Nukunukoo

Nukunukoo

Lives in United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Works as a Photographer and Digital Graphics Editor
Joined on Aug 29, 2012

Comments

Total: 431, showing: 1 – 20
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On Sony: An eye on focus article (530 comments in total)

What about the RX10 II?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 2, 2015 at 17:39 UTC as 71st comment
On Nikon offers AF-S DX Nikkor 16-80mm F2.8-4E ED VR article (273 comments in total)

Exciting DX Street lens. Expensive though. How long do I have to wait for the price to drop at reasonable levels?

Direct link | Posted on Jul 2, 2015 at 09:07 UTC as 54th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Jefftan: of all these type of camera available now

Panasonic GM1 is the best for price and IQ (both sensor and lens excellent). This is my judgement. You guys can choose to believe or not

Not bothered by picture IQ. It's the video that's important to me right now. Then again, the RX10 II would be THE better choice for that. =)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 30, 2015 at 10:16 UTC
In reply to:

drivecancel: I bought a Fujifilm X100 used and upgraded it to FW 2.0 instead of buying an RX100, looking at the studio tests I made the right choice! (had to use X100S results)

This has got to be the most uninformed post yet.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 28, 2015 at 10:34 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (3361 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nukunukoo: Good Lord, why are people so obsessed with taking photos above ISO 6400? Maybe you guys should take off that ND 16 filter off your lens!!!

@fatdeeman

Perhaps, but I compose my shots and lighting so that I will never need it and when I do, it seldom, if ever, goes to the client.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 26, 2015 at 09:10 UTC

A friendly advice, Mr. Oosting: Try to go outdoors more often, reality will do you good.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 26, 2015 at 08:47 UTC as 39th comment
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (3361 comments in total)
In reply to:

Nukunukoo: Good Lord, why are people so obsessed with taking photos above ISO 6400? Maybe you guys should take off that ND 16 filter off your lens!!!

So I guess at ISO 6400 and above, you all are happy with the quality of the photos then? Or am I to critical of the quality of mine?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 19:45 UTC

HUH?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 25, 2015 at 15:30 UTC as 96th comment
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (3361 comments in total)

Good Lord, why are people so obsessed with taking photos above ISO 6400? Maybe you guys should take off that ND 16 filter off your lens!!!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2015 at 12:23 UTC as 125th comment | 11 replies
On Opinion: Did Sony just do the impossible? article (1038 comments in total)
In reply to:

Preamp: Only downside: It's a Sony!

Oh riiiight. That means Nikons, Olympus and other cameras that use the Sony sensor are suspect too.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 23, 2015 at 08:18 UTC

I own a good collection of the Sigma Global Vision series and I am gobsmacked by their Image output (FF and Crop). But to be honest, I'm finding it hard to justify the zoom range. How difficult (or big) would it have been to create, say, a 24-45mm?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 19, 2015 at 12:26 UTC as 89th comment | 1 reply
On Going solo: DxO introduces 20MP 'ONE' connected camera article (124 comments in total)

no

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2015 at 15:27 UTC as 35th comment
On Canon PowerShot G3 X: What you need to know article (565 comments in total)

$1K. I'd go for the RX10 II. This Canon would probably cater more to the Wildlife and Voyeur crowd.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 18, 2015 at 07:05 UTC as 125th comment | 2 replies

All things considered. Sony's RX10 II, while not interchangeable, has an extremely useful 24-200mm 2.8 constant lens and can take 16.8MP (as opposed to 8MP) photos and can be saved as RAW as oppose to just JPEG. For Wedding videographers and photographers like me, this is an incredible plus. Considering I don't need to change lens and its weatherproofing. =) Complements my DSLR incredibly!

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 09:31 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

RuneMC: Stacked sensor sounds very interesting if it means something like the Sigma sensor/image quality.

4K video also interesting, but 8K would have been even more interesting to extract panorama images from the video with Microsoft ICE 2.0 for example.

And the EVF - please drop it to drop the price significantly.

Will probably keep my RX100 Mk1 and wait for RX200 (whenever that may be) - although if the stacked sensor is exceptional, then I might be tempted...

@RuneMC For 8K to happen at that sensor aspect ratio, you have to realize that the sensor must be at least 48MP. Same mistake GoPro rumor mongers make.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 08:35 UTC
In reply to:

fireplace33: On a technical note,...
At first, I got the impression here that the active area of each individual pixel had somehow become bigger with this new stacked sensor technology, and the sensor could thus gather more light.
But looking closer at the stacked sensor design, the physical size of the array of all the light sensitive pixels is just the same as before.
The active area of the pixels are the same size and the gap between the pixels is also the same.
What becomes smaller is “only” the size of the total chip package (photo sensitive part + logic circuitry part) , since with the new design the logic circuits are placed underneath the photo pixels instead of next to the pixel array.
This obviously brings space advantages to a camera designer and allows more complex circuitry advantages, but not a light gathering advantage, or did I miss something?

I also get why you state that there is no change in the surface size. Because in the illustration, the active area is still the same. BUT, and this is very important, the ENTIRE area of that single photosite is reduced. now imagine if we kept the same area (BSI) the same with a Stacked version; you then get an extra active area. Does not really matter, as I am confident that this will be detailed in the coming weeks =) But I will be more than glad to actually illustrate if you wish.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 13, 2015 at 00:16 UTC
In reply to:

fireplace33: On a technical note,...
At first, I got the impression here that the active area of each individual pixel had somehow become bigger with this new stacked sensor technology, and the sensor could thus gather more light.
But looking closer at the stacked sensor design, the physical size of the array of all the light sensitive pixels is just the same as before.
The active area of the pixels are the same size and the gap between the pixels is also the same.
What becomes smaller is “only” the size of the total chip package (photo sensitive part + logic circuitry part) , since with the new design the logic circuits are placed underneath the photo pixels instead of next to the pixel array.
This obviously brings space advantages to a camera designer and allows more complex circuitry advantages, but not a light gathering advantage, or did I miss something?

@ Fireplace. Okay, let's put it this way: With Sony's 1/2.3" stacked design last year, they were able to increase the resolution yet maintain the light gathering characteristics in the same surface area as opposed to BSI. Now, with the new 1" stacked design, the sensor size is still 1"AND the resolution is still 20MP. Now, do you think all of the interface circuitry that was once competing with the photosite area gone that Sony just wasted the new extra real estate for nothing? That actually contradicts the purpose of the design in the first place, of course that's beside the ability to place the actual buffer on the same substrate.

But I have absolutely no doubt that this will be revealed exactly as I said later when more details come out. I actually did predict this here last year that read time will be super fast on stacked designs (dramatically reducing rolling shutter) as well as having a memory circuit built-in. =)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2015 at 23:13 UTC
In reply to:

fireplace33: On a technical note,...
At first, I got the impression here that the active area of each individual pixel had somehow become bigger with this new stacked sensor technology, and the sensor could thus gather more light.
But looking closer at the stacked sensor design, the physical size of the array of all the light sensitive pixels is just the same as before.
The active area of the pixels are the same size and the gap between the pixels is also the same.
What becomes smaller is “only” the size of the total chip package (photo sensitive part + logic circuitry part) , since with the new design the logic circuits are placed underneath the photo pixels instead of next to the pixel array.
This obviously brings space advantages to a camera designer and allows more complex circuitry advantages, but not a light gathering advantage, or did I miss something?

@fireplace. Why is moving the support circuit from the same plane of each photosite to another stack WITHOUT decreasing the chip area AND maintaining the same megapixel NOT allow the ability of increasing the photosite surface? I'm going to create a diagram for you to understand. Also, the best proof will be the review where the dynamic range AND the ISO S/R ratio will increase. Which I am sure will happen.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2015 at 22:07 UTC
In reply to:

fireplace33: On a technical note,...
At first, I got the impression here that the active area of each individual pixel had somehow become bigger with this new stacked sensor technology, and the sensor could thus gather more light.
But looking closer at the stacked sensor design, the physical size of the array of all the light sensitive pixels is just the same as before.
The active area of the pixels are the same size and the gap between the pixels is also the same.
What becomes smaller is “only” the size of the total chip package (photo sensitive part + logic circuitry part) , since with the new design the logic circuits are placed underneath the photo pixels instead of next to the pixel array.
This obviously brings space advantages to a camera designer and allows more complex circuitry advantages, but not a light gathering advantage, or did I miss something?

I found it. Here's the Link and check page 2.

http://www.sony.net/Products/SC-HP/cx_news_archives/img/pdf/vol_68/sideview_vol68.pdf

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2015 at 21:42 UTC
In reply to:

fireplace33: On a technical note,...
At first, I got the impression here that the active area of each individual pixel had somehow become bigger with this new stacked sensor technology, and the sensor could thus gather more light.
But looking closer at the stacked sensor design, the physical size of the array of all the light sensitive pixels is just the same as before.
The active area of the pixels are the same size and the gap between the pixels is also the same.
What becomes smaller is “only” the size of the total chip package (photo sensitive part + logic circuitry part) , since with the new design the logic circuits are placed underneath the photo pixels instead of next to the pixel array.
This obviously brings space advantages to a camera designer and allows more complex circuitry advantages, but not a light gathering advantage, or did I miss something?

Good point. Check the Sony White Paper on their site. I have no time but months ago I read the 30% from there. Post link when you find it. =)

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2015 at 21:15 UTC
Total: 431, showing: 1 – 20
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