showmeyourpics

showmeyourpics

Lives in United States New Rochelle, NY, United States
Works as a instructor
Joined on Aug 29, 2011
About me:

taking better pics

Comments

Total: 70, showing: 1 – 20
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On Olympus OM-D E-M10 Review preview (324 comments in total)

I have been using the camera for about 2 weeks now shooting almost every day outdoors and indoors, mostly with the honest Pana 14-45mm lens. My brain has no doubt that it is a great camera, especially for its price and size. My gut is taking its time to get used to it. It is simply hard to believe that this little thing can be so absolutely brilliant and fun to use. My main camera has been a Pentax K5 and, hey, that's a real camera, right? I have a ton of part-time pro experience and know what I want from my gear. So, as soon as I got the camera I checked out all the controls, fixed and customizable, and set them up just right. Now I can change settings without taking my eye off the more than decent EVF. I just ordered a second body, will sell my APS-C gear and buy a few of the M43 pro line lenses. Between the Sony A7 and this camera, there is no doubt in my mind that the future is mirrorless and EVF.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 6, 2014 at 19:40 UTC as 7th comment
On Hands-on with the Pentax K-S1 article (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

rob579: Funny how cool these cameras look except for that that ugly lens out front. I had a Pentax in the film days. I wish so much pentax would make something a little smaller with a touch screen. PLEASE compete with the big guys.

Hi, all the Pentax K series cameras are top quality photographic tools at VERY competitive prices. No touch screen, just glorious pentaprism optical finders. The K5 for a long time had a best-in-class sensor with a 82 DxO score. The K3 is the 1st camera on the market with a switchable AA filter effect.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 20:47 UTC
On Hands-on with the Pentax K-S1 article (316 comments in total)

I own and love Pentax (and Olympus) cameras.
Rational reaction: let's wait for the tests
Gut reaction: AAAAAAARGH!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 29, 2014 at 15:35 UTC as 23rd comment
On Opinion: Do we really need the Fuji X30? article (303 comments in total)
In reply to:

LarryLatchkey: i went on a trip with my mom last w.e. and we took a series of photos from the same position in order to compare our cams. I wanted to show her that she really should take my GF2 to replace her 11 years old kodak 4MP 10x zoom.

Later at the pc she said she can't really see a difference and that she was happy with her camera. and tbh, i was surprised to see in bright sunlight the (to me obvious) difference was smaller than expected.

The adverts will praise the X30 as superior to small-sensor cameras and rightly so. 80% of camera users don't know what bokeh is and simply don't SEE a difference, their eye doesn't recognise sharpening artefacts or mushy shadow texture. If the colours seem right, the camera works for them. They have heard that digital cams don't work well in dimly lit places, so they don't expect great images from church visits.

sorry, just thinking aloud.

Words of truth, viva cell phone cameras

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 21:52 UTC
On Opinion: Do we really need the Fuji X30? article (303 comments in total)

Amateurs do not NEED new cameras but it surely is a lot of fun to squabble over them. It is easier to judge a camera that serves a clear-cut niche, more difficult if it is a cross-model like this one: too large to be a true pocketable and in competition with small mirrorless models. There are applications though where a similar camera, and not a CSC, is the best there is. I develop building energy efficiency courses, teach them and perform building audits with heavy use of photographic documentation. I find my Nikon P7800 to be (almost) perfect for the job: it is small enough to fit in my cargo pants pockets, has a sharp lens with a great range, a useful EVF and fully articulated LCD monitor, and enough DR to cover the lousiest of light conditions with fill flash but without HDR. A properly exposed and developed shot up to ISO400 can be printed impeccably up to 16x20". Just the larger sensor and the addition of a high quality EVF makes the X30 worthy of consideration.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 21:49 UTC as 65th comment
On Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III Review preview (774 comments in total)
In reply to:

CMurdock: The Sigma Merrill cameras have the best image quality of any pocketable camera, but DPR won't review them. I wouldn't dream of buying a camera (like this one) that has aggressive sharpening of JPGs that can't be turned off.

Hi ChapelThrill23, I am a seasoned part-time fine art photographer and shoot Raw + jpeg, develop my Raw pics for printing and use jpegs for web posting. My personal experience shows that there is no in-camera jpeg processing engine that can come reasonably close to a well developed Raw file in term of absolute IQ (i quickly reprocess even my jpegs before publishing them). Squeezing all the potential IQ out of a Raw file requires not only a mastership of camera technology and software capabilities but also a clear understanding of human visual perception. I interact with NYC professionals on a regular base and find that VERY few are familiar with the latter. Just one example is the exceptional influence of local contrast. In my experience, the algorithms built into camera processing engines do not take these key IQ drivers into consideration and are not able to properly differentiate between the different processing needs of diverse subjects (often presenting similar histograms).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2014 at 17:48 UTC
On Photographing Thailand with the Nokia Lumia 1020 article (155 comments in total)
In reply to:

showmeyourpics: Hi, I find many of these pics to be fascinating because of the strength of the subject. At the same time, I can't help being annoyed by this nonsense about smartphone photography. In ideal conditions of subject and light one can take interesting pictures with the lousiest of cameras but for consistently good photography smart phones are simply pitiful. There is plenty of people who are not interested in investing time and money in photography, and for them smart phones are just right. Like many others who truly love photography, I take pictures of Nature, landscapes, cityscapes, travel and people. I try to balance technology with technique (not to go crazy about gear) but should be out of my mind to visit a remarkable place like Thailand and rely exclusively on my smartphone camera. I don't buy the portability issue either because there is a choice of little cameras on the market that can do amazing work and fit in your pocket.

Hi, I do carry my Nikon P7800 with me everywhere and photograph in the New York City area anywhere without any problem whatsoever (in places where they do not allow photography you should not use your smart phone either). You just have to get into the habit of having a (smaller) camera with you all the time. There is nothing wrong if you do not, it just means that you don't have that level of dedication. As I already said, for a lot of people smart phone cameras are just right but they do not cut it as a consistently capable photographic tool. This is supposed to be a site for people who truly love photography and articles like these, while fashionable, should not be taken into consideration

Direct link | Posted on Aug 5, 2014 at 12:27 UTC
On Photographing Thailand with the Nokia Lumia 1020 article (155 comments in total)

Hi, I find many of these pics to be fascinating because of the strength of the subject. At the same time, I can't help being annoyed by this nonsense about smartphone photography. In ideal conditions of subject and light one can take interesting pictures with the lousiest of cameras but for consistently good photography smart phones are simply pitiful. There is plenty of people who are not interested in investing time and money in photography, and for them smart phones are just right. Like many others who truly love photography, I take pictures of Nature, landscapes, cityscapes, travel and people. I try to balance technology with technique (not to go crazy about gear) but should be out of my mind to visit a remarkable place like Thailand and rely exclusively on my smartphone camera. I don't buy the portability issue either because there is a choice of little cameras on the market that can do amazing work and fit in your pocket.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 3, 2014 at 14:07 UTC as 25th comment | 3 replies
On Adobe CC Announcements: What you need to know article (181 comments in total)

I am a part-time pro and mostly work in fine art, reproductions of artwork and restorations of old photos. I shoot mostly in Raw and have been using PS for a bunch of years. For a time, it was great to be a NAPP member and participate in various Adobe's events. The feeling of "belonging" was good. Like many photographers, I was royally annoyed with the onset of the subscription-only formula. I updated from CS5 to CS6 and decided to stick with it for as long as possible. After the initial annoyance abated, I realized/accepted the fact that Adobe is a for-profit business whose main goal is to maximize stockholders' value. Their marketing and finance decided to go that way ad there is nothing to complain about, excluding the hassle of changing platforms if one does not want to subscribe. Even the model of a low intro price and subsequent increases was not invented by them. The somewhat bitter lesson is: we are not a large happy family of creative people, profit is the name of the game.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2014 at 21:31 UTC as 43rd comment | 1 reply
On Enthusiast compact camera 2013 roundup article (232 comments in total)
In reply to:

dwm2020: I fail to see how the RX10 is considered a 'compact' camera, beside it having a small sensor.

Why is the sony different from other Bridge cameras and not considered one?

Disrespectful, misguided comment that disregards the feelings of most of our fellow commentators. I do not not know who the "us who understand this art" are. I have been a successful fine art photographer for decades, have worked with more film and digital gear that I can shake a stick at, have a truckload of awards, write about and teach the art but still agree with dwm2020 100%. Please stay out of this forum if you cannot maintain a civilized discourse.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 3, 2014 at 13:18 UTC
On Enthusiast compact camera 2013 roundup article (232 comments in total)

While offering a unique and excellent feature set in a relatively small body, this is not a camera that most of us would call a compact. By size and price, I think that comparing it to a small MFT would be more realistic. Now the problem is wrapping your head around a camera that is so capable but has a fix lens. But the EVF and LCD are great and the zoom is a magnificent 24-200mm f/2.8, a range that encompasses most photography, and try to buy it as an interchangeable lens ... The body is weather-resistant too ... It looks to me that this camera, while clashing with a generally accepted camera design, offers a tremendous bang for the buck for landscape, travel, family and associated photography. It warrants a trip to B&H and some playtime.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 3, 2014 at 02:31 UTC as 12th comment | 2 replies
On Olympus OM-D E-M10 Review preview (324 comments in total)
In reply to:

showmeyourpics: For a long time as an outdoor photographer I could not find a better balance of features, ergonomics and price than with the Olympus OM2n and its Zuiko lenses. I am happy that with their E-M camera system Olympus is back to that level of quality. I love exploring and my photography is always challenging, requiring getting up at some ungodly hours, a well supplied backpack and being ready for some tough weather. I am lucky to live close to B&H and visit monthly to check out the new toys. Last week, I had the E-M10 in my hands for a while. I left asking myself how it was possible not to fall in love with it. Minimum size and weight but excellent build quality, beautiful EVF and LCD, good control layout, awesome features and customization, and a sensor that can give you fine-art quality poster prints through a good ISO range. If I compare my beloved Pentax K5 with the two DA* f/2.8 zooms to the E-M10 (or the weatherized E-M1) with the equivalent M43 pro zooms at comparable prices ...

For me, Pentax is in the APS-C system what Olympus and Panasonic are in the M43: a winning combination of features, ergonomics and prices. I find it difficult to give up my Pentax gear - I would get the K3 in a heartbeat if I could afford it - but handling the E-M cameras with the available selection of M43 lenses makes it really tempting. If I had the budget for it I would keep them both just for the pleasure to shoot with such amazing tools.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 19, 2014 at 12:00 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M10 Review preview (324 comments in total)

For a long time as an outdoor photographer I could not find a better balance of features, ergonomics and price than with the Olympus OM2n and its Zuiko lenses. I am happy that with their E-M camera system Olympus is back to that level of quality. I love exploring and my photography is always challenging, requiring getting up at some ungodly hours, a well supplied backpack and being ready for some tough weather. I am lucky to live close to B&H and visit monthly to check out the new toys. Last week, I had the E-M10 in my hands for a while. I left asking myself how it was possible not to fall in love with it. Minimum size and weight but excellent build quality, beautiful EVF and LCD, good control layout, awesome features and customization, and a sensor that can give you fine-art quality poster prints through a good ISO range. If I compare my beloved Pentax K5 with the two DA* f/2.8 zooms to the E-M10 (or the weatherized E-M1) with the equivalent M43 pro zooms at comparable prices ...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 18, 2014 at 21:26 UTC as 64th comment | 4 replies
On Fujifilm X-T1 First Impressions Review preview (1657 comments in total)

It looks like another jewel of a camera to me. If we accept the fact that different people have different shooting styles and favorite subjects, then the proper question for judging this or any other camera would be: what is it good for? As a "mature", fine art photographer, I like to "sip" my photography. I also love the look of mechanically refined gear which gives me a sense of fine craftsmanship. I appreciate the functionality of button and dial controls but still enjoy the feeling of older-style controls. This camera would not be my first choice for fast action photography but there are caveats here too. I do take publication-quality action photos of animals with slower cameras because I spent the time to learn and predict animal behavior, and "be there" at the right time and place with the camera ready for the shot. It seems like the X-T1 can offer high IQ together with a very enjoyable shooting experience for my kind of photography. It needs a good set of weatherized lenses.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 15:17 UTC as 78th comment | 2 replies
On Readers' Choice: Best Gear of 2013 Awards article (210 comments in total)
In reply to:

Frank C.: m4/3 = poor dof control. I would never buy m4/3 just because of that, FX is ok, DX is borderline, m4/3 is plain ol' bad

Dear JB, Frank C. forgot to explain that shallow depth of field, which gets shallower and blurs the background more with the increased size of the sensor, is paramount to him personally. Millions of photographers (including me with my award-winning fine art photography) are very happy with the other side of the coin: increased dof for the same f/stop, the ability to stay closer to the lens IQ sweet spot (f/5.6, f/8) and avoid extreme f/stops (f/16 or f/22) were diffraction rules and kills sharpness. If I need shallow dof with my m4/3 and APS-C gear, I do not mind just using a longer lens. The E-M10 looks like an excellent first camera to me (quality/size/weight/price balance), and it comes with a comprehensive selection of dedicated lenses which you would greatly appreciate as your technique grows.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2014 at 17:35 UTC
On Readers' Choice: Best Gear of 2013 Awards article (210 comments in total)
In reply to:

oselimg: A camera (K3) never revieved by Dpreview wins it. Isn't this a proof that people don't refer to this site when buying a camera or at least a DSLR? Can infantile trollheads and gearheads take some lessons from this phenomenon and finally grow up or is it a wishful thinking?

My research is not particularly attached to any one specific web source but I have noticed that on this site, which I particularly like, the review lead time for Olympus and Pentax has been on the long side. DxO suffers from the same delays. The imaging resource K3 review is not complete either.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2014 at 17:04 UTC
On Readers' Choice: Best Gear of 2013 Awards article (210 comments in total)

I don't believe that DPR ever asserted that these are scientific surveys. With all their limitations though, with almost 30K voters they do offer a fun view of the readers' sentiments. I am glad that what wins is actually common sense. We know what to expect from FF cameras but innovation in that sector has been slow recently. As a mostly outdoor photographer, I find that the truly exciting stuff has been happening in the mirror-less category, including the new 4/3 models and the FF Sony A7. Feature sets and IQ have been going up while size and weight remain contained or are shrinking. IMO, Pentax is not an overall replacement for Canon or Nikon vast systems but keeps producing a limited number of APS-C models with killer characteristics and performance at unbeatable prices - just check out what the K50 offers, including a 79 points DxO sensor, for about $500 -. The dedicated lens selection is 1st class too with its great choice of primes.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 3, 2014 at 16:55 UTC as 22nd comment | 4 replies
On Olympus OM-D E-M10 First Impressions Review preview (618 comments in total)
In reply to:

ybizzle: Buy a new EM-5 body for $799 (B&H) or a used one for $500 and call it a day. Pricing for this doesn't make sense when the body is only $100 cheaper than the EM-5.

I just want to share the purchasing strategy that has been working FOR ME as a part-time pro on a tight budget. I have been buying good quality bodies exactly at the time of the introduction of a new model to take advantage of the price drop. The savings go toward upgrading my lens collection (at an average rate of $1000 a pop). When the Panasonic GH2 came out, I got a GH1 for half the original price (with a better sensor than the new model according to DxO). More importantly, I purchased a new Pentax K5 for $800.00 in similar circumstances (DxO sensor score of 82). As long as the core features of a camera body are solid, lenses are more important to me and good glass is expensive. I believe that getting the best out of the EM camera sensors requires pro-level glass. A basic set of 2 bright zooms and a prime macro is now worth $3000+. BTW, more than drooling over new gear, I really love to get out there and take pictures.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 30, 2014 at 14:16 UTC
On Olympus OM-D E-M10 First Impressions Review preview (618 comments in total)
In reply to:

pacnwhobbyist: Maybe I'm in the minority on this, but unless you do a lot of critical low-light work and plan on spending money on additional lenses, I think the Stylus 1 is a better choice in this price bracket for most casual photographers. Not to say this is a poor choice or a bad camera, it's neither. But if you're willing to put up with a smaller (but still good) sensor and the limitations it has you get a lot of the features from the OM-D series and a nice constant aperture 28-300 lens. That sort of lens option just doesn't exist in the M 4/3rds realm right now.

Words of wisdom. I wouldn't take my Nikon P7800 (same sensor size, 28-200mm lens) to a formal photo shoot but I use it almost every day for "fun" photography that regularly gives me publication-quality pics. I do some teaching and recommend beginners to start with a camera with a feature set that allows them to learn the trade but is (relatively) easy to use and comfortable to carry around. Upgrade to a more powerful, expensive, larger and heavyer system only when you are certain of your commitment to photography and your technique has surpassed your first camera (which you should keep as a spare anyway)

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2014 at 18:53 UTC
On Fujifilm X-T1 First Impressions Review preview (1657 comments in total)
In reply to:

REDred Photo: I'll never understand why so many people feel the need to trash new cameras from venerable companies. I understand that not every camera will be what everyone wants. But MANY people have been asking for a camera like this for years. Is it perfect in every way? NO... but "not perfect" is certainly not the same as awful.

To those who can only tear something down: If you don't like this camera, then it's safe to say that Fuji didn't make this camera for you... so don't buy it... Legitimate constructive criticism and suggestions for improvement are welcome... but please acknowledge that you are not the most important person in the world, you are not the only customer out there, and not everyone shoots the way you do. Why trash something that wasn't made for you?

A few generations of Photoshop ago, I realized that the software had become so good that, instead of deserving complaints, learning it's features offered me a number of aha! moments and inspired me to push the envelope of my creativity. The same thing happens with most modern digital cameras. Just reading the manual cover to cover can show most photographers how much room for improvement there is for their own technique. By reading all this bitching and moaning, it looks like the ideal camera would be the one that you turn on, put on the floor, and runs around taking breathtaking pictures all by itself.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2014 at 21:16 UTC
Total: 70, showing: 1 – 20
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