PIX 2015
showmeyourpics

showmeyourpics

Lives in United States New Rochelle, NY, United States
Works as a instructor
Joined on Aug 29, 2011
About me:

taking better pics

Comments

Total: 87, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Fogsprig: Some photos are OK, but there's a bunch of "why did they show these?" pics (especially taken with a fisheye).
But after all the 7-14mm is a highly desirable lens.

Hi "iudex", I hope you were kidding. Statements like yours just show how much some people don't know about photography and/or how fun it must be (for the same some) to waste forum space and people's time. Be proud, you wanted reactions and you got them, now please go away.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2015 at 22:25 UTC
On Opinion - Erez Marom: Whatever it Doesn't Take article (190 comments in total)

There is a lot of negativity and wrong assumptions in these comments. The idea that mediocrity can be photoshopped into gorgeousness only means that the commentator has never tried to do it. Blow out your highlights and show me how to fix them in PS. Thinking that reachable locations have already been photographed to death and are now worthless is also myopic. The appearance of most landscapes varies constantly under ever-changing seasonal, weather and light conditions offering the creative photographer infinite opportunities. This is true for exotic places as well as for more mundane ones. I love my parks along the Long Island Sound and keep getting original, compelling images just by regularly walking along the shoreline. The same thing happens to me along the frozen Hudson River and in Vermont during the foliage season. I agree with many that Erez could have chosen pictures of more ordinary places to make his point which nevertheless remains valid.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2015 at 21:43 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
On Opinion - Erez Marom: Whatever it Doesn't Take article (190 comments in total)

Hi, Erez is right on the money. There is value in images of locations and situations unreachable by most humans, but: a) a bad pic is a bad pic and b) a good pic is not necessarily exotic. I grew up near the Italian Alps and have done a good amount of "extreme" photography (rock climbing, ski mountaineering, etc.) but I regularly get some truly lovely pics (especially in Winter's snow and ice) near my home in Westchester County, NY, along the Long Island Sound shoreline and up the Hudson and Delaware rivers, and in my relatively small garden during the blooming season (all pics that I regularly sell as a part-time fine art pro). Trying to differentiate yourself by counting exclusively on prohibitive locations (and exceptional photo gear) can work but is definitely not indispensable and always takes second place to your ability to see compelling subjects and light and create exquisite compositions. There is plenty of amazing photography everywhere.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2015 at 14:02 UTC as 68th comment
In reply to:

D 503: They are all cameras.

Oh no they are not. There is no "universal" camera, some are better than others for a specific kind of photography and photographer, and for many budget is still an important factor.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2015 at 02:47 UTC

I am a part-time pro with 50 years of experience, currently shooting fine art. I use a Pentax K5 with (big) DA* lenses and 2 E-M10 with the smallest and lightest available M43 lenses for maximum portability. I do love the K5 for its gorgeous optical viewfinder and its overall ergonomics (body and controls). When the going gets tough (distance, terrain, weather etc.), I am very happy to work with the 2 E-M10 which, with the Panasonic 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 and 35-100mm f/4-5.6 on each camera, fit in my jacket pockets (I keep the 14-140mm f/3.5-5.6 as a spare). When I switch from them to the K5, I thoroughly enjoy the size and clarity of the viewfinder but sorely miss all the real time info displayed on the E-M10's EVF, beginning with the histogram. With either one of my current systems, I can make (and sell) impeccable 24x36" prints on my Epson printer. If I had to keep only 1 of the 2 systems, I would go for M43 weatherized bodies with both f/2.8 and f/3.5-4 lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 16:18 UTC as 165th comment
On Hands-on with the Pentax K-3 II article (525 comments in total)

The K5 has been my favorite camera for a number of years. So far I haven't consider upgrading but the K3II is now quite attractive. I almost never use a flash and when I do it's off-camera, so the lack of a built-in is not an issue. The higher pixel count is not that important to me either (I make and sell fine art quality 24x36" prints out of the K5), but capturing full color info on every pixel and the consequent reduction of noise are enticing. It should take about 1/2 sec to get the 4 exposures but it could already work with many of my favorite subjects including cityscapes, landscapes (with calm weather), tabletop and macro. I do love night photography and the astrotracer should be a real boon. I would like a fully articulated LCD because I regularly photograph low on the ground. Nonetheless, for its price and with features like weatherization, great optical viewfinder and advance IBIS, the K3II is not going to be the perfect camera for everyone but an excellent choice for many.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2015 at 20:23 UTC as 12th comment
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (827 comments in total)
In reply to:

dave: In the age of cheap full frame cameras, the quarter sized sensor will always hold Olympus back. All of the bells an whistles can't makeup for the small sensor.

Hi AKH and jefrs, where I live the B&H prices are the go-to source: E-M5II = $1099, Sony a7II = GH4 = $1698 = 2 different price categories also considering that a full system = 2 bodies. Plus, the Sony lenses and the GH4 body are much bigger. The camera's high res has been tested against the D810 by the "other" top review site. The E-M5II has comparable quality and it is always free of Moire. My comments are limited to photography because for video I use a camcorder. I work with E-M10's, bracket the exposure +-1 f/stop for possible HDR and then I never use it because 1 frame has always enough DR even with high contrast subjects. The "other" site also tests for print size. Above ISO 1600 one can't print fine art 24x36" with any camera so I don't use it (ISO800 max and DxO OP processing). I believe that the Oly cameras and lenses offer the best IQ, versatility and cost combination when portability is paramount. If not, I like my Pentax K5 with DA* lenses even better.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 30, 2015 at 01:38 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (827 comments in total)
In reply to:

dave: In the age of cheap full frame cameras, the quarter sized sensor will always hold Olympus back. All of the bells an whistles can't makeup for the small sensor.

A growing number of pros is migrating to the M43 system. The industry projects mirrorless to become the best selling camera technology in a few years and Nikon and Canon have no more than 5 years to join or else. The high res mode is revolutionary. Olympus states that it will take them a couple of years to lower the time for the 8 exposures to 1/60sec, making their cameras resolution-competitive with FF in a bunch of photographic fields. 16Mp base resolution is too little? Well exposed and processed, 16Mp files make high quality 24x36" prints (enlargements are typically upsized with specialized software such as Perfect Resize up to x10 without visible loss of quality). 16Mp files opened in Photoshop at 16bit become 90Mb+. With a few layers they reach 400Mb+ (how much larger is handable?). Throw in the E-M5II weatherization, the best IS, lots of features, great ergonomics and portability, all for about $1,000, plus a robust selection of good-to-excellent lenses at reasonable prices ...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 27, 2015 at 17:54 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (827 comments in total)
In reply to:

showmeyourpics: Camera gear should be judged by what you get out of it and at what cost (money and aggravation). If what you do with it is pixel peeping and/or bragging about it, then let's face it, you are not a photographer. Making large prints is the most demanding output with slide shows and sharing on the web being much less challenging. I love to travel to places that inspire me (Nature, city's, etc.) and can afford or intend to visit only once, and want reliable gear at affordable prices that is comfortable to carry around and let me make high quality prints up to 24x36". Here comes the M4/3 system with the new killer E-M5 II body and a record selection of good-to-excellent lenses (minuscule F/3.5 or f/4 lenses, larger pro level f/2.8 models, and all the 4/3 lenses with an inexpensive AF adapter) at a decent price. I do my diligent and fun research and, to the best of my knowledge, there is nothing else out there that can match its combination of quality, versatility, ergonomics and price.

Hi guys, there is so much photography out there that I don't do that I would not dream of drawing universal conclusions about any specific camera system. M4/3 works for me because I ofter shoot in tough conditions - distance, terrain, weather, etc. -, want a system with full redundancy (bodies and lenses), I am on a budget, need high portability, and judge IQ on 24x36" prints that I make with my own printer (under any condition, the best of monitors is just an approximation of what a print would look like including sharpness). Everything is a compromise and a personal decision, but by using 4/3 and then M4/3 gear I have been able to sell enough fine art prints (part-time) to buy my house, be invited to talk at a bunch of photo clubs and art societies, and have a lot of fun in the process. I wish you the same and better no matter what gear you use.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 27, 2015 at 13:48 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (827 comments in total)

Camera gear should be judged by what you get out of it and at what cost (money and aggravation). If what you do with it is pixel peeping and/or bragging about it, then let's face it, you are not a photographer. Making large prints is the most demanding output with slide shows and sharing on the web being much less challenging. I love to travel to places that inspire me (Nature, city's, etc.) and can afford or intend to visit only once, and want reliable gear at affordable prices that is comfortable to carry around and let me make high quality prints up to 24x36". Here comes the M4/3 system with the new killer E-M5 II body and a record selection of good-to-excellent lenses (minuscule F/3.5 or f/4 lenses, larger pro level f/2.8 models, and all the 4/3 lenses with an inexpensive AF adapter) at a decent price. I do my diligent and fun research and, to the best of my knowledge, there is nothing else out there that can match its combination of quality, versatility, ergonomics and price.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 22, 2015 at 14:29 UTC as 68th comment | 5 replies
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (827 comments in total)
In reply to:

showmeyourpics: I feel that somehow this review misses the point even if it does mention the overall value of the M4/3 system. With the large choice of diminutive and good-to-excellent lenses, the E-M5 II offers a very well built, weatherized, as small as feasible body with great ergonomics; a sensor that in most conditions would let me print 24x36" fine art quality prints; a very good EVF and fully articulated LCD; the best image stabilization on the market; fast auto-focus and continuous shooting; a breakthrough high resolution mode; and a wealth of features well above its category for around $1,000. There are other cameras that can do some things better but none that can offer the same versatile value for the money. I work in tough environments with two E-M10 bodies, one with the Panasonic 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 and the other with the 35-100mm f/4-5.6. I believe that today no other system can match their combination of IQ, portability, versatility and cost. The E-M5 II is all that and much more.

Hi 2eyesee, the slow zooms are a personal choice because, with all my shooting in tough Winter conditions, they are so small that the two cameras fit in my parka's pockets warm and well protected. Also, I don't have to change lenses in the field. The pro level f/2.8 lenses are available from both Olympus and Panasonic. With the Panasonic 14-140mm lens as a backup, I have full system redundancy, 2 bodies and focal lengths from 24mm to 280mm equivalent. With an inexpensive AF adapter, I can mount all the 4/3 lenses (I have the Olympus 4/3 70-300mm). With another inexpensive adapter, I mount my Pentax 50mm macro lens (manual focus only which is OK to me for a macro lens). You cannot seriously compare this system to any fix lens camera.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 19, 2015 at 13:01 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M5 II Review preview (827 comments in total)

I feel that somehow this review misses the point even if it does mention the overall value of the M4/3 system. With the large choice of diminutive and good-to-excellent lenses, the E-M5 II offers a very well built, weatherized, as small as feasible body with great ergonomics; a sensor that in most conditions would let me print 24x36" fine art quality prints; a very good EVF and fully articulated LCD; the best image stabilization on the market; fast auto-focus and continuous shooting; a breakthrough high resolution mode; and a wealth of features well above its category for around $1,000. There are other cameras that can do some things better but none that can offer the same versatile value for the money. I work in tough environments with two E-M10 bodies, one with the Panasonic 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 and the other with the 35-100mm f/4-5.6. I believe that today no other system can match their combination of IQ, portability, versatility and cost. The E-M5 II is all that and much more.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 19, 2015 at 04:51 UTC as 150th comment | 5 replies
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1471 comments in total)
In reply to:

Carlos Taylhardat: I wonder when we will have a full frame medium format camera or 8X10 sensor's with hundred of thousands of megapixel's?

Wow, careful there. They will be around by the time we build the first real Enterprise and cost like a current compact camera. What are they going to use for lenses though ...

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 17:24 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1471 comments in total)

I appreciate these articles because they highlight some realities that should help with the choice of camera gear. On the other hand, it's practically impossible to establish firm ground rules for non-pro photographers. Our purchases don't need to look good on a P&L statement or balance sheet, they just have to make us happy. It is well known that people make purchasing decisions more emotionally than rationally. I think that the most ephemeral conclusion here is about FF being (or not being) the final target of every (serious) photographer. I don't care about FF (144MB 16bit Raw files?) and am very happy with my advanced compact, M4/3 and APS-C cameras, but would not argue with anyone wanting an FF system. I do resent being treated like a 2nd class photographer because I don't have one though. My 24x36" self-made prints tell a different story.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 9, 2015 at 17:19 UTC as 194th comment
In reply to:

norman shearer: Question is, how long will you be satisfied with the sensor/body before it begins to look like old tech? As nice as the LX100 body is now, will you still find it so appealing in 2 years time? Better extend that warranty too because if the camera develops a fault your lovely lens will be going in the bin with the body.

With the GX7+12-35mm F2.8 you can sell on the body and attach the good optics to new body and hey presto, state of the art again!

LX100 is the choice if you are content with short term gains and don't mind taking a greater loss later on. Fixed lens cameras invariably plummit in value as sensor tech etc evolves.

Right, you won't get many because few are into it due to true love for photography. I have been making and selling fine art quality 24x36" prints for years beginning with modest digital cameras (after happily using the same four OM2n bodies, Zuiko lenses and Fujichrome 100 for a bunch of years). Both my Oly E-M10 and Pentax K5 systems are technically light years ahead of "photographers" for whom a new camera is a "must have" otherwise they get bored. The idea that these cameras can lose their value as competent photographic tools is ridiculous. Anyway, how can you have a meaningful conversation with anyone who really does not give a hoot about the subject?

Direct link | Posted on Nov 7, 2014 at 16:02 UTC
On Post-Photokina polls - Tell us what you think article (198 comments in total)

Like every other process, the creative process of photography is validated by its output. What do you do with your captures? Pixel peeping only (on an Adobe RGB calibrated monitor)? Web sharing? Presentations? Magazine sells? Your own prints? In principle, there is never too much image quality (color depth, DR, high ISO noise, etc.). In practice, there are very clear limitations due to ergonomics and budget and, mostly, operator's technique. In order of priority, the photographer's ability to see a compelling subject in a beautiful light, and compose, expose, develop and print the (now Raw) captures masterfully is by far job # 1 (Ansel Adams again). Technology-wise, lenses are significantly more important than camera bodies. After 45 years of experience, for a long time I have been printing and selling (part-time) 24x36" fine art prints, done gallery shows and being invited to talk at camera clubs and even art societies. Most of the captures come from my beloved 4/3 and now M4/3 gear.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 4, 2014 at 14:00 UTC as 62nd comment

In favor of advanced compacts. Most of my photos produce very tangible outputs. Beyond sharing jpegs on the web with family and friends, I make fine art prints up to 24x36" and sell them as a part-time fine art photographer. An energy efficiency trainer and auditor, I take pics of buildings indoor and outdoor including close-up scenes. I use the pics for my reports and for producing PowerPoint presentations. Many are taken in tough locations and light conditions. I own a Pentax K5 + DA* lenses, 2 Oly e-m10 and a Nikon P7800. I use them all but it is the Nikon that goes with me everywhere, especially to work. It's the only one that fits in my cargo pants, has a good lens with a killer zoom range, a more than usable EVF and fully articulated LCD. Raw + jpeg write in 1.5sec with a fast card. I always get the necessary DR in one exposure. Last Winter, I got many great pics in below zero temps and 3"x hour snowstorms with it. Up to ISO400, it makes impeccable + sellable 16x24" prints.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 2, 2014 at 02:55 UTC as 126th comment
On Olympus OM-D E-M10 Review preview (345 comments in total)

I have been using the camera for about 2 weeks now shooting almost every day outdoors and indoors, mostly with the honest Pana 14-45mm lens. My brain has no doubt that it is a great camera, especially for its price and size. My gut is taking its time to get used to it. It is simply hard to believe that this little thing can be so absolutely brilliant and fun to use. My main camera has been a Pentax K5 and, hey, that's a real camera, right? I have a ton of part-time pro experience and know what I want from my gear. So, as soon as I got the camera I checked out all the controls, fixed and customizable, and set them up just right. Now I can change settings without taking my eye off the more than decent EVF. I just ordered a second body, will sell my APS-C gear and buy a few of the M43 pro line lenses. Between the Sony A7 and this camera, there is no doubt in my mind that the future is mirrorless and EVF.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2014 at 19:40 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply
On Hands-on with the Pentax K-S1 article (346 comments in total)
In reply to:

rob579: Funny how cool these cameras look except for that that ugly lens out front. I had a Pentax in the film days. I wish so much pentax would make something a little smaller with a touch screen. PLEASE compete with the big guys.

Hi, all the Pentax K series cameras are top quality photographic tools at VERY competitive prices. No touch screen, just glorious pentaprism optical finders. The K5 for a long time had a best-in-class sensor with a 82 DxO score. The K3 is the 1st camera on the market with a switchable AA filter effect.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 20:47 UTC
On Hands-on with the Pentax K-S1 article (346 comments in total)

I own and love Pentax (and Olympus) cameras.
Rational reaction: let's wait for the tests
Gut reaction: AAAAAAARGH!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 15:35 UTC as 35th comment
Total: 87, showing: 1 – 20
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