showmeyourpics

Lives in United States New Rochelle, NY, United States
Works as a instructor
Joined on Aug 29, 2011
About me:

taking better pics

Comments

Total: 114, showing: 1 – 20
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On article The price is right: Canon EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D Review (320 comments in total)

Hi, in my 50 years of photography I have worked with more than 40 different cameras from almost all the current and old brands, including Canon and Nikon. You can't touch Canikon for their overall systems but today there are very valid alternatives from other manufacturers. Pentax, Olympus, Panasonic and Sony (not a complete list) have been introducing cutting-edge models at very competitive prices that pros are buying ever more. Pentax and the M43 alliance also offer a very attractive selection of lenses often in two ranges of brightness, size and price. I just pre-ordered the Pentax K70 which, for $650, is a real powerhouse in a truly small package. I also work with the Oly E-M10II and E-M5II. As a photographer and an engineer, I believe that the ratio of features, built quality, ergonomics and price of these cameras is hard to beat. I suspect that the DPR people are being "nice" in this review out of respect for the deservingly illustrious Canon name.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2016 at 13:58 UTC as 9th comment
On article Affinity Photo coming to Windows (145 comments in total)

Hi, I am a part-time fine art photographer and the hours I can dedicate to photography vary with the workload of my primary earning activity. Hence, I don't have a high volume of photos to process but work on any single one till it looks the way I want it. I have been using PS for a bunch of years but stopped upgrading at CS6. I have an axe to grind with Adobe for trying to force me into their subscription model, which I have refused to do. CS6 is still giving me all the important processing and creative tools I need with the exception of Camera Raw updates. I have also been using DxO OpticsPro for its class leading noise reduction and Raw developer updates. I am already signed up as a beta tester for Affinity Photo for Windows. If the software matches Serif' promises (the reviews of the Mac version are enthusiastic), I'll definitively consider switching from CS6.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 17:41 UTC as 1st comment

Wow, I thought this was an article on aerial photography, not on sustainability (which BTW I teach together with energy conservation). I would like to make a couple of points. Firstly, this kind of photography has been producing some unique, inspiring and breathtakingly beautiful images. Also, it has been documenting the horrible scarring of the planet done by human development. This contributes to increase people's love for the Earth and awareness of the crimes perpetrated on it by humanity's self interest (and, finally, self destruction). If we have an international movement toward sustainability, this is also due to this amazing branch of photography. Secondly, even blinking has a carbon footprint. As long as there is a small number of photographers doing it, it is truly negligible in comparison with the big generators (industry, transportation and buildings). It is not an exorbitant price to pay (so far) for its very valuable contributions.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2016 at 17:08 UTC as 19th comment | 3 replies

Hi, the K70 is as close as it gets to my ideal camera (landscapes, cityscapes, travel, indoor fine art studies and artwork repro). I am used to the great bang for the buck offered by Pentax cameras (I began with the K20D), but the K70 is nevertheless hard to believe. My excellent K-S2 is already on ebay. I am curious to see with what the usual envious trolls will come up to put down this little jewel. Alas, resistance is futile!

Link | Posted on Jun 15, 2016 at 03:37 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift: An update (96 comments in total)

Hi, about the real value of pixel shift technology in a very high native IQ camera such as the K1: within its boundaries of use, pixel shift high res works very well. In any applicable field of photography where the right gear is medium format, the K1 in pixel shift high res can achieve comparable or better results with a smaller, lighter, significantly less expensive system (the 645Z is now $7,000 at B&H). For pro photographers in a number of fields, this means being able to expand the business with a lower gear investment (often a make-or-break condition). This means that the K1 is over-engineered for many pros (amateurs just need to want it and have the $ to buy it). With my fine art photography printed to a max 24x36" size on watercolor paper and canvas, I don't NEED this camera (but would jump through hoops to get it just because of its awesomeness). At last, there is no premium price attached to the relatively inexpensive K1 because of the presence of this technology.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2016 at 13:49 UTC as 15th comment
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (209 comments in total)

Hi, I seriously wonder what's behind all this push back aimed at pixel shift technology. The proven facts are: with static subjects (= several fields of photography), I can get captures that rival FF cameras (plus no moire) with gear that is a fraction of the size, weight and price. With judicious post processing, I can reach the same results with subjects with some motion (i.e.: many landscapes and cityscapes subjects). I already do all this with my E-M5ii and Oly pro lenses, and have the pictures to prove it. This technology is at its early stages of implementation and is bound to evolve quickly. Since it is a natural offspring of existing, refined IS systems, it is not imposing a premium price on the cameras that offer it. So, what's not to love about it? Photographers' only hard decision is choosing if they want to use it or not. Could the push back be just good old envy?

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 17:34 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (209 comments in total)
In reply to:

MLP120: A question to the experts. I am going to be setting up a small studio for product photography which of course will be a controlled environment. I have mostly Nikon and was going to purchase the D-810 but I am thinking that with this K-1 and results closer to medium format, is it a better choice for studio shots? My studio will be LED lighting and not strobes so that should work best with the pixel shift, correct? Thanks in advance for any advice.

Hi, I do some product photography with the Oly E-M5ii in high res and the results are awesome. The K1 is definitively worth considering but I would recommend taking into consideration lenses and accessories (what you already have and what is available for the K1) before changing system.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 15:58 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (209 comments in total)
In reply to:

sh10453: Without going through much detail, I think (ON THE LONG RUN) the best implementation for pixel shift is to be processed in the camera without the need for external software to do it.
Most likely this will happen as pixel shift evolves and gets implemented by other major manufacturers.
However, we do not know what the other big names are quietly working on that COULD make pixel shift obsolete.

We'll continue to be surprised with new features and new technologies, like this, the double pixel, 4K video, 8K video, etc.
So waiting a year or so more to buy my latest and greatest camera won't help; six months down the road I'd find myself saying "I should've waited six more months for this latest model" ... :)

Hi sh10453, good comment with one exception: every new technology goes through a life cycle with includes a period of rapid evolution followed by a mature leveling off. You are getting the biggest bang for your investment when the technology is truly useful to you and you can wait for it to reach this later stage before you buy it. If you throw into the fray the possibility of a breakthrough that would make it completely obsolete before this happens then you would never buy a new camera. For many people this might be a positive thing though :-) Personally, I am waiting to upgrade my K5 to see where this high res thing is going (in the meantime I am using its first reiteration with my Oly E-M5ii)

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 15:48 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (209 comments in total)
In reply to:

Satyaa: This is a nice feature that no doubt produces excellent results for suitable subjects. But it's not going to be used by a majority of K-1 buyers on a daily basis.

I would like DPR reviewers to take this camera with a Tamron 70-200/2.8 (under $800 lens) to the Acquarium or Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, and show us what this camera can do! A handful of photos at full resolution, a handful of action shots (not the D5 kind but more of slow action that you might find in a zoo), some nice portraits, some examples using CPL filters, macro shots (100mm F/2.8?), shots in crop mode, and definitely some PSR for the record. That will provide what exactly the K-1 potential buyers need.

Some examples of architectural shots with a T/S lens would be great for PSR, where the subject lends itself well to the use of this feature.

Thanks for the review.
PS: Just pay my travel expenses and I'll do it without charging a fee :)

Hi Satyaa (again). The digital photo gear market is quite difficult to navigate and I would like to make a practical observation about it. Cameras like the K1 are (relatively) expensive, bulky, heavy and deserve a set of bulky, heavy and expensive pro-grade lenses (and tripods) to take full advantage of their sensors and features. While they can be very attractive to the true amateur, they can be so demanding as to end up becoming a hassle instead of fun to use (and stay at home more often than not). The K1 is a pro-grade camera and requires these economic and ergonomic sacrifices in exchange for what it can do. In general, I would recommend my non-pro students (I do some teaching) to consider a less demanding system which they would actually use regularly and with which they would have real fun. You know that a camera is over-engineered for you if you are not going to use most of the features that makes it unique or in which it excels.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 15:21 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (209 comments in total)
In reply to:

showmeyourpics: Hi, I am a mature, part-time fine art photographer and for me these articles are pure gold. Thanks DPR! Pixel shift high res is very good for me. It's straight forward in static indoor conditions (I have tried it and it blew my mind). It's more time consuming with outdoor subjects but I already spend serious time in post processing and love a challenge. For what I can see here, the K1 Motion Correction helps with cleaner input files. Hey rwl408, I must be hallucinating or we live on two different planets. I use an E-M5ii to take high res captures (no substantial difference with the Pentax cameras). My results match what this article shows. My composited outdoor pics make for some outstanding 24x36" enlargements with amazing detail in the still components. Lower detail in things like leaves and water is inconsequential because people actually expect it. With the speed of digital tech evolution, your high res bursting bubbles will not take long to become a mainstream feature.

Hi Satyaa, I was referring to the shared problem of artifacts in motion areas which I resolve by compositing a high and a normal resolution capture. This is not different from the post processing work that I typically do with my pics to apply selective tonal, color and sharpness "corrections". Since I do fine art photography, I do not feel the pressure of producing in quantity under a tight schedule.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 15:01 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (209 comments in total)
In reply to:

spencerda: Nice update thank you.

Question since movement causes issue in pixel shift mode would faster shutter speed reduced the artifacts?

if so might help in some landscape shots but would not be desirable for waterfalls if one wants the milky look .

Dave

Hi, it definitively helps when replacing the areas of motion of a high res exposure with the corresponding, as-sharp-as-possible areas of a normal one.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 14:28 UTC
On article Pentax K-1 Pixel Shift Resolution: Updated Field Test (209 comments in total)

Hi, I am a mature, part-time fine art photographer and for me these articles are pure gold. Thanks DPR! Pixel shift high res is very good for me. It's straight forward in static indoor conditions (I have tried it and it blew my mind). It's more time consuming with outdoor subjects but I already spend serious time in post processing and love a challenge. For what I can see here, the K1 Motion Correction helps with cleaner input files. Hey rwl408, I must be hallucinating or we live on two different planets. I use an E-M5ii to take high res captures (no substantial difference with the Pentax cameras). My results match what this article shows. My composited outdoor pics make for some outstanding 24x36" enlargements with amazing detail in the still components. Lower detail in things like leaves and water is inconsequential because people actually expect it. With the speed of digital tech evolution, your high res bursting bubbles will not take long to become a mainstream feature.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2016 at 20:20 UTC as 62nd comment | 5 replies
On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $800-1200 (214 comments in total)

Addendum to my previous post: AJDVD mentions the Olympus cameras great quality but horrible menu (because of all the camera features, it is complex for less expert photographers). My E-M5ii has so many direct controls and custom settings that I used the menu once to set them up then forgot about it and focused on enjoying the camera excellent ergonomics and IQ. Sensor pixel count is another one: 16Mp even cropped down to 12Mp and resized with Perfect Resize let me make 24x36" fine art prints that I regularly sell.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 02:51 UTC as 5th comment
On article 2016 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $800-1200 (214 comments in total)

Hi, all of these cameras must be cream of the crop just to qualify for this article. To take advantage of it, decide what features are key to your kind of photography then read the individual reviews to find the model that best fits your needs (no-one is best for everything). After that, go to a camera store to try it in your hands. Even better, rent one for a day and put it through its paces. Also, it is worth checking what the pros are buying in terms of smaller and lighter cameras since their choices are typically quite concrete. The one caveat regarding these articles is that they tend to judge cameras by some factors that are less than relevant and vice-versa. Case in point, the importance of a higher number of AF points when most advanced photographers, for very good reasons, use spot focusing and reframing (and blocking focus on a specific plane by switching to MF). The opposite is the insufficient appreciation for body weatherization which puts a camera in a class of its own.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 02:38 UTC as 6th comment

After 50 years of photography, often in tough environments, and having worked with all kind of gear and accessories, my back has come to the following conclusions. For heavier gear (such as my Pentax K5 with a number of DA* lenses) and lots of walking/hiking, nothing beats the balance and comfort of a well made backpack (with a waterproof storm bag inside). For lighter/smaller gear (such as my Oly OM-D cameras) and easy going, a small sling pouch is the height of functionality. I keep the individual cameras and lenses in heavy duty, waterproof zip lock bags. Lastly, all of my bags look truly anonymous.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2016 at 18:54 UTC as 25th comment
On article Worth the wait? A look inside the Pentax K-1 (650 comments in total)

During my 50+ years of photography, I have always admired Pentax (and Olympus) for their focus on basic photography, high quality and affordable pricing. I am currently working with a K5 and DA* lenses (and several OM-D bodies and Zuiko lenses). The K1 completes the selection of excellent Pentax bodies and seems to retain the character of the APS-C and 645 models. Alas, I can't shake off the feeling that it's somewhat late for the general market (I would get one yesterday), and believe that exploring the mirrorless or other advanced design would have made more sense. The EVF is quite puzzling. It is much more complex with many more parts than the articulation on the side and it does not seem to offer the same range of motion. More complex designs with many parts are often less robust than the simpler ones. The ability to use a bunch of older lenses is quite attractive but many are not going to be good enough for the sensor. At last, I love the camera and wish Pentax good luck.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2016 at 19:46 UTC as 4th comment

You do have to pay attention to what Rishi is saying: a moderate wide angle will bring in the environment giving the portrait a sense of place and, when shooting close to the subject, a sense of close proximity and intimacy. The former, I believe, is easier to appreciate and has been a specific approach to portraiture for a long time. The latter is more difficult because that physical closeness can make some people uncomfortable especially if they are not intimate with the subject. Also, attention must be paid to the proper position of the subject and their distance from the lens. Overall, good points and pictures, thanks.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2016 at 16:09 UTC as 120th comment | 1 reply
On article Bang for the Buck: Olympus OM-D E-M10 II Review (712 comments in total)

Hi, this is not the 1st time that I read the pro's and con's of a new camera at the top of this page and then the overall score looks to be the one for a different model (80%, really?). I am a seasoned fine art semi-pro using an EM10, EM10II, EM5II and Pentax K5 with pro grade lenses. There is a limited number of improvements between the EM10 and the EM10II but all significant to me, including the better IS and EVF, and the successful relocation of a couple of buttons. The EM10II is obviously not "perfect" for everyone but in its own category it's a masterpiece of construction and IQ, ergonomics, feature set, customization and price. People should study the camera and become truly familiar with it, mount one of the Pro lenses, go out there and take a bunch of pics, process and print them properly, and then complain if it's still called for. I have used more than 40 different cameras in 5 formats in my life, and the EM10II gives me one of the most enjoyable shooting experiences ever.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2016 at 01:24 UTC as 15th comment

Hi, while technically correct, the article makes the arguable assumption that there is a vast population of amateur photographers who is able to appreciate and take advantage of the particular competences of a specific camera model. It is a well known fact that the typical owner of a digital camera does not take the time to read the manual and even less experiment with the camera itself. I use a Nikon P7800 (go everywhere), Olympus EM10II and EM5II, and Pentax K5 with pro and non-pro lenses. Even the P7800 is competent enough for most photography (excellent 13x19" prints at ISO400 with Raw in DxO OpticsPro). It has a low ISO ceiling and is slow to write to memory but personal technique is still paramount. Case in point: even a superior AF is not enough for good action shots if one is not familiar with the subject and cannot predict its behavior (watch the pros). Alas, many people just expect modern cameras to do all the work instead of being challenged by their advanced features.

Link | Posted on Jan 23, 2016 at 15:35 UTC as 46th comment
On article Readers' Showcase: Rob Kearney (76 comments in total)

Let's keep some perspective. The young man shows promise. His pics show his efforts to "see" the picture. The processing leaves a lot to be desired. He definitely deserves encouragement and I wish him not to grow a gigantic ego

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2015 at 18:31 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
Total: 114, showing: 1 – 20
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