Jeff Seltzer

Jeff Seltzer

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Feb 23, 2006

Comments

Total: 72, showing: 21 – 40
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On Fujifilm X-T1 First Impressions Review preview (1657 comments in total)
In reply to:

russbarnes: Massive, massive yawn. Fuji have already become as predictable in this market as Canon has with its DSLRs. Every single release near identical to the last, the sensor is the same to three years ago, it's like Fuji are playing a fruit machine trying to find the right combination of a body that actually sells. The fact is that until they enter the full frame market, no one will take them seriously, if they put this body around something like the A7R sensor then it would sell, but failing to produce any lenses that could be used on full frame suggests this is years away. By then, Sony will have stolen the march on them.

I'm at a loss as to who believes this is a winning strategy from Fuji because their sales are so bad they don't even register in some countries. If they want to prise away customers from the DSLR market, it's not going to happen with £1000 crop sensor cameras and £1000 crop sensor lenses....

I just ordered one. I guess I'm an idiot.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 28, 2014 at 06:37 UTC

Good grief. I think people need therapy - so much hostility. All they did was introduce an improved version of an optional grip. You can choose to buy it or not. If you really like it, but $150 is too much and you can't afford it, then you probably shouldn't be buying expensive cameras in the first place. I don't know, I guess I just don't see the bad side of all this like so many of you.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2014 at 04:49 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies
On Sigma announces all-new 50mm F1.4 DG HSM 'Art' lens article (245 comments in total)
In reply to:

eaa: Min. aperture F16?
That is not normal for an FF lens, where F22 or 32 are the norm.
Why a min aperture even below the diffraction limit?
Must be a typo (like the initially wrong weight (85 gr), now corrected to 470 gr.

Under what circumstances would you want f22 vs. f16?

Direct link | Posted on Jan 6, 2014 at 23:09 UTC
On DPReview Gear of the Year - Part 1: Fujifilm X100S article (307 comments in total)
In reply to:

white shadow: The X100s is a reasonably good camera for casual use and perhaps for travel. Some like the " Leica look alike" look because they couldn't afford the real McCoy Leica M. It is a fairly good camera to take casual portraits. That's about it.

A full frame DSLR is still the more versatile camera if one is serious about photography despite its heavier weight. It will deliver the goods expected of a professional photographer or for those who engaged them to shoot.

Similar to a Micro 4/3 camera, it will remain a camera for casual use or for collectors who like the look. For practical casual use, the Ricoh GR may be better. For sheer convenience, the Lumix LX7 is surprisingly very useful despite its much smaller sensor especially in low light.

Ummm...

1. I could afford a Leica, but I wanted an X-pro1 instead.

2. What is your definition of versatile? My 5DII wasn't nearly as versatile sitting in my camera bag vs. my X-pro1 which is always with me due to form factor and weight.

3. I hardly consider what I do "casual." There are many pros using the X-system.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 13, 2013 at 00:22 UTC

To all the haters below...don't worry, I'm sure it's only a matter of time before DPR features your museum quality pictures of babies, sunsets, butterfly macros, and cats...hold tight!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 05:08 UTC as 39th comment | 1 reply

Very cool, but the cost of film is SOOO high.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 25, 2013 at 16:54 UTC as 34th comment
In reply to:

mcshan: Kim Kardashian could snap a photo and sell it for big money. If she did that some on this forum would refer to her as an artist no matter how mundane the photo.

@Howard: b craw's point? Maybe. I thought the point is that it's silly to think K.K. can take a photo and that be considered art, because to be considered true fine art, the fine art world (museums, collectors, galleries, publications) need to validate it as such. My point is that those on this forum (you!) who just dismiss these images as "simple, anyone can take them..." are at the same time calling museums, collectors, galleries, and publication foolish. But, the reality is that YOU don't really understand what defines "fine art" photography. That's okay, though, it's a difficult concept. If you are truly interested, email me. I'm not trying to be antagonistic here.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 19:21 UTC
In reply to:

mcshan: Kim Kardashian could snap a photo and sell it for big money. If she did that some on this forum would refer to her as an artist no matter how mundane the photo.

Very well said...it's like some people here believe galleries, collectors, and museums are just stupid. If it was up to most here, galleries would primarily hang sunsets, cats, kids, and food shots.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 18:22 UTC
In reply to:

Jeff Seltzer: Well, it's no surprise to read the chorus of "I could do that!" and "This is art??" and "What a bunch of crap!" It's amazing to me you people (yeah, I said it...you people) who come to PHOTOGRAPHY FORUM can not understand and appreciate some of the greatest photographers of all time! Do you even know anything about Gursky?? Have you seen any of his works in-person? Looked at any of his dozens of books?? What you seem to NOT understand is that fine art photography is not about one image, but a body of work, and the importance of that work in the overall medium. You people are the same who walk into a museum, and say "what's with the abstract painting?? It looks like a kid did that!"

Sorry to say, but your images of cats, sunsets, and kids are NOT hanging in museums or on the walls of collectors for a reason. Instead of quickly judging single images, try to do a little research on WHY these images are so sought after.

Somehow, based on your sarcasm, my sense is that you really don't want to engage in a conversation about why Gursky is so important. Try Google.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 23, 2013 at 15:35 UTC

Well, it's no surprise to read the chorus of "I could do that!" and "This is art??" and "What a bunch of crap!" It's amazing to me you people (yeah, I said it...you people) who come to PHOTOGRAPHY FORUM can not understand and appreciate some of the greatest photographers of all time! Do you even know anything about Gursky?? Have you seen any of his works in-person? Looked at any of his dozens of books?? What you seem to NOT understand is that fine art photography is not about one image, but a body of work, and the importance of that work in the overall medium. You people are the same who walk into a museum, and say "what's with the abstract painting?? It looks like a kid did that!"

Sorry to say, but your images of cats, sunsets, and kids are NOT hanging in museums or on the walls of collectors for a reason. Instead of quickly judging single images, try to do a little research on WHY these images are so sought after.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 23, 2013 at 15:01 UTC as 42nd comment | 7 replies
On Adobe releases Photoshop Lightroom 5 article (253 comments in total)
In reply to:

Matz03: wow this site is so full of whiners! You don't like adobe don't buy it! $80 upgrade is really that expensive, what a joke. Even $150 for the product is still a steal for what you get, probably more important then other photo gear you'll purchase.

Henry, very well crafted. You are very smart.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2013 at 01:27 UTC
On Adobe releases Photoshop Lightroom 5 article (253 comments in total)
In reply to:

Matz03: wow this site is so full of whiners! You don't like adobe don't buy it! $80 upgrade is really that expensive, what a joke. Even $150 for the product is still a steal for what you get, probably more important then other photo gear you'll purchase.

Seriously. Some guy below claims Adobe's decision is an assault on his freedom??!! Anyway, it's not like your version 4.x doesn't work anymore. For me, the new features are very much worth it. But, hey, that's me - I'm a big spender, I guess. I'm Mr. Big.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 15:50 UTC
On Adobe releases Photoshop Lightroom 5 article (253 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jeff Seltzer: I have been using and enjoying the Beta version of 5. I think there are some significant feature updates vs. 4. For any of you that have purchased v5, are there are new features not in the beta? ALSO, what's with all the hostility towards Adobe?? It's just software. Lighten up.

Like I said, Lighten up. It's just software. Sorry, I think you are over-reacting. Adobe is not taking away your freedom. Good grief.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 15:41 UTC
On Adobe releases Photoshop Lightroom 5 article (253 comments in total)

I have been using and enjoying the Beta version of 5. I think there are some significant feature updates vs. 4. For any of you that have purchased v5, are there are new features not in the beta? ALSO, what's with all the hostility towards Adobe?? It's just software. Lighten up.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 11, 2013 at 02:23 UTC as 33rd comment | 2 replies

Nothing worries me. If it's worth it, I'll buy. If not, I won't.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 14:17 UTC as 461st comment | 2 replies
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: This is a famous photo, no doubt. And several here has come to its defence when others claims its the emperors new clothes.

Although it has some charms, I cannot really understand its greatness.

I would be very grateful to anyone that can explain to me why it is so fantastic.

Roland, it's a legit question. To understand why this image is so "great" you need to understand the importance of Eggleston. It's easy to look at this (and the rest of his work) as simple snapshots now, but 40+ years ago, the idea of documenting the "mundane" details around you was new. And, his use of color as a primary focal point in his images was unprecedented - he was basically the first non-advertising photographer to use color in such a way. He was the first to see the beauty that surrounds us with every day objects, and the way he used color as a primary "character" or subject was (is) amazing. His color printing process was also revolutionary. So, like a lot of fine art, you need to understand what the image represents, and not analyze just the image. This image is symbolic of a movement, and is representative of a body of work that revolutionized color photography. If you look at my work, for example, you can see why I appreciate him so much.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 14, 2013 at 15:55 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Tremolux: Eggleston is vastly overrated.

Glorified snapshots.

Period.

This attitude reminds me of the people who walk into a modern art museum, look at the abstract or minimalism paintings, and say "what's the big deal, I could do that!" This is called ignorance. The importance of his work is not the technical composition or subject matter, but the unprecedented use of color and printing process. It's easy to look at these images now and say "I could do that" but the truth is, you didn't do it. And doing it now is just copying someone else. There's a reason why collectors and museums value Eggleston, and not "your" pictures of cats, sunsets, sailboats, and kids. Yes, it's easy to take a picture of a a tricycle now, but it's much harder to take a series of pictures with a POV and style that is totally unique to that point. If you can do that, your images will hang in museums, too. Good luck.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2013 at 01:47 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

BroncoBro: Many comments here remind me of how insular the photography community is. Sorry if I come off sounding elitist, but please consider what I have to say. My background is in painting originally. I came to photography in my 20s while in art school because I thought the images were interesting. Those working in one traditional art media often look at artists working in other media for inspiration. Not so it seems with photographers. With a few commendable exceptions, the comments here are similar to those found in any photographer's forum. There seems to be little awareness of photography beyond the most pedestrian types of work. My guess is that if those at fault would broaden their world view by looking at what is going on in contemporary painting, drawing, installation, video, film, and so on, this discussion about Eggleston would be far different. Taking the time to get out and look at the original physical objects when they come up for exhibition would do a LOT of good.

Totally agree. For a "photography" forum, there is an alarming lack of appreciation for images that are not cats, sunsets, and kids. There's a very troubling "I can do that so why is it special?" attitude. Sad, really.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 11, 2013 at 01:35 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jeff Seltzer: A couple of thoughts...

1. In this age of modern digital printing, the notion of "limited editions" is just a marketing scheme. Limited editions used to make sense, but now with digital files, print #100 looks just the same as #1. Creating limited editions huts the artist more than the collector.

2. For all of you slamming the "Tricycle" image...go learn more about what makes an image fine art vs. decorative. Read-up on Eggleston and learn more about why his photography matters. He really started a photographic movement, and the above image is symbolic of that movement. It's an incredibly important image, if not a beautiful or technically complex image. But, do yourselves a favor, and look at his body of work.

@SystemBuilder - very well crafted and thought-out. I liked how your post was even edited after posting, which shows true dedication.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2013 at 14:46 UTC
On US Judge rules for Eggleston in dispute with collector article (300 comments in total)
In reply to:

macjonny1: I went out on my back patio, laid on the ground, and took a photo of my kid's bigwheel. Put a bleach bypass filter effect using ColoEfex pro, and looks just like this. Even took it in front of my neighbor's rancher for effect. Granted the bigwheel is plastic but looks the same to me!

Too bad you didn't do it 30 years ago. Easy to make fun of it now, but he was using color in a way no one else was. Maybe instead of poking fun, why don't you do something unique and innovative in photography? Then, maybe you could actually sell a print.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 9, 2013 at 14:26 UTC
Total: 72, showing: 21 – 40
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