mark l perry

mark l perry

Lives in Queensland
Joined on Jan 10, 2010

Comments

Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5
In reply to:

backupgeek: Too bad replacing my shutter hasn't fixed the problem.

Send it back to Nikon, my two D600 shutters were replaced 6 months ago and seems to have solved dust/oil issues. I have shot 5,000+ images no oil and no dust.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 26, 2014 at 07:38 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)
In reply to:

mark l perry: Ok I too had the dust issue and I cleaned my sensor by blowing it out with Dry Nitrogen don’t know what went wrong on production but it’s not an issue it’s just an inconvenience, I have not seen any oil but I’m sure if it needs addressing Nikon will take care of it. I wet clean my sensors about every 12 months because the sensors build up a fog or film on them after a while like the inside of your cars windscreen and when you drive into the sun the film magnifies the glare imagine what that would do to your images. In-between wet cleans I use an arctic butterfly with a blower bulb and it works just fine. It is a waste of time griping over dust because sooner or later you will get dust on your sensor just clean it and forget about all the small stuff and who is better than who and go outdoors and take some fantastic images.

Point Taken Have you taken your camera to a Nikon service center for cleaning?
It sounds like you have a chamber with a lot of dust floating around, dust would be attracted statically back to the sensor. When cleaning the sensor firstly blow out the front chamber before you lock up the mirror to clean the sensor. Also before you start any cleaning could you turn off the sensor auto cleaning function in the menu and live it off for a couple of weeks then check to see if there is dust on the sensor. If you have no dust on the sensor turn the sensor auto cleaning back on and use the camera for a few days and then check for dust, if you find dust I think I know what's happening but let's hope I'm wrong. I gave my camera a really good blow out and I'm up to 4,500 shots and no dust has come back. I know it's upsetting especially on your new camera and it should not have happened. I am sure DPREVIEW knocked points off for the dust issue because the D600 should have scrod in the high 90's.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 16, 2012 at 17:19 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)

I’m now about 1 month in using the D600 and can’t complain about the functionality it was designed to do, I don’t compare the D600 against my D4, D3X or my D800 and I don’t expect it to keep up to the speed of my D4. What I expect from the D600 is superb image quality which the D600 unquestionably delivers and if you get down to the nitty-gritty is a little better than the D3X which is now a old very expensive good camera and I wonder to myself what Nikon will replace it with. I invested in the D600 because I wanted to reduce the weight I’m carrying for 6 hours a day, my D4 with my 14-24 2.8 or 24-70 2.8 gets very weighty after 2 hours. The D600 took me a few days to get use to the smallness coming from the larger bodies I’ve since added the battery grip and it feels perfect. I use the D600 now mostly with my old 35-70 2.8D lens and it’s a mirage from heaven.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 16, 2012 at 11:21 UTC as 34th comment | 1 reply
On Just Posted: Nikon D600 In-depth Review article (499 comments in total)

Ok I too had the dust issue and I cleaned my sensor by blowing it out with Dry Nitrogen don’t know what went wrong on production but it’s not an issue it’s just an inconvenience, I have not seen any oil but I’m sure if it needs addressing Nikon will take care of it. I wet clean my sensors about every 12 months because the sensors build up a fog or film on them after a while like the inside of your cars windscreen and when you drive into the sun the film magnifies the glare imagine what that would do to your images. In-between wet cleans I use an arctic butterfly with a blower bulb and it works just fine. It is a waste of time griping over dust because sooner or later you will get dust on your sensor just clean it and forget about all the small stuff and who is better than who and go outdoors and take some fantastic images.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 16, 2012 at 11:21 UTC as 35th comment | 4 replies
On Nikon D600 Hands-on Preview preview (713 comments in total)

I own both these cameras and they are both very good, the D600 I've had for a little over a week and it blows my D3X away which is what I was using for landscape. I purchased the D800E for landscape and it is magnificent. I would say it would be your best option for exceptional landscape work; the D600 would be the next best option it won't disappoint you.

I think both cameras have excellent dynamic range and would not worry which is better. However when playing around with these large sensors you will need the top of the range glass mounted on these cameras, poor man's glass just won't cut it.

Don't pay too much attention to what you see on the web and on test charts etc its real world images you need to judge. Ansel Adams made fantastic landscape images with 1920's and 30's equipment.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Camera-Sensor-Ratings
Here are some D800 samples look at ISO & Glass used.
http://www.pixel-peeper.com/cameras/?camera=1657

Best of luck
Mark

Direct link | Posted on Oct 8, 2012 at 12:00 UTC as 39th comment
Total: 5, showing: 1 – 5