swhs

swhs

Joined on Jan 22, 2011

Comments

Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

tiberiousgracchus: All the hard work the photographer put into getting there for the monkey to have his hands on the camera in the first place means nothing then? Its the photographers property. The large organisations are using a loophole to 'own' what could be an all time classic image.

Copyright is about creativity, not about 'hard work' nor about the amount of money that someone spends on making something. If the result is not 'created' such that it is considered a creative work which is protectable with copyright law, then all the effort done and money spent won't change that.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 27, 2014 at 11:38 UTC
In reply to:

straylightrun: Breaking news just in: It has now been confirmed that If your photo is captured using the camera's self timer, it is legally not your photo any more but is the property of your camera.

> It has now been confirmed that If your photo is captured using the camera's self timer, it is legally not your photo any more but is the property of your camera.

The creative part needed to make a photo to have copyright rights for the photographer was done before pressing the button: Selecting how to aim the camera with what background, and imagining where one would want to be in that. So the self-timer changes nothing.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 22, 2014 at 08:15 UTC
On Manfrotto announces carbon fiber BeFree tripod article (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: Get a Gitzo, a good ball head and an Arca or RRS release. Costs a lot, but they last a lifetime and unlike cameras, don't become obsolete after a couple years.

Yes, the front fan. You know there are multiple fans in a turbine engine and any where the fuel is ignited are made of titanium.

Ti edges of a carbon fibre fan could be for impact resistance with small 'stuff'.

All I wrote is correct.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 16, 2014 at 06:10 UTC
On Manfrotto announces carbon fiber BeFree tripod article (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: Get a Gitzo, a good ball head and an Arca or RRS release. Costs a lot, but they last a lifetime and unlike cameras, don't become obsolete after a couple years.

Titanium is used for heat resistance in turbines. You can't use epoxy there...

Otherwise carbon fibre is far superior. Titanium is not a wonder material, it's not very resistant to scratching, nor all that strong (in weight and strength it lies between steel and aluminium and it's not really better than either, well depending on type of application, tube diameter etc. one or the other is preferable). Ti can handle bending well and deals well with vibrations. Which is why ti-bikes are very comfortable.

If you want really strong and light, ask for beryllium! (but it's toxic :)) Or the aluminium-beryllium alloy that a bike maker once considered. I guess cancelled because of the toxicity of beryllium.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 21:40 UTC
On Leica T (Typ 701) First Impressions Review preview (2300 comments in total)

There's a missing option in the part 'Gear in this story' which shows how many people own it / want it / had it.

But what about the number of people who "Do not want it"?

Direct link | Posted on Apr 28, 2014 at 04:19 UTC as 343rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Manfred Bachmann: again a new akku? slowly i think nikon needs a break!

Akku is not German slang, it is normal German and it means 'rechargeable battery". Just like in Dutch in German there are different words for non rechargeable battery (batterie) and rechargeable battery (akku).

Direct link | Posted on Apr 10, 2014 at 19:12 UTC

> as a legal alternative to image theft.

It's copyright infringement, not theft.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 10, 2014 at 13:58 UTC as 10th comment | 1 reply
On Leica announces X Vario zoom compact with APS-C sensor article (757 comments in total)

This 'news' should be in a new news category, "news for dentists", just like that new hasselblad.

2. Calling this camera compact is ludicrous. The G1X is a brick, this is a bigger brick.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2013 at 18:52 UTC as 60th comment | 1 reply
On Leica teases 'Mini M' for 11th June release article (304 comments in total)

Good news for dentists

Direct link | Posted on May 23, 2013 at 17:13 UTC as 115th comment | 1 reply
On Connect contest winner announced! post (44 comments in total)

To me the images that 'win' show not actually what is asked, namely how people (after all that's what life for humans is about) really connect. E.g. someone charging a phone, which is not interesting. If it had been say a solar charger, then it would have been interesting...

The image I submitted was, though perhaps not artistically great (then again I see nothing special in the winning images), interesting as it showed a connection from book to PC to tablet (better than a mobile phone for me, esp. where there is good WiFi coverage) with the picture of someone I know in all of them. This signifies much more, a connection to people, and of how communication changed (from letters/books to electronic)

I don't believe no entries from the USA or western Europe were at least as good as the winning images, and that these all come from non-western countries is thus caused by bias of the judges, perhaps even who they want to win because they can use the prize money better.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 20, 2012 at 07:09 UTC as 12th comment

PART 2: Nothing is built from the air, everything is built from the shoulders of others. Now we have companies who have bought old pictures and sell the right to them which is essentially a tax. Good for them (the people working in them), good for the people selling them to those companies (such as children, who have done no work to earn that money). But these companies serve no real purpose. They produce nothing of value. Their tax goes to pay people doing administrative work that serves no further purpose, or even worse, pays people who have done zilch.

Copyright law hogs memories, so we can't just download a song from our youth, we need to buy it (again!). Ditto for TV and everything else that we like(d) and already paid for by watching advertising or paying a licence fee. The only interesting change for copyright laws is when the duration is reduced to say 10 years.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2012 at 23:19 UTC as 11th comment

PART 1: The biggest problem with all copyright laws is the duration for which these rights are granted. This means administrative nonsense and not always being able to rerelease stuff due to not being able to find all copyright owners. It also means a hogging of our memories. Whatever we really like, the thing in question has something related to the times (fashion type qualities) or it has innate qualities of how we think and perceive things that we like. So it's not a creative work, it's a creative work that is appreciated by people because of how they are. It's partly like a discovery, not a invention.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 9, 2012 at 23:19 UTC as 12th comment
In reply to:

Boerseuntjie: This is proof that we live in a era of smart phones and stupid people

> likewise I have never seen anything remotely intelligent come out of your mouth swhs

Mods, please ban this moron.

And FYI Boerseuntjie, your view about my writings is of no value whatsoever.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2012 at 18:43 UTC
In reply to:

Boerseuntjie: This is proof that we live in a era of smart phones and stupid people

And yet another infantile meaningless comment. I have not seen anything useful from you ever. In one of your comments below you whine about the USSR, you whine again about 'Samsuck'. Moderators: Please ban this troll!

Direct link | Posted on Aug 30, 2012 at 07:21 UTC

> many commentors dismissing his images as unprofessional at best, and at worst unpatriotic.

Ah yes, there we have 'patriotic'/'unpatriotic' again. Of course!

Such inane comments are much more offensive than any quality those picture may or may not have. And such commentators obviously don't understand anything about the olympic ideals. No, it's not about performing for a country, it's for yourself. Despite what countries (goverments and/or a large part of the populous feeling the following way:) who want advertise themselves (esp. during the Cold war times, but it hasn't stopped for various reasons) as better than others, think.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 7, 2012 at 04:33 UTC as 154th comment
On Samsung releases 12MP EX2F 'Smart Camera' article (370 comments in total)
In reply to:

iudex: I am really impressed. A used to own an EX1 and was really satisfied how it worked and what pictures it took. There were some flaws, however: 1. no full HD video, a bit too slow, only 1/1500 s was not sufficient in bright sunny day, f7,1 as well, 72 mm was a bit short and 370 g was a bit heavy. All this has hanged and the good remained (or even got better). That is what I call progress. My Canon S100 with its f2-5,9 is ashamed. :-)

What 370g? 387g? Did you two measure or just read specs off of websites?

Mine is an early one so no improvements that might have been made in versions with later serial no., and it weighs 336 g including battery and memory card.

Direct link | Posted on Jul 4, 2012 at 11:36 UTC
On Just Posted: Nikon Coolpix P310 review article (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

BJN: Raw is descriptive of the format, it's not an acronym (raw, not RAW – unless you're shouting at a sushi making competition). I think tkbslc is correct that when you settle for the small sensor you're not likely to fret too much about not getting raw files.

> Thanks for the lesson, but nobody thinks it's an acronym, but just as file discriptors like JPEG, TIFF, are often written in upper case, so can the word RAW.

Apparantly you need the lesson, because JPEG and TIFF are acronyms, not 'file descriptors', whatever that is...

Raw files are raw, not RAW, therefore uppercase is inappropriate.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 24, 2012 at 01:30 UTC
On Just posted: Our Samsung NX200 in-depth review article (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

patchfree: Similar to Pana GX1 but GX1 has a smaller size, included the lens. So no real choice: GX1.

> half? 4/3 sensor is 13mm high, APS-C is 15,7mm, just 20% more...

Uhm, yes, and what about width? You need to take the surface so square that factor...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 1, 2012 at 07:45 UTC
In reply to:

Karl K Grambow: I think a lot of you have missed the point (which to be fair hasn't been accurately put across in the article either).

The defendant had previously tried to use the original photograph in a commercial setting. But the claimant said "hang on, that's my photo, if you want to use it commercially then pay up". And they went to court over this.

Later on, the defendant decided that if he couldn't use the original photo, he'd take one that was similar so that he could avoid having to pay royalties.

The problem is that he used the original image as the idea with which to compose his photograph. And he did so expressly for commercial gain (and the claimants ultimate commercial loss). The fact that there are many other such-like images was irrelevant in this case because the defendant admitted in court that he used the claimants image as his inspiration.

So the issue here is that he copied someone elses idea (he addmitted as much) specifically for commercial gain.

> I think a lot of you have missed the point (which to be fair hasn't been accurately put across in the article either).

I certainly didn't and many others didn't either. It's all been explained and your post restates again a untenable viewpoint that an idea is copyrightable.

> The problem is that he used the original image as the idea with which to compose his photograph. And he did so expressly for commercial gain (and the claimants ultimate commercial loss).

[ snip ]

> the defendant admitted in court that he used the claimants image as his inspiration.

> So the issue here is that he copied someone elses idea (he addmitted as much) specifically for commercial gain.

This doesn't matter. Just like reverse engineering is allowed, this is too. Ideas are not copyrighteable. The second photo is not a work based on the first, but a similar one.

The only way this case should have been handled is as a trademark issue because both pictures were used to sell stuff.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2012 at 12:42 UTC
In reply to:

Vlad S: Why do you guys all ignore the finding (that was not disputed by the defendant) that The defendant *fashioned* the image specifically based on Fielder's version, specifically to avoid paying the licensing fees. I think this is not so much about the freedom of expression as about a cheat being caught.

From the ruling:
"The whole point of this case is that Mr Houghton and his company wish lawfully to produce an image which does bear some resemblance to the claimant's work. The inference that I draw is that Mr Houghton sought out this other material after he had decided to produce an image similar to the claimant's. ... That does not avoid a causal link. If Mr Houghton had seen Mr Fielder's image, decided he wanted to use a similar one, found the Rodriguez or Getty photographs and put one of those on his boxes of tea, there would be no question of infringement. ... But that is not what happened."

> You guys always seem to omit one or the other aspect of the ruling.

No.
But you seem to 'forget' that I said that reverse engineering is legal.

> PLUS the circumstance that Houghton already tried to steal this image outright and was forced to pay the license fees, PLUS Houghton's admission that he was not aware of the similar images before he used Fielder's. That's just too many "coincidences" to say that he did not try to reproduce Fielder's work knowingly and in substantial part.

What he did to circumvent paying a licence fee or what he did in the past is IRRELEVANT!

The issue is about having a copyright on an idea. Which is wrong.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 26, 2012 at 06:52 UTC
Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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