T3

T3

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 1, 2003

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On Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review preview (1110 comments in total)
In reply to:

deltaskyking: 10 frames per second - check
65 point wide viewfinder filling autofocus - check
Class leading fast autofocus - check
Pro level weather sealing - check
Excellent low light autofocus and image capture - check
Another B.S. "Silver Award" for Canon cameras from dpreview - check

@deltaskyking - anyone can cherry pick five favorite features to "check", and give a camera a "Gold Award." But a real review needs to assess the totality of a camera, not just five bits and pieces.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 17:59 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II Review preview (1110 comments in total)
In reply to:

across_mountains: I have a 7D. I was hoping for the Mark II to have an articulated screen. Unfortunately, the 7D Mark II lacks it. While most of my photography doesn't need it, I've taken enough that I wish the Mark II had an articulated screen so that I wouldn't have to engage in Hail Mary picture taking. I'm disappointed.

@kimvette - people used to say the same thing about pop-up flashes. People would say, "If you want a *fragile* built-in flash, get an XXD body. Because Canon will never put a *fragile* built-in flash into an of their *serious* DSLRs." Then Canon came out with the 7D which had a pop-up flash. And amazingly, those *fragile* built-in flashes are doing just fine. Why? Because they really aren't that fragile, because they stay closed most of the time, especially in situations where damage is most likely to occur. The same goes for a *fragile* articulating screen: it stays closed most of the time, especially in situations where damage is most likely to occur. You only take it out when you need it, but it's always there for you. Maybe you only flip the screen out only a few times a year. What's wrong with having it there for those occasions? It's not as if the articulating screen is *fragile* even when it's closed!

My guess is that we'll finally see a "flippy" screen on the 7DIII, in 5 yrs.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 14, 2014 at 02:18 UTC

So if this technology becomes a reality for Olympus, does that mean that it might eventually make it to Sony sensor shift cameras as well?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2014 at 20:24 UTC as 16th comment
In reply to:

Noham: Noticed that it weights a good 130g more than the other – ny reason for this ? The body made looks pretty much the same as the A7r – is it the stabilization mechanism that is adding the weight ?

In addition, the front panel is now magnesium alloy instead of plastic, and the "lens mount has also been reinforced, for more stability when using heavy lenses."

Direct link | Posted on Nov 30, 2014 at 17:07 UTC
In reply to:

TheDevil: I like that they made the grip bigger. I have big hands and I hated the ergonomics of the first A7. I just wish they would have used the extra real estate and jammed a higher capacity battery in there.

@quezra - I think it's inevitable that mirrorless cameras will move to larger batteries. Inevitable. It happened with DSLRs. It'll happen with mirrorless. And it's an even more pressing issue with mirrorless, because of their higher power consumption. Higher shooting capacity will be used as a selling point. As soon as one mirorless manufacturer starts touting higher shooting capacity in their new camera (by switching to a higher capacity battery), other mirrorless manufacturers will follow. Then it becomes a market pressure issue. So it's going to happen, sooner or later. Plus, I think it will happen (larger batteries, higher shooting capacity) as more and more people turn to mirrorless cameras as DSLR replacements. Right now, I use both DSLR and mirrorless, because DSLRs still have much better battery life. Mirrorless can't compete there. Mirrorless manufacturers will eventually want to close this shooting capacity gap. And they'll do it by finally upping the battery size.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 18:45 UTC
In reply to:

TheDevil: I like that they made the grip bigger. I have big hands and I hated the ergonomics of the first A7. I just wish they would have used the extra real estate and jammed a higher capacity battery in there.

I definitely agree that these mirrorless cameras need bigger batteries. Mirrorless bodies consume more power, and yet these cameras have smaller capacity batteries than their DSLR counterparts. The NP-FM500H battery for the Sony A77 SLT has a capacity of 1650mAH while the capacity of the NP-FW50 battery for the A7 is only 1020mAh. It doesn't make any sense. Larger power consumption devices need larger capacity batteries, not the other way around. And it makes even less sense to keep using a smaller battery if the camera now has a deeper grip that can accommodate a larger battery. So I'm right there with you, TheDevil. Bigger battery, please!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 17:28 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: Since I don't live in Japan, I don't get excited about cameras that are only available there. :-)

Obviously, the Sony A7 II isn't going to just be limited to Japan. That's more like something that Canon would do with their mirrorless, LOL!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 04:00 UTC
In reply to:

bcalkins: I'm all for improvements in technology and image quality over time, but still waiting to see an article with the title "Skilled photographer upgrades to new camera and others notice dramatic improvement!"

Why does it have to be about "dramatic improvement" that "others notice"? Why can't it be about improvements that only the user notices? I think those kinds of improvements are just as important.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 03:58 UTC
In reply to:

erotavlas: grrrr.... no touchscreen again! Not sure about everyone else but I find touchscreen really useful to quickly point at what I want in focus rather than using buttons to reposition.

Yeah, it's too bad. I think every camera should have the option of a touchscreen. It's just such a handy feature, especially for focus point selection.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2014 at 03:56 UTC
In reply to:

GoneMirrorless: IBIS reality check.
The 3 DSLR companies that offer IBIS are Pentax, Olympus, Sony/Minolta.
The 2 DSLR companies that do not are Canon and Nikon.

While I think it is a nice feature, it sure seems to have jinxed DSLR sales. Sony and Olympus no longer make DSLRs!

@GoneMirrorless - your conclusions are flawed. First of all, with Sony and Oly DSLR, they were both going against heavily entrenched Canon and Nikon DSLR...and Oly was further hampered by using a smaller sensor. I don't think Sony or Oly ever really stood a chance in the DSLR segment. But now they are in a different camera segment: mirrorless. So they will attract people who want the characteristic aspects of mirrorless, and they'll have the ADDITIONAL benefit of IBIS. In the DSLR segment, IBIS alone was not enough of a draw. But today, IBIS and mirrorless *combined* are a much better and more compelling draw, which is further enhanced by the fact that Canon and Nikon's mirrorless offerings are so poor and non-competitive!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 23:58 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: Looks like Sony has finally figured out how to do useful incremental upgrades that actually enhance the performance of their cameras, just like the big 2 have done for decades, instead of simply tacking on whatever feature that seems popular at the moment. Good job Sony! :)

Except that the big two are now doing these upgrades every 5 years or so (a far, far, far longer interval that Sony is)! And the big two are running low on new ideas to implement, just milking old DSLR designs, and refusing to try anything new. Heck, even wifi, a higher resolution sensor and an articulating screen was too new and daunting of an idea for Canon's new 7D MKII, which was 5 years in the making.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 23:01 UTC
In reply to:

GoneMirrorless: IBIS reality check.
The 3 DSLR companies that offer IBIS are Pentax, Olympus, Sony/Minolta.
The 2 DSLR companies that do not are Canon and Nikon.

While I think it is a nice feature, it sure seems to have jinxed DSLR sales. Sony and Olympus no longer make DSLRs!

You're confusing correlation with causation IBIS has not *caused* this so-called "jinxed DSLR sales". It's merely a correlation. Correlation does not imply causation. In other words, a correlation between two variables does not necessarily imply that one causes the other. For example, "Since the 1950s, both the atmospheric CO2 level and obesity levels have increased sharply. Hence, atmospheric CO2 causes obesity." Obviously, that's false, just like you implying that the inclusion of IBIS caused Sony and Olympus to "no longer make DSLRs!" LOL. Nice try.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 22:58 UTC
In reply to:

nyer82: I knew this was possible... to have both sensor and optical stabilization and the camera decides how to implement them. It's really the best of all worlds. But whenever I brought it up, people screamed at me.

Just remember, some people (and companies) only "see impossible." Other companies just do it.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 22:48 UTC
In reply to:

Paul Liukas: Great camera, great specifications, but lack of emotions like XT1. Camera like a brick too modern and too cold for me. If you are tired of pixel peeping like me and want to get a joy from photography, camera should be with soul :) Fuji will spoil many of us with soul and light lenses. I don't want to use D810 anymore, except for product photos (need)..

Anyway great job Sony!

Cameras don't have emotions or soul. That includes the XT1. All those things (emotion, soul, joy, etc) are supplied exclusively by the user. Stop kidding yourself.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 22:47 UTC
In reply to:

GoneMirrorless: IMHO, IBIS is more for crop cameras where focal lengths are longer. @ 24mm IS is not a big deal. @300mm it is. That's why most long zooms and many long primes already come with IS.

With IBIS, you can have stabilization with any focal length you want. If you don't want it, just shut it off! But the reality is that stabilization can be helpful even at shorter focal lengths. Why do you think Canon introduced a full frame 24mm f/2.8 IS lens? Anything that can get you a more stable handheld shot can be an advantage and a benefit.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 22:44 UTC

Well, I guess I see my next camera! This is fantastic news. FF with IBIS is a dream come true.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 07:12 UTC as 293rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

peeyaj: I am a newbie in cameras.. I just want to ask a question.

Does having an IBIS in a full frame mirrorless camera a big deal? What is the advantage compared to others especially 4/3 and DSLRs? Thanks.

Frankly, I think IBIS is always an advantage to have in a camera, whether it be FF, APS-C, or m4/3. It's silly to assume that stabilization isn't a "big deal" if you have FF. There are plenty of FF DSLR users who use stabilized lenses. Why? Because stabilization helps, even on FF.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 07:10 UTC
On Canon PowerShot G7 X Review preview (412 comments in total)

Is Canon ever going to produce a camera that can do panorama sweep? I really enjoy this feature, especially in a compact camera. So many other cameras have this feature, but not Canon. I guess when it comes to panorama sweep, Canon sees it as impossible.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 04:34 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply
On Canon PowerShot G7 X Review preview (412 comments in total)
In reply to:

damian5000: Reviewers have shot 370+ images on a charge. Other reviewers were able to shoot 70 min 1080p60 on a single charge. The rest of the negatives are mostly nitpicks in comparison to the positives. The exposure comp dial is hard to turn? Come on... Be serious.

You have to keep in mind that some of consider exposure compensation an important control parameter (which is probably why Canon dedicated such a prominent control ring to this feature!), and so if the interface for this important control parameter makes it less easy to use, that's not just a "nitpick". If a company puts physical controls on a camera, they should at least operate well. It's attention to these kinds of details that can make the difference between a truly enjoyable camera to use, and one that you wish you hadn't bought. So basically, how well the controls operate is not a "nitpick".

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 04:28 UTC
On JVC introduces GY-LS300 4K camcorder with MFT mount article (75 comments in total)
In reply to:

pdelux: Another nail in the coffin of the M4/3 format. Not long now before this Format dies as the experts have predicted. How can anyone survive with so many brands using it, too many lenses to choose from, too much competition.

Whats next Kodak back from the dead with M4/3 mount?

Yeah, how terrible that so many brands use it! Lol. That's what you *want* to happen with a format!!! Proprietary and closed system are generally bad. Open is good. Widely adopted by multiple brands is good. You want as many brands to use it as possible! Ever hear of 35mm film? VHS cassette? DVD? Yeah, it was soooo terrible that so many brands used these formats.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2014 at 22:16 UTC
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