist level finder?

A flip-out LCD would take care of that. Maybe on the X2D.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2016 at 02:48 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

brownie314: I think this is FAR too expensive for the type of photographer this camera will appeal to. If you shoot in the studio and need a MF sensor - you probably already have pro studio equipment and can switch out digital backs to get whatever you want. If you need to shoot on-site - well the camera is not the biggest piece of equipment you will carry out into the wild (reflectors, flash systems, stands, etc.). So I think this is aimed at the VERY well healed amateur. I don't know how many of those there are that can drop $9k and just get a body with no lenses. We will see.

I hate this "you probably already have..." non-sense logic that idiots like to use. Yep, no one needs anything new because everyone who might want something "already has it". Yeah, makes total sense. Why in the world should any company produce any new products then?

BTW, well-healed amateurs do exist. In fact, I think it's the well-healed amateurs who are buying most of the high-end products out there. Who do you think are buying most of the high-end aviator/pilot watches out there? It's not really professional aviators or pilots. It's well-healed non-pilots who keep these high-end watch manufacturers in business. And do you think that the only people buying Range Rovers are people who go off-road? Hahaha! Nope, it's well-healed non-off-roaders. Open your eyes. There are *plenty* of rich people in the world. Better to go after that market than the downward spiral of lower-end products the cater to very price-conscious consumers.

Link | Posted on Jun 25, 2016 at 07:43 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mssimo: Who here would like to see a digital Hasselblad XPan or any brand Pano camera.

XPan and Pano cameras were a necessity in the analog era. But even then, it was very much a niche product. In the digital age, the very high resolution sensors that are available now, combined with image stitching, make things like an XPan less necessary. I think a pano crop or pano stitching from today's sensors compares quite well to images from XPan's of the past. So I think a digital pano camera would be even more of a niche than it was in the analog era, and it'd be a lot more expensive, too.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 13:47 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

Bruce Crossan: What king of pedigree does Nitto Koyagu have in making lenses of the standard that will be demanded by buyers of this system?

"Pedigree?" LOL. That's really old thinking. In the digital age of information and technology, knowledge is not some kind of genetic inheritance.

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2016 at 13:39 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

GodSpeaks: To be honest, the big issue I have now with medium format, is that the sensor is not large enough, as they all fall far short of a full sized 645 frame.

These sensors are even smaller than the 36x48mm sensor (2xFF) I had in my Mamiya digital MF camera years ago.

Why is it that no one is offering a full 645 sized sensor?

"I understand the cost/expense issue, but given the target market (pros) an extra $1000 or two would go unnoticed in that market."

I don't think it would just be "an extra $1000 or two." It'd probably be a lot more than that. If it were so easy, and the cost differential so little, don't you think that there would be plenty of full 645 sensor cameras already in the market? The fact that there *aren't* is a pretty clear indicator of the difficulty and expense. Of course, arm-chair engineers always think that it's a lot easier and cheaper than it really is. Don't think that camera manufacturers are simply ignoring the "full 645 sensor" market because they are too lazy or stupid to go after that market.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 04:03 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

attomole: I think they have done a great Job with packaging on this, the gains for medium format loosing the mirror box are bigger than 35mm, silly that others have not made this enginerring choice before (Pentax).

Like others, I am sceptical that given the ubiquitous DSLR has better, faster technology development, and better light gathering, fast lens options. This will struggle to find its place, but with some specialist focal plane adjustment lenses, a "super wide C" lens option, as a specialist studio and field camera, and it looks like it might even work as a street shooter. It might find its spot in the market none the less.

It does look a nice rig to use, it has an "I want one" appeal.

There's bells and whistles, then there's a medium format sensor. There's definitely a place for a medium format sensor, especially in such a compact package. These camera will have no problem finding its place in the market. Frankly, I think new DSLRs having a harder time finding their place in the market, because the market is increasingly saturated, and there's less and less need to upgrade your DSLR.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 03:58 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

fmian: For such a small sensor I would have expected them to debut it with faster glass.
Compared to what has come before it, this is quite disappointing.

First of all, this is just a debut. It's not a complete system. I'm sure faster lenses will eventually be introduced. No need to freak out so soon. Secondly, I'm sure existing medium-format lenses will adapt quite nicely to this mirrorless Hassy once adapters become available. That's one of the great things about mirrorless cameras: adaptability.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 03:12 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)
In reply to:

GodSpeaks: To be honest, the big issue I have now with medium format, is that the sensor is not large enough, as they all fall far short of a full sized 645 frame.

These sensors are even smaller than the 36x48mm sensor (2xFF) I had in my Mamiya digital MF camera years ago.

Why is it that no one is offering a full 645 sized sensor?

Expense. Larger sensors get extremely expensive. You could increase the frame size of film, and the cost didn't go up that much. The cost increase was probably fairly linear. But when increasing the size of a digital sensor, the cost goes way, way up. It's more of an exponential increase in cost. Plus, it's an issue of diminishing returns. 51mp is already an immense about of resolution. So don't hold your breath for full 645 sized sensors, or 4x5 sensors, or 8x10 sensors. Those would be astronomically expensive, and there would be little to no market for them due to the extremely high cost of such large sensors.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 03:07 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

zakaria: As some has mentioned before it is Pentax k01 like which dpr didn't like it.
Pentax would you please give the market your k02 with VF. The market mood is ready now to receive it with hail.

There's no point of a K02 with a VF if it uses the same flange distance as a regular DSLR. Totally pointless. The reason why this Hassy is so slim is because it uses a totally different lens register distance because these lenses are designed for the short distance of mirrorless.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 02:58 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

Richard Kwon: I can't wait until the new Pentax ML medium format!!! I'm sure they are studying this right now :)

But at the pace that Pentax works, it's probably a decade away.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 02:54 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

JackM: I'm still a fan, but on second look, there are no manual controls for aperture, shutter speed, or ISO. That's a pity.

Canon and Nikon bodies don't have "a shutter speed dial on the body, and proper aperture rings on the lenses" either. Plenty of pros and non-pros seem to *get by* with Canon and Nikon gear. In fact, most photographers overwhelmingly prefer thumb and finger-wheel dials for shutter speed and aperture control (the way Canon and Nikon have it). It's more ergonomically efficient. Shutter speed dials on the top plate require more hand movement to reach them. The same goes for aperture rings, especially when using longer lenses where you hand position may be a few centimeters from the aperture ring (which is typically located very close to the body, at the base of the lens).

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 02:53 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

razadaz: I find the decision to go with two SD cards interesting. SD cards have always had the aura of being for amateur based cameras, both Cannon and Nikon omitting them from their top cameras altogether. Perhaps this could be the start of that changing.

I think it's absurd not to use SD cards. CF-card cameras are a dying breed. I think CF-card cameras will eventually become extinct. SD is now the overwhelming standard for digital cameras.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 02:46 UTC
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)

Looks like a solid, clean, well-designed piece of equipment. I love the pop-up mode dial. It keeps the design clean, and prevents un-intential movements of the dial. Incredibly compact and slim body. Mirrorless is definitely starting to mature.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 02:39 UTC as 161st comment
On article Hands-on with Hasselblad X1D (789 comments in total)
In reply to:

stereo: I suppose it's like a Leica camera. It looks a bit boring at first sight. When you hold it in your hands, it all makes sense!

So true. I never judge a camera's looks and design solely based on what I see on the web. These things need to be judged in person, in your hand, and even after a bit of use.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 02:32 UTC
On article Medium-format mirrorless: Hasselblad unveils X1D (1189 comments in total)

Wow, pretty sweet! Amazingly compact for a medium format sensor, thanks to the elimination of the mirror and OVF! Love it!

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2016 at 02:29 UTC as 38th comment
On article X-ray: iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1 (33 comments in total)
In reply to:

qwertyasdf: Despite Fuji's reputation, and their target audience, I have to say Fuji makes one of the worst feeling cameras, the plastic on the X-T1 simply feels yuck!

I have the X-E1 and X-A1, both feels very plasticy and they actually are (which to me is a good thing though, becoz of the light weight).

I have an X-E1. Feels fine to me. Are parts of the body made of plastic? Sure. Does it make any functional difference? No. It's all psychological. If you want a camera carved out of a solid block of aluminum, get a Leica T.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2016 at 00:16 UTC
Total: 2427, showing: 1 – 20
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