Charlie Lab

Charlie Lab

Lives in Canada Canada
Works as a Other
Joined on Jan 30, 2012

Comments

Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7
On article A lot to Leica? Hands-on with the Leica SL (Typ 601) (1512 comments in total)

Hmmm. Leica does a lot of things really well, but I can't quite figure out this release. A totally new mount for a new system that touts itself as the first "professional" mirrorless system - but then only has one kit zoom lens available for the whole "system" - with only two more in the pipeline. If the Sony A7 series wasn't around, this would be a much more exciting announcement, but it feels a little late to the party and not quite complete for release at that.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2015 at 17:23 UTC as 87th comment | 5 replies
On photo 5, going on 15 in the My Best Photo of the Week challenge (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

Steve Throndson: This was one of my favorites in the challenge. The expression made me feel sympathetic and, at the same time, curious as to what the child is thinking. Certainly not your standard portrait. A brave entry!
I'm curious what a '1968 Thorium Takumar' is. I guess I can Google that.
Cheers,
Steve

Thanks for the comments on the portrait. I agree - I found the expression very captivating (although not the ideal expression for a kids portrait :-))

To answer your question: The lens is a 1968 Asahi (Pentax) 50mm f1.4. They labelled their premium lenses as "Takumar" or "Super Takumar" - and these early version used radioactive Thorium elements to get highly refractive elements in a small size. They are still great lenses, although of course all manual controls. I love this lens on an APS-C body for portraits, particularly indoors where space is limited.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2015 at 03:25 UTC
On article Sony Alpha 7 Review (1596 comments in total)

Good to finally have a full review up. I tend to agree that the "cons" were weighted more that I would have done, but overall a pretty fair assessment. I like what Sony has done with the A7/A7R and if I were buying a new camera today, it would be one of these. Not perfect, but very good for my style.

GREAT for landscape & street photography, natural light portraits, & using older manual-focus lenses. The accuracy of CDAF focus should be noted in addition to the slower focus compared to PDAF. Small/light weight FF such a huge plus.

NOT GREAT for fast action or sophisticated flash work. Limited glass selection means it is (temporarily) limited in native lens use.

I appreciate that the reviewers did not like the "feel" of the camera - as shown by the lowest score in "ergonomics and handling" - but also recognize this is the most subjective of sections, and the most customizable.

Overall, Sony deserves to be applauded for innovation, this pushes the art of Photography forward.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2014 at 19:02 UTC as 158th comment | 1 reply
On article Using third-party lenses on the Sony a7 / a7R (532 comments in total)

Thanks for the article.
I shoot almost exclusively with manual-focus lenses on my NEX-7, which has some of the same concerns as the A7/A7R. While not perfect, these platforms are a dream to use with these old lenses... I would also add that they take a lot of practice. The HUGE plus to me of the A7 over the NEX-7 is the inclusion of auto-ISO in manual mode. Great improvement for these manual lenses.
Getting tack-sharp focus at open apertures is tricky for computers or people, but it really does get easier with practice and getting used to the lenses. I actually feel somewhat disconnected with the act of photography trusting the auto focus now.
And yes, razor sharp rendering is not generally the description I would use for most of the older lenses. "Character" comes up a lot more.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2014 at 22:53 UTC as 169th comment
On Connect post Sample gallery: Apple's iPhone 5s (105 comments in total)

Not just the iPhone, but many of the later generation smartphones are perfectly acceptable replacements for "point and click" compacts and for gimmick shots like panorama (linear in the case of iPhone, or spherical in the case of Android). That camera market segment is rapidly disappearing as a result, with phones used to capture moments when one doesn't have a quality camera along. The only thing that caught my eye with these particular pictures was the apparently high-quality in-camera panorama stitching. Good to see phone manufacturers competing on this basis- it brings nothing but goodness for us consumers.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 19:38 UTC as 36th comment
On article Sample gallery: Apple's iPhone 5s (105 comments in total)

Not just the iPhone, but many of the later generation smartphones are perfectly acceptable replacements for "point and click" compacts and for gimmick shots like panorama (linear in the case of iPhone, or spherical in the case of Android). That camera market segment is rapidly disappearing as a result, with phones used to capture moments when one doesn't have a quality camera along. The only thing that caught my eye with these particular pictures was the apparently high-quality in-camera panorama stitching. Good to see phone manufacturers competing on this basis- it brings nothing but goodness for us consumers.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 19:38 UTC as 36th comment
On article Dpreview Users' Poll: Best Camera of 2012? (1508 comments in total)

Lots of great cameras on this list. For me, the photography made possible by the RX-1 differentiates it. Having a spectacular 24MP Full-Frame sensor (have you seen the high ISO samples!?!) and immaculate 35mm macro-capable Zeiss lens in a camera that slips into a pocket makes this the camera that everyone wants, even if we mostly can't afford it... and even there, the closest camera feature-wise would cost 2-3x as much and weigh 5x as much.

If I could have any camera on that list, I would chose the RX-1, so it gets my vote.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2012 at 04:36 UTC as 605th comment
Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7