sportyaccordy

sportyaccordy

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Aug 1, 2010

Comments

Total: 202, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On Huawei Honor 6 Plus comes with three 8MP cameras post (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Menneisyys: No point in trying to emulate shallow DoF. The results will be sometimes dreadful, as has been shown by the M8.

I'm confused. Why did you get the QX instead of a NEX camera? They have NEX cameras with WiFi

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 21:15 UTC
On Huawei Honor 6 Plus comes with three 8MP cameras post (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Menneisyys: No point in trying to emulate shallow DoF. The results will be sometimes dreadful, as has been shown by the M8.

It's doable with arrays. 4 1/2.3" sensors (25mm2) ~ 1 1" sensor (116mm2). 9 1/2.3" sensors ~ 1 MFT sensor. Etc etc. And with arrays you wouldn't need Bayer filters... you could just capture one color or straight luminance etc. So youd get more resolution and signal too. It's just a matter of cost and form factor.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 19:36 UTC
On Huawei Honor 6 Plus comes with three 8MP cameras post (35 comments in total)
In reply to:

Menneisyys: No point in trying to emulate shallow DoF. The results will be sometimes dreadful, as has been shown by the M8.

It can be done, just need more sensor area and higher f/stops

An array of sensors adding up to the size of a large sensor with fast lenses will look like a big sensor with a fast lens.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 16, 2014 at 18:48 UTC
On Medium well done: Two takes on the Pentax 645Z article (240 comments in total)
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: For whatever its worth, in the studio comparison anyway, the D810 gives nothing up to the 645Z on a 100% view basis as far as noise goes. Def want to see its DR capabilities as well as ability to pull info from dark/underexposed areas. DxOMark's data can't come soon enough. Not in the market, just want to see what it can do.

How does resolution/base ISO = theoretical DR.... isn't DR a dimensionless unit, and ISO an arbitrary holdover from film days?

Direct link | Posted on Dec 10, 2014 at 14:23 UTC
On Medium well done: Two takes on the Pentax 645Z article (240 comments in total)
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: For whatever its worth, in the studio comparison anyway, the D810 gives nothing up to the 645Z on a 100% view basis as far as noise goes. Def want to see its DR capabilities as well as ability to pull info from dark/underexposed areas. DxOMark's data can't come soon enough. Not in the market, just want to see what it can do.

What is the denominator in that formula?

And it's possible DxOMark will never test this sensor. They have only tested 1 X-Pro body for example.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2014 at 18:57 UTC
On Medium well done: Two takes on the Pentax 645Z article (240 comments in total)

For whatever its worth, in the studio comparison anyway, the D810 gives nothing up to the 645Z on a 100% view basis as far as noise goes. Def want to see its DR capabilities as well as ability to pull info from dark/underexposed areas. DxOMark's data can't come soon enough. Not in the market, just want to see what it can do.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2014 at 13:24 UTC as 63rd comment | 36 replies
On Real-world test: Going pro with the Samsung NX1 article (349 comments in total)

Can't wait for the DxO tests of this and the 645Z.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2014 at 01:40 UTC as 109th comment

I'm really hoping this thing drives used A7I prices down. All I really care about.

I do kind of hope they fix the A7R's shutter next go round.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 14:50 UTC as 173rd comment
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (821 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I wonder why they couldn’t have produced a camera like this a few years ago. I know the auto focus tech was not as good and you wouldn’t have had the 4K video. However, couldn’t they have put a 4/3s inch sensor in this size body back then?

Could they have produced this lens a few years back? Were they just waiting for the software correcting technology to catch-up with this lens design?

Hopefully those lens advances are spreading across the industry... and will make their way up to Sony's FE line for some budget options

Direct link | Posted on Nov 19, 2014 at 02:28 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (821 comments in total)
In reply to:

john10001: This camera may be great but unfortunately it can no longer be considered an Advanced "COMPACT" Digital Camera like its predecessors, COMPACT being the operative word.

Unfortunately this is no longer something I want to buy. This thing is a hefalump. A brick. And not something I can live with.

If you can live with it's size and it still ticks all your boxes and needs in a camera after coming from LX3/5/7 then fair enough good luck to you.

For me Panasonic have messed up and fallen behind the competition. They no longer have an advance compact digital camera to compete with rivals so what they did with the LX100 is take the range out of its previous category into a new category.

For someone who still wants something compact, advanced, and refined, Panasonic now have nothing to offer.

This leaves me looking at the Ricoh GR, Nikon Coolpix A, Sony RX100 II/III and the Canon G7 X. All advanced compact digital cameras that take great photos and a logical step from the LX3/5/7.

Fallen behind what competition? Barring the Coolpix A it has the largest sensor, and it has a more versatile lens than the Coolpix A. Only dimension it is larger in is thickness- a whopping ~0.75"

If this isn't "compact" for what it offers, show me another camera with similar sensor size, zoom range and body smallness. Only thing that comes close is the RX 100 III and even that falls short....

So what are your real complaints? What you are saying just isn't true.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 18, 2014 at 21:52 UTC

So can I use this on my C3?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 15, 2014 at 20:21 UTC as 2nd comment | 1 reply

Good riddance

Direct link | Posted on Nov 8, 2014 at 01:41 UTC as 174th comment
In reply to:

Samuel Dilworth: Look at the compressed depth-of-field and distance scales. Not only are they entirely useless for scale focusing or gauging depth of field (so why are they there at all?), but the focus speed is senselessly quick. At f/1.2 the full depth of field would be traversed in an impossibly short movement of the focus ring (likely less than the backlash in the mechanics!).

Of course the whole appearance is shamefully (and badly) copied from Leica.

The optics might be good – the headline specs certainly sound interesting – but they’re wasted in a housing like this.

The distance scale seems to be about ~120 degrees, with the middle range (2-8 ft) using the bulk of the range... not much different than my FD 50 1.4. Does kind of suck that the DoF scales are so tiny, but if you are shooting MF you are probably checking focus through the viewfinder anyway. Hardly a deal breaker.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 27, 2014 at 16:18 UTC
In reply to:

Clyde Thomas: Liquid lens... great for cold weather shooting I presume?

It's not just not freezing....

The liquid has to be optically clear, it has to be thermally stable (or the lens mechanism has to compensate), etc etc. There are a lot of challenges with using liquids for optics

Direct link | Posted on Oct 24, 2014 at 13:09 UTC
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: This thing could be a winner, but my big big fear is that it relies heavily on software correction to help what I imagine is a heavily compromised lens. The specs look great, and the price is reasonable, but I'd have to wait for reviews and lens tests to really get behind it.

Lens correction algorithms "correct" for distortion and vignetting. Both, but more obviously vignetting, amount to lost information, invalidating the purported advantages of faster glass. If, for example, without correction, wide open shots amount to 1 stop less average exposure, that's 1 stop less resolution than what you should be getting. So it kind of makes the lens worse than if it just had slower, less compromised glass.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2014 at 19:54 UTC
In reply to:

Antonio Rojilla: Or a Sony A6000. With the compact 16-50 they are almost the same size and have almost the same focal length and aperture (well, depending on how you do the calculation anyway). The Sony sensor is not only larger, the Panny is smaller than m43 (the effective area used at least). The lens may be better in the LX100, but the EVF and AF better in the A6000. You also get double the pixels, a tilt LCD, a built-in flash and last but no least a lens mount.

http://camerasize.com/compact/#569,535.360,ha,b

I only see two reasons to get the Panny: 4K, and look and feel, as it is a beautiful camera with some nice retro controls.

Lens correction algorithms "correct" for distortion and vignetting. Both, but more obviously vignetting, amount to lost information, invalidating the purported advantages of faster glass. If, for example, without correction, wide open shots amount to 1 stop less average exposure, that's 1 stop less resolution than what you should be getting. So it kind of makes the lens worse than if it just had slower, less compromised glass.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 3, 2014 at 19:54 UTC
In reply to:

sportyaccordy: This thing could be a winner, but my big big fear is that it relies heavily on software correction to help what I imagine is a heavily compromised lens. The specs look great, and the price is reasonable, but I'd have to wait for reviews and lens tests to really get behind it.

@Joseph Black, if the end result is an image that has as much info as, essentially, an underexposed shot, they might as well have made the lens faster.

I'd rather pull up data in PP than lose it forever through inaccessible lens correction. The worst outcome would be if the lens needed to be corrected at all focal lengths and "normal" apertures (F/4-F/11) in order for it to be able to have that headline grabbing lens spec.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 20:23 UTC

I don't know if this is really real. We will see.

I am still holding out for arrays, personally. I feel like a zoom camera could be approximated by combining the images of fixed lens cameras of different focal lengths focused on the same thing with algorithms. Such a setup could also be huge for subject isolation as well. And with small sensors getting long equivalent focal lenghts wouldn't be too tough.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 14:57 UTC as 2nd comment

This thing could be a winner, but my big big fear is that it relies heavily on software correction to help what I imagine is a heavily compromised lens. The specs look great, and the price is reasonable, but I'd have to wait for reviews and lens tests to really get behind it.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 1, 2014 at 17:36 UTC as 172nd comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

ZhanMInG12: Amazing! In seriousness Canon managed to create the mess that is the EOS M, then proceeded to sell an upgrade the equivalent of new firmware!

I shudder when I think about what they would have done if they weren't serious...

But could the extra $500 you could have saved on an actual 50 1.8 have bought you a FF body instead?

When you normalize for focal length (i.e. 35 1.4 vs 35 1.4), FF is generally more expensive, especially on the wide end. But if you normalize for aperture diameter & field of view (i.e. 50/2 vs 35 1.4), FF has the advantage as far as glass goes. For most APS-C mounts there's no equivalent to something even as piddly as a 24 2.8, and when there is (16 2.0) it's very big and very expensive......

I still think there needs to be mroe wide angle primes built for APS-Cs.... but I want to see it just to see what they will spec out like and cost.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 18:25 UTC
Total: 202, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »