Mike Sandman

Mike Sandman

Lives in United States Brookline, MA, United States
Works as a Manager
Joined on Mar 20, 2003
About me:

Canon 5D Mark II; Canon 24-105mm f/4 L IS; 70-200 f/4 IS; 17-40mm f/4 L; 24mm TSE II; 420EX; 580 EX II; Tamron 90mm f/2.8 Macro. Epson 3880 printer. Canon Powershot S-95. Started with a Balda 35mm rangefinder in 1956.

Comments

Total: 90, showing: 41 – 60
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On Just posted: Sony Alpha NEX-6 Review article (330 comments in total)

Thanks for this review - we've been waiting for this for quite a while. (1) The comment that battery life is better than average has me wondering what I'm doing wrong -- I get maybe 200 shots from a fully charged battery. (2) The main menu is indeed a hodgepodge and the "settings" tab is utterly disorganized. But if you set up the Fn key to suit the way you shoot, it's possible to avoid getting into the main menu very often. (Of course the Fn key just gets you into a personalized subset of the on-screen menu).

Direct link | Posted on Mar 26, 2013 at 13:21 UTC as 47th comment
In reply to:

l_d_allan: Samyang 14mm: own ... great lens for terrific price
Samyang 8mm fisheye: own ... very good lens (not great imo) for terrific price

Samyang 24 T/S: Too expensive for me. Wait a year or so to come down? BH has Canon 24 t/s for $2039-USD. If Samyang was 33% of Canon (~ $700) then I'd be interested. Maybe?

But still, the Samyang 14mm will work almost as well for me ... more FOV and probably about as much DOF.

I'm underwhelmed by the thought of taking 9 pano images to stitch together to get the panorama equivalent of 16mm or so.

You may be right if all you want is panorama shots, although a pano made from 3 shots taken with a 24mss TS lens is really quite easy to align. However, the main uses of a TS are (1) shifting to reduce the convergence of vertical lines in architectural shots and (2) tilting to adjust the plane of focus to change the effective depth of field. A 14 mm lens doesn't do either of those things.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2013 at 03:18 UTC
On Theme and Variations article (96 comments in total)

Some of the comments here have the theme, "Well, sure, you can do that because of where you live, but I live in... [some supposedly dull place].

Rubbish.

There are opportunities all around us. Kids playing in those "scrubby suburban parks"; the river, harbor and Long Island Sound in New London, CT., etc. Really, anywhere you live, there's a place to practice the lessons of the article. There's a garden or a grove of trees or a pond you can examine.

What the article teaches is that you have to spend the time understanding the environment in order to photograph it well, whether it's the picturesque west coast of Ireland or the streets of Peoria.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 8, 2013 at 04:27 UTC as 50th comment | 2 replies
On Just posted: Fujifilm X-E1 Review article (527 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: I don't understand why a sensor that does not have a Bayer array and therefore does not need an anti-aliasing filter generates raw files that are less than sharp. I though the whole point of Fuji's sensor was to improve resolution (which is connected to sharpness, at least in my mind).

Is there less of a link between perceived sharpness and resolution than I think?

Perhaps someone who's able to provide a technical explanation would weigh in here??

Ok, so you folks are saying the sensor IS producing sharp images, and the ACR conversion is the problem. That's certainly plausible. Thanks.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 2, 2013 at 04:24 UTC
On Just posted: Fujifilm X-E1 Review article (527 comments in total)

I don't understand why a sensor that does not have a Bayer array and therefore does not need an anti-aliasing filter generates raw files that are less than sharp. I though the whole point of Fuji's sensor was to improve resolution (which is connected to sharpness, at least in my mind).

Is there less of a link between perceived sharpness and resolution than I think?

Perhaps someone who's able to provide a technical explanation would weigh in here??

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2013 at 21:32 UTC as 83rd comment | 9 replies

Fun, and impressive. The resolution is amazing. Where can I get my own 256GB 16-core computer?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 22, 2013 at 17:19 UTC as 26th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Vitruvius: I LOVE DRReview and it is very sad for me to see the information here becoming less and less relavent. Reviews used to come out the day after a camera was announced. Now there are "previews" coming out 3 to 6 months after the camera is for sale. So what is the point of that? The Lumix G5 sems like a competent camera that was announced in July and there aren't even studio shots available to compare it to other cameras, at least not on this site. Which means that I am forced to look more and more to other sites for relavent information. It is very sad because this was a great site which I used to recomend to everyone I knew. I am sure these are factors beyond the control of the staff and I am sure they are just as frustrated so you have my sympathy.

Barney: First and foremost: Thank you for the very useful info in the updated preview. The IQ tests point in the direction of a favorable review, and they're a major addition to the initial preview.

Your replies to the comments show us that you're feeling the heat from the complaint that reviews of important cameras have been coming out at a rather slow pace. Good! dPreview publishes the most complete and consistent reviews available, and you're the victims of your own success

The reviews are what attracts our eyeballs to your site in the first place. The many comments here reflect the hope that you'll devote more resources to camera and lens reviews, and less on the content that isn't as connected to what we (your customers) see as your most valuable product.

And again, thank you for the excellent material published thus far on the NEX-6.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 5, 2013 at 14:40 UTC
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (489 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: Mr. Maeda seems to miss the reason for the limited success of the EOS M. Canon was very late to the mirrorless party, and it allowed the 4/3 and NEX cameras to become established in the market. Furthermore, the first EOS M is designed for people who want a simple point & shoot experience - just the opposite of the kind of user who will swap lenses (and buy new ones with an M mount).

You're right (meland) that introducing the EOS M in a simple form was a strategic decision. And you do see them on the store shelves in Asia - I was there two weeks ago, poking around camera shops. It was also a strategic decision to wait a long time before introducing a mirrorless APS-C camera, and that was a mistake. Many people (including me) who would have been Canon customers if Canon had been there earlier have gone elsewhere by now. No doubt Canon will offer a version aimed at enthusiasts and will develop a line of lenses, but Mr. Maeda shouldn't be surprised at the EOS M's slow start, given its delayed arrival. Now Canon has an uphill battle recovering lost market share in the mirrorless segment, a segment that will cut into DSLR sales. Going to FF is one way to build a barrier against the encroachment of mirrorless cameras into the enthusiast/prosumer market, but it's not a sure bet to succeed, given the higher cost of FF (and the potential to build a FF mirrorless.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 21:07 UTC
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (489 comments in total)

Mr. Maeda seems to miss the reason for the limited success of the EOS M. Canon was very late to the mirrorless party, and it allowed the 4/3 and NEX cameras to become established in the market. Furthermore, the first EOS M is designed for people who want a simple point & shoot experience - just the opposite of the kind of user who will swap lenses (and buy new ones with an M mount).

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 17:25 UTC as 80th comment | 3 replies
On CP+ 2013: Interview with Canon's Masaya Maeda article (489 comments in total)
In reply to:

WilliamJ: I note no camera maker ever had the idea - isnt' business made to earn money ? - to design a camera that could be upgradable. The 1970-80's where the years of disposable items (lighters, razors, cameras and so on) but why not making the 2010's the era of items that could be upgradables ? Your camera is too slow ? Change of image processor. The sensor is too old ? Have a new one... That way, camera makers could get some more money to make a living without having to produce unrestly new now-super-complicated models with the bad results we can see far too often.

Hey, Mr Maeda ! That's a concept for you !

Upgrading a sensor might be nice, but it's not a very powerful feature vs. a new camera. New cameras typically include new features - GPS, hybrid focusing systems, peak focusing assistance, wifi... The list goes on. You can add new features to a desktop computer because it has a standard bus into which you plug in a wide range of cards, but engineering a standard bus into the confined space of a camera would be quite a task. And even with a standard bus, desktop PC's become obsolete when faster memory and new processors are developed. And all of those constraints leave out the technology changes like mirrorless cameras that change the whole design of the camera body.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 1, 2013 at 17:11 UTC
In reply to:

Andreas Stuebs: I think this could be a good idea. It would be neat to be able to use a Shift/Tilt lens witrh my Micro4/3 camera without loosing too much of the angle of view. Only question is: is there any issue with the image circle? Would it work if effectively the booster is not colinear with the lens?

The white paper addresses this specifically and says that the tilt/shift effects are unchanged, so a 24mm lens will work just it does on a full frame camera, except for a slight loss in field of view -- about 25 mm vs 24.

The white paper answers a lot of questions. There's some hype in it, but also some technical info that seems convincing. This seems like an impressive development for cameras with a short flange distance between the lens and the sensor (generally mirrorless cameras).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 19, 2013 at 08:34 UTC
On Accessory Review: Kata Digital Rucksack 467-DL article (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cane: Does everyone here bring that much camera stuff with them to places you would bring a backpack? It's like women who carry giant purses and you ask, "do you really need all that stuff?"

"Do you really need all that stuff?" Yes, sometimes, and so do "women who carry giant purses." A laptop & power supply are needed on a business trip. (An iPad doesn't quite do it yet.) Add a phone charger, and a plug adapter for overseas. Add a DSLR and a couple of lenses; maybe a monopod & cable release for night shots. You have a moderately heavy load that is easier to haul in a purpose-built backpack that squeezes under an airplane seat. It's overkill for a stroll around the block or when you're happy with a camera and a single lens. But it's pretty useful for any sort of real travel when you anticipate using a wider range of gear.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 16:59 UTC
On Accessory Review: Kata Digital Rucksack 467-DL article (48 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: For all of you who laughed at seeing the OM-D in the photo at the beginning of the article:

I have the slightly smaller version of this bag, the D466, and it holds my Canon 5D Mark II with 24-105 lens attached in the bottom compartment along with at least one and sometimes two other short-barrel lenses. It's a tight fit and it's heavy, but it works. It also holds a 15" laptop, a quart-size Ziplock bag with assorted cables, and the computer's power supply. Sometimes I can even squeeze in an apple (the edible kind). It's my go-to backpack for long business trips when I will have a day off or a weekend to explore a new place. The chest strap is very helpful in keeping it on and comfortably in place. It's been around the world at least five times (all the way around...) and it still looks like new. One can sneer at the concept and at OM-D in the photo, but people who own these bags have the last laugh.

You may be right - and I should have recognized it, because I owned am OM-1 myself. But with all due respect, you miss my point. "Digital" branding silliness aside, this backpack is a great design if you want a fairly small package to carry a DSLR, a laptop, and a couple of lenses, and still have room for a snack.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 03:25 UTC
On Accessory Review: Kata Digital Rucksack 467-DL article (48 comments in total)

For all of you who laughed at seeing the OM-D in the photo at the beginning of the article:

I have the slightly smaller version of this bag, the D466, and it holds my Canon 5D Mark II with 24-105 lens attached in the bottom compartment along with at least one and sometimes two other short-barrel lenses. It's a tight fit and it's heavy, but it works. It also holds a 15" laptop, a quart-size Ziplock bag with assorted cables, and the computer's power supply. Sometimes I can even squeeze in an apple (the edible kind). It's my go-to backpack for long business trips when I will have a day off or a weekend to explore a new place. The chest strap is very helpful in keeping it on and comfortably in place. It's been around the world at least five times (all the way around...) and it still looks like new. One can sneer at the concept and at OM-D in the photo, but people who own these bags have the last laugh.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 28, 2012 at 00:48 UTC as 12th comment | 6 replies
On Adobe releases Lightroom 4.3 and Adobe Camera Raw 7.3 article (69 comments in total)

Sony NEX-6 raw files are also supported, it seems.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 13, 2012 at 18:24 UTC as 12th comment
On 2012 Holiday Mobile Photography Gift Guide post (33 comments in total)

Fun.
Small correction -- the Restoration Hardware lens is a microscope in your pocket, not a telescope as the current caption indicates.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 11, 2012 at 01:27 UTC as 8th comment | 1 reply

Awful scene. Publishing it is in bad taste, but that's often what readers buy. Republishing it seems to extend the reach of the Post, which is unfortunate.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 4, 2012 at 21:40 UTC as 90th comment
On Metabones adds autofocus to Canon-NEX adapter article (63 comments in total)
In reply to:

Deleted-pending: One reason I would never buy such a small camera : you are holding the lens and not the tiny camera !
It looks like a sheet of paper holding a metal tube.

If you think it looks ridiculous to mount a large lens on a small body, well, it's the appearance of the image that's important, not the appearance of the device that's producing it.

The adapter & a big lens are not something to stick in your coat pocket all the time, but it will be useful, especially for those who have full frame Canons and sometimes want the 1.5x focal length multiplier you get with an APS-C sensor.

If the price seems high, consider the cost of a Canon L-grade lens, or Zeiss lens for the NEX.

Of course you could use Canon EF and Ef-S lenses on a Canon M, but that too requires buying an adapter. And unfortunately the Canon M is designed as an upgrade for point & shoot camera, not as a small-package alternative for full-featured DSLRs.

-------

Mike Sandman

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2012 at 19:54 UTC
On Mirrorless Cameras: A Primer article (183 comments in total)

This article, posted only 10 months ago, is pretty good but it needs an update. A growing number of models now have electronic viewfinders for those who prefer to put the camera up to an eye. They cost more than models that don't offer viewfinders but they may be more suitable for serious photography. And three or four now have hybrid auto-focus systems that promise faster focusing speeds, including the Nikon 1 mentioned in the article, but also including the newest Sony NEX models and the Canon M.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 28, 2012 at 16:59 UTC as 25th comment | 1 reply

Fun article. I've been waiting f or something like the CameraMator so I could easily use the iPad screen as a fine focusing aid without having to tether to a laptop. Very nice.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2012 at 14:13 UTC as 12th comment
Total: 90, showing: 41 – 60
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