showmeyourpics

Lives in United States New Rochelle, NY, United States
Works as a instructor
Joined on Aug 29, 2011
About me:

taking better pics

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Total: 102, showing: 1 – 20
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On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $800-1200 (204 comments in total)

Addendum to my previous post: AJDVD mentions the Olympus cameras great quality but horrible menu (because of all the camera features, it is complex for less expert photographers). My E-M5ii has so many direct controls and custom settings that I used the menu once to set them up then forgot about it and focused on enjoying the camera excellent ergonomics and IQ. Sensor pixel count is another one: 16Mp even cropped down to 12Mp and resized with Perfect Resize let me make 24x36" fine art prints that I regularly sell.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 02:51 UTC as 1st comment
On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $800-1200 (204 comments in total)

Hi, all of these cameras must be cream of the crop just to qualify for this article. To take advantage of it, decide what features are key to your kind of photography then read the individual reviews to find the model that best fits your needs (no-one is best for everything). After that, go to a camera store to try it in your hands. Even better, rent one for a day and put it through its paces. Also, it is worth checking what the pros are buying in terms of smaller and lighter cameras since their choices are typically quite concrete. The one caveat regarding these articles is that they tend to judge cameras by some factors that are less than relevant and vice-versa. Case in point, the importance of a higher number of AF points when most advanced photographers, for very good reasons, use spot focusing and reframing (and blocking focus on a specific plane by switching to MF). The opposite is the insufficient appreciation for body weatherization which puts a camera in a class of its own.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 02:38 UTC as 2nd comment

After 50 years of photography, often in tough environments, and having worked with all kind of gear and accessories, my back has come to the following conclusions. For heavier gear (such as my Pentax K5 with a number of DA* lenses) and lots of walking/hiking, nothing beats the balance and comfort of a well made backpack (with a waterproof storm bag inside). For lighter/smaller gear (such as my Oly OM-D cameras) and easy going, a small sling pouch is the height of functionality. I keep the individual cameras and lenses in heavy duty, waterproof zip lock bags. Lastly, all of my bags look truly anonymous.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2016 at 18:54 UTC as 22nd comment
On article Worth the wait? A look inside the Pentax K-1 (649 comments in total)

During my 50+ years of photography, I have always admired Pentax (and Olympus) for their focus on basic photography, high quality and affordable pricing. I am currently working with a K5 and DA* lenses (and several OM-D bodies and Zuiko lenses). The K1 completes the selection of excellent Pentax bodies and seems to retain the character of the APS-C and 645 models. Alas, I can't shake off the feeling that it's somewhat late for the general market (I would get one yesterday), and believe that exploring the mirrorless or other advanced design would have made more sense. The EVF is quite puzzling. It is much more complex with many more parts than the articulation on the side and it does not seem to offer the same range of motion. More complex designs with many parts are often less robust than the simpler ones. The ability to use a bunch of older lenses is quite attractive but many are not going to be good enough for the sensor. At last, I love the camera and wish Pentax good luck.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2016 at 19:46 UTC as 4th comment

You do have to pay attention to what Rishi is saying: a moderate wide angle will bring in the environment giving the portrait a sense of place and, when shooting close to the subject, a sense of close proximity and intimacy. The former, I believe, is easier to appreciate and has been a specific approach to portraiture for a long time. The latter is more difficult because that physical closeness can make some people uncomfortable especially if they are not intimate with the subject. Also, attention must be paid to the proper position of the subject and their distance from the lens. Overall, good points and pictures, thanks.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2016 at 16:09 UTC as 120th comment | 1 reply
On article Bang for the Buck: Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Review (710 comments in total)

Hi, this is not the 1st time that I read the pro's and con's of a new camera at the top of this page and then the overall score looks to be the one for a different model (80%, really?). I am a seasoned fine art semi-pro using an EM10, EM10II, EM5II and Pentax K5 with pro grade lenses. There is a limited number of improvements between the EM10 and the EM10II but all significant to me, including the better IS and EVF, and the successful relocation of a couple of buttons. The EM10II is obviously not "perfect" for everyone but in its own category it's a masterpiece of construction and IQ, ergonomics, feature set, customization and price. People should study the camera and become truly familiar with it, mount one of the Pro lenses, go out there and take a bunch of pics, process and print them properly, and then complain if it's still called for. I have used more than 40 different cameras in 5 formats in my life, and the EM10II gives me one of the most enjoyable shooting experiences ever.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2016 at 01:24 UTC as 13th comment

Hi, while technically correct, the article makes the arguable assumption that there is a vast population of amateur photographers who is able to appreciate and take advantage of the particular competences of a specific camera model. It is a well known fact that the typical owner of a digital camera does not take the time to read the manual and even less experiment with the camera itself. I use a Nikon P7800 (go everywhere), Olympus EM10II and EM5II, and Pentax K5 with pro and non-pro lenses. Even the P7800 is competent enough for most photography (excellent 13x19" prints at ISO400 with Raw in DxO OpticsPro). It has a low ISO ceiling and is slow to write to memory but personal technique is still paramount. Case in point: even a superior AF is not enough for good action shots if one is not familiar with the subject and cannot predict its behavior (watch the pros). Alas, many people just expect modern cameras to do all the work instead of being challenged by their advanced features.

Link | Posted on Jan 23, 2016 at 15:35 UTC as 44th comment
On article Readers' Showcase: Rob Kearney (76 comments in total)

Let's keep some perspective. The young man shows promise. His pics show his efforts to "see" the picture. The processing leaves a lot to be desired. He definitely deserves encouragement and I wish him not to grow a gigantic ego

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2015 at 18:31 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (560 comments in total)

As the article points out, makers of mirrorless cameras are still experimenting with body design. Also, sensor size of different systems varies substantially which influences the size/weight of the lenses. I recently bought into the OM-D system because of its substantial size/weight advantage vs my beloved Pentax K5 and DA* lenses. I can chose between the M43 bigger pro lenses for maximum IQ or go with the slower, minuscule ones for maximum portability. I do static photography (land and cityscapes) as well as more dynamic travel, people and animals. While I love the OVF of the K5, the Oly EVF is great for real time feedback on my camera settings and exposure. There is no limit to the usefulness of ever higher, noise-free ISO, but today with the Oly's (EM10II and EM5II) I shoot at ISO1600 and still make excellent 16x24" prints (up to 24x36" with lower ISO). For me, the Oly's combination of ergonomics, state of the art IS and large and bright EVF makes for an awesome shooting experience.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2015 at 11:25 UTC as 6th comment
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (560 comments in total)
In reply to:

Charlie Jin: Combined with Lenses and adaptors the mirrorless cameras have only very negligible advantage sacrificing other important factors. It is like comparing the two gun systems - one with 1 meter 30 centimetre long (DSLR) and another with 1 meter 25 centimetre long (ILC). After attaching accessaries on them, you just can't distinguish on the basis of original size and weight alone. If you really need the small and light, just carry a hand gun.

For this reason, I think that mirrorless is only a fad created by Sony and DPReview combined, and will disappear in the future - unless they come up with much smaller and lighter lenses - uhh -- "Glassless lens", that is ....

Ups, then what about the Sony A7?

Link | Posted on Dec 9, 2015 at 01:48 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (560 comments in total)
In reply to:

Charlie Jin: Combined with Lenses and adaptors the mirrorless cameras have only very negligible advantage sacrificing other important factors. It is like comparing the two gun systems - one with 1 meter 30 centimetre long (DSLR) and another with 1 meter 25 centimetre long (ILC). After attaching accessaries on them, you just can't distinguish on the basis of original size and weight alone. If you really need the small and light, just carry a hand gun.

For this reason, I think that mirrorless is only a fad created by Sony and DPReview combined, and will disappear in the future - unless they come up with much smaller and lighter lenses - uhh -- "Glassless lens", that is ....

Something is wrong here. My EM5II with the 12-40mm (24-80mm eq) f/2.8 Pro weighs 29.98 ounces while my Pentax K5 with the DA* 16-50mm (24-75mm eq) f/2.8 weighs 45.6 ounces. The Olympus setup is about 1/2 the size of the Pentax which is a very small APS-C body. This is systematic throughout all combinations of bodies and lenses. Maybe your DSLR's should be measured in meters and the ILC's in feet?

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 03:32 UTC
On article Primer: Why would I buy a mirrorless camera? (560 comments in total)

Right now DSLR's, especially full format, still do some things better while mirrorless are catching up quickly and are a God-send when maximum portability is paramount. With the enormous evolutionary capabilities of digital, in time everything that is mechanical will probably be replaced by digital and get smaller and lighter. Last year, I went back to Olympus by buying two EM10's and then an EM5II. After some inner struggle, I decided to keep my Pentax K5 with its pro grade lenses. Two Oly bodies with the minuscule short and medium zooms disappear in my jacket pockets. Even with pro lenses, they are still very small and light. I love all the info that's visible on the EVF. The Pentax on the other end has perfect ergonomics for me. The body is larger and I can reach the controls comfortably and with no indecision. The older sensor is still great for low light/noise photography. The pentaprism is simply superb. It is heavier but in my hands that makes it more stable than the Oly's.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 03:08 UTC as 77th comment | 1 reply
On article What's missing? Ming Thein on the state of mirrorless (751 comments in total)

Sure, there are no perfect cameras and camera manufacturers but this is not interfering with the immense fun I have with taking pictures (for the last 50 years). I can understand the designer angst (I am an engineer) but the following is also true. Modern cameras are extremely competent. My Oly EM5II's offer more features that most photographers will ever use. They are a joy to handle with the Pro lenses on them and the IQ is great (poster size fine art prints that I regularly sell). If there is a problem with them is the long learning curve due to their wealth of (useful) features. If I think about how I could be a better photographer, improving my technique and buying better lenses come to mind well before new cameras. For me, Thein's points are real but hardly relevant. I personally feel that this is an awesome time to be a photographer with whatever camera you prefer to use.

Link | Posted on Nov 6, 2015 at 17:36 UTC as 138th comment
In reply to:

munchaussen: But dont force us to use LAGGY EVFs. PLEASEEEEEEEE

The argument in favor of EVF's is that they "see" what camera sensors see which, in a digital photographic process, is arguably more relevant than what the photographer sees through an otherwise beautiful OVF. Anyway, this is quickly becoming a non-issue if the industry pundits are right and DSLR's and OVF's are quickly on their way to extinction.

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2015 at 01:22 UTC
In reply to:

munchaussen: But dont force us to use LAGGY EVFs. PLEASEEEEEEEE

As an older photographer, I am used to some great pentaprism viewfinders but today's best EVF's are gorgeous and leave any OVF in the dust in many applications. I find the ability to reset the camera and expose with the histogram without taking my eye off the finder to be invaluable.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2015 at 13:23 UTC

All current cameras are good, some do something better than others. One can chose whatever they want depending on their kind of photography or any other personal reason. Denying that mirrorless is here to stay is naive or ill-motivated. Sales are steadily growing and ever more professionals are using these cameras especially when portability is paramount. In my 50 years of photography, I have used anything up to 4x5". I can promise you that my EM5II with pro-grade Olympus weatherized lenses is a VERY versatile and competent camera. It is a ton of fun to use in any environment and gives me impeccable prints up to 24x36". Who cares if this article does some Sony advertising when it offers truly valuable information? More important to learn is that mirrorless cameras can mount excellent glass from other systems; the use of adapters disables some of these lenses auto features; and some native lenses are optimized for their cameras AF system and this is lost with lenses from other brands.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2015 at 13:15 UTC as 8th comment

As usual, lots of bitching and moaning in these posts. In his presentation, Brian Smith is very clear about what he is talking about. Mirrorless is here to stay and, in addition to a number of features that makes it particularly attractive to many photographers, there is the extraordinary ability to mount a number of larger formats lenses through inexpensive adapters. These can be either modern or legacy lenses, probably models that are exceptional in their quality and performance. With a positive attitude, Brian takes advantage of the opportunity and, for example, has no problem using manual focusing with an otherwise excellent lens. BTW, there is plenty of pros who are already using mirror-less equipment and EVF's and make no mystery about it. This is another feature that makes the format even more attractive.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2015 at 17:28 UTC as 39th comment | 7 replies
On article Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review (857 comments in total)

I am an experienced part-time pro. For the last month, I have been testing my new E-M5II outdoors and in my home studio photographing landscapes, architecture, nature and small products. I agree with the enthusiastic findings of the most trusted on-line reviewers. With the 60mm macro, 12-40mm, and 40-150mm f/2.8 weatherized lenses, the 1.4x teleconveter and the two-piece grip, the E-M5II can handle a lot of professional work while offering a very enjoyable shooting experience. Even cropping down to 12Mp, I can make impeccable prints up to 24x36" up to ISO1600 (Raw developed in DxO Optics Pro, processed in Photoshop and upsized with Perfect Resize). I find that criticizing this camera without hands-on experience is meaningless and that one needs to be an advanced photographer to master its more sophisticated features. Otherwise, one would do better considering an E-M10, possibly with the slower, smaller M4/3 lenses (such as the very good Pana 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 and 35-100mm f/4-5.6).

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2015 at 11:32 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

Fogsprig: Some photos are OK, but there's a bunch of "why did they show these?" pics (especially taken with a fisheye).
But after all the 7-14mm is a highly desirable lens.

Hi "iudex", I hope you were kidding. Statements like yours just show how much some people don't know about photography and/or how fun it must be (for the same some) to waste forum space and people's time. Be proud, you wanted reactions and you got them, now please go away.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2015 at 22:25 UTC
On article Opinion - Erez Marom: Whatever it Doesn't Take (191 comments in total)

There is a lot of negativity and wrong assumptions in these comments. The idea that mediocrity can be photoshopped into gorgeousness only means that the commentator has never tried to do it. Blow out your highlights and show me how to fix them in PS. Thinking that reachable locations have already been photographed to death and are now worthless is also myopic. The appearance of most landscapes varies constantly under ever-changing seasonal, weather and light conditions offering the creative photographer infinite opportunities. This is true for exotic places as well as for more mundane ones. I love my parks along the Long Island Sound and keep getting original, compelling images just by regularly walking along the shoreline. The same thing happens to me along the frozen Hudson River and in Vermont during the foliage season. I agree with many that Erez could have chosen pictures of more ordinary places to make his point which nevertheless remains valid.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2015 at 21:43 UTC as 24th comment | 1 reply
Total: 102, showing: 1 – 20
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