Steve Balcombe

Steve Balcombe

Lives in United Kingdom United Kingdom
Joined on Jun 16, 2004

Comments

Total: 108, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Steve Balcombe: I've been earning my living from created works since about 1987 - photography, graphic design, computer programming and web site design. So I have a vested interest in preventing copyright theft.

But for goodness sake, does this guy think that because he published a photograph of a basketball player with his legs split in 1985, he owns every photograph of the same thing? Utterly ridiculous.

If that was the situation I would agree with you, but in this particular case the 'concept' has little or no original creative content. If he'd taken a shot of Michael Jordan walking down the street eating an ice cream, would he expect to profit from all future shots of Michael Jordan walking down the street eating an ice cream?

Direct link | Posted on Feb 2, 2015 at 13:38 UTC
In reply to:

munro harrap: Facts first. WE can see the logo, but WE need to see the photograph he claims it is derived from. UNtil then we can form neither opinion nor judgement, and perhaps DP needs to get the photographer to state his case.

Why talk to the monkey when you should be talking to the organ-grinder?

Oh stop trying to change history. If you had followed it you would have known that the original photograph was there.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 16:45 UTC
In reply to:

Steve Balcombe: I've been earning my living from created works since about 1987 - photography, graphic design, computer programming and web site design. So I have a vested interest in preventing copyright theft.

But for goodness sake, does this guy think that because he published a photograph of a basketball player with his legs split in 1985, he owns every photograph of the same thing? Utterly ridiculous.

@Ken - I know what the law says but you are missing my point. The original shot is just a basketball player with his legs apart. The law doesn't say nobody can ever again take another shot of a basketball player with his legs apart. If all or many aspects of the original were distinctive and had been copied, there might have been a case, but everything about the second shot is different. The position of the limbs, the background, the lighting (especially the absence of back light), the perspective of the hoop, it's all different. And better FWIW. The ONLY things the two have in common are split legs (but *differently* split legs) and Michael Jordan himself, who is not owned by the photographer!! It's a specious claim.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 16:41 UTC

I remember buying 'transfers' as a kid in the 1960s, this is just a modern reinvention of the same idea.Why not, kids will love it.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 13:39 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

munro harrap: Facts first. WE can see the logo, but WE need to see the photograph he claims it is derived from. UNtil then we can form neither opinion nor judgement, and perhaps DP needs to get the photographer to state his case.

Why talk to the monkey when you should be talking to the organ-grinder?

WE followed the link, highlighted in blue in the middle of the story.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 13:35 UTC

I've been earning my living from created works since about 1987 - photography, graphic design, computer programming and web site design. So I have a vested interest in preventing copyright theft.

But for goodness sake, does this guy think that because he published a photograph of a basketball player with his legs split in 1985, he owns every photograph of the same thing? Utterly ridiculous.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 29, 2015 at 13:33 UTC as 34th comment | 5 replies
On Adobe details OS support for next version of Lightroom article (227 comments in total)
In reply to:

marc petzold: What keeps me away from LT for ages: That damn catalogue everything thing, and then it's way sluggish from operation & behaviour, Adobe should really speed things up.

I'm not saying I like everything about LR either, but the Library is a key part of what makes LR tick. It's a huge benefit when I get home at the end of the day with 500 images to sort out - ideally the same day. If you don't want that then LR is probably not the right choice. You can do the 'Develop' part in Photoshop if you prefer, RAW conversion is identical.

Direct link | Posted on Jan 22, 2015 at 22:48 UTC
In reply to:

joero: The numbers say more about the subscribers to flickr than about cameras.

Of course they do, no dispute there. If you want to know about camera ownership across the whole population you have to get your data another way. But this is the fun of statistics - getting the data is one thing, working out what it means is another thing altogether!

Direct link | Posted on Jan 19, 2015 at 09:02 UTC
On Portrait Salon 'rejects' exhibition opens in London article (67 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mark Banas: Thanks for the head's up on another interesting project, Damien. There are some wonderful portraits on the Portrait Salon website, including one from Nick Ballon's zombie Bolivian airline project.

See http://www.dougiewallace.com/

Direct link | Posted on Nov 6, 2014 at 13:55 UTC
On Portrait Salon 'rejects' exhibition opens in London article (67 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mark Banas: Thanks for the head's up on another interesting project, Damien. There are some wonderful portraits on the Portrait Salon website, including one from Nick Ballon's zombie Bolivian airline project.

@2482 - just looked at your web site - brilliant work. Compelling viewing!

Direct link | Posted on Nov 6, 2014 at 11:28 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II: A professional's opinion article (501 comments in total)
In reply to:

Steve Balcombe: It's really good to read the actual thoughts of an actual working pro. But I'm afraid her reaction mostly comes across as "Ew, a crop camera".

The first big giveaway was "I like knowing that my lenses are true to their focal length", which is just ridiculous and betrays a complete lack of understanding. I wonder what she did before the 1Dx (i.e. only 3 years ago), when sports professionals routinely used the 1.3x crop 1D MkIV?

Then there is this emphasis on the voice memo feature which is apparently a deal-breaker for her. I can understand how useful it is. Yet she speaks highly of the 5D3 *which has no voice memo feature".

And she lists "no built-in wifi" in her Cons, but no 1-series or 5D has that either.

Fine, these are the observations of a working professional photographer and valuable as such. But I think she decided she didn't like it because it's not a "professional" body in the traditional sense, then she looked for reasons to justify that.

Just looked at the gallery on her web site. One of the two collections of sports photography still has its EXIF data, and it was taken with a D300S. 1.5x crop. Yes, I know, maybe she has moved on since them, and it's not directly relevant to the 7D2 vs 1Dx anyway, but I just thought it was interesting.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2014 at 14:03 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II: A professional's opinion article (501 comments in total)
In reply to:

Steve Balcombe: It's really good to read the actual thoughts of an actual working pro. But I'm afraid her reaction mostly comes across as "Ew, a crop camera".

The first big giveaway was "I like knowing that my lenses are true to their focal length", which is just ridiculous and betrays a complete lack of understanding. I wonder what she did before the 1Dx (i.e. only 3 years ago), when sports professionals routinely used the 1.3x crop 1D MkIV?

Then there is this emphasis on the voice memo feature which is apparently a deal-breaker for her. I can understand how useful it is. Yet she speaks highly of the 5D3 *which has no voice memo feature".

And she lists "no built-in wifi" in her Cons, but no 1-series or 5D has that either.

Fine, these are the observations of a working professional photographer and valuable as such. But I think she decided she didn't like it because it's not a "professional" body in the traditional sense, then she looked for reasons to justify that.

@Michael_13 - because the thrust of the article is why the 7D2 is unsuitable for her needs. How can lacking something which her favoured cameras also lack make it unsuitable?

As it happens, the lack of wifi is one of my biggest gripes with the 7D2 spec, but I have two important uses for it - she has none.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2014 at 13:52 UTC
On Canon EOS 7D Mark II: A professional's opinion article (501 comments in total)

It's really good to read the actual thoughts of an actual working pro. But I'm afraid her reaction mostly comes across as "Ew, a crop camera".

The first big giveaway was "I like knowing that my lenses are true to their focal length", which is just ridiculous and betrays a complete lack of understanding. I wonder what she did before the 1Dx (i.e. only 3 years ago), when sports professionals routinely used the 1.3x crop 1D MkIV?

Then there is this emphasis on the voice memo feature which is apparently a deal-breaker for her. I can understand how useful it is. Yet she speaks highly of the 5D3 *which has no voice memo feature".

And she lists "no built-in wifi" in her Cons, but no 1-series or 5D has that either.

Fine, these are the observations of a working professional photographer and valuable as such. But I think she decided she didn't like it because it's not a "professional" body in the traditional sense, then she looked for reasons to justify that.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 23, 2014 at 12:07 UTC as 75th comment | 7 replies
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1658 comments in total)
In reply to:

aftab: Others have reported 9am ET, not 6am. I wonder if DPR got it wrong.

It's almost certainly a programming error, I just think it's more fun to speculate that Canon has invented a way to eliminate time differences across the world.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 09:56 UTC
On 'See Impossible': Canon counts down to... something. article (1658 comments in total)
In reply to:

aftab: Others have reported 9am ET, not 6am. I wonder if DPR got it wrong.

Right now it's showing 23h16m and it's 09:44 here in the UK, (GMT+1). So 9am Tuesday. If Barney is right, Canon have invented a way to close the Atlantic - now that would fit the 'impossible' tag.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 6, 2014 at 08:47 UTC
In reply to:

sdh: Quoting from the 1st paragraph in page 7:
"Despite the advanced metering sensor, the 1.8% spot-meter unfortunately cannot be linked to the AF point (as it can on the 1D X)."

Why????

Doesn't Nikon do spot metering linked to focus point in, like it's entry or near-entry level models?

I'm wondering whether this is something which could be added in a firmware upgrade, since all the required hardware seems to be there.

Pity we can't say the same about the missing wi-fi...

Direct link | Posted on Sep 23, 2014 at 13:08 UTC
On Beginner's guide: shooting high-key at home article (68 comments in total)
In reply to:

Steve Balcombe: Why use exposure compensation, which is hit-and-miss? Use spot/partial metering to select a manual exposure. That way, if you take a number of shots with different amounts of white background your metering won't keep changing.

Also, adjustment brushes in LightRoom are a pretty clumsy tool for this sort of job. Select the white area in Photoshop and fill it with pure white.

It makes no difference that it's "for beginners". In any case it's not for people with a beginner attitude, it's for people who want to learn new skills. Setting a manual exposure is not only the best way to get correct and consistent exposures, it's also easier than estimating the correct EC. And it engenders correct thinking - what we are aiming to do is get a correct exposure for the subject, so why measure something else then do a correction, instead of measuring the subject directly?

The point about changing light is a good one, but EC doesn't fully deal with that. If a cloud came over, the contrast and therefore the EC needed would change.

Regarding filling the background - I didn't say that. I said select the background and fill the *selection*. There are many ways to make the selection of course.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 21:55 UTC
On Beginner's guide: shooting high-key at home article (68 comments in total)

Why use exposure compensation, which is hit-and-miss? Use spot/partial metering to select a manual exposure. That way, if you take a number of shots with different amounts of white background your metering won't keep changing.

Also, adjustment brushes in LightRoom are a pretty clumsy tool for this sort of job. Select the white area in Photoshop and fill it with pure white.

Direct link | Posted on Sep 8, 2014 at 17:03 UTC as 26th comment | 3 replies
On Canon confirms price drop on select EF lenses article (140 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheDevil: All the mirrorless manufacturers combined will never sell 100million of anything in their lifetime.

@T3 - are you kidding? Canon announced its 50 millionth EF lens in January 2010 - http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/news/50_million_lenses.do - and less than 5 years later they've made another 50 million. And that's despite much higher prices and a recession!!

Direct link | Posted on Sep 3, 2014 at 11:32 UTC
On Manfrotto announces carbon fiber BeFree tripod article (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

PHOTOJOE55: Is the Carbon fibre more stable, or is it just lighter than the aluminum model?

Vibrations damp more quickly, it's lighter, and it's nicer to handle in hot/cold conditions. Very strong too - I've never tested a tripod to destruction but my carbon fibre kayak paddles have been unbelievably durable. I'm a big fan.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 14, 2014 at 14:30 UTC
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