AlexeyD

AlexeyD

Lives in United Kingdom Hampshire, United Kingdom
Works as a Software Engineer
Has a website at http://www.aletan.com
Joined on Feb 10, 2006
About me:

Cameras: Kodak SLR/n x 2

Nikkors: 17-35 f/2.8 AFS,
28-70 f/2.8 AFS,
50mm f/1.4 AF-D
Sigma: 24mm f/2.8 (manual)
MF Lenses:
Carl Zeiss Biometar 120mm f/2.8 MC with P6 adapter
Mamiya Sekor 80mm f/1.9 with chipped adapter
Pentax 67 45mm f/4.0 on Mirex T/S adapter for Nikon

Comments

Total: 12, showing: 1 – 12
On Nikon announces flagship D4s professional DSLR article (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: Pixels wars are over, ISO wars have begun. Now if only we could get a real ISO 50, with L ISO 25.

> How long does an ISO 6 exposure take on a Kodak DSLR when you otherwise would have needed ISO 100 and f/16 for a 1/100" exposure? A true ISO 6 should only take 1/3 second.

True Kodak's slow ISO are limited to certain shutter speeds but after all they are not native ISOs. Which does not make them any less real or true - just limited. There is nothing new in selecting expo pair from a limited subset - we do it all the time with limited flash sync. So when picking up aperture to match preset slow ISO time for correct exposure, the Kodaks will expose at a real and calibrated slow ISOs.

> and it's nothing you can't accomplish with any other DSLR and some PP software.

As with anything - try it. You may find that it is not at all possible in PS or any other common PP software and in fact will require some extra coding (perhaps writing a plugin) to do it.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 20:41 UTC
On Nikon announces flagship D4s professional DSLR article (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: Pixels wars are over, ISO wars have begun. Now if only we could get a real ISO 50, with L ISO 25.

> A real ISO 6 would allow for a single long exposure.
Have you actually own Kodak? It is a single exposure - the shuter opens and closes once. How it is implemented is actually quite relevant and Kodak implementation is effectively a way to capture long exposure without overexposing. It is in that respect more real than overexposed ISO 50 and to any degree exactly the same as if your sensor native exposure was at ISO 6.

As with anything, it would be good if you'd get some basic understanding of the mechanisms involved - without it it is all just idle talks.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 16:51 UTC
On Nikon announces flagship D4s professional DSLR article (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: Pixels wars are over, ISO wars have begun. Now if only we could get a real ISO 50, with L ISO 25.

Read up yourself (preferably in Kodak own patent describing how it all done - here for example http://resume.jemcgarvey.com in Intellectual Property section). It does multiple sampling from sensor over a specified exposure time to prevent overexposure (since you cannot go below sensor base sensitivity) not the shots. And accumulated signal gets proportioned back to what exposure at slow ISO should be. How is it fake?? It is also calibrated like base ISO.

ISO 50 and other in modern cameras however are simply overexposed shots at base ISO and that is definitely fake.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 14:52 UTC
On Nikon announces flagship D4s professional DSLR article (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

thx1138: Pixels wars are over, ISO wars have begun. Now if only we could get a real ISO 50, with L ISO 25.

Get yourself a Kodak SLR/n - they are cheap now. Nikon F mount and real (not fake) slow ISOs down to ISO 6.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 09:31 UTC
In reply to:

Just a Photographer: I am not surprised that the Nikon 1 is not selling well.
The world has been calling for a compact mirrorless full frame camera. But Nikon and Canon refuses to make one.

Sony has the (the RX1) , but that one is crippled by not having the option to change lenses and is too expensive.

Make a affordable compact lightweight full frame small body camera with a interchangeble lens system and you'll have a definate winner.

"FF lenses are huge, and will stay huge on a mirrorless FF."

Ever heard of Leica? It is full frame and their lenses are far from huge.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 9, 2013 at 08:28 UTC
On User Review: Gura Gear Kiboko 30L Backpack article (113 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Scarff: I bought one shortly after it came out and LOVE it. My previous bag was a Lowepro Roadrunner AW which I still have, but very rarely use now. I bought the Kiboko 30L for international travel, but now use it all the time. The Roadrunner AW has wheels and is very secure....but very heavy (15+ lbs.?) The Kiboko 30L is about 4 pounds - a huge benefit.

I travel with a Canon 400mm DO lens, a 70-300mm L, 1.4X TC, a 7D and a 60D cameras, a medium weight carbon fiber tripod, flash, 18-135mm lens, etc. No problem fitting that all in/on the bag with quick access to everything.

The biggest challenge I see in travel outside the U.S. is the common 7 kg (15 lbs) weight limit for carry-on baggage. My experience is airlines enforce this. With the Kiboko I can pack my 2 cameras, and lenses and still be under. Plus although it is slightly longer than international length limits, it is soft and can easily be compressed to fit into the allowed volume. Never had a problem.

To RBFresno:
My 'facts' are simply based on the fact that I just flew by Lufthansa from Germany to UK carrying photo backpack weighting 21kg with me on a airplane. I was asked at checking if I take it as a hand luggage and that is all. Besides, your 'facts' do confirm at least BA part of what I said.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 22, 2012 at 12:07 UTC
On User Review: Gura Gear Kiboko 30L Backpack article (113 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Scarff: I bought one shortly after it came out and LOVE it. My previous bag was a Lowepro Roadrunner AW which I still have, but very rarely use now. I bought the Kiboko 30L for international travel, but now use it all the time. The Roadrunner AW has wheels and is very secure....but very heavy (15+ lbs.?) The Kiboko 30L is about 4 pounds - a huge benefit.

I travel with a Canon 400mm DO lens, a 70-300mm L, 1.4X TC, a 7D and a 60D cameras, a medium weight carbon fiber tripod, flash, 18-135mm lens, etc. No problem fitting that all in/on the bag with quick access to everything.

The biggest challenge I see in travel outside the U.S. is the common 7 kg (15 lbs) weight limit for carry-on baggage. My experience is airlines enforce this. With the Kiboko I can pack my 2 cameras, and lenses and still be under. Plus although it is slightly longer than international length limits, it is soft and can easily be compressed to fit into the allowed volume. Never had a problem.

Where did you get 7kg carry on limit from? I am flying in Europe and none of the airlines I used there had that limit (Lufthansa, BA etc) all state in fact that the weight of the carry on bag should be such that you yourself should be able to put it into overhead locker. The lockers on different planes also limited to hold certain amount of weight but usually it comes down to 20-23 kg per bag.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 20, 2012 at 08:04 UTC
On Shooting with the Leica M9-P article (648 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: Note to Kodachrome 200 and others who do not see the sense of what they believe is an obsolete camera.
When I use my M8u while traveling' the deliberate shooting method imposed by the manual rangefinder followed by re-composition before shooting results in fewer shots over all and many more "keepers".
So don't be so fast to knock a RF digital camera. They have their place even if that is not in your place. I'll continue to use my faithful M8 because I cannot spend $9000 on an M9 since I prefer to retain domestic tranquility in the household. But Leica RF cameras are a superior product built like a tank and guaranteed to be a precision picture taking instrument long after other and less well built cameras have gone to their Chinese junkyard for recycling. They truly last forever which should satisfy any owner except those who need to buy the latest thing on the market every 6 to 12 months. So, maybe in the long haul, those who spend the $9000 really come out ahead, money wise.

> ...long after other and less well built cameras have gone to their Chinese junkyard for recycling.

When was the last time you had a pro grade not so expensive (comparing to Leica) SLR in your hands? Let me guess - probably never. A lot of them have build quality on par with Leica and are build to last.

Direct link | Posted on May 8, 2012 at 08:42 UTC
On First Impressions: Using the Nikon D800 article (307 comments in total)

Not sure about comparison yet but the author of the photos should really tidy up his bed in the morning and not end up with it showing up in the first shots as reflection ;-)))

Direct link | Posted on Mar 23, 2012 at 08:48 UTC as 99th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

RudivanS: As a pro, all I care for is an improved raw processing engine.
Raw Photo Processor (mac only), is still superior at rendering raw files.

You guys should really try RPP and its film profiles to see that both LR and DPP are not as good as you think they are.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 17, 2012 at 11:53 UTC
On Adobe faces criticism for change of upgrade policy article (398 comments in total)
In reply to:

Archiver: I have two licenses for Lightroom 3 and have only activated one. I am saving the second for when I upgrade my home computer, which will save me the bother of deactivating and reactivating somewhere else.

Lightroom is the only program I have found that gives me the image quality and 'look' that I like; no other raw processor gives the same look and IQ of Lightroom. This rather ties me in to Lightroom and means I may eventually have to pay big bucks to upgrade in the future, unless another raw converter comes to the party.

Lightroom does not use activation (yet) as Photoshop does. It simply accepts your serial number and does not require activation/deactivation. I never had a problem installing it on my upgraded PC with a new Windows 7 - just entered my serial and it was working.

Direct link | Posted on Nov 23, 2011 at 10:13 UTC
On The Soldier in the You'r in the army now! challenge (8 comments in total)

Dookie Moogle wrote:
> I feel it's like Picasso painting a piece of artwork as a gift for a friend, and then he repaints the exact same painting as another gift for another friend. Nothing but a buttered bun.

It feels nothing of the kind - these are not a gifts after all but entries to the competition - unless explicitly stated by the challenge hosts, I see nothing wrong with somebody submitting his image to more than one challenge.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 20, 2009 at 21:42 UTC as 4th comment
Total: 12, showing: 1 – 12