Tonio Loewald

Tonio Loewald

Lives in United States Arlington, VA, United States
Works as a Consultant
Has a website at http://loewald.com/
Joined on Jul 25, 2005

Comments

Total: 232, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Mike FL: Marketing is already running away from Pentax after Ricoh puts hands on Pentax.

I hope Ricoh / Pentax hits a home run with this (a compact FF body with IBIS is pretty much the Holy Grail for me). The question is whether it will be built around the Sony/Nikon 36MP sensor. If so, it's probably going to be a generation behind.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 17, 2015 at 15:35 UTC
In reply to:

Goodmeme: Canon's camera business has tried to change market and product at the same time with its launch into Hollywood, video and the C system.

I can't help thinking that whoever is driving that fairly extreme strategy has in part caused what we might perceive as Canon's disinterest or lack of resources towards its cash cow photography market.

With mirrorless, phones and other technologies changing expectations, perhaps Canon could have done with at least one foot on the ground in order better to roll with the movement. Perhaps it's hard to change direction when you're mid-leap... I'll be interested to see how the division does generally.

Dr Jon — great point. I did not realise Canon dominated industry profits that strongly. The big problem the camera industry faces is survival. If you view your lenses as a lifetime investment, not having a state of the art body to use them with in ten years is a huge deal. It's kind of hard to imagine Olympus, say, will still be around (although hopefully there will be a surviving M43 vendor).

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 14:37 UTC
In reply to:

Catalin Stavaru: 99% of the upsetting caused by the EOS M3 comes from the lack of an electronic viewfinder. If it had one, everyone was raving.

To me, the inclusion of an EVF means a larger camera, a higher price, and another component that could make the camera obsolete sooner because another EVF is brighter or has more pixels.

So the exclusion of the EVF is in fact a very good idea. Those who need it can attach it, and right now it is offered almost for free at Amazon Japan together with the camera (and anyone can preorder via a package forwarding company).

I personally think that the EOS M3 is a winner. The EOS M lens range is small but very high quality and perfectly chosen for the target audience.

The world's most profitable (public) company releases products on a predictable schedule and does not do steep discounting. It's also the world's largest camera company by far. The crazy way the [other] camera companies release products at science fiction prices and then provide ever-greater discounts at random intervals reflects poor supply chain management and product pipelines. In the long run it makes customers alienated and cynical.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 14:12 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2267 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: Maybe it's time to test out the new Pentax 645 or something equally high-performance and expensive? The "featured story" being this Canon, which few Canon DSLR buyers will ever buy, is like how mainstream auto mags often test high-megabuck sports cars most of their readers will never buy. So, by "featuring" it and pegging it at the top of the page, it achieves a 17.5% "popularity" rating where more important information on "far more likely to be bought" cameras get pushed down lower. It might be exciting, but it's not particularly important.

"Maybe he means they need to shut up about it? No one really likes the grammar police."

He has upvotes ;-). And moot vs. mute isn't a question of grammar, it's idiom or semantics. (Points being "mute" makes no sense, since points don't speak normally.)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 14:31 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2267 comments in total)
In reply to:

Anastigmat: As camera makers seem to be unable to decide whether to make high pixel count or low pixel count cameras. It may be time that someone introduces interchangeable sensors. Buy a camera and the user can buy extra sensors that can be easily changed, the same way that a user used to change film, so that a user can decide to shoot high resolution or high sensitivity instead of having to be stuck with one or the other.

How much bigger, more fragile, and expensive are you willing for your interchangeable sensor camera to be?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 14:29 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2267 comments in total)
In reply to:

photomikeleth: If this is aimed at landscape and studio why not do something out of the box like add a 25 or 50 ISO setting. I was really excited when I first heard of this camera but really not a lot that is cutting edge other than the 50mp. I may still buy one for those few shots that 50mp will be needed for but not looking like a game changer in any way.

"I think it is time that all manufacturers start to push the limits."

I think it's fair to say that the camera companies are great at pushing technical limits (e.g. increasing megapixels, sensitivity, and even dynamic range). What they suck at is user experience, upgradability, modularity, workflow enhancement, etc. which would actually solve real problems.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 10, 2015 at 14:21 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2267 comments in total)
In reply to:

photomikeleth: If this is aimed at landscape and studio why not do something out of the box like add a 25 or 50 ISO setting. I was really excited when I first heard of this camera but really not a lot that is cutting edge other than the 50mp. I may still buy one for those few shots that 50mp will be needed for but not looking like a game changer in any way.

This is like asking why the volume knob goes up to 11. The sensor has certain capabilities that represent a design tradeoff. In order to support ISO25 or ISO50 (which hardly anyone would use) they'd need to sacrifice some other capability. Obviously you can stick an ND filter in front of the lens and simulate arbitrarily low ISOs, so what you're asking for is more dynamic range or lower noise at some ISO, not ISO 25 or 50 specifically, and they simply couldn't achieve it and get the other characteristics they wanted.

This sensor is, in essence, exactly the same as the 7DII's sensor, just bigger. There's no magic sauce that comes with being full frame.

Sony could presumably make a 54MP sensor using its APS-C 24MP sensor technology and get the same per-pixel quality as the D7100 / A7.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 18:59 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2267 comments in total)
In reply to:

RPJG: Does anyone know why Nikon and Canon have self-cancelling LPFs, rather than just not having an LPF at all?

@eCube -- the D750 and D6x0 have AA filters (as do the Df, D4, and D4s), the D810 has none (not self-canceling, none).

Direct link | Posted on Feb 7, 2015 at 00:51 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2267 comments in total)
In reply to:

RPJG: Does anyone know why Nikon and Canon have self-cancelling LPFs, rather than just not having an LPF at all?

The way the LPF or AA filters in DSLRs work there are two layers that blur the incoming light vertically and then horizontally. With "self-canceling" the second layer tries to undo what the first layer did, so the result is not quite as sharp as if you had no filters at all. The D800E had a "self-canceling" filter while the D800 had a conventional pair. The reason for this is that the design allowed for the same optical path length (since the filters refract light) and simply eliminating the filter would entail moving the sensor (and possibly reorienting microlenses on the sensor itself).

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 17:55 UTC
On Canon EOS 5DS / SR First Impressions Review preview (2267 comments in total)
In reply to:

RPJG: Does anyone know why Nikon and Canon have self-cancelling LPFs, rather than just not having an LPF at all?

Nikon doesn't with more recent cameras (e.g. the D810). Originally, it was because they weren't confident about eliminating the LPF, and so they offered both a conventional LPF and a self-canceling option (same number of optical layers) to avoid having to use two different assembly-line processes.

I imagine that at 50MP the moire issues are pretty minor and Canon will follow in Nikon's footsteps and eliminate the LPF in a future model. (Nikon has also eliminated the LPF in 24MP APS-C models, but not 24MP FF models, presumably because moire is more of a problem at lower resolutions.)

Direct link | Posted on Feb 6, 2015 at 17:25 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1873 comments in total)
In reply to:

ecube: What is "Quality"?
To me, it it conformance to SPECIFICATION

There is "Fit and Tolerance" in "Machine Design" or "Design of the Elements of Mechanism". Precision machines such as watches have tight "fit and tolerances". Camera is considered a precision machine. Within this set of precision machines are subsets of classes. The high end Swiss and Japanese Certified Chronographs have ultra-fine fit and ultra tight tolerances approaching single digit microns.

Quality Assurance program is to ensure that the product is BUILT to meet or exceed the "Design Specifications". Good specification is NOT SUBJECT TO INTERPRETATION. Good specification is quantifiable and measurable. For this reason, a good design does not call for a Fit & Tolerances that cannot be measured by any existing instrument

The above barely scratch the surface of design, manufacturing, and Q/A but I feel is enough to ask: Does the Nikon D750 meet the basic of good DESIGN, MANUFACTURING, and QUALITY ASSURANCE?

@Rishi — comparing the two photographs, the difference seems quite pronounced (e.g. in one you can see dark cut-outs (?) and in the other you cannot).

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2015 at 13:52 UTC
On Nikon D750 Review preview (1873 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sad Joe: Well, DPR took its sweet time but we now have 'proof' that the top Canon has the same fault ? OK - so why aren't Canon recalling them all ? Why aren't 1DX users finding the fault? Why aren't 1DX users demanding its sorted out RIGHT NOW ? Sorry DPR I simply don't believe its the same issue nor the same volume of problem. Me ? Even if I were going a D750 I'd hold off for several months as its retail price is going to sink as people simply don't buy it in the numbers Nikon need to make money. Another great camera ruined by STINKER QC. Bring on the D760....

> Why aren't 1DX users demanding its sorted out RIGHT NOW

The article asks the same question, and suggests it's because 1DX owners are pros and too busy shooting to whine about an "issue" that doesn't matter.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2015 at 13:37 UTC
On Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path article (1405 comments in total)

I went from the D7000 to the D600 a couple of years ago. I had a 70-300mm full frame lens and an old 24-85mm f2.8-4 (mediocre lens except for Macro); everything else was crop. The 35mm f1.8 turns out to work perfectly well on the FX body aside from somewhat greater vignetting than with a proper prime.

But there are other considerations: the D7000 and D600 use the same battery. I can carry both bodies and switch lenses between them. Any lens I buy for the D600 can also be used on the D7000. The controls are 99% identical.

When I was upgrading I looked at the cost of switching systems, and — yes — there wasn't much benefit in terms of glass (it's not like my 70-300 was a fantastic lens), but amazingly to me the cost of putting together an equivalent kit with any other system except Canon was *vastly* higher. Decent M43 lenses are expensive — I got my 50mm f1.8 for $120, and my 85mm f1.8 (one of the sharpest lenses available at any price) for $500. Today I could add a $700 20mm f1.8.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 14, 2015 at 16:50 UTC as 82nd comment
In reply to:

RichRMA: The monkey shot and the deer shot and the valley shots stand out. There should be a moratorium on penguin shots, we've been inundated with them for 10 years now.

Yeah I'm not sure what's so great about the Penguin shot (or the airshow shot for that matter).

Direct link | Posted on Dec 15, 2014 at 02:18 UTC
In reply to:

Known Member: I really don't like incremental upgrades like this camera. I will be waiting for A9 which is coming out in Feb 2015!

"there is no lens problem" — I happen to like autofocus. I don't use it for everything, but not having it is a major bummer. If 95% of a system's lenses had no AF would you call that a problem? (Obviously, not if you're Leica :-) )

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2014 at 14:02 UTC
On Enthusiast interchangeable lens camera 2013 roundup article (467 comments in total)
In reply to:

Hasa: No FF bodies - WHAT?
I am an amateur.
My enthusiast "specialised landscape camera" choice is the Nikon D800. It should have been included here - and/or the 800e or the 810. Indeed we have a "specialised sports photography camera" like the Canon d7 M2 in the mix vs. the half as expensive D7100 ! DPR has - by eliminating the Nikon FF D8xx and D6xx and Canon's offerings in FF completely avoided giving any advice on the pertinent and difficult choice of FF vs. APS-C for landscape photographers. Is it a foregone conclusion that enthusiast DSLR = APS-C ? Maybe the Nikon DF is an example of the ultimate "enthusiast" dslr body catering for those that want to have access to 55 years worth of Nikkors.

There's a separate FF article. They recommend D750 or Sony A7. The real issue with this article is that the 7Dii is the elephant in the room, but really it's in a different league to the other cameras here (both in performance and price).

Direct link | Posted on Dec 8, 2014 at 14:16 UTC
In reply to:

red fuji: what you doing comparing Full frame to APS-C ??? we have apples and oranges here.

@KaelinHill — The GH4 is M43, which is ~4x smaller than FF. APS-C is ~2x smaller than FF. There is no APS-C camera being discussed here.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 05:07 UTC
On Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review preview (895 comments in total)
In reply to:

Reilly Diefenbach: The D3300 with kit lens kills this nice little camera at $350 less. Can't carry a one pound camera? Really?

Very good point. I found this camera pretty compelling, but the small DSLRs you can get these days are superb, and they also have ludicrously better battery life.

And there's the SL1 if you prefer Canon (smaller body but larger kit zoom) and $50 more.

And, given we're talking Panasonic, you can actually find the Canons and Nikons for sale in stores and stuff.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 04:48 UTC
On Nikon AF-S Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G Lab Test Review preview (79 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: There should come a point at which there is no vignetting. A lens designed to cover the sensor properly would have no vignetting even wide open. As they charge now so much money, perhaps we could get them to design for full-frame. I do not care if it is bigger and heavier, but I do care if it always vignettes. DX review shows it still vignettes a third of a stop at f11. I have zooms that are better than this.

If you use primes quality is now the sole criterion> I want primes that ALWAYS cover the sensor> I want zooms that do as well- remember the 70-200f2.8G VRI?

@BarnET — interesting (and interesting about the low t-stop — f2.8 -> t4.5)! Wide angle lenses tend to have far more optical problems (including vignetting) so if there were going to be a near-perfect lens in this regard, it's no surprise it's a telephoto.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 04:41 UTC
In reply to:

jhinkey: Anticipating the A7RII sometime in the next 6 months I may have to let the A7R go now. I've taken some great shots with it, but the lack of IBIS was limiting for some of the things I do. If the A7II fixes the sensor cover issues, has a less noisy shutter I might grab that in the mean time. The A7R was an experiment for me as a companion to my D800, but has not worked out as well as I had hoped for my style of shooting.

Bring on the innovation Sony - hopefully Nikon will take notice and finally get off it's a** and get a full-frame mirrorless out the door. If they do it can't possibly be any less capable than the A7R and like have far better ergonomics.

@abortabort — you do realize Nikon was the *first* company to ship PDAF on sensor and has the fastest AF mirrorless cameras (whatever their other flaws) and consistently gets better results from Sony's sensor tech than Sony does. It's possible Sony would refuse to make Nikon FF sensors with PDAF or that Nikon's PDAF is somehow incompatible with Sony sensor tech (since Nikons PDAF is on Aptina sensors).

Direct link | Posted on Nov 21, 2014 at 04:36 UTC
Total: 232, showing: 1 – 20
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