E_Nielsen

E_Nielsen

Lives in United States United States
Works as a Information Devel. Mgr.
Joined on Sep 22, 2009
About me:

Photo enthusiast

Comments

Total: 37, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

E_Nielsen: In retrospect, Slater may have handled it wrong. He could have said that he took the photos, not the monkey. After all, where's the definitive evidence that the monkey pressed the shutter release? You can't tell from the photo.

Had he done that, the public may have been equally impressed albeit for a different reason: what other photographer can get that close to a wild animal and make it smile into the camera? Shoot, I can't even do that with humans!

Speaking of humans, that's who copyright laws were written for. It's a foolish notion to argue that animals should be granted copyright protection. Shame on Wikimedia Commons for grabbing Slater's photos and using that feeble excuse.

Gee, Krich13, you seem to take this rather personally. Are we looking at your selfies?

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2014 at 23:26 UTC

In retrospect, Slater may have handled it wrong. He could have said that he took the photos, not the monkey. After all, where's the definitive evidence that the monkey pressed the shutter release? You can't tell from the photo.

Had he done that, the public may have been equally impressed albeit for a different reason: what other photographer can get that close to a wild animal and make it smile into the camera? Shoot, I can't even do that with humans!

Speaking of humans, that's who copyright laws were written for. It's a foolish notion to argue that animals should be granted copyright protection. Shame on Wikimedia Commons for grabbing Slater's photos and using that feeble excuse.

Direct link | Posted on Aug 8, 2014 at 23:00 UTC as 180th comment | 7 replies

I didn't see this one coming, either. I thought Canon might have finally taken one of my BIG product suggestions to heart and developed either an oversized ELPH for people with large hands or a new 2,500 mm lens sporting a built-in tripod with wheels (motorized, of course).

Direct link | Posted on Aug 1, 2014 at 22:07 UTC as 38th comment | 1 reply

I have the original DP2 Merrill and absolutely love it. There is nothing short of a high-end DSLR that I would even consider to replace it, and even then, the bulk of a DSLR would be a problem.
The improvements in the new DP2 Quattro sound terrific, but I'm not sold on the shape of the body, as I need something compact and easy to carry. 'Would like to get one in my hands to see if the new form factor is less of a problem than it looks.

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2014 at 23:09 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

clicstudio: It's a nice story, but not for a review site. DPR has lost its way…. They should remember the title of the site. Less news and more reviews.

clicstudio--
One option might be to not read the articles you are not interested in. Personally, I enjoyed this one.

Direct link | Posted on Apr 4, 2014 at 16:54 UTC
On Judge strikes down fine against drone photographer article (127 comments in total)

By the way, I'd love to see some of the videos and photos that Mr. Pirker took with the drone over the University of Virginia. That is one of the most beautiful campuses I've ever seen.
DPReview: can you do a follow-up article?

Direct link | Posted on Mar 15, 2014 at 00:14 UTC as 25th comment | 2 replies
On Judge strikes down fine against drone photographer article (127 comments in total)

Excellent article, and way to go, Judge Geraghty!
The Federal government is way out of control, harrassing individuals and businesses right and left. What's next? Are they going to set up a new agency to regulate the subject matter in our photos? I, for one, intend to vote only for constitutional conservatives from now on.

In the meantime, maybe I'll get a small drone with a video camera and buzz it around the FAA building for a couple of days...

Direct link | Posted on Mar 14, 2014 at 23:53 UTC as 26th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Digitall: Out of curiosity, but, the word "quattro" is a registered trademark of Audi AG?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quattro_(four-wheel-drive_system)

Anyway, I find it interesting when people say that this camera is pocketable :)
Obviously the pockets are relative, but traditionally refer to this camera as pocketable is still a significant difference.
And the boomerang effect will not help at all.

It is common practice for the same trademark to be granted to multiple owners when that trademarked name is used in unrelated industries. As far as I know, Audi doesn't make cameras...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2014 at 23:49 UTC
In reply to:

E_Nielsen: As a DP2 Merrill owner, I am intrigued by the new Quattro technology and the promise that file sizes and processing times will be reduced. (Well done, Sigma!) However, I didn't see any mention of the feature I miss the most: image stabilization.

As much as I love the DP2 Merrill, I have been disappointed a number of times when I discovered that some very promising photos, which looked sharp in the LCD, were actually slightly shaken. In most cases, I realized that I should have used a tripod, but that was not always an option at the time. And doesn't carrying a tripod everywhere defeat the purpose of having a compact camera? I hope the Quattros will address this shortcoming.

Yabokkie -- I'm sorry, but that makes no sense whatsoever. The subject is image stabilization.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2014 at 23:44 UTC
In reply to:

E_Nielsen: As a DP2 Merrill owner, I am intrigued by the new Quattro technology and the promise that file sizes and processing times will be reduced. (Well done, Sigma!) However, I didn't see any mention of the feature I miss the most: image stabilization.

As much as I love the DP2 Merrill, I have been disappointed a number of times when I discovered that some very promising photos, which looked sharp in the LCD, were actually slightly shaken. In most cases, I realized that I should have used a tripod, but that was not always an option at the time. And doesn't carrying a tripod everywhere defeat the purpose of having a compact camera? I hope the Quattros will address this shortcoming.

Great tips, Mcmx -- thank you!

I'm still hoping for image stabilization, though...

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2014 at 23:40 UTC

As a DP2 Merrill owner, I am intrigued by the new Quattro technology and the promise that file sizes and processing times will be reduced. (Well done, Sigma!) However, I didn't see any mention of the feature I miss the most: image stabilization.

As much as I love the DP2 Merrill, I have been disappointed a number of times when I discovered that some very promising photos, which looked sharp in the LCD, were actually slightly shaken. In most cases, I realized that I should have used a tripod, but that was not always an option at the time. And doesn't carrying a tripod everywhere defeat the purpose of having a compact camera? I hope the Quattros will address this shortcoming.

Direct link | Posted on Feb 11, 2014 at 21:08 UTC as 32nd comment | 7 replies
On Have your say: Best Fixed-lens Compact Camera of 2013 article (91 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dogonit: Why in the world did you include the Sigma DP3 Merrill and not the far more common and standard DP2 Merrill?

I also think the DP2M is the better of the two, but it was introduced in 2012. I own a DP2M, by the way, and wouldn't trade it for any of the cameras in this list.
Sadly, the Sigmas will not lead in this category because despite their stunning results (like a medium-format camera!), most people think in terms of which camera would be the best all around. The Sigmas can't win that race -- it would be like entering a Lamborghini in a comparison of family cars.
Somewhere in the description or in the comments, it was said that the DP3M would be great for portraits (with its telephoto lens), but I have found that most people are shocked at how many blemishes and wrinkles show up in the DPxM photos. That's why I use the DP2M almost exclusively for travel and landscape photography, and a lower-res enthusiast camera for family photos and portraits.

Direct link | Posted on Dec 19, 2013 at 23:37 UTC
On Bad Weather = Good Photography article (77 comments in total)

I enjoyed the article and learned a few things. Thank you, Carsten Krieger and DPReview!

Direct link | Posted on Oct 21, 2013 at 22:17 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

brianj: Looks like it is easier to do photography there than in the US and probably much less likely to be shot by a crazed madman. I am waiting for the tours to be available.

One of the lucky ones?? Gun violence in the U.S. has been on a steady decline for the past couple of decades, but I don't imagine your "news" sources would want to mention that.

What do you say we stick to photography in this forum?

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2013 at 21:38 UTC

Politics aside, I really like the 360-degree panoramic images. What a great way to capture a moment.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2013 at 21:31 UTC as 20th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

brianj: Looks like it is easier to do photography there than in the US and probably much less likely to be shot by a crazed madman. I am waiting for the tours to be available.

I do hope your wish for entry into DPRK will be fulfilled. Meanwhile, I'll continue to enjoy photography in the U.S., as I have for many decades, with no fear of being shot.

Direct link | Posted on Oct 15, 2013 at 21:26 UTC
In reply to:

Artistico: Just as a comment to many of the commentators who don't seem to know: "Organic" in this sense doesn't mean biological, bio-degradable, grown without pesticides, free-range, sustainably produced, low carbon footprint, or any other such thing. It just means the molecules involved in the sensor technology are carbon-based.

Does this mean that they've finally found a use for the common cold virus?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2013 at 21:27 UTC
In reply to:

rfsIII: What they're not telling you is that "organic" is just another word for "carbon-based life form." Bottom line: this sensor is alive; it's a creature that was either discovered or genetically engineered to live inside your camera and translate photons into images (remember the bird that lived inside Fred Flintstone's camera and chiseled pictures onto stone tablets? Same principle, different species). Nobody tell PETA or they'll put the kibosh on the whole thing.

That's hysterical!
I wonder what the life expectancy of the organic matter is? Would it be closer to a hummingbird or a parrot?

Direct link | Posted on Jun 12, 2013 at 21:20 UTC
In reply to:

E_Nielsen: I recently tried to buy maintenance for many copies of PhotoShop in my company (actually, Creative Suite, which includes PS), but was told that they are discontinuing that option in favor of the cloud service. That will not work for us, since we use PhotoShop for mission-critical work and cannot accept forced upgrades at Adobe's discretion without allowing us to fully test and plan the upgrades first.

Like many other software companies, Adobe has dropped features and changed interfaces with their various releases, which can throw us into a tailspin at the worst possible moments. Acrobat X was a prime example of this, where the updated interface broke an important feature that we used daily. If we were using a cloud version of Acrobat, how could we revert to a more appropriave release for our needs?

We will probably end up keeping our version of PhotoShop until we find a viable non-cloud alternative.

We had assumed that it was the same as other cloud software, where the SW company company manages the version that you access and rolls out updates when it pleases. If that is not the case, I stand corrected. 'Wish Adobe did a better job of explaining that on their Web site, as we couldn't find any details about how upgrades are handled when we looked into it earlier.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 18:17 UTC
In reply to:

djsphynx: All this talk about Adobe and the future of its product offerings has me thinking even further down my workflow. Because of all this, I'll begin to move away from PSD files where possible since I don't want to be beholden to their formats which may or may not work long term.

As for me, I'll stick to PS CS6, I'll retire LR in all likelihood (don't want to be tied to their catalogues since LR will inevitably be only offered in CC) and will pick up a couple of alternatives, starting with Pixelmator and Aperture.

They have the option to do what they did, I have the option to do what I'm about to do. The thought of not being able to open a file in a few years is scary as hell for me (and for other photographers), I can't imagine ever subscribing ad agreeing to such a scheme.

Great point about moving away from .PSD files. Thanks for that. We'll definitely consider that carefully in my company.

Direct link | Posted on May 9, 2013 at 18:09 UTC
Total: 37, showing: 1 – 20
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