Mike Sandman

Mike Sandman

Lives in United States Brookline, MA, United States
Works as a Manager
Joined on Mar 20, 2003
About me:

Canon 5D Mark II; Canon 24-105mm f/4 L IS; 70-200 f/4 IS; 17-40mm f/4 L; 24mm TSE II; 420EX; 580 EX II; Tamron 90mm f/2.8 Macro. Epson 3880 printer. Canon Powershot S-95. Started with a Balda 35mm rangefinder in 1956.

Comments

Total: 90, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1175 comments in total)
In reply to:

zdechlypes: I am Canon 5DM2 owner and have just recently found about the term "ISO variant/invariant". Canon is ISO variant and I know it very, very well ... unfortunately.
I did not know that Nikon is soooo much better. I am about to buy 5DM3 as the prices are getting better but not able to switch as I had heavily invested in L lenses, flashes and other Canon stuff. It would be bloody expensive swap. :-(

Good job Nikon!

I too am a Canon 5D-II owner, waiting for the 5D-IV to decide whether to go that way, or move to the Alpha 7-II (which, with an adapter, allows me to use my Canon lenses).
Canon needs to offer a very good 5D-IV to counter its competitors, and unless they go to a Sony sensor or have some breakthrough in their own sensor technology, it's going to be difficult to match Nikon & Sony. For a long time, Canon had a lock on the top end, and the current disruption is good for all of us -- ultimately including Canon owners.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 20, 2014 at 19:48 UTC

Very well done - nice to see something that's not all geek-speak. I have a Canon 5DII and L lenses used mostly for landscape/architecture & am on the fence about switching to Fuji (small + high IQ but requires a whole new kit; $$$,) Sony 7-II (high DR sensor; can use adapter for Canon lenses but not much net advantage regarding size); 5D-IV (optical viewfinder but size/weight penalty and uncertain timing; $$). Alas, this video only makes the decision harder. Let's have more of these.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2014 at 15:07 UTC as 43rd comment
On ShareGrid offers peer-to-peer gear rental article (32 comments in total)

I'm an amateur with good gear - Canon L lenses, etc. I might borrow, but I'm reluctant to lend unless the rate is high enough to cover the perceived risk and I think others with good gear will feel that way. It only makes sense if lenders who have top-end gear are willing to participate. Not many people will want to borrow a cheap lens or camera.

Still, it could work for local rentals even if the rates are high, because the borrower would avoid the high shipping cost to & from firms like LensRentals. As one of the posts suggests, pros are unlikely to offer their gear for rental because of the time and effort it takes, although they too may be interested in borrowing.

So it's not going to be Uber for photo gear. but it might work in metro areas where there are enough lenders and borrowers.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 12, 2014 at 04:34 UTC as 13th comment
On High-end full frame roundup (2014) article (541 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThePhilips: I have expected to see the Sony A99 as one of the picks on the last page. But otherwise, pretty unsurprising conclusions.

The most interesting bit for me is the explosion of the number of the FF cameras. I wish the manufacturers were as eager to bring their lens catalogs into the 21st century: some small and pancakes primes and zooms would have done much good to really expand the choices.

Pancake primes are interesting, and the Canon 40mm f/2.8 is quite good - check the review on dPreview. More lenses of that type would be interesting for mirrorless cameras, including FF mirrorless.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 15:36 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Dali's Dream article (101 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mike Sandman: Excellent explanation, but I'd like to understand why HDR wouldn't work here. I've used in in situations where there was a high level of contrast. The result didn't look like over-cooked HDR, and the details were visible in areas as dark at the room to the left.

See https://www.flickr.com/photos/msandman/4592433976/in/set-72157646361874135

Isn't HDR for situations exactly like this?

(However, I'm not sure I could have squeezed off the five or six shots for HDR during the brief time when the sun was peeking through the rafters.)

I suppose that "easier" is in the eye of the beholder -:)

This is very good explanation of an alternative, and a superb shot (as usual), so thank you.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2014 at 22:23 UTC
On Behind the Shot: Dali's Dream article (101 comments in total)

Excellent explanation, but I'd like to understand why HDR wouldn't work here. I've used in in situations where there was a high level of contrast. The result didn't look like over-cooked HDR, and the details were visible in areas as dark at the room to the left.

See https://www.flickr.com/photos/msandman/4592433976/in/set-72157646361874135

Isn't HDR for situations exactly like this?

(However, I'm not sure I could have squeezed off the five or six shots for HDR during the brief time when the sun was peeking through the rafters.)

Direct link | Posted on Dec 7, 2014 at 22:13 UTC as 19th comment | 4 replies

This seems to have the functionality of a CamRanger on steroids. Given the price, there's a question in my mind of whether the motion, sound, light etc. sensors have the quality needed to perform consistently. If it's a rock solid device, it could appeal to pros. But when you watch the video on Kickstarter, is clear that the inventor is aiming for the amateur market, at a price amateurs would pay. And the video is a bit over the top in its wild-eyed enthusiasm for what are admittedly some really interesting features. If they all work properly and keep working.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 6, 2014 at 02:57 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
On Ten things you need to know about the Sony Alpha 7 II article (264 comments in total)

Helpful. Thanks. Learned something and therefore didn't mind getting hooked by the "clickbait"

Direct link | Posted on Nov 27, 2014 at 04:23 UTC as 51st comment
On Tune in to DPReview Live this Thursday and Friday article (238 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jeff Keller: Just added the schedule of events (subject to change, of course). The show will loop after we're done for the day, and you will be able to stream each segment a few days later.

Yes, thanks. Very helpful.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 9, 2014 at 12:18 UTC
On Tune in to DPReview Live this Thursday and Friday article (238 comments in total)

It would be very helpful for dPreview to publish an approximate schedule/agenda. I don't have time to listen to all of the company reps, but I could make time to listen to the two or three I'm most interested in...if only you'd let us know when they'll be "on." Same with the photographers you're speaking with. Thanks.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2014 at 21:21 UTC as 46th comment | 3 replies
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1659 comments in total)

If it's a camera, I'm rooting for a mirrorless with something extra. Foveon sensor; no AA filter, FF... we'll see in 13 hours.

But whatever it is, you have to give Canon's ad agency credit -- they elicited 444 comments thus far, including this one, and people are still posting. And all of us will be watching - and hoping for more than a new photocopier.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 23:50 UTC as 617th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: PR 101:

1. Don’t ever point out what your competitor’s product has that yours doesn’t.

2. Don’t ever admit that you made a mistake and you might keep making that mistake in the future.

3. Don’t ever say that you need to listen to your customers more. It is something that every company could do more of. Mentioning it just makes you sound like you know you should do it but you choose not to.

Well, he didn't pretend, that's true. He didn't pretend to acknowledge that Nikon screwed up in responding to the D600 oil problem, and he missed or deliberately ignored the chance to apologize and say Nikon would be more responsive in the future. It's hard for a corporate spokesperson to say "Sorry". It probably has to come from the top of the company first.

There's also a more serious problem here (for Nikon). Product breakthroughs are usually developed by the incumbents in an industry, but they're often brought to market by an outsider (like Sony & Panasonic with the MILC.) Fuji is an exception to the rule. In contrast Nikon seems to have accepted that others will lead the industry in innovations, and it will then follow, if it has to. That's not a winning strategy. Just ask Kodak... Digital Equipment Corp.... Underwood Typewriter

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 03:27 UTC
In reply to:

ManuelVilardeMacedo: Hmm, what have we got here? A manufacturer that makes the best lenses south of Leica and Zeiss, with a wonderful tradition of quality throughout its history. They make no less than six full-frame models, all of them highly respected by their image quality; they are at the forefront of their industry in terms of effective, useful innovation and, despite relying almost exclusively on their cameras and lenses, they are still the second largest photography manufacturer. Professionals all over the world use Nikon for the most demanding jobs. I'd say they deserve some respect for all this, but how do people react to a simple interview?
- We want 4K;
- We want cropped sensors;
- We want crappy mirrorless;
- We don't care for wonderfully bright viewfinders, we just want dumb electronic ones;
- We want E-mount;
- And X- mount;
- We want useless features that add nothing to image quality.
The photography community has gone insane.

It's true that Nikon has a glorious history in photography... just like Kodak.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 24, 2014 at 02:59 UTC

OK Metabones, now please get to work on an EF to Fuji X-mount.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 4, 2014 at 20:35 UTC as 2nd comment
On Cold War camera: 1950s Berlin in color (part 1) article (120 comments in total)

I spent several days in Berlin earlier this year, so these old photos are particularly interesting. The massive buildings on Strausenberger Platz were built by the East German government and are mostly apartments, built to show that the Communist system could provide good housing for the masses. They're part of a massive, half-mile long complex along what is still called Karl-Marx Allee in what used to be east Berlin.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 1, 2014 at 13:33 UTC as 34th comment
On Enthusiast interchangeable lens camera 2013 roundup article (468 comments in total)

A very odd "updated" list, and a very odd time to publish it given that Photokina is around the corner and both the Fuji X-Pro and XE-2 and likely to be updated, plus who-knows-what else from Canon. And why include the NEX-6 when the A6000 is here?

dPreview editors, can you enlighten us as to why you posted this now, and what the thought process was in developing the list?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 26, 2014 at 02:30 UTC as 79th comment | 3 replies

Only a few occupations have persisted for much of humankind's existence, and soldiering is one of them. (Other examples are agriculture, fishing, metalworking and pottery-making.) Setting aside one's aversion for war, it's a fascinating look at the pace of change in technology, and the increased complexity of one's possessions as technology advances. Nicely done.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 23, 2014 at 15:41 UTC as 14th comment | 1 reply
On Behind the Shot: Flames of the North article (67 comments in total)

Thanks for the images and for the explanation. One doesn't think of focus stacking with a super-wide angle lens, but this is clearly a situation that called for it.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 11, 2014 at 18:24 UTC as 18th comment
On Nikon D810: What You Need to Know article (142 comments in total)

Nice summary. Thank you.

For those of us in the Canon world, it will be interesting to see how soon Canon follows suit with an update to the 5D Mark III.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 27, 2014 at 14:53 UTC as 16th comment
On Step into Edgar Martins' Time Machine article (34 comments in total)

What these wonderful images need is an explanation of what we're looking at. The control panel, is pretty clearly a control panel, but the beautiful arched hall in the second frame is photographed with exquisite precision, but what was or is its function? It's not obvious to me, and I've actually been in a hydroelectric power plant.
Please, if you can, add captions that tell us what we're looking at -- what the function is of the bigs halls, in particular.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2014 at 01:43 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
Total: 90, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »