Dvlee

Dvlee

Joined on Nov 29, 2011

Comments

Total: 161, showing: 61 – 80
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On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

Superka: landscape photographers would laugh at this "technique". Too many limitations.
I was trying to make panoramas with panoramic heads. I have Nodal Ninja 5, bought for this! But it just a non-sense! It is slow to setup, slow to shoot, no viewfinder, no long exposures, moving objects always present!
Now I have 6x17 panoramic camera which gives me 160 Mpx at one shot! Perfect 160Mpx! And I often shoot hand held!!!! My camera, Gaoersi 617 was made in China and costs 940$+450 for the Fuji SW 90/8 super wide lens.
All this stuff, like FF digital, TS-E lenses costs so much, that you can easy buy good scanner (imacon or Nikon) and have beautiful film colors and 13-stop Dynamic range (with Kodak Ektar).

http://flic.kr/p/63gmaZ

http://flic.kr/p/634ypT

http://flic.kr/p/63xhHS

http://flic.kr/p/638Aio

http://flic.kr/p/64Gdgk

http://flic.kr/p/635JVK

Oh..one more thing...$940 for camera plus $450 for lens comes to $1390. I paid $1299 for a tilt shift lens. I don't include the camera in that cost because I already have the camera which I use a lot for all kinds of photography, not just landscapes. Plus the tilt shift lens gives me the special functionality for which it was designed.

A tilt shift lens is a far more flexible tool than a specialized film camera and does not incur the additional cost of film and processing.

I've used 617s and I shot Technical Pans B&W film which enabled me to make phenominally large and beautiful prints. I have to agree with you that a 617 can deliver beautiful images..but it is old school technology and outside of the scope of interest of DP Review.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 21:10 UTC
On The DSLR Field Camera article (180 comments in total)
In reply to:

Superka: landscape photographers would laugh at this "technique". Too many limitations.
I was trying to make panoramas with panoramic heads. I have Nodal Ninja 5, bought for this! But it just a non-sense! It is slow to setup, slow to shoot, no viewfinder, no long exposures, moving objects always present!
Now I have 6x17 panoramic camera which gives me 160 Mpx at one shot! Perfect 160Mpx! And I often shoot hand held!!!! My camera, Gaoersi 617 was made in China and costs 940$+450 for the Fuji SW 90/8 super wide lens.
All this stuff, like FF digital, TS-E lenses costs so much, that you can easy buy good scanner (imacon or Nikon) and have beautiful film colors and 13-stop Dynamic range (with Kodak Ektar).

http://flic.kr/p/63gmaZ

http://flic.kr/p/634ypT

http://flic.kr/p/63xhHS

http://flic.kr/p/638Aio

http://flic.kr/p/64Gdgk

http://flic.kr/p/635JVK

Years ago I used the Fuljfilm 617, which was a nice portable alternative to a 5x7camera. But if portability is not an issue than it would be cheaper to buy an old 5x7. The advantage with an actual view camera compared to the 617s is the flexibility of movements that allow the full range of movements controlling focus, field of view and perspective(distortion). Plus you have more room for cropping to reposition the horizontal lines.

But I think the point of the article is about using tilt/shift lens as a DIGITAL alternative to a large format field camera and as an alternative to using a panoramic head.

In the transition from film to digital I first abandoned the darkroom but coninued to shoot 4x5 film and scanning the negs before eventually abandoning film altogether.

Scanning film is so 20th century. So is spotting dust specks, and the expense of film and processing. that more than offsets any savings over a tilt shift.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 29, 2012 at 20:38 UTC
On 500px expanding into the cloud post (34 comments in total)
In reply to:

BSHolland: I'm a bit confused about 500px Terms of Service, with regards to licensing & sublicensing. (English is not my mother tongue).

500px claim the "right to sublicense". But only "in connection with the Services".
From my understanding, sub licensing is only necessary when it is NOT in connection with the services.

So what's the point in phrasing it like that?

Even those of us who speak English as our first language are asking that question.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 23, 2012 at 19:48 UTC
On 500px expanding into the cloud post (34 comments in total)
In reply to:

klopus: Since it's a paid photo hosting, marketing and sales site what makes it different from SmugMug or Zenofolio both of which are also targeted to "serious" photography?

The terms of Service make it different.

While the sidebar says ". We will protect the copyright and will not sell your photos without your permission.” the terms of service imply that by the mere act of posting content to 500px, you are giving them that permission. Like most of the other photo display sites, they make it a point to say they are not claiming the copyright, but they are claiming what is essentially unlimited usage with the right to sublicense.

Zenfolio does not do that.

While YOU can sell photos on 500PX, the terms of service imply that 500PX is claiming the right to sell your images through some other portal...say an independent photo stock service?? If you had discovered that 500px had sold your work to a third party, by virtue of the terms of service, you would have no recourse to sue 500PX. Not only do the terms of service feature the standard usage rights grab, it also includes a waiver of your right to sue 500px for any reason whatsoever!

Direct link | Posted on Dec 21, 2012 at 02:33 UTC
On Instagram responds to clamor around TOS changes post (79 comments in total)

This issue does not address the question of model releases. When we post images of people on instagram and facebook, we do so under the assumption that the images are only being posted for personal usage...sharing with others, and not for commercial usage.

If facebook uses any image of people for promotional purposes, they are doing so without model releases.

The facebook/instagram terms of service do not require that users have model releases from all persons whose likenesses are posted on those services. They cannot absolve themselves of the liability, or transfer the responsibility for releases onto the persons who posted the pictures for non commercial use. The user(photographer) owns the copyright to the image but if the person in the photo has not signed a release neither facebook/Instagram nor the user has the right to assume or grant permission for the use of their likeness for commercial purposes.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2012 at 07:04 UTC as 31st comment | 2 replies
On Instagram responds to clamor around TOS changes post (79 comments in total)
In reply to:

Najinsky: Storm meet teacup.

Instagram allows you to share your images with others. That costs money; servers, storage, bandwidth, people. Money doesn't magically appear where needed and has to be raised.

In raising money they want to showcase their product, which incorporates your images and the community surrounding them.

It's really easy.

What's really hard it making wording to describe it to the satisfaction of the litigious hoards and conspiracy theorists. And with good reason, because when a business get granted a right, whether intentionally or by accident, history tells us it may one day suit it to exploit that right to the max.

The fees they would have to pay for images to use in their ads and promotions would be an insignificant amount in proportion to their other operating expenses and earnings.

Other companies that have much smaller earnings and tighter profit margins pay substantial amounts for photography. The photography aspect is just a small portion of their advertising costs.

Look at the numbers for 2011:

Facebook-3.71 billion in sales/revenue
1 billion net income

Canon-45 Billion in net sales
4.8 billion net income (pretax)

Epson-11.7 billion in sales
123 million in net income

When facebook purchased Instagram , Instagram had 13 employees. Its operating expenses are practically nonexistant compared to Canon (197,000 employees), Epson (80,000 employees) and even the parent company facebook, which only employs some 3000 employees.

facebook/Instagram can afford to pay for the photos they use in their ads.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2012 at 06:50 UTC
On Instagram responds to clamor around TOS changes post (79 comments in total)
In reply to:

Photomonkey: Kind of fun to watch people get outraged about TOS on a free service. Also fun to see business people try to figure out how to make money with their free service without enraging the users.

They provide the platform but the users provide the actual content that makes the platform interesting to people. Facebook and Instagram do not create their own content, we do it for them.

They sell the information they gather on us to advertisers who use it to advertise to a target demographic. This is a more efficient and cost effective method of advertising.

case in point: On Pinterest I created a board on Mid Century Modern furniture. Almost immediately I start seeing ads for Mid Century Modern Furniture on facebook, Yahoo, just about any site I go to that has ads. The information we provide them is a valuable commodity to advertisers.

So we may not have to pay for those services, but we give them something valuable in exchange. Yahoo, fb and Google have made billions this way, as did TV and radio for many decades before the web. They don't need to claim usage rights to get a fair exchange for the service they provide.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2012 at 06:00 UTC
On Instagram responds to clamor around TOS changes post (79 comments in total)

It looks like we got their attention!

But we have yet to see how Instagrams revised terms play out. Will they quell the public uproar? Or will they just try to introduce more ambiguous wording that leaves us scratching our heads?

I'm afraid however the the erosion of user intellectual property rights will be like the rise in gas prices: up a dollar, the public complains, down seventy five sents, the public feels relief, then up a dollar...after a while gas hits $6 a gallon we'll be happy to see the price drop to $5.25!!

Likewise these "social networking" ,or digital image display sites may announce unacceptable terms , then, in response to user complaints, revise them to make it appear that they have backed off, when in fact, they have advanced their encroachment on IP rights.

We have to be diligent about these changes and stand by a Zero Tolerance policy. In fact we should demand they rescind all usage claims other than what is needed to display content as the users intended.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2012 at 05:25 UTC as 35th comment
In reply to:

chiumeister: Just watermark everything you post on Instagram and other sites.

Watermarking is like branding your beautiful wife's face so other men won't look at her.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2012 at 22:32 UTC
In reply to:

whyamihere: I'm thoroughly enjoying the public freakout now that the legal language that has represented this service (and others) is being phrased in terms that normal people can understand.

Since it's part of my job to read the complete ToS for many apps and services, none of this is surprising at all to me.

One of these days, you'll all learn to read the agreements instead of hastily clicking the 'I Agree' or 'Ok' button. In this case, any service that offers to relocate your data for ease of access reserves the right to use, change, or delete your data. It's still yours, but you don't have as much control over what happens to it once that data hits their servers without their consent. That's how it works, and that's how it has always worked.

Most individuals do not understand copyrights and usage agreement. They don't realize that photographers can grant all kinds of usage agreements from very specifically defined restrictive single use agreements to unlimited agreements that allow the client to publish anywhere with no time limitation.

Even the unlimited usage agreement does not normally grant the client the right to sell or relicense the image to a third party.

The typical ToS agreement goes above and beyond what is required by the service to publish and archive the content. They claim the right to relicense the content but to what end? Why else would they need that right other than to acquire free access to content that they can relicense for profit?

Anyone who has ever had to write a usage contract should be able to understand the terms in ToS contracts..if they would only take the time to read them.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2012 at 22:27 UTC
In reply to:

Peter K Burian: It amazes me that a company like this would have the nerve to try this. Granted, 95% of the photos are snapshots but that is not the point.

Good point. The quality of the images does not alter the matter of ownership and copyright. If we allow this to slide, then we are opening the door to more aggregious rights grabs.

Still, I might say that I have seen some very good...and marketable, content posted on other sites that are subject to the same terms.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2012 at 21:18 UTC

When pressed for an explaination, many of the services claim they need the right to publish the image in order to achieve the normal operation of the site.

I've been on four sides of the image usage relationship: photo lab printer, copy technician, photo buyer for a publication and as the photographer and copyright holder of the image.

As a printer and copy tech. all I needed was proof of permission to reproduce the image. I did not want to be party to unauthorized reproduction.

As a photo buyer, usage agreements clearly defined how the images would be used, number of imprints and for how long. Payment was made accordingly.

facebook and friends do not need unlimited usage in order to post the content in the manner the user intended. All that is needed is proof the user has permission to use and publish the content. The do not need unlimited usage rights to protect themselves from liability.They just want free access to content they can sell for profit.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2012 at 21:02 UTC as 16th comment
In reply to:

frankmv: Never opened an account with Instagram...and now I never will. Further, I've deleted the app from my iPhone. I'll take a much harder look at Flickr and other similar social media (read "sharing") sites. I may just swear off them all...

@ Franka T L...You might want to take another look at filckr's ToS. Saying they do not claim owneship of the copyright is not the same thing as not claiming unrestricted usage of the image.

Many sites make that claim, but effectively claim all the rights that a copyright provides, except exclusivity.

There is another term for what they claim: "unlimited usage" Unlimited usage does not transfer the copyright to the buyer , it just allows them to use it in any way, for as long as they want, including reselling the image.

But even with unlimited usage, the photographer still retains the right to license or sell the image to other parties. The photographer still retains ownership, but allows the other party to relicense or use the image in a manner outside of what is required for the operation of the site.

What these ToS agreements are claiming is unlimited usage, but not ownership of the copyright. But for all intents and purposes, they own the image.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2012 at 20:36 UTC
In reply to:

xlynx9: Most online services have similar clauses. They're just to allow for screenshots of the site/app to be used in promotional material, magazines etc.

I make a portion of my photography income by selling the usage rights of my images to be used in promotional material, magazines, etc.

I would be happy if facebook used one of my images in their promotions, as long as they pay the appropriate usage fee for the type and circulation size. Facebook is a business and they should pay for any images they use for the promotion of their business like any other busienss would.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 18, 2012 at 20:21 UTC

As with anything, each individuals experience is different. No harm in trying.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 9, 2012 at 00:28 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

GabrielZ: Only costs 22 grand, I'll buy a dozen...ha ha. But seriously why go for this when you can get a D800/D800e with virtually the same resolution, add to it a Zeiss prime and you've got a system with the same image quality for a fraction of the price. Still...a nice camera none the less.

@ Canon Pro...with a high speed sync capable speedlight, you can use flash up to 1/4000, no ND filters required. An old school friend suggested that NDs would work just as well but I'd have to have three of them tyo fit the difffferent lens sizes.

With high speed sync,one can switch from flash to ambient at the flick of a switch without having to fumble around with filters.

No need for a $21000 dollar camera to accomplish that.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 18, 2012 at 03:59 UTC
On HDR for the Rest of Us article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

obeythebeagle: Don't take my Kodachrome, or HDR, or B&W, away. It's all fun. HDR is Ansel Adam's brain on LSD.

I formulated my own developer for Tech Pan. It was difficult to mix but gave far better results than the Kodak Technidol developer. So I can always make my own. But the only Tech Pan I can find is 8 year old stock that been stored at room temp.

I hope that whomever buys Kodaks patents will recognize the qualities of Tech Pan for fine arts photography and start making it.

If that doesn't happen I'll proabably never soot another role or sheet of film. And when Canon gets off its behind and gives us the rumored 46MPX camera, even tech pan will be surpassed.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2012 at 02:34 UTC
On HDR for the Rest of Us article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

CaseyComo: Call me old-fashioned, but I prefer the look of a single exposure. If the sky is too bright, expose for the shadows and use a grad ND filter.

@gasdive:I'm with you on that. I don't like the graduated filter look, they can only used in certain circumstances and you're stuck with whatever you get when you take the shot. I cringe when I watch CSI Miami which overuses an orange grad filter. Makes it look like Miami's got a bad smog problem!

HDR offers more control and flexibility.One can make the image scream "HDR" or one can apply just enough of the effect to balance the tonal values and make the image pop a little more than a straight shot.

There are lots of filter effects that were ok when that was all we had but look dated today.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2012 at 02:07 UTC
On HDR for the Rest of Us article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

dark goob: Just think, if you had an external HDMI monitor you wouldn't have to bend to the ground. Or a camera with a rotating screen.

Why doesn't Canon put a damn rotating screen on the Mark III? I would buy one if it had it.

In certain conditions an iPad is the right tool but in the field I want something smaller, easier to handle that doesn't take up too much space;like the Samsung Note.

But I'd rather have a dedicated device that has physical buttons and dials that mirror the cameras. I don't like the touchscreen shutter releases. The camera controller apps I've looked have certain functions that are not part of the camera system like intervalometer and expanded HDR exposure braketing.Touch screen focus select would be nice.

But there are compatibility issues with apps and phones. My brand new phone would have to be upgraded and rooted for the app to work. That is too complicated and risky.

A dedicated device would not require its own internal operating system, would run off the camera battery, would not have to be replaced when I changed phones and would probabaly be more rugged and materproof than an iPad or smart phone.

I much rather have a dedicated piece of camera hardware.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2012 at 01:58 UTC
On HDR for the Rest of Us article (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

elefteriadis alexandros: HDR? just use film..

I actually agree with your assessment of the sample images above. They are not great examples of the true potential of realistic renderings of HDR imageing.

May I add that its a little bit unfair to judge my abilities based upon someone elses images!!! My work does not look anything like the above samples. I don't shoot to display online, I shoot to print. My philosophy is that the photograph is not complete until it has been consigned to paper. Much of my work is black and white, which was not addressed here. So please don't disparage my work based upon someone elses work.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 2, 2012 at 01:29 UTC
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