Dvlee

Dvlee

Joined on Nov 29, 2011

Comments

Total: 183, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On Adorama launches Flashpoint Ring Li-On 400ws ringflash article (56 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dvlee: Thumbs up for the real circular flash tube instead of a pair of tubes under a diffuser or a ring a LEDs.

Thumbs down to no TTL.

Besides freezing the motion of constantly moving little creatures or flowers swaying in the breeze, one of the advantages of using a flash for macro is being able to hand hold the camera while stalking bugs flitting from flower to flower. At a close working distance a small variation in the distance between the light and the subject can result in a large difference in the brightenss of the light.

I used a manual flash for macro for many years, but TTL has been a game changer! No more fiddling with apertures and power settings between shots.

If I have to weigh having a true ring flash tube against TTL, I'd choose TTL. It seems like a half decent unit otherwise. A bit pricey for no TTL.

It mentions "macro work" in the article. I was responding to that.

In the description on the Adorama website it says; “a 'must-have' for nature and field shooters in macro and close-up situations.”

”The circular photographic flash has been the light of choice for medical and dental photography”

And; “As the flashtube surrounds the optical axis of the lens, when the subject is very close to the camera, as is the case in macro photography, the distance of the flash from the optical axis becomes critical.”

I’ve also done medical and forensic photography and it has always been handheld, subject to the same problems as macro in the wild.

It’s true that this flash will more useful for studio work than for macro, but Adorama is indeed marketing this as a ring flash for macro, not just for studio fashion.

But you’re right. It’s not a flash for macro, which is what I said.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2015 at 18:41 UTC
On Adorama launches Flashpoint Ring Li-On 400ws ringflash article (56 comments in total)

Thumbs up for the real circular flash tube instead of a pair of tubes under a diffuser or a ring a LEDs.

Thumbs down to no TTL.

Besides freezing the motion of constantly moving little creatures or flowers swaying in the breeze, one of the advantages of using a flash for macro is being able to hand hold the camera while stalking bugs flitting from flower to flower. At a close working distance a small variation in the distance between the light and the subject can result in a large difference in the brightenss of the light.

I used a manual flash for macro for many years, but TTL has been a game changer! No more fiddling with apertures and power settings between shots.

If I have to weigh having a true ring flash tube against TTL, I'd choose TTL. It seems like a half decent unit otherwise. A bit pricey for no TTL.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2015 at 21:56 UTC as 7th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Edymagno: In my opinion, Pentax should focus on the 645Z system:

1.- Three or four new strategic lenses could make it into a Super FF camera. It could well be the 1Ds of this decade. The 1 Series is only now for sport photography.

AND/OR

2.- Three new digital-formula lenses with leaf-shutters and strengthening the tether capabilities and medium format users will switch to Pentax in hordes.

As psychology says, some individuals start diverting and branching in order to not achieve their goals to full potential. I think it's called fear of success.

@canonpro...even if the sensor is exactly the same the camera itself will be different. With the sensor being the same, its all about build, features, function and price. So if it has the same sensor as the Nikon it will have to have something else to make it competitive with Nikon. Features can make or break it.

Think back to the days before digital when it didn’t matter what camera you had, you could load the same film in all of them. So the big differentiator was optics, features quality and price.

If the Pentax ends up having the same sensor as the Nikon and Sony, at a price point between them, then the Pentax could do quite well.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 9, 2015 at 21:02 UTC
In reply to:

Edymagno: In my opinion, Pentax should focus on the 645Z system:

1.- Three or four new strategic lenses could make it into a Super FF camera. It could well be the 1Ds of this decade. The 1 Series is only now for sport photography.

AND/OR

2.- Three new digital-formula lenses with leaf-shutters and strengthening the tether capabilities and medium format users will switch to Pentax in hordes.

As psychology says, some individuals start diverting and branching in order to not achieve their goals to full potential. I think it's called fear of success.

The 645Z has been a nice , less expensive alternative to the Hasselblads and Phase One. But the new crop of high megapixel cameras from Nikon, Sony and Canon are creating some competitive pressure from below. Even if the 645Z sports better DR and less noise, many of those who were on the fence about the 645Z due to cost will make the leap for new Canon and Nikon, especially if they already have a stable of lenses.

Pentax needs to tap into that market. A Pentax high megapixel, FF DSLR not only taps into the market for a reasonably priced alternative, but it also keep Pentax loyalist happy and may even create new Pentax loyalists who might grown into the 645Z.

Direct link | Posted on Mar 8, 2015 at 21:18 UTC
In reply to:

Dvlee: It says Konost is an American startup but exactly where is it going to be made? China? Does anyoneat all make cameras in the US?

I'm not sure how much of a market there is for such a basic camera. It seems like it might appeal to senior citizens who are overwhelmed by complicated features and functions of modern cameras and feel nostalgic for their old rangefinders.

Still I admire their gumption to attempt to start up a camera company in the environment in which the only new camera companies are started by giant corporations that can pour tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars into the project. I'm afraid however , that in order to make it in today's market they would have to come up with something that is more innovative and advanced.

Mescalamba,

Yes the problem is deeper and more widespread but it really does;t have to be that way.

Take the guitar industry as an example. Brands like Gibson and Fender are hybrid companies. Theyhave outsourced the production of their budget models to Mexico, Korea, China, etc while still manufacturing their premium lines in the US. Discriminating guitarists insist upon US made guitars and are willing to pay a premium price for them. There are still many companies like Rickenbacker, that refuse to compromise their products by outsourcing or making budget lines and there are literately thousands of boutique guitar makers who produce handmade products of ultra premium quality and price.

And just as there are American made guitar amplifiers and electronic devices, so too are there American made flash systems and accessories...so why not cameras? Not cheap consumer products, but premium quality, premium price should be possible.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 05:21 UTC
In reply to:

Dvlee: It says Konost is an American startup but exactly where is it going to be made? China? Does anyoneat all make cameras in the US?

I'm not sure how much of a market there is for such a basic camera. It seems like it might appeal to senior citizens who are overwhelmed by complicated features and functions of modern cameras and feel nostalgic for their old rangefinders.

Still I admire their gumption to attempt to start up a camera company in the environment in which the only new camera companies are started by giant corporations that can pour tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars into the project. I'm afraid however , that in order to make it in today's market they would have to come up with something that is more innovative and advanced.

HowaboutRAW,

Yes Aptina makes sensors, I think in the US. Aptina was a division of Micron, and was acquired by On Semiconductor in 2014 for a cool $400 million. So we'e talking some seriously big money behind Aptina. Aptina does not make cameras.

The Konost is reportedly using a sensor from Belgium.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 25, 2015 at 04:43 UTC

It says Konost is an American startup but exactly where is it going to be made? China? Does anyoneat all make cameras in the US?

I'm not sure how much of a market there is for such a basic camera. It seems like it might appeal to senior citizens who are overwhelmed by complicated features and functions of modern cameras and feel nostalgic for their old rangefinders.

Still I admire their gumption to attempt to start up a camera company in the environment in which the only new camera companies are started by giant corporations that can pour tens if not hundreds of millions of dollars into the project. I'm afraid however , that in order to make it in today's market they would have to come up with something that is more innovative and advanced.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 24, 2015 at 20:54 UTC as 128th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

Hugo808: How about 40mp HDR?

Ah! I understand.

But HDR tone mapping is not only a very subjective process, it’s also one that requires a lot of finesse to get the desired effect without introducing artifacts or looking overcooked. I don’t even trust the camera to make a decent JPEG or B&W, much less tone map an HDR image!

For example, for an artistic cityscape of decaying buildings I would push the limits for a gritty edgy feel, but for an architectural interior I just want to give it that “well lit” look to bring the dark interior shadows and bright widow views of the exterior into balance, without having that “HDR look.” There is no one size fits all HDR process.

As for the editing time sink, I know all too well how that goes! With digital it’s easy to over shoot things and then end up with a lot of editing to do. In post that’s just a workflow issue, but in shooting I just had to slow down, be a little bit more deliberate; shoot slower but shoot better. And when shooting multi shot techniques, keep notes

Direct link | Posted on Feb 18, 2015 at 05:21 UTC
In reply to:

Hugo808: How about 40mp HDR?

Stefan...that all depends upon what you're using to do your HDR merge...what software, what hardware? I use Oloneo HDR and even on my old XP machine its pretty quick. It as quick and as easy as opening and processing a single image in Camera Raw.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 16, 2015 at 21:18 UTC
In reply to:

brycesteiner: I think they might be able to do this by also using 4 shots instead of 8 and still get the desired resolution. This will probably end up in all camera within 5 years just like liveview and sensor cleaning.

There are two ways to create super-resolution. One way is to precisely reposition the sensor exactly halfway between the normal sensor positions on both axis.
Easy to do with a large sensor at slow speed. With a small sensor alignment is much more critical and using the in camera stabilization, its happening much quicker.
But super-resolution software that is used to create high resolution stills from video does so by taking 16 or more frames that have been subject to minute vibrations between frames. Super-resolution software actually depends upon random differences between the frames to ensure that the data in each is different. It then “averages” the data andt condenses 16 pixel sets down to 4. It actually works better with a light small format camera that is more prone to vibration than with a large format camera that is rock steady
The Olympus system is a hybrid. It uses both sensor movement and super-resolution processing. Less precision is required if more pixel sets are made

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2015 at 21:18 UTC
In reply to:

Hugo808: How about 40mp HDR?

HDR would require even more exposures. That might be possible in the future when the sensor is capable of capturing thousands of frames per second. It's also take a lot of processing power. Olympus is probably pushing the limit on how fast all the operations can take place, and one still has to consider that all the exposure have to take place within an exposure time short enough to freeze any movement between exposures.

One step at a time.

However, you could still do HDR by making three separate exposures in the high MPX mode. I've not been satisfied with in camera HDR processing in autio HDR modes. I get better results by post processing HDR. So you might be better of sticking t the standard way of doing HDR.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 14, 2015 at 20:26 UTC
In reply to:

Tilted Plane: The question does linger--is a $900 camera, without a lens, entry level? The Rebel line seems to beg for a true entry level--in terms of price--without having to buy a 2 or 3 year old model. No?

Peter62...the 2009 sensor in the T5 is just fine for an entry level shooter.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 20:13 UTC
On Samsung NX1 First Impressions Review preview (1451 comments in total)
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: I read the review so far and I simply couldn’t help thinking that I would never buy a Canon 7D MKII over this camera. There simply wasn’t anything I saw in that review that would convince me otherwise.

Sure each camera has its own benefits and drawbacks. However, the NX1's benefits far outweigh its drawbacks and the 7D MKII’s benefits.

However, I simply can't convince anyone else that this is the camera to get. When I mention the Samsung camera they say “I would be more comfortable getting something everyone else has like a Canon”.

The average photographer cares more about not getting the “wrong” camera than the “right” camera. They don’t want to take a chance buying a camera that is inferior and no one else uses because they are afraid people will say "I told you so".

With the Canon camera they can simply say “Everyone else has it so it can’t be that bad”. Convincing people that the majority of camera buyers are wrong is a next to impossible task even though I think that is true.

@ The Philips...if Canon or Nikon APS-C shooters want to use premium primes then full frame lenses are the only way to go...not because they are better but because are necessarily better than APS lens but simply because they are the only primes available. Canon and Nikon offer only a few primes for cropped sensors.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2015 at 23:07 UTC
In reply to:

Mssimo: Very good deal since no one really wants autofocus for really high mag macro work anyway.

pulsar...I'm a bit confused about what you're saying.

If you're saying that by mounting the lenses face to face , it's only possible with an AF lens? As I stated above, I did this with old Olympus lenses, which are manual focus, so it simply isn't true that one has to be an AF for that to work.

If on the other hand you're saying that in order to use the Magic Lantern the lens has to be AF, then that's a completely different matter. Of course if you are using a remote program to operate the camera and do the focusing, then its obvious that it has to be an AF lens.

As I said before, unless you are using a touch screen , or a remote system with a touch sensitive focusing system, AF isn't going to work very well, but if you are using a touch screen, the touch system will only work by using AF.

But I'm not using Magic Lantern or any other kind of remote system. Not everyone can use Magic Lantern, in which case you'll have to shut auto focus off and do it manually.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 06:44 UTC
In reply to:

Mssimo: Very good deal since no one really wants autofocus for really high mag macro work anyway.

Clint009; when this report first appeared I tried but could not access the sample images. Now that I've been able to se them , all I can say is this whole conversation is moot because those images are not sharp, not by a long shot.

I'm getting much better results with a 1:1 macro and extension tubes.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 06:20 UTC
In reply to:

Mssimo: Very good deal since no one really wants autofocus for really high mag macro work anyway.

pulsar; I used that method long ago on an Olympus OM-1. I glued two step up riings together to reverse mount a 28mm to the front of a 100mm. I also had an adapter to reverse mount a lens to the body. But the best by far was an enlarger lens reverse mounted onto extension bellows.

Whenever I shoot a series for focus stacking I also shoot a few images stopped way down as a contingency. When comparing the focus stacked images to the stopped down images, I'm not really seeing that big a difference. The stopped down image may require a little bit more sharpening but not so much that is degrades the image.

I think the diffraction problem is being overstated.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 24, 2015 at 05:23 UTC
In reply to:

Henrik Herranen: A macro announcement without any mention of the working distance? That's highly suspicious. My guess would be something between 0 and 2 centimeters at 2X magnification. I'd happy to be wrong, though.

EDIT: Went to the Venus Optics website which claims minimum working distance is 6 cm. Still not much, but better than expected. Fair enough, though I still think working distance is essential to any macro announcement.

While there may be differences in the working distance of different lenses, does it really matter if there is a couple of centimeters difference from one lens and another?

I think the differences between long lenses and short lenses is a more important factor.

A 60 mm meter lens is going to be close no matter what. whether the lens is optically 2:1 or is being used with extension tubes, it's going to be close.

As I stated before, working close provides the "bugs eye" perspective on the subject while working from a stand off distance yields a flatter perspective. Get far enough from the subject with a really long macro and the image looks more like an image that has been enlarged and cropped.

When photographing flat objects working distance has no effect on perspective , but when shooting 3D objects, working close yields a more dramatic perspective.

Working close is more difficult but I don't think a few centimeters matter that much. At 2:1, it'll be close no matter what.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 19, 2015 at 19:10 UTC
In reply to:

Mssimo: Very good deal since no one really wants autofocus for really high mag macro work anyway.

While its intriguing that this lens goes to 2X, I’m already getting that with a 1:1 with extension tubes.

So the question is if the Venus lens is sharper than a 1:1 macro prime with extension tubes. If it is then I wonder how well it would perform with extension tubes at 4X. That would make it a very affordable alternative to the Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5X macro.

I also wonder how it is achieving 2X. Does it have internal optical focusing or is it just moving the lens further from the focal plane? If it’s the former them maybe it could be sharper than a macro with tubes. But if it’s only extending the focusing movement, then it’s really nothing more than a conventional macro with built in extension. In that case, save your money and buy some extension tubes.

I would reserve judgment on this until we see some test results. If it’s sharper than using tubes, then it’s a buy. If no,t there are other ways to achieve better than 1:1 without breaking the bank for a Canon MP-E 65mm macro.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2015 at 01:06 UTC
In reply to:

Mssimo: Very good deal since no one really wants autofocus for really high mag macro work anyway.

Oh I agree with you completely that once you get beyond 1:1, manual focus is the way to go. But I wouldn't say you are the typical photographer. I think the typical photographer would be chasing bees and butterflies in the garden with their macro lens. Only the less typical photographer is going to bother with a tripod, much less focusing rails.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 16, 2015 at 00:33 UTC
In reply to:

Henrik Herranen: A macro announcement without any mention of the working distance? That's highly suspicious. My guess would be something between 0 and 2 centimeters at 2X magnification. I'd happy to be wrong, though.

EDIT: Went to the Venus Optics website which claims minimum working distance is 6 cm. Still not much, but better than expected. Fair enough, though I still think working distance is essential to any macro announcement.

What exactly do you mean by the minimum working distance is "not enough"

Do you mean that the working distance should be longer at maximum magnification so you don't have to get right on top of the subject? Or do you mean the working distance should be closer so you can get that true "bugs eye" perspective.

Many people prefer the "stand off" position of a 100mm that won't disturb small creatures, is a safe distance away from things that could bite or sting like bees and spiders, and will enable you to get macro shots of things that you cannot get physically close to.

Other want to get as close as possible so they can get the bugs eye view that makes tiny creatures look like huge monsters!

I like to get as close as possible. I've had a few bugs and spiders jump onto me and was bitten by a none-poisonous snake...anything to get the shot!

But there are certain creatures from which I keep my distance. That's when the long working distance of a tele-macro comes in handy.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 15, 2015 at 20:08 UTC
Total: 183, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »